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The Gardener's Monthly And Horticulturist V23 | by Thomas Meehan



It is considered one of the reproaches of English gardening that it is limited to few materials. In some specialties they have great variety. In coniferous trees for instance, English people ransack the globe, and give long Latin names to trifling varieties, to swell the importance of every little form. So in Rhododendrons, and those fibrous rooting plants which thrive only in porous soil, and to which they give distinctively the names of "American plants," of which they have many forms under culture. But in deciduous trees, shrubs and hardy border plants, one sees the same dozen or so of things over and over again...

TitleThe Gardener's Monthly And Horticulturist V23
AuthorThomas Meehan
PublisherCharles H. Marot
Year1881
Copyright1881, Charles H. Marot
AmazonFour-Season Harvest: Organic Vegetables from Your Home Garden All Year Long

Devoted To Horticulture, Arboriculture And Rural Affairs.

Edited By Thomas Meehan, Formerly Head Gardener to Caleb Cope, Esq., at Springbrook, and at the Bart-ram Botanic Garden near Philadelphia; Graduate of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, (London,) England,. Member of the Academy of Natural Sciences. Author of "American Hand-Book of Ornamental Trees." etc.

-January, 1881. Vol. XXIII. Number 265. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
It is considered one of the reproaches of English gardening that it is limited to few materials. In some specialties they have great variety. In coniferous trees for instance, English people ransack t...
-Carden Notes And Gossip
The readers of the Monthly may possibly remember my note in the April number, on a plant bought under the name of Nicotiana suaveolens, and the disappointment and disgust it entailed. I think it no mo...
-Destruction Of Trees In Cities
A year or more ago my attention was attracted to the frequent deaths of trees along our streets and avenues, and since have seen comments on it in our daily papers. These, like the Gardener's Monthly,...
-Croupinc Trees On Lawns
In one of his Rural Essays, the late Mr. Downing has called attention to the opportunity which we have of grouping and arranging trees upon the lawn with some reference to their autumn coloring. He ...
-Dianthus Heddewsgil
This is one of the most beautiful of all the perennials. Of this species there are several varieties, of which H. diadematus and H. laci-niatus are the most important; these are the results of hybridi...
-Ornamenting Our Homes
There has been a marked improvement in our country homes within the past few years, although there is still abundant room for more. A few years ago no such thing as a flower garden was to be seen on t...
-Evergreens In Missouri
During a recent journey through northeastern Missouri, the writer noted some interesting experiments on the grounds of the University at Columbia, Mo., under Prof. Hussman's care, in regard to evergre...
-The Yellow Clematis
The American Agriculturist says this belongs to the flamula group, and says its flowers - something remarkable among these plants - are yellow. The plant is rather slender and delicate, having less ro...
-Carpenteria Californica
T. S. P., Kingsbury, Cal., writes: Quoted from the Garden in the January number of the Horticulturist, it is said that the Carpenteria Californica is an extremely rare plant even in its native habita...
-Destroying The Roots Of The Paper Mulberry
Noah Barlow, Natchez, Miss., writes to Prof. Riley, who hands us the query: Having tried in vain to kill the roots of the Paper mulberry, I take the liberty of writing to you, in the hope that you wi...
-January, 1881. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Window plants suffer much at this season from the high and dry temperature at which it is necessary for human comfort to keep our dwellings. Air can seldom be admitted from the lowness of the external...
-Communications. Fragmentary Recollections Of Dragon Trees
The fine specimen of that rare old plant, Dracaena fragrans, of which the editor gave a pen picture in a late Monthly, would do one good to see. That it is both rare and old, cannot be denied. Since...
-Orchids
There is now at this date, November 24th, a splendid variety of the scarce Orchid, Oncidium Krammerii, in flower in the new and rare plant houses of the Cincinnati Floral Company's establishment, Coll...
-Peter Henderson Carnation
In reply to the article published in your last number about P. H. Carnation, would say that if the flower of the carnation, P. H. is cut at the proper time and handled correctly afterwards, it wil...
-The Ox-Eye Daisy
In one of the back numbers of the Monthly a timely warning was published against Convolvulus arvensis. It may not be amiss to extend this warning to the Ox-eye daisy, as it is no less a pernicious wee...
-Ool Houses
We believe cool houses - houses in which plants are merely to rest during the winter for summer use - will come into great favor. In a recent visit to Tower Grove Park, St. Louis, we were pleased to f...
-Floriculture In Louisville
The Courier Journal has recently been giving a history of gardening about Louisville. The first professional florist was Edward Wilson. He came there in 1836, and retired in 1860 to Geo. Walker. He ha...
-Killing Insects By Coal Oil
A correspondent of the Gardeners' Record says: Take four gallons of warm water, dissolve in it one ounce of soft soap, add a wineglassful of paraffin, thoroughly mix by drawing the syringe full and d...
-New And Rare Plants. Tuberous Rooted Begonias
There have few more rapid advances in floral progress than in the improvement of tuberous rooted Begonias, since the B. Bolivensis was introduced but a few years ago. Among those who have been among t...
-Beaucarneas
S. W. M , Louella, Pa , writes: In a greenhouse at Downingtown, I saw a few days ago among some other bulbs, a plant marked Beaucarnea rosea and another Beau-carnea robusta. I have searched all the c...
-Gas Tar On Hot Water Pipes
A Waverly (Md.) correspondent writes: A young florist, a friend of mine, put up a range of houses last summer, heated by hot water. On the recommendation of some ignoramus he painted the pipes with g...
-Raising New Varieties
It is a wonder more amateurs do not interest themselves in raising new varieties of flowers. It gives as much pleasure as any branch of gardening. A Clinton, New York, correspondent writes enthusiasti...
-January, 1881. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
One of the troubles of a beginner in fruit growing is to decide on what varieties to plant. It is just here that no writer of seasonable hints can help him. Varieties which do well in one place will n...
-Communications. Plough And The Spade
This seems to be the leading topic in recent numbers. It is true great men and things have had small beginnings. That Indiana English gardener has stirred up a hornet's nest, and some of them may be s...
-Market Gardening
In an article on page 162, of the June number of the Gardener's Monthly, regarding market gardening by Peter Henderson, the natural inference would be that the difference in the cost of products in Lo...
-Fruit For Kansas
In the November number of the Monthly, just to hand, T. R., Chanute, Kansas, inquires What kind of apples, pears, plums and cherries will thrive best in this locality? Let me say to T. R. that ...
-Lawn Mowers And Fruit Trees
Among the benefits now being realized by the introduction of the excellent American lawn mowers, is one I wish to call attention to as capable of perhaps a large extension. I mean the use of the mower...
-Orchard Culture
Some of our Western co-temporaries referring to practices in orchard culture in some places, take occasion to remark that a practice good for one place may be bad for another. This is exactly the doct...
-Director Alphand Pear
The Revue Horticole of Paris, figured this Pear in its Sep. 15th issue, where it is represented as of enormous size, five and a half inches long by four and a half wide, larger than the finest Duchess...
-The Currant Caterpillar
The gooseberry and currant caterpillars are great pests to American fruit growers. The following recipe for dealing with these pests is given by a County Down subscriber to the Garden, and which ...
-Asparagus In France
Accustomed as we are to simple methods of culture, the trouble some people take in other parts of the world seems almost incomprehensible. Here for instance is the account which a famous grower in Ar-...
-The Napoleon Weeping Cherry
At a recent meeting of the Fruit Growers' Association of Ontario, Mr. Dougall, of Windsor, exhibited a photograph of a very handsome weeping cherry, and states in his letter that the origin of the wee...
-American Tomatoes In England
The London Garden has the following to say about American tomatoes, but we are not so sure of the Garden's conclusion. A tomato ripened under an American sun is something no English climate can reach....
-Scraps And Queries. Improved Pine Apples
J. C. C. D., Leesburg, Florida, writes: My object in writing is to ask you whether you can give me the address of some party to whom I can apply in order to obtain pine-apple plants or buds of the va...
-Forestry. Communications. Forests And Forestry
(From advance sheets of the Annual Report of Penna. State Board of Agriculture.) The matters brought to the attention of your Botanist this season have been chiefly in relation to the important sub...
-Sassafras Trees In Massachusetts
I recently read an article in some agricultural publication, the name of which has slipped my memory, where it was stated that while the Sassafras attained to the size of a tree in the South, in New E...
-Editorial Notes. The Black Walnut
While there is a great deal of loose talk about the danger of the United States being without a stick of timber within the near future, there is no doubt but that it will pay now to plant some kinds o...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Objects Of Sex, And Of Odor In Flowers
Read before the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Saratoga, August, 1879, BY THOMAS MEEHAN, Professor of Botany in the State Board of Agriculture of Pennsylvania, and Fellow of the ...
-Vegetation And Man
The whole history of the vegetable kingdom from its inception to the appearance of man seems to have been one of preparation. It was a course of gradual development from the lowest and most simple for...
-Objects Of Sex And Of Odor In Flowers
Read before the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Saratoga, August, 1879, BY THOMAS MEEHAN, Professor of Botany in the State Board of Agriculture of Pennsylvania, and Fellow of the ...
-Common Names For Plants
In England, a movement has been inaugurated to give common names to plants that have not yet become common. Botanical names often seem hard, and an easy common name very desirable; but we fancy to be ...
-Freezing Of Plants And Insects In Winter
Most of our readers know that we have repeatedly brought to their attention reasons for believing that plants and insects cannot have their juices freeze in winter and yet retain subsequent life. One ...
-Tender Asparagus
It is not well known, though often noted by the Gardener's Monthly, that many plants are not hardy simply because they have too much or too little heat in summer time. The exact conditions of health w...
-Vitis Berlandieri
M. Planch on has communicated to the Academy of Sciences some particulars of a new American species of vine, which he proposes to call Vitis Berlandieri. It was discovered in New Mexico or Texas in 18...
-Alcoholic Fermentation In Plants
By the following, which we find in the London Gardener's Chronicle, it will be seen that the discovery is somewhat akin to those of Prof. Burrill and others in this country: When plants are depriv...
-Graphalium Polycephalum
This is the plant inquired about in the following paragraph from the Garden: Will any American friend of the Garden tell me to what plant Oliver Wendell Holmes alludes in the following passage from...
-Vinegar
The recent discovery of a ferment fungus in fire blight and yellows, renders all information about the growth of these little plants interesting, We give the following from the Boston Journal of Chemi...
-Bee-Keeping In Paris
Among the industries of Paris the keeping of bees is one that is much practiced, and frequent complaints have been made to the police about the nuisance this occasioned. One inhabitant keeps from eigh...
-More California Items
Says a correspondent, The Live Oak grows singly, or in its park-like groves, and is a most beautiful tree, but utterly valueless here for anything but firing. Its companion along the water courses, t...
-Tulips
In 1835, the bulb of a new Tulip, called the Citadel of Antwerp, was sold to M. Vanderwick, of Amsterdam, for 640. For a Viceroy, on one occasion, were paid four tons of wheat, eight tons of rye, fou...
-Visit To Hon. M. P. Wilder Editorial Letter
During a visit to Boston last autumn, about the time the grapes were ripe, I made a hurried visit to the home of Mr. Wilder, and was pleased to find him in as excellent health and spirits as if it wer...
-David Fergusson
As we go to press the public papers announce the sudden death of Mr. David Fergusson, the well-known proprietor of the Laurel Hill Nurseries, Philadelphia. Mr. Fergusson came to Philadelphia many year...
-American Geography
Nothing surprises an American more than the manner in which even intelligent European writers speak of the geography of this continent. Writing of Crataegus glan-dulosa, one of the best informed of Eu...
-Correct Reports Of Facts
It is perfectly amazing to find how rarely a fact can be cor. rectly reported. This is not merely true of the common people, but appears in the writings of the best scientific men. As the work of the ...
-God's Acre Beautiful
By Wm. Robinson. London: Published at the office of the Garden. 1880. Mr. Robinson, is well known as the editor of the very useful Garden, and author of the Parks and Gardens of Paris, as well as...
-Nectar - What It Is And Some Of Its Uses
By William Trelease, Ithaca, N. Y. Published by the U. S. Department of Agriculture. If this work had no other merit, the long list of references to works treating of the subject would make it of ines...
-Farm Homes
By E. H. Leland. New York, Orange Judd Company. Whoever travels through the farm districts of the United States must have noted by the frequent attempts at ornamentation that the desire to have someth...
-Collection Of Queensland Timber
By Mr. Walter Hill, Director Botanic Garden, Brisbane, Australia. Mr. Hill not only gives here a list of the timbers exhibited at Philadelphia, Paris and elsewhere, but describes in detail their uses ...
-Rowell's Newspaper Directory, 1880
This is a list of the newspapers and magazines of the United States, with such facts concerning them as Rowell & Co. believe will be useful to advertisers. Rowell & Co. seem to have had much trouble w...
-Humbugs In Horticulture
As a supplement to Mr. Henderson's paper, a prominent firm hands us the enclosed, which we publish just aa received, suppressing only the names; as we are sure the fortunate proprietor of such a disti...
-Robbing Florists
Under date of Nov. 20th, we have the following from Mr. Fred. Hahman, Philadelphia: A brief article of the conviction of William Cowan (spelled thus) for theft in our establishment appeared in the Le...
-February, 1881. Vol. XXIII. Number 266. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Among the pleasures of gardening is that which aims at perfection in some one department, or in some one thing. If one has room, he may arrange for a complete specimen of landscape gardening. If not, ...
-Communications. The Best Twenty-Four Monthly Roses For Bedding
In selecting roses suitable for bedding, several necessary qualifications must be considered. When we plant roses in isolated positions, we often do so having regard to some special qualities which by...
-Cypripedium Spectabile
This is an indigenous variety found in some of the swamps around here, grows two feet in height. I was greatly delighted when I first met it growing in an amateur's garden. I called on the late Mr. Wi...
-Trees In Cities
Augusta Larned has a sympathetic letter in the Christian Register, on the deprivation which the poor of large cities endure in the absence of trees along the sidewalks. She thinks the efforts made to ...
-The Harvard Arboretum
As already known to our readers, it is the design to have in Boston an Arboretum, of which that city may be proud, and which will act favorably on Arboriculture and Forestry all over the United States...
-Grafting Maples
A correspondent from Clifton, Kan., writes: Will you be so kind as to inform me whether the different kinds of maple can be grafted, root grafted and budded the same as the apple with success. Have s...
-Roses
Mrs. E., Melrose, Mass., writes : - Will the writer of that invaluable article in the November Monthly, The best Autumnal Roses among Hybrid Perpetuals, do the public still another srevice by givin...
-Cherokee Rose
A correspondent says, that one might suppose from its name it was a native species, but the late Dr. Ward, of Athens, Georgia, informed me years since that it was imported many years ago from the Mes...
-Jean Liaband Rose
Mrs. E., writes: - In my article the name of the free flowering crimson rose, should have been Jean Liaband, instead of as printed. Jean Thibaud, as I know of no variety under the latter name. I ...
-February, 1881. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
About this time the lamentable inquiry usually comes to the editor, What is the matter with my window plants? some of them have done very well, but this one or that one is yellow or sickly, and looks...
-Fuchsias In Summer
Dr Wolcott had also a lot of fuchsias planted under the shade of a high apple tree, and all summer long they kept growing and blooming better than any I have seen in the neighborhood. Next to them ran...
-The Holy Ghost Flower (Peristeria Elata)
This is one of the most satisfactory orchids we grow, and interesting and esteemed by everybody. It is so often mentioned in everyday literature that like the Banyan and Upas trees, children and peopl...
-"Pot-Bound" In Plants
If ever this evil was visible, it is so this summer. The recent exceptionally severe drouth brought it to light. Young plants that were raised in and transplanted from beds in frames, boxes or open bo...
-Mexican Orchids
We are indebted to our sister republic for some of the finest orchids that adorn our greenhouses, and I have found the orchids of no other country that have so many good qualities. One of their greate...
-Mesembrianthemum Aequilaterale
During the summer of 1877, famous as the dry year, I took a trip through the extreme lower portion of our State. The hot August sun beat down most unmercifully, making the high seat of a lumber wagon ...
-Cut Flowers
How many females find a a means of gaining a livelihood by selling buttonholes, etc, in the streets of London may be inferred from the fact that a few days since 2000 flower-girls were taken down to S...
-Shoots Of Flowering Shrubs In Water
At p. 467 are some remarks on this subject from the Gardener's Monthly, and it may interest some to know that flowers may be produced on branches on which the flower buds are formed by simply immersin...
-Hot Water Propagating Tanks
C. T. W., Fairview, Ky., says: Will you please give your readers some information on the use of hot water tanks in the propagation of plants. What plants are thus rooted and the temperature of water;...
-Rose Culture
A lady writing from Lynn, Mass., kindly says: I am greatly interested in the Monthly, although I have only been a subscriber one year, and intend to take it as long as it is published. I have been an...
-Heating A Small Conservatory
D. F. F., Leavenworth, Kan., asks: What would you recommend for heating a small conservatory 8 x 12 in connection with a library 12 x 16 on same floor. [For so small a conservatory, the same arra...
-February, 1881. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The rule in pruning grape-vines, is to shorten the shoots in proportion to their strength]; but, if the advice we have given in former summer hints has been attended to, there will be little dispropor...
-Communications. Fruits In Kansas
I have collected a few thoughts in reply to the inquiries of T. K., Chanute, Kans., of the November number. I am of the opinion that any variety of Apple will succeed here under favorable circumstance...
-The Consumption Of Vegetables
Few persons appreciate the progress made in the consumption of vegetables. Statistics show that while the population of Philadelphia has increased twenty per cent., the consumption of vegetables has b...
-Plough And Spade
I am afraid your readers are getting too much of this subject; but you will bear me out in saying that I did not start the controversy in your columns, and only now refer to it in defence of my positi...
-Washing With Lime Wash
The objections some people make are very striking. We have said that a wash of lime in which a little sulphur is mixed, with some soot or dark substance to destroy the glare, is good for fruit trees, ...
-Laws Against Weeds
In a recent address at Dayton, O., Miss Carrie Brown says: - Some European countries and a few States, I believe in our country, have a law that should be universal, that is, one making it compuls...
-Bermuda Grass
The Rural New Yorker says the Bermuda grass has been found a good lawn grass as far north as Augusta, Georgia, by Mr. Berckmans. We should hardly suppose it would be evergreen much further north than ...
-Improved Bush Beans
We do not seem to pay the same attention to improving peas and beans as we do potatoes or corn, - but it is of some importance whether we grow a real bush bean, or one which spends half its vigor in e...
-Prof. Burrill's Discoveries In Pear Blight
J. W., writes: - I see you endorse Prof. Burrill's so-called discoveries as to the cause of fire blight in the pear. Now I have a firm belief that nobody knows anything about this disease more than a...
-Raspberry Insects
I. C. W.,says: - I send you by this mail some samples of the Highland Hardy Raspberry canes. You will notice that they have been punctured or stung by some insect, and in cutting or splitting the pie...
-Black Walnut From Arkansas
The towboat Ida reached New Orleans, out of the Arkansas River, on June 8, with a walnut log raft of unusual proportions. Additional interest attaches itself to this raft on account of it being part o...
-French Walnut Veneers
A New York importer of veneers has just received from France a log of walnut veneer, which, for the various qualities of size, color, figure and freedom from blemishes, has rarely been equaled. The la...
-Forests And Forestry
(From advance sheets of the Annual Report of Penna. State Board of Agriculture.) BY THOS. MEEHAN, BOTANIST OF THE BOARD Concluded from page 20. But little use is made of these magnificent forest...
-Logan's Elm
The tree under which Logan the Indian warrior made his famous speech, is still standing in the farm of James T. Boggs, near camp Lewis in Ohio. The Stockman of Pittsburg says: The old elm is loc...
-Profits Of Forestry
A writer urging forest planting has the following: Some one writing upon this subject gives this fact: ' A man in Wisconsin planted a piece of land with black walnut, twenty-three years ago. The l...
-Encouraging Forestry
We read in a Western paper that The American Association for the Advancement of Science recognizing the importance of this movement, appointed a committee at their last meeting in Boston to memoria...
-Frozen Plants
I have tried dipping in cold water and sprinkling, and generally with unfavorable results - perhaps from not managing it right - from the fact that plants out of doors will pass through a pretty sever...
-Edelweiss
This little Alpine plant is known to botanists as the Gnaphalium Leontopodium, but to the Swiss as Edelweiss, which signifies noble purity. Some of our own native species, as life-everlasting, are o...
-The Academy Of Natural Sciences Of Philadelphia
As stated in our last, it seemed a duty to those at a distance, who were led to believe by the American Naturalist that there is something very bad about the manner in which the members of the Academy...
-Marshall's Garden
Botanists will be sorry to learn that the garden of the first American writer on botany will soon probably be a thing of the past. The Arbustrum Americanum, the American Grove, compiled from actual k...
-The Tradescants
John Tradescant. after whom the Tradescantia was named, was gardener to King Charles. He is said to have founded the first English museum, and one of the first English botanic gardens. His house is st...
-Selective Power Of Roots
Of the numerous problems of vegetable life which yet remain unsolved is the nature of the power the roots of plants seem to possess of taking up just those elements required to make the plant, and no ...
-Bees And Flowers
Mr Thomas Meehan, in a note in the Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club, says: I find that the behavior of bees is governed by circumstances. When flowers are abundant they visit those only which th...
-Oleomargarine
B. inquires: What is the correct pronunciation of Oleomargarine? I hear it given with g soft invariably, but it comes from margarin, which has the g hard. Webster's Unabridged edition of 1875 does no...
-Insectivorous Plants
B. says: In regard Insect-eating Plants, p. 27. On the other side of this question I have to mention the fact that in collecting Sarracenias, the odor of putrescent animal matter from the insects cau...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Notes And Queries-No. 21
The Quinine tree is now thoroughly acclimatized and cultivated in India and results already assured. In Ceylon the experiments have been entirely successful, the price of the drug having fallen to 8s....
-Almonds In California
Mr. Hollister, of California, had a large crop of Almonds in the fall, but it is a question whether they will pay to prepare for market. The cold damp summer has made the shuck stick to the nut so tig...
-Citrus Exhibition
Southern California is about to forward to the East a magnificent exhibition of fruits, to include all the Citrus tribe. It will be warmly welcomed. In Lisbon field crickets are sold in miniature c...
-Cemeteries. The Advantages Possessed By Philadelphia In This Respect
It was left for Americans to invent the idea of the rural cemetery, where religious differences should be ignored, and which should be something more aesthetic than a mere yard where a grave could be ...
-Imaginative Gardeners
It does not follow that because a gardener or a botanist has to deal with hard facts, and always be scrupulously accurate, they may not also have a vivid imagination. The late Dr. Berthold Seeman, dis...
-Pleasantries
Until the writer was some years in the Editorial Chair, he never could understand how it was that even under the most righteous provocation, the prophets of old were justified in getting so mad as to ...
-The New Rugby
Mr. Thomas Hughes addressed the workingmen of London recently, in aid of emigration to his new colony of Rugby in Tennessee. We have seldom read such a farrago of nonsense. Amongst other things, he to...
-A Botanical Marriage
The California papers announce the marriage of John G. Lemmon, Botanist, and Sara A. Plummer, Botanist, and that they will welcome their botanical and other friends at their new herbarium rooms on T...
-Botany Of California
The second volume of this very useful work is before us, completing the whole Botany of the State. Californians have especial reason to be thankful; for their legislature gave no assistance, and priva...
-Easy Lessons In Sanitary Science - Drainage For Health
There can be no doubt but the general interest in public health, and the absolute necessity of every one using his reason and judgment to guard against disease, will render this little book very welco...
-Cut Of A New Fruit
Some time since a correspondent sent us a cut of new fruit and some account thereof. It had some merit, and the account was moderately written. It seemed information that would be of service to the ma...
-Amateurs And Commercial Men
A correspondent who has kindly communicated some valuable knowledge of flowers to the Gardener's Monthly, repeatedly receives application for his catalogue of prices. It is a poor compliment to a wr...
-Frauds
J. B., Topeka, Kansas, writes: Allow me in the columns of the Gardener's Monthly to notify its Western readers and all others of the amateur class in floriculture, that there is on the war path a tub...
-March, 1881. Vol. XXIII. Number 267. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
If the use of suffering in the world is to teach us to take care of ourselves, horticultural sufferers ought to be very thankful for this extra severe winter. Surely some very useful lessons should co...
-Communications. Mr. F. L. Ames' Garden At North Easton, Mass
North Easton is a town on the Old Colony Railroad and about an hour's ride from Boston. Twenty-seven years ago, beyond the vegetable plots of the villagers there was but little attempt at gardening, b...
-Native Plants For Cultivation
Your Seasonable Hints in January number as to the lack of variety in gardens and ornamental grounds are well timed, and they are suggestive of what may be accomplished towards a more cultivated tast...
-Raising New Roses By Artificial Fecundation
The present seems to me a suitable time for directing the attention of all who are interested in the production of new varieties of plants, to the possibilities open in the way of raising new roses. I...
-Horticulture About Baltimore
Mr. John Feast gives in the Maryland Farmer some interesting notes on gardening in Baltimore. Mrs. Charles Ridgely's is near Towsontown, has a number of plant houses, fine grounds, and some good speci...
-Shading The Ground
In reference to the note in the Gardener's Monthly last fall, Mr. Daniel Smith, of Newburg. N. Y., says in the Newburg Journal: I am exceedingly pleased by seeing this theory of shading the soil advo...
-Eradicating Paper Mulberry
B. says: If it is half as tenacious of life as Ailanthus, I suspect it will require ten times 'two or three times pulling of the sprouts' to kill the roots. I have been trying on an Ailanthus two yea...
-March, 1881. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hintts
The modern flower garden is a good deal dependent on the greenhouse for its summer beauty in these days. It will be wise, therefore, to look out for a good stock of bedding plants in time; by striking...
-A Visit To Easton, Mass., And St. Johnsbury, Ver
The greenhouses of the Hon. Frederic Ames, at North Easton, Mass., should have a great interest for gardeners at all seasons of the year, because the collection of plants is so fine and the orchid col...
-Cattleya Skinnerii
A beautiful orchid from Guatemala, of easy culture. The flowers are produced on spikes from the top of the bulbs, as many as six and eight flowers being produced on single spikes, if the plant is stro...
-New Coleus
In response to the query of Mrs. R. B. Edson, about Dreer's New Hybrid Coleus, I take pleasure in giving my experience with regard to their hardiness in the summer sun. As the summers in our city are ...
-Michel's Greenhouses At St. Louis
On a recent visit to the hothouses of Michel & Co., this city, my attention was called to a curious freak of grafting. Mr. Emele Wintzer, foreman of the establishment, had grafted a scion of Abutilon ...
-Dancer From Coal Tar
We have recently put new water pipes into our greenhouses, and unfortunately had them painted with coal tar, very much to the injury of our plants. Can you suggest any remedy to get rid of the troubl...
-The Yellow Bouvardia
The following reply to an inquiry recently made is supplied from the Garden. We cannot learn that it has yet appeared in American gardens. It is Bouvardia flava. The flowers of this kind are of such a...
-Richardia Not Flowering
A subscriber, Phila, says: A few weeks ago I was in the greenhouse of an amateur friend. I noticed his calla lilies looked very much drawn, and when I asked the reason he said the roof had not the ...
-Disease In Carnations
W. M. G., Niles, Michigan, writes: In taking up my carnations I cut around each plant, and deep enough to not disturb the roots in the least, carrying in one at a time, and planted them on the bench...
-Failures In Geraniums
M Lansing, Mich., writes: At your convenience I would be glad if you could tell me what to do to make my geraniums bloom. I have them in a house with a southern exposure, warmed with brick flue, nig...
-Electric Light And Steam Boilers
A Boston correspondent says: What reason is there one cannot use steam boilers to heat hot water pipes, as well as water boilers? Are there any steam boilers in use? What about electric light, do you...
-March, 1881. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The past winter, when the ground has been covered with snow for months, mice, rabbits and other animals have been nearly starved, and have had to take what they could get, even to the bark of apple an...
-Root Blicht In Apple Trees
In reading different agricultural and horticultural papers and magazines, I find many writers discussing the subject of root blight in apple trees in Missouri and Texas. Now, if I can add one word t...
-Pot Vines At Mansfield Nurseries, Mass
At the Mansfield Nurseries, (Winter Brothers) are now to be seen some very fine grapes, ripe, grown in 16-inch pots, some extra large bunches among them for pot vines. Some bunches will each weigh thr...
-Pine Apples
A correspondent asks for instruction in growing pine apples. I have never thought it requires as much skill - or at all events not more - to grow pine apples than to grow tomatoes under glass. If Inq...
-How To Save Your Apples
No sooner are our fruits well housed for winter than the question is asked by neighbors, Are your apples keeping well? Mine are rotting badly. Let me suggest where the difficulty comes in. 1. App...
-They Only Stole A Few Cherries
The Country Gentleman has the following from an Orange, New Jersey, correspondent: - Eight of the city roughs bounded over the fence and commenced clawing off the large clusters of green cherries and...
-Canadian Apples
A correspondent of the Gardener's Record says: - In Covent Garden I hear a very good account of Canadian apples, and was surprised to learn they were beating the American product out of the field. Th...
-Peach Yellows In Georgia
The following valuable note has been handed to us by Mr. John Putter. Augusta, Ga., February 12, 1881. Mr. J. Putter, West Chester, Pa.: Dear Sir: - The question of the existence of the 'Yell...
-Laying Down Grape Vines
A correspondent who sent us the query in our last, writes: I do not wish to trouble you to make another reply to a question that you understood me to ask in December last; but I may explain that y...
-German Prunes
Are there any German prune trees to be found in this country, and do they bear good fruit? Which is the best kind in this country; and how do they need to be treated? [The German prune is in the ...
-Apple Esopus Spitzenberg
H. C. K., Tolona, Mo., writes: I have sent to your address by mail, samples of apples that I think probably are seedlings; those who have seen them cannot tell what they are. Some claim that they ...
-Gregg Raspberry
Mr. Bassett, Hammonton, N. J., says: I planted a few of these in the spring of 79 and they all killed to the ground the following winter, while in situations but little more sheltered, gladiolus, ...
-Lettuce Nellis' Perpetual
We have the following illustration of a new lettuce under the above head, but no description of the advantages claimed for it. It is, however, such a distinct looking kind that it is worth noting. The...
-Forestry. Communications. Sumac
In reply to an inquiry at p. 29 some time since, the Gardener's Monthly stated that Rhus copaliina was not the variety used for tanning purposes; but I find in Appleton's Cyclopaedia, edition of 1S79,...
-Sugar From The Butternut
In the Gardener's Monthly for January, Editorial Notes, page 20, you speak of the sugar-bearing quality of the sap of the butternut, Juglans cinerea, and ask if any of your readers know anything about...
-Forest Fires In North Carolina
Referring to Mr. Meehan's point that the permitting of underbrush is the main source of the power of forest fires, Mrs. Mary Bayard Clarke, the distinguished poetess, says in the Raleigh Farmer and Me...
-The Black Walnut In Europe
It is remarkable how long it takes for a good idea to travel from one country to another. The black walnut was introduced into England from America in 1656, but the fact that it is a far superior tree...
-Where Our Forests Are Going
To make shoe pegs enough for American use, consumes annually 100,000 cords of timber, and to make our lucifer matches, 300,000 cubic feet of the best pine are required every year. Lasts and boot-trees...
-Forest Fires
The Department of the Interior has issued a circular in connection with the census office, asking for information in regard to the cause and extent of forest fires, with a view to legislation. We hope...
-Typographical Errors
So far as we know the Gardener's Monthly is one of the few magazines that is not ashamed to correct typographical or other errors, no matter how small they may be. The disinclination to do this often ...
-The Black Walnut
The Gardener's Chronicle says: In connection with the subject of the uses of black walnut wood (Juglans nigra), referred to in the Gardener's Chronicle for August 28 last, p. 2(33, we have recently...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Note On Beaucarnea
I see in your last number of Gardener's Monthly a query about Beaucarnea. You will find all about them in Trimen's Journal of Botany Vol. X, pp. 296 and 323; in my Libiaceae, 218 and 246, and in Botan...
-English Names Of Plants
I have not seen all that has appeared in The Garden on the English names of plants, but from what has come under my notice it would seem that greater zeal than discretion is being mani- fested in assa...
-The Carolina Jasmine In Texas
In your first number of Native Flowers and Ferns of the United States, I noticed that in describing the yellow jassamine, you mentioned it was not found in Texas - a mistake I wish to correct. It gr...
-Adaptation
The word adaptation is coming into use by some writers on science, evi dently without a clear conception of its meaning. Thus a writer in the American Naturalist says, I have seen humming-birds vis...
-A New Aphis
A new species of Aphis, supposed to have come from Japan, has been discovered on Japan Lily plants by Mr. Peter B. Mead, of New York, and has been described and named by Mr. Joseph Monell, of St. Loui...
-Barren Chestnut Trees
It has been noted by several observers in Illinois and Indiana, that when a chestnut tree is alone by itself - a mile or more from other trees - it does not produce fruit. The chestnut is bi-sexual...
-Graft Hybrids
Professor Beal writes: - Not long ago I sent you a copy of my report. You complimented it, and made a note of my reference to your experiments on 'Graft Hybrids.' Of course we know the result would o...
-Chamomile And Pyrethrum
W. writes: Will you please inform us whether or not the Pyrethrum roseum is a 'Chamomile.' The case is this, Pyrethrum roseum is known in commerce as the Persian (or Caucasian) Chamomile. Chamomile...
-Quinine
At length we have the results of the care for the future in regard to Cinchona barks. An official report to the Indian government for 1879-80 is published, regarding the Cinchona cultivation in Ben...
-Burning Of Horticultural Hall, Philada
A church adjoining Horticultural Hall, took fire on Feb. 1st, and burnt out some $170,000. The roof of Horticultural Hall took fire, and the whole upper floor was destroyed. Some $50,000 of damage was...
-Execrable Writing
We puzzled over a letter fifteen minutes that ought to have been read in two, but when we got to the end and came to excuse haste, it was too much. Because the lunatic has no time to write plainly,...
-Railroads And The People
A friend sends us Scribner's Monthly for December, with an article by Thurber under the above title, asking that we call attention to it. The point of the article is that the charge of the public h...
-Hunting A Gardener
A correspondent, Rambler, sends us an amusing account of a gardener in search of a place. He was unlucky enough to fall in with people who understood a first-class gardener to be one who could ...
-Prof. Alphonso Wood
This distinguished botanist died on the 4th of January, in his seventy-first year. Few men have done more to make American botany popular than he. His works - marred somewhat by typographical errors -...
-Die Cultur Des Champignons. (The Culture Of Mushrooms),
At the present time there is a great interest felt in mushroom culture in the United States, and for those who understand the German language, this little book will be very useful. As a sample of the ...
-Preparation Of Manure
The manure of horses and mules is the only kind which can be successfully used in the cultivation of these plants. In preparing the manure for the beds, it ought to be free from coarse straw or oth...
-Planting
If the beds have attained a temperature of 15 R., they can be planted according to the quantity of spawn you have; if plentiful, three by four inches, otherwise six by six or eight by eight, abou...
-The Peach And Its Diseases
Mr. Butter shows by historical records, that the short-lived character of the Peach in some locations has been a fact for at least a hundred years, and that the yellows had probably to do with this ...
-Sugar Beet
Report on the culture, by Wm. McMurtrie, Chemist to the Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. Published by the Commissioner of Agriculture. The student of history knows how hard it is to get...
-Scraps And Queries. Oleomargarine
J. C. writes on subject of the pronunciation of oleomargarine: Will you allow me to say that I think you are in error in your reply (in February's G. M.) to the question of a correspondent as to the ...
-Germantown, Pa., Horticultural Society
The February monthly meeting had a good J many items of interest. A beautiful specimen of Paullinia thalictroides rivalled many ferns in! foliage; one might take it at first sight for a Maiden Hair fe...
-Fifth Report Of The Montreal Horticultural Society - From Henry S. Evans, Secretary
The chief papers and discussions are on apples and grapes which give much valuable information on these kinds of fruit for which Canada is so famous. In a paper on the codling moth, Mr. Bowles tells u...
-Annual Dinner Of The New York Horticultural Society
This was attended by many ladies and gentlemen among New York's leading citizens. President Sloan claimed that it should be considered as a continuation of the old society started in 1822. He did not ...
-Horticultural Essays
The Massachusetts Horticultural Society has offered: For the best essay upon our native plants, adapted for winter culture for their flowers, $25.00; for the best essay on our wild fruits, with hints ...
-April, 1881. Vol. XXIII. Number 268. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
When we come to Seasonable Hints, it is almost impossible not to go over, again and again, ground that we have traversed before. Like the Sunday sermon it is the same old truths, - the same rules fo...
-Communications. Caladiums As Beddinc Plants
For some years the culture and keeping of Caladiums were considered difficult; their preservation during winter was of the nature of an experiment. Now these hindrances have vanished, and even amateur...
-The Fern Grotto
There is a large fernery in natural conservatory style. The sides are lined and pouched with virgin cork in shaggy fashion and the interior banked, bouldered and intersected with rocky mounds and un...
-Pitcher Plants
As many kinds of Nepenthes, as Kina Balu himself can boast of, are here represented in basket homes depending from the roof in the stove. They are growing in Such's orchid-peat and sphagnum moss throu...
-Letter From The Black Forests In Germany. By. W. D
The November number of the Monthly is, as usual, stored with information most useful and interesting to all lovers of flori and horticulture. The communications of Messrs. Ellwanger, W. E. Meehan and ...
-Double Flowers
Speaking of Double Stock-gillies, M. Chote in a French paper translated by the Gardener's Clironicle, says: Every time that I have had a single flower, in which one or more stamens were adhering t...
-Drooping Norway Spruces
It may be remembered that in a paper contributed some years ago to the meeting of the American Association at Salem, Mass., Mr. Meehan showed that the branches of trees which had the greatest power to...
-Gardening Near Baltimore
The Maryland Farmer for February has a few more notes. Mr. Charles J. Baker has two plant houses, one rose house for winter flowers, and two grape houses. Mr. Daniel Thorley is regarded as a first cla...
-Abies Parsonsiana
The names of pines and other coniferous trees have been so mixed up by the fondness of some for attaching Latin names to mere varieties, and by their ignorance of botanical rules, that we scarcely kno...
-Making A Star
Subscriber, Denver, Colorado, says: - Would you be kind enough to inform me how to lay out practically a five cornered or five angle star. Have laid them out for flower bed purposes, but thought th...
-Gloire De Dijon Rose
T., Bristol, Penna., writes: - Have you any knowledge of the Gloire de Dijon Rose standing the winter when planted out as far north as this, say twenty miles north of Philadelphia? We have one here t...
-Greenhouse And House Gardening. Communications. How To Construct And Manage A Small Hothouse
Feeling sure that many lovers of flowers would construct conservatories for their own private use, but are deterred from so doing by the supposed large cost necessary for building and running the same...
-Poinsetta As A Greenhouse Plant
I know the Poinsetta is thought by many to be a hot-house plant, but that it will do in the greenhouse must be evident to all who have given it a trial. I think no one who has a greenhouse, should be ...
-How To Remove Coal Tar From Hot Water Pipes Without Removing The Pipes
One of my customers having painted his hot water pipes with coal tar, with the usual result, was advised to take them out and burn them to take it off. The house was new and beautifully finished. The ...
-Steam Heating
I have yours of the 10th ult., and shall endeavor to meet the question as to the greater merits of steam heating above that of hot water. If I rightly recollect our conversation you put it about as fo...
-Coelogyne Flaccida
I thought I would call the attention of the readers of the Monthly, who are interested in the cultivation of orchids, to this plant, as a very desirable one for winter blooming. I have not seen it not...
-Dendrochilum Glumaceum
Among the many orchids now in bloom in my greenhouses I find none with flowers more delicately beautiful or more deliciously fragrant than those of the lovely Dendrochilum gluma-ceum. It is to be regr...
-The Winter And Flowers In Ohio
A correspondent says: - This has so far been one of the severest winters I have experienced since I came to the country. I do not know what you have had in the East, but here we had almost zero weath...
-Double Abutilon
Mr. Edward C. Haines says: - In looking over my abutilons to-day, I was surprised by finding on a year old plant named Robt. George, a double flower composed of eight petals; ordinarily they have but...
-Flower Queries
The following questions of general interest have been handed in by Miss M. W. of Quaker Hill: - As my queries last April were so kindly answered by several of the readers of the Monthly, I venture to...
-Shading Greenhouses
R. L. B., Des Moines, Iowa, writes: - I would like to know through the Monthly of a shading for glass in summer, other than the usual lime wash, which I believe destroys the putty and paint on the sa...
-Bananas
Mr. James Greenhalgh, gardener to G. G. Green of Woodbury, N. J., sends us a Banana fruit which weighed four ounces. He had three hundred such on a plant eleven feet high. This would make a bunch of a...
-April, 1881. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Many persons take grafts of currants, gooseberries, grapes, quinces and other things off in the winter season, tie them in bundles and put in sand boxes till spring. One trouble is that if the tempera...
-Communications. Peaches On The North River
In answer to a question in January Number of Gardener's Monthly, page 50,1 can only say to V. B., Kingston, N. Y., it is very difficult to give proper information as to what varieties of peaches will ...
-The Pocklington Crape
I have become somewhat identified with the Pocklington grape, so much so that I get a great many inquiries as to my real candid opinion of its merits for general cultivation and for market purpose...
-Spreading Phylloxera
In the March number of the American Naturalist, Professor Riley shows that the phylloxera can be introduced by cuttings of vines, though not so probably as by rooted plants. In localities not infested...
-Killing The Codling Moth
Prof. Burrill has shown that a solution of Paris green engined over an apple tree about the time the codling moth appears, is a certain security against this destructive insect. By the time the fruit ...
-Vitis Californica As A Stock Against Phylloxera
Professor Eugene W. Hilyard says: - Among the resistant stocks most readily available to California grape growers, the native wild grape, Vitis California, deserves earnest attention. In its botanica...
-The Pear Market
Few men know more about marketing than Edwin Satterthwaite. He says that there is one thing about pear culture of which it might be well to remind those about to engage in fruit culture for market pu...
-Varieties Of Apples
In his report at Gettysburg, Mr. Satterthwaite gave the following as the best varieties of apples and peaches for Pennsylvania: - Early Harvest, Red Astrachan, Benoni, Porter, Blush, Smokehouse, Domin...
-New And Rare Fruits. Langford Apple
When in Geneva in the spring of 1879, the writer was much impressed with a large greenish-brown, and generally fine looking apple, shown to us by Messrs. Chase. It was remarkably heavy for its size,wh...
-Insects On Apple Trees
H. B., Painesville, Ohio, says: - Please find a portion of an apple scion with insects on. Will you please name the insect in Gardener's Monthly, and its mission. I never saw anything like it before...
-Spades And Plows
J. B., Fredericton, N. B., sends another chapter, which as it would occupy several pages, we are sorry we cannot find room, as there are some good points in it. For instance, he notes that in a large ...
-Forestry. Communications. Growth Of A Walnut Tree
Reading in your January number that you recently saw some walnut logs in Indiana that had been sold for one hundred dollars, called to mind that when I was a boy ten years old, living with an uncle in...
-Crowth Of The Live Oak
It is generally supposed that the Live Oak grows very slowly. This is not always the case. Dr. Charles Mohr, of Mobile, sends the following measurements of a Live Oak which was planted in 1852 near St...
-Russian Mulberry
A correspondent sends us a circular issued in the West, offering the above, and asks what is it? It offers the cut leaved Russian and the common Russian. The former is praised especially as a fine...
-Timber In Pennsylvania
Statistics, such as they are, show that thirty years ago Pennsylvania had about 25 per cent, of its area in timber trees. In an address at Harrisburg, Mr. Meehan remarked in reference to this, that th...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Eccentricity Of The Annual Layers Of Wood In Plants
In the Gardener's Monthly this subject was briefly touched, and knowing it to be an open question yet, I take the same liberty as others did before me, to give the result of my investigation. My atten...
-Sex As An Aid In Plant Adjustment
The evolutionist believes that change of conditions and diversity of environment necessitates corresponding, or all changes and unlikeness there is in plant and animal life. We find most plants can...
-Megarrhiza Californica
Plants are commonly divided into annuals and perennials, but under these names are many separate classes. A strawberry, for instance, is regarded as a perennial, but there is probably never any part o...
-Eccentric Growth Of Trees
Mr. Poppey gives a suggestive paper on this subject in this number, and offers the correct explanation. Wood is formed by the germination of new cells from the mother cells. The size or abundance of t...
-Botany In Philadelphia
The progress of Botany in Philadelphia, of late years, has been very satisfactory to the devotees of this interesting science. Different individuals and societies have vied with each other to such an ...
-English Names
Mr. Meehan, in his Gardener's Monthly, objects to these, on the score of there being more than one applied to the same plant, but this seems to us no reason whatever why people should not aim at havi...
-Early Ripening
New York, Feb. 10th, 1881. Editor of Gardener's Monthly - Dear Sir: - From a review in the Temps, Paris newspaper, I gather that M. Tisseraud, at present one of the French Ministers of State, owner of...
-Common Names Of Plants In Australia
We note by an article in the Leader of Melbourne, Australia, that the reaction against the extravagant endeavors to coin common names for everything that has not had the good fortune to meet with one ...
-Influence Of Light On Colored Leaves
The Compte rendu du Congres de Botanique et d'Horticidture de 1880, contains a valuable paper by Professor Ed. Peynaert on this subject. He shews that the influence varies with the class of colors. In...
-Origin Of Trees On The Prairies
Mr. Lorin Blodgett writes: - I read with interest your recent address on The Origin of the Prairies, merely a notice in the daily papers. I hope you will give it in full in the Monthly. I had th...
-Freezing Of The Sap Of Trees
W. H. P., Chicago, III, writes: - I see that the editor of the Monthly still allows the sap-freezing controversy a place in his columns, although he keeps himself modestly or cautiously out of the ar...
-Southern Notes
A correspondent sends us an extract from a letter by Wm. Izzard Bull, apparently from some part of the far South. The letter is sent it seems for some opinion on the points referred to. It is said tha...
-Rhododendron Poisonous To Bees
A. J. M., Berlin Heights, Ohio, writes: - Two or three years ago I had some Rhododendrons which came out before the red clover, and would you think it, it was something new for Ohio humble bees. They...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Notes And Queries No. 23
Dear Notes ,And Queries; That was an interesting account of the plant that cuts off the heads of its yictims. It is yet to be discovered, I suppose, whether the plant feeds on the dislodged head. W...
-Nursery Agents
Perhaps there is no industry so little understood at the present time as that of selling or supplying trees and plants to the public by retail, through the medium of agents, or what are more familiarl...
-The New York Horticultural Society
The following gentlemen were elected officers for the coming year: Samuel Sloan, President; J. Pier-pont Morgan, Percy R. Pyne, Chas. Butler, E. S Sanford, Vice-Presidents; James Y. Murkland, Recordin...
-The Justifying Value Of A Public Park
By Frederick Law Olmsted. This is a paper read by Mr. Olmsted at the meeting of the American Social Science Association at Saratoga in 1880. Mr. Olmsted proposes for discussion in this paper the quest...
-The Food Of Birds
By A. E. Forbes, reprinted from the Bulletin of the Laboratory of Natural History of Illinois. Many who read the discussions in newspapers must often wonder why people will write an opinion which t...
-May, 1881. Vol. XXIII. Number 269. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
We take up our pen on this 1st day of April to offer a few Seasonable Hints. They are for our magazine, which is to appear on the first of May. It seems hard to tell just now what will be seasonabl...
-Roses For Bedding
In the February number of Gardener's Monthly, Mr. H. B. Ellwanger gives a list of the best twenty-four monthly roses for bedding. No doubt for the Northern and Eastern States the list could not be imp...
-Bedding Plants
I observe in the March number of the Monthly the request of A. L. O. E. These initials are so intimately associated with the name of that noble lady, Miss Tucker, that it is difficult to think of them...
-Bedding Geraniums
In the Gardener's Monthly for March, 1881, A. L. O. E. inquires for information concerning bedding geraniums, and asks for the names of the best six scarlet geraniums, the best pink and the best white...
-More Plants And Flowers For City People
The example set by Philadelphia, Chicago, Boston and Allegheny, deserves to be followed by many other cities, notably New York and Brooklyn. The bearing fruit testifies how much of an educator is t...
-The Drouth Of 1880
According to a record of the rain fall since 1840, kept at Harvard College Observatory, the spring of 1880 is the driest recorded, the rain-fall during the months of April, May and June being but 4.31...
-Spades
Light, thin-bladed spades are more to be desired than heavy ones, the workmen like them, better, and can do more work with them. I use Ames' spades, and formerly had those marked 0. Ames & Sons, ...
-Letter From The Black Forest In Germany
(Concluded from page 102.) Deutzia gracilis is a most excellent small shrub for winter forcing. Early in November plant it in an eight-inch pot, and plunge the pot down to the brim in the garden, w...
-For Room Culture
There is a plant, which as it does not mind the dust of the room or the constant change of the temperature, ought to be more widely known than it is. I mean the old Clivia (Imantophyllum miniatum). It...
-Hyacinthus Candicans
Introduced by the Messrs. Kreelage &Son, of Haarlem, is not what it i reported to be. The white flowers, produced on a stem three to four feet high, are shaped like the flowers of single hyacinths, bu...
-Fairmount Park
The New York Tribune of March 14 has an appreciative and well deserved account of Fairmount Park, Philadelphia. In regard to the grand conservatory it says: - Within the very precincts of this great ...
-Gardens Of The Mexican Aborigines
The Contributor of Salt Lake City, referring to the City of Mexico, says: - Beyond the limits of the city proper, on the plain intervening between it and the higher mountains, is the nearest approach...
-Maryland Gardens
Mr. Feast continues his interesting sketches in the Maryland Farmer. Mr. A. S. Abell, of the Baltimore Sun, has a pretty place at Guilford. The grounds are large, well kept, and well arranged from a l...
-Cattle In Public Streets
It is well known that cattle are sometimes allowed to run at large on country roads, to the annoyance of farmers and rural gardeners. But it will surprise many that the same outrage is permitted in su...
-Rheum Palmatum
Rhubarb has served many useful purposes. When the old folks were younger it served with their mothers what the soothing syrups and other popularities do for us. As pie plant, we all know how valuabl...
-Greenhouse And House Gardening. Communications. Shading Greenhouses
In regard to shading greenhouses, I found it paid better to mix up a lot of clay'with a little indigo or bluing to the consistency of thin paste and wash the glass, than to use lime white-wash, but or...
-Shading Greenhouses In Summer
R. L. B. of Des Moines, Iowa, wishes to know the best method of shading the glass of the greenhouse in summer. Peter Henderson (I do not know a better authority) says, The best shading we have used...
-Mealy Bug
Mr. J. D. S., Upper Sandusky, Ohio, asks: Is there any way to keep down mealy bug in my greenhouse? My gardener is at his wit's end. [Usually they are kept down by continuous sponging. Diluted tu...
-How To Manage A Small Hothouse
Some of the difficulties of my subject can be imagined when one considers that hundreds of books and innumerable magazine articles have been written on hothouse management; and also the fact that out ...
-Coal Or Gas Tar On Pipes
I notice that Theodore Lawrence, of Ogdensburg, N. Y., says that he has succeeded in removing coal tar from hot-water pipes by swab-ing them with hot lye. I apprehend that in that case either the surf...
-Eulalias
In reply to B,, who inquires for information concerning the Eulalias on page 70 of the Gardener's Monthly for March, I would say that both Eulalia japonica and E. J. zebrina, are perfectly hardy in th...
-Cool Orchids Epidendrums
In a former article upon Stanhopeas (December, page 364) I referred to the above as the easiest of culture of all orchids. They also are most numerous, if we except the Oncidiums and possibly the Dend...
-Heat From Above
All our heat comes from above. This fact patent to all has led me to view the present arrangement of hot water pipes (in part) in greenhouse, stove and pit as against nature's laws and not supported b...
-A Fine Garden And Good Gardener
How often do we come across gardeners possessing the best of practical knowledge, at the same time diffident about conveying their knowledge to others through the press. Not but what they are willing ...
-Franciscea
The broad leaved Franciscea (Franciscea latifolia) is a South American evergreen shrub, belonging to the natural order Scrophulariaceae. It is a native of Brazil and is said to be found growing in gre...
-Editorial Notes. Hot Water Boilers
A novelty is offered in Carmody's sectional extension water heater. This novel point is thus described: It is adjustable, being in sections; its power can be increased or diminished at will. To illus...
-Cypripedium Euryandrum
As so much interest has been shown for orchids recently, we give here an illustration of a curious and beautiful hybrid Cypripedium, raised by the foreman of Messrs. Veitch of Chelsea, near London. Mr...
-Heinl's Monthly Pelargoniums
Our readers were no doubt pleased with the representations of these improved Pelargoniums as given in Mr. Heinl's colored plate advertisement, which appeared in the March number of our magazine. It is...
-Heating Water By Steam
Charles Cruck-nell, St. Louis, says: - A Boston correspondent in the March number enquires if there are any fcteam boilers in use for heating hot water pipes. There is one in use here, it is tubular,...
-A New Mignonette
A. W., Cumminsville, near Cincinnati, writes: - We send you by mail a few heads of Mignonettes which we have grown and improved for the last ten years. We think it is the best ever grown as a market ...
-Our Orchid Articles
The following was not intended for publication, but is on that account the more just a tribute to the excellent correspondents alluded to, and we stretch a point in courtesy which does not permit of p...
-May, 1881. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Blackberries and raspberries, set out in spring, may kill themselves by overbearing. It is pardonable to wish for some fruit the first year. If a tree seems to be growing freely, some fruit may be lef...
-Communications. Culture Of Asparagus And The Mound Plan
A few years since I repeated in your journal a new way that had been told me of growing asparagus. It was based on the idea that asparagus yearly made new roots from its annual stalk and a new crown; ...
-Is It The French Pippin?
A fine appearing apple, above medium in size, was placed in my hands a few days since by a friend, who said it came to him as the French Pippin. This fruit has been grown in Pennsylvania for at least ...
-Insects On Oranges
The dark colored remains of the small seedlike insects seen upon the skins of many oranges, according to Professor C. V. Riley, the Government Entomologist, are known vulgarly as the long or mussel-sh...
-Peach Yellows In The South
The following is from the Farmer's Home Journal, of Louisville, Ky. After quoting the remarks of the Gardener's Monthly, the editor says: We are pretty well acquainted with the orchards along the 'Ja...
-Forcing Strawberries
Few things better indicate the differences between the climate of this part of the world and of England than this from the Gardener's Chronicle, regarding the forcing of strawberries at the Marquis of...
-Wash For Trees
W. A. M., Philadelphia, says: Seeing in your February number, page 49, a wash for trees, I only wish to remind your patrons that the following wash (although not new) is the best we ever used. Perfec...
-Packing Apples For Export
We had a notice recently, credited to the Gardener's Record, in regard to the packing of American apples. In Covent Garden market, those from the United States had those on the top larger than those b...
-Moss Mulching
H. L. P., Washington, D. C, says: - I should like to hear through the Gardener's Monthly from Mr. Henderson, in regard to a difficulty I have found in his method of mulching with sphagnum and bone du...
-Booting Blackberries From The Tips
Mr. Samuel Lockwood, a distinguished scientific man, writes as follows to the Torrey Bulletin: When the Delaware grape vine first came into market, I bought a young vine. It had a large root, but it ...
-The Sparrow In Australia
An Australian paper says: The sparrows are devouring the fruits of the tig in the neighborhood of Adelaide as fast as they begin to ripen. In some gardens it is next to impossible to get a ripe fig t...
-English Gooseberries
It seems they can raise these as well in the Oceanic Islands as in England. A fine sample of gooseberries, says a Tasmania paper, were sixteen in number, weighing sixteen, and a half ounces. Last y...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. The Modern Diet Of Worms
The Abronia grows almost invariably on sandy soil. The plant is of such a viscid nature that it is difficult to procure good herbarium specimens, on account of the sand and rubbish that adhere to the ...
-Watering Plants By Leaf Absorption
The idea is quite common that the foliage of plants absorbs moisture while growing; and that the leaves cannot be kept healthy without frequent sprinkling. It rains on plants out doors, so we imitate ...
-Juvenile Forms Of Coniferae
It has been long ago explained by the writer of this, and by Mr. Hoopes in his Book of Evergreens, that many of the curious forms of Junipers, Arbor-vitae and Retinispora, which are well known to cu...
-Averages
There are few more deceptive rules for practical men. Averages of the weather for March are illustrations. Every one interested in gardening knows that we have really had the coldest month ever known....
-The Herbarium Of The Academy Of Natural Sciences Of Philadelphia
None know better than the lovers of flowers how important it is to have at command a complete herbarium, as well as a first-class botanical library. Our plant names would be in endless confusion but f...
-The Elm Tree Beetle
In Philadelphia we have two bad elm beetles, and probably a few more that are good for nothing. One seems to have been with the trees for many years, chiefly on the English species. There are noble tr...
-Pronunciation Of Phylloxera
T. S. P., Kingsburg, Cal., asks: - How shall we pronounce Phylloxera? Prof. Hilgard of the University of California, says it is 'pronounced as if spelled fillo-xee-ra; emphasis on xee.' (See supplem...
-Freezing Of The Sap
B. J., Cleveland, 0., writes: - I notice that you say in your papers, on this subject that a living organism cannot have its juices frozen, and yet live afterwards. I think it would serve the cause o...
-Persimmons
Fine specimens of the Japan persimmon have reached the writer from California - one that was quite ripe was delicious. The tree bears profusely, each little stem, and those near the, ground on very...
-Hardy Bamboos, Etc
Attention is called in England to a list of bamboos that are hardy under cultivation there. Also to a hardy Cactus from the Rocky Mountains, Begonia from the Andes, the well-known Chamaerops excelsa, ...
-"Alas! Our Brother."
A clew seems at last to have been found which will apparently lead to something more definite in regard to the fate of the long lost Dr. Leieh-ardt, who disappeared in the inhospitable wilds of Austra...
-Wanderings Of A Correspondent
It will likely surprise you not a little to learn of my return to America. Sometime in last April I left Australia for my native land, Russia. Through so many years absence, estranged to all and every...
-A Word To Young Gardeners And Young Farmers
How often we hear expressions of discontent among gardeners, and who, not seldom severely censure their fathers for having been so weak-minded as to encourage their boys to become gardeners, when so m...
-W. D. Brackenridge
The American Farmer, of Baltimore, gives in its April number a portrait and sketch of the life of this gentleman, whose great services to American botany and gardening have not received near the recog...
-Did Not Know Celery
The smallest kind of wit is that which makes fun of other people's ignorance. A Massachussets paper says: A young chap from Shutesburg, Mass., having his girl along, took her to dinner at a hotel not...
-Portage County (Ohio) Horticultural Society
The excellent example of the Montgomery County Society is bringing forth good fruits by imitation elsewhere. We have here before us the proceedings of a younger body which promises a similar life of u...
-The Vegetation Of The Rocky Mountain Region
By Asa Gray and Sir Joseph Hooker. From the Bulletin of the United States Survey of the Territories, Vol. VI., No. 1. These distinguished botanists, to whom the world already owes so much, have in thi...
-Henderson's Hand-Book Of Plants
New York: Published by Peter Henderson & Co. In preparing this work Mr. Henderson has added largely to the gratitude American horticulturists already owe him. It is somewhat on the plan of Paxton's an...
-Our Native Ferns
By Dr. J. M. Underwood, Bloomington, Illinois. This little book has the merit of originality of treatment, and explains about ferns in so easy and simple a manner that few will read without knowing mo...
-The Gymnosporangia, Or Cedar Apples Of The United States
By Prof. W. G. Farlow. Published by the Boston Society of Natural History. We are interested in botany for various reasons, but the hoticulturist before any other class is interested in the progres...
-Bad Letter Addresses
L. C L, Nashville, Tenn., under cover of an envelope, endorsed 814 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, and to to which he adds, with ironical care, the word Pennsylvania, spelled out in full, says: A ...
-Spade And Plow
J. S. L: We puzzled over your letter some ten minutes, but found it impossible to make out the words by the handwriting so as to make any sense out of it, so very reluctantly, it went into the waste b...
-Horticultural Societies. American Pomological, Society
The Massachusetts Horticultural Society having invited the American Pomological Society to hold its next meeting at Boston, the Eighteenth Session will be held in that city, commencing Wednesday, Sept...
-June, 1881. Vol. XXIII. Number 270. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
If you would have nice evergreens, use the knife freely and yet judiciously. The strongest central shoots should be cut out where thickening is desired. If the tree be running up tall the leader may h...
-Double Carolina Jasmine
Mr. P. J. Berck-mans, Augusta, Ga., says: - I enclose a couple of flowers of a Double Carolina Jasmine. It was found growing in the woods near Columbus, Ga., some years ago. It is a really nice green...
-Flower Garden Adornments
It can scarcely be doubted that some variation is needed in our style of flower garden adornments. Exactly what that need is does not seem so well understood; or it may be merely difference of opinion...
-Climbing Roses
Some time ago a discussion took place in my neighborhood between some horticulturists, about the merits of the new varieties of roses sent out since two or three years, and amongst them some advertise...
-Some New Roses
Anna Marie Montraval (Rosa Polyantha Perpetual) I received the first stock plants of this variety in the latter part of December, 1879; it will no doubt become a very popular rose. The habit of the...
-Garden Scions
A somewhat new and very fine species, with large purple flowers, is likely to be one of our foremost hardy herbaceous perennials. I am not sure that it is quite hardy out of doors, but it winters all ...
-Horticulture In Pittsburgh
An editorial letter that appeared in the February number of your excellent journal of this year, suggested that a few words on the state of advancement in horticulture in and around the Iron City migh...
-Fall Grass On Lawns
Under our eye for some years has been a lawn on which at least half the space was covered by the unwelcome fall grass - Paspalum sanguinale. By the advice of the writer, attention was given to encoura...
-Forsythia Suspensa
Though this pretty shrub has been many years in our gardens, its merits are not well known. It is in every way a finer plant than its neighbor Forsythia viridissima, the well known Golden Bell. It is ...
-Early Lilacs
It is remarkable how soon lazy nature catches up with her neglected work when she has a mind to. Near Philadelphia the lilac is the gauge of the season. Let the season be early or late, all is general...
-Greenhouse And House Gardening. Communications. Winter Culture Of Plants
Please allow me to suggest to M., Lansing, Mich., that a night temperature of 50 to 60 is 15 too warm for Geraniums in winter, and that the fungus which blights the buds is probably t...
-Naphtha And Milk For Greenhouse Shade
Some one asks what is best for shading a glass house. Mr. Henderson advises naphtha and white lead, mixed to the consistency of milk, and sprinkled on the roof with a syringe. Having tried the experim...
-How To Construct And Manage A Small Greenhouse
I have no doubt but that many who desire to have greenhouses, but are ignorant of their construction and cost, will bestow due thanks on C. D. Warde for the able assistance he offers them. While ag...
-Brassia And Brassavola
An inquiry has been made as to the treatment of Brassia caudata, B. Gireoudiana and Brassavola glauca. The two Brassias, though coming from different countries, can be grown in the same way. I find al...
-Lath For Shading Greenhouses
I have for some years used shutters made of plaster laths for a window 3 by 6 feet. I use ten laths across and one and a half in length, making fifteen to a shutter, nailed on four cross pieces, with ...
-Mealy Bug, Etc
I noticed in the February Monthly some one inquiring how to destroy the Mealy Bug. I find a small brush costs ten or fifteen cents; half a pint of alcohol; pour out about a thimble full at once in a c...
-Shading For Glass
In reply to the query of your correspondent, R. L. B., of Des Moines, Iowa, I am glad to be able to give him a receipt for a better method than lime wash, which is not only very unsightly, but for mos...
-Oncidium Ornithorhyncum, Etc
Oncidium ornithorhyncum is best grown in a pot, in a mixture of orchid peat and sphagnum moss. It is one of the easiest of orchids to grow. It should be kept in a temperature of from 50 to 55...
-Greenhouses Of Mr. Daniel H. Brown, St. Louis, Mo
Securing a seat in the yellow cars at Fourth and Pine streets on one of the coldest mornings of the old year, a fifteen minutes ride landed me at State and Lami streets, within a block of my destinati...
-A Remarkable Rose Bush
A short walk from the greenhouses of Mr. Brown are those of Wm. Syred, situated on Shaw avenue. 'The most remarkable thing here was a bush of Lamarque rose in full bloom. It occupies the centre of one...
-Directions For Cultivating Pyrethrum For Insect Powder
Many of my correspondents ask for particulars and directions to guide them in the cultivation of the Pyrethrum seed, which has been sent to them. As its cultivation in many of the localities where it ...
-Treatment Of Poinsetta Pulcherrima
Will you kindly allow me to make a few remarks in reference to the treatment of this subject in your columns? They should be repotted and started into growth about the beginning of May. Pot them in so...
-Curious Sport In A Carnation
S. F. T., Saratoga Springs, N. Y., writes: - I send you by mail to-day a box of carnation blooms (three) and buds. You will find by dividing that they are triple flowers, one inside the other, and in...
-New And Rare Plants. Alocasia Thibautiana
This aroid was introduced by Messrs. Veitch of Chelsea, London. It is a splendid foliage plant of stately and robust habit, and without doubt by far the finest of all Alocasias. The leaves are of i...
-June, 1881. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Fruit growers know by this time that the reproductive and the mere vegetative forces of plants are antagonistic. There may not be two distinct principles like two distinct men, in vegetables, the one ...
-Communications. Forcing Strawberries
I finished strawberry picking yesterday. The following may be interesting to you, and I will give you a correct record of the different pickings: March 1st, picked first a few, kept no record; 3d, ...
-Crape Vines In Pots
Grapes grown in pots for forcing, when well furnished with fruit, have a beautiful appearance, and when properly grown make an ample return. For this purpose the plants should be raised from single ey...
-Early Peaches
I believe the common theory as to why Hale's Early Peach produces so many extra early kinds, all so nearly resembling itself, is, that it blooms so late - after nearly all other varieties are out of b...
-Cinchona Culture
In recent issues of the Gardener's Monthly, I notice with much pleasure the notes on Cinchona. It is a true and well known fact that the consumption of quinine of late years has increased to such an e...
-Some Remarks About Varieties Of Fruit Brought To The Rochester Market
As a general rule, no better plan can be adopted to ascertain what varieties of fruits pay best than to ascertain what growers bring to market in largest quantities. Thinking that a few facts from ...
-Asparagus Beetle
Prof. J. A. Leitner contributes an interesting paper to the Country Gentleman on this insect. It is a long known pest in the old world, having been named by Linnaeas, Crioceris asparagi. It is often a...
-Preparing Walnuts For The Table
A daily paper says: During the walnut season, while they are fresh and crisp, Queen Victoria has every day on her table a dish of this fruit taken out of the shells and carefully freed from the skins...
-Injured Grape Vines
G. S., Brocton, New York, writes: So far as I have been able to ascertain, no material damage had been done to the grapes and peaches in Portland up to the first week in February, and why? Because th...
-Kieffer Pear
F. L., Madison, Wisconsin, writes: Would you be kind enough to give us some information about this fruit which seems to be widely pushed from your section of the country, and is pronounced to be whol...
-Forestry. Communications. Catalpa Speciosa
This species has been in the past a very favorite tree in the prairie towns of West Louisiana where fine specimens are common; and at several places both in Western Louisiana and Eastern Texas it is n...
-Notes On Eucalyptus
For out-door culture Australia offers but little to the Eastern United States; but some eucalyptus and acacia may be utilized for South California, Arizona and Southern Texas; but E. amygdalina, E. pa...
-The Black Walnut In North Carolina
In January number, page 20, I noticed an article on black walnut. On its scarcity, value and its quick growth I just wished to speak, and of one in our neighborhood, this county. Two miles distant liv...
-Newspaper Nonsense
There is no doubt but the newspaper nonsense, and which some of our agricultural contemporaries would have us adopt, does more harm to forestry planting than many persons have any idea of. Here before...
-Sumac
The Lynchburg Advance, published in the heart of the Sumac region, says: Gather when the leaves are full grown, say from June to August. Only the leaves and the small stems on which they immediately ...
-Birch Timber
The Greely Tribune says: The small value of Birch wood for fuel, and its lack of toughness and strength, except in the smaller twigs, have led to its general neglect in the arts. Our more enterprisin...
-Black Walnut In Kansas
B. F. S., Lawrence, Kansas, says: Am this day in receipt of a letter from my friend, who owns the farm where the Walnut stands which I have written you about. He says he measured it a few days ago, a...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. The Home Of The Torreya Taxifolia
My own early conception of Florida would correspond, I fancy, very nearly with that popularly held, and which, if given in a few words would agree nearly with this: That it is a great sandy-surfaced p...
-A Fine Witch Hazel
The arrival of the Gardener's Monthly reminds me of a beautiful witch hazel (Hamma-melis Virginiana) of which I wish to tell you. It grew in Monroe County, Pa., in an open plateau in the wild woods, n...
-Wild Flowers Of South Carolina
We have been much pleased to-day, May 2nd, during a long drive, with the elegance of our native Styrax which I think well worthy the attention of those who love a garden. Buds and blossoms resemble th...
-Editorial Notes. Fuschia Procumbens
Most of us have heard of the two disputants, one proving that the breath was a cooling agent by blowing on his hot coffee, the other that it was a warm principle by blowing on his half-frozen hands. M...
-The English Sky-Lark In America
The New York Sun tells us that another attempt to introduce the English sky-lark is to be made near New York. Many have been tried during the last fifty years and failed. No one seems to reflect on ho...
-Exotics And Indigenous Plants
When the average newspaper man wanders among the mazes of botany, he is very apt to put his foot into it, as witness the following from an editorial in the Philadelphia Press: One sensible revolut...
-Controlling The Weather
In our days when prayers are offered up in the churches for dry weather or for rain, it is not usual to stop to consider whether any one may possibly have good reason for objecting to the proposed cha...
-English Plant Names
Mr. Veitch, of New Haven, and Mr. Meehan, of Germantown, in the Gardener's Monthly, are picking holes in the English-name question, and saying nothing about the manifold absurdities of the Latin nomen...
-Double Rue-Anemone
With some double flowers of Anemone thalictroides, H. C. K., Tolona, Mo., writes: - I have sent you by mail a double wild flower, found growing among the single varieties which grow very plentiful on...
-Pritchardia Gaudichaudii
A St. Louis correspondent writes: - Throw a beam of light on the following, through the pages of the Monthly: In one of the houses of the Missouri Botanical Gardens is to be seen a palm named Pritcha...
-Carolina Jasmine In Texas
A. R. says: - Mr. James Greig, Hockley, Texas, offers me Gel-semium nitidum,which you rank in your Native Ferns and Flowers synonym to Sempervirens, and doubt its reaching the Southern States from...
-Mulberry Leaves
The small economies of the European peasants are illustrated by the trade in mulberry leaves. They are purchased by people who have silk worms and have not the means at their homes for feeding them. T...
-The Dog's Capacity
The most striking article on the senses of the dog will be found in the Gentleman's Magazine (London) for September, and it is by a lady. She says: How can we account for so much potentiality of inte...
-Reminiscences Of A Visit To The Late Dr. Darlington
The 24th of May, 1858, I went on the cars from Philadelphia to West Chester, Pa., distance twenty-four miles, to see Dr. Darlington, then one of the oldest botanists in the United States. He told me h...
-Advice To Young Men
Young men stay in the country. Do not think of coming to a large city, if you wish to be happy and prosperous. I have experienced both and say that there is more real happiness in one day in the count...
-The Bartram Gardens
It is with great pain that we record the fact that an effort to save the trees, garden, and residence of John Bartram from destruction has utterly failed. By the will of Mr. Eastwick, the property of ...
-The Great West
How strange the predictions of public men seem but a few years afterwards. It is not long ago that General Fremont and Senator Clark laughed at the idea of such land as that of Kansas and Nebraska eve...
-Illegible Writing Again
Some one from Brocton, New York writes to the Editor, and requests the special favor of a reply. The Editor cannot promise to communicate personally with correspondents, or otherwise than as an Edit...
-Literary Thefts
Our publisher calls our attention to an agricultural paper, which continually steals boldly and unblushingly from our pages; of course the Editor has noticed this also, but we try to soothe the pub...
-Charles M. Hovey
The Rural New Yorker of April 23, has a portrait and sketch of the life and services of Mr. C. M. Hovey. He was born at Cambridgeport, Mass., on the 26th of October, 1810. Quite early in life, he and ...
-Botanical Collectors
Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Lemmon are off among the Santa Catarina mountains of Arizona. In a recent letter to the Pacific Rural Press Mr. Lemmon says: We packed ourselves (wife and I) with blankets, provis...
-J. C. Sidney
Mr. Sidney was not only famous as an architect, but had considerable taste in landscape gardening;, and was well known in both these professions, not only in Philadelphia, but in many parts of the Uni...
-A Treatise On Pruning Forest Trees
By A. des Cars. Translated from the French by Prof. Charles S. Sargent. Boston: A. Williams & Co. Professor Sargent has done a very useful work in presenting to American readers this standard work....
-Second Report Of The United States Entomological Commission
By Messrs. Riley,Thomas and Packard. Published by the Department of the Interior. It is pleasant to note that the important work of getting to an exact knowledge of the devastating locusts and othe...
-July, 1881. Vol. XXIII. Number 271. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Our readers must remember that only recently has it been clearly demonstrated that a dead branch on a tree makes almost as great a strain on the main plant for moisture as does a living one. It is one...
-Communications. Aesculus Californica
No one traveling along the foothills of our mountain ranges in spring will fail to remark the bright green color of our common California buckeye, nor to note the light rose tint of its blossoms. One ...
-Bermuda Lawn Grass
In the May number of the Gardener's Monthly the question is asked if any one has tried close clipping of Bermuda grass. This grass will bear any amount of clipping. I have been acquainted with it in S...
-Hybridizing Pitcher Plants
Jacques, page 189, speaks of what English gardeners are doing in this way. The finest set of hybrid Nepenthes I ever saw was at Such's Nurseries, South Amboy, N. J., and some of these same hybrids a...
-The Edelweiss
It defies me to find the intrinsic beauty of this little plant, either as regards specimens of it grown on the Alps or in the garden. In beauty it does not begin to compare with the gentians, pinks an...
-Antennarias And Gnaphaliums
Miss Hunter is more sanguine in her hopes for improvement in the flowers than I am. But one of the prettiest features in artificial alpine gardening is produced with Antennarias. A mound, waved, unsha...
-Coleus Pharo
Your correspondents have a good deal to say about the new coleuses. Let me say a word for Pharo. I have twenty-four kinds of new coleuses which for want of room are wintered in three-inch pots. Some o...
-The Past Winter In England
The Rev. Henry L. Ellacombe, of Blitton, in a recent letter speaks of the past winter there: It has been a most destructive winter here. Many things never touched before have been injured now. I hav...
-Japan Maples
According to the Rural New Yorker, the Japan maples tested on the grounds of the editor have not proved hardy during the past winter. In the vicinity of Philadelphia the numerous varieties show so m...
-The Evergreen Cotoneasters
These just now look fresh and cheerful, while many of their associates are bare. Whether for planting in shrubberies, for covering sloping banks, or, in the case of the smaller kinds, for planting on ...
-Early Gardening In England
Fruit culture made considerable progress during the reign of Henry VIII., whose gardener, Mr. Harris, planted the first cherry orchards of Kent. Progress was again arrested for a short time by the Par...
-New Scarlet Bouvardia
As there are but few scarlet bouvardias, Dazzler, raised by Mr. Balchin, is likely to prove valuable to both market and private growers. I have seen it in the nursery of the raiser, and I saw the plan...
-An Ornamental Grass - Bromus Patulus Nanus
There are few things that have given more interest to the modern flower garden than the introduction of ornamental grasses. Most of the popular ones are tall. Here is a pretty dwarf one, introduced to...
-Lilium Parryi
To the New Plant and Bulb Company, Colchester, we are indebted for the first sight of the flowers of this new lily, of which we have heard so long. It is very distinct from any other kind in cultivati...
-Planting In City Squares
A New York correspondent says: The continuous close planting of trees on narrow city streets is objectionable, the best effects being produced by an occasional tree, a group, two set opposite, or a s...
-A Destructive Winter In St. Louis
A correspondent writes: Acer macrophyllum, killed to ground; Acer Colchicum, much damaged; Crataegus Pyracantha, many plants killed; Firs - Pectinata, Pichta, Nordmans, all much damaged or killed; Pi...
-Rosa Polyantha
A friend kindly says: Again I am in receipt of the grand old Gardener's Monthly, which is such a mine of botanical treasures that I do not see how any can do without it, even if they care nothing for...
-Greenhouse And House Gardening. Communications. Brassia Gireoudiana
C. T., inquires for hints on the culture of Brassia Gireoudiana and Caudata. Both are Costa Rican orchids and require pot culture with good drainage and a compost of sphagnum with a little peat interm...
-Greenhouses Of Daniel H. Brown, St. Louis, Mo
At the north end is a rockery planted with ferns and mosses; two large plants of Alsophilga Australis, the silver tree fern Cyathea de Albata, and that very rare fern Cyathea Smithii, Cibotium Menzeis...
-Lime Milk For Shade
In making a wash to shade greenhouses, slack good lime with water, using only water enough to make a paste, and thin the paste with skim milk, and it will last much longer than if reduced with water. ...
-Milk Shade For Glass
In reply to R. L. B., page 110, April No. Gardener's Monthly, would say we prefer to use skimmed milk, made of the proper consistency by stirring into it powdered whiting. If skimmed milk is not so ea...
-Fuchsias
Every spot around one's home ought to be beautified. No matter if it is a house built of logs or stone you call home, you cannot make it too beautiful. If yours is a little log cabin, cover it with vi...
-Stove Plant Houses
The experiment of building a house with double brick walls with a little light through double glass windows, has been so successful in Tower Grove Park, at St. Louis, that Mr. Shaw, the generous propr...
-Lilium Harrisii
The following is from the report of the New York Horticultural Society: W. K Harris, Darby Road, Philadelphia, presents a new lily (Lilium Harrisii), which draws especial notice for its alleged pecul...
-A Large Stag's Horn Fern
This, the Platy-cerium alcicorne, is a native of Australia. Among the fine representative plants brought by Mr. Charles Moore, of the Sydney Botanic Gardens, to our International Exhibition, one remar...
-Adulteration Of Pepper
At a recent meeting of the Delaware Co. Institute of Science, Colonel Willcox spoke of having been in a mill not many miles distant, where cocoanut shells were being ground in large quantities. He asc...
-Variegated Plants
Messrs. J. R. and A. Bather, Clinton, Iowa, send us a variegated Fuchsia and a Mock Orange, of which they say: The Syringa originated as a sport taken from a large bush we have near our house. We hav...
-Plant Culture
Seedling asks: - Is there any book on greenhouse plants that tells what to do, when to do, and how to do? If so, please give title, price, and state where it may be had. [Henderson's Handbook of P...
-New And Rare Plants. Aralia Elegantissima
A beautiful stove plant introduced by Messrs. Veitch of London from the South Sea Islands, with a straight, erect stem, furnished at short intervals with digitate leaves on long foot-stalks, mottled w...
-Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Communications. Pear Culture In New Hampshire
It has been but a few years since the people of our State learned that the finer varieties of our cultivated pears could be raised here successfully. Formerly the wild button pear was the only variety...
-Wild Coose Plums
How about the wild goose plums is often asked. All say the trees grow splendidly, but the fruit crop where is it? Oh, the plums are beautifnl, golden and red with a fine bloom. From what I have seen i...
-Rabbits Gnawing Trees
I have tried various experiments to prevent their depredations on nursery stock for several years past, and find petroleum, in which a small quantity of Paris green is mixed, is effectual. Petroleum, ...
-Seedling Apples
I have been much interested during the past year in studying a few seedling apples planted about the first of the century by Dominie Kirkland, then missionary to the Oneida Indians, and the founder of...
-No Peach Yellows In The South
The Farmers' Home Journal some months since copied an article written by Mr. Stackhouse, the horticultural editor of The Comet, published at Jackson, Miss., in which he controverted the statement made...
-The Unlucky Sparrows
Almost every daily paper we take up has a wail from some sparrow-haunted pen. This is what the editor of the Montreal Star has to say about the wail of his constituents: And at last the sparrows h...
-New Method Of Vine Culture
Under this title the Gardeners' Chronicle has the following paragraph: We take the following from an Anglo-Italian journal, which evidently accepts the statement in full confidence. What a pity ed...
-Plum Curculio
In the rambles of the writer over the United States he has failed to find any evidence that the wild plums are less liable to the attacks of curculio than other kinds. Trees will often be found with f...
-Potato Beetle
The Philadelphia Press says: Burlington's veteran gardener, Nathaniel Stow-ell, aged 92 years, has discovered and proved the efficiency of green (garden) sage leaves as a thorough preventative of the...
-Strawberries
At the meeting of the Davidson County (Tenn.) Horticultural Society at Nashville, May 21st, 150 gallons of strawberries were exhibited. As showing how strawberry growing stands in this part of the wor...
-Salt For Asparagus
The English journals are discussing the use of salt on asparagus, most of the discussors condemning its use. There would be no dispute if they understood why salt is sometimes beneficial, as we think ...
-The Season In Texas
Under date of May 6th, Mr. Onderdonk, of Mission Valley, writes: Our prospect for fruit was splendid, but on the night of April 13th, when peaches were nearly one-fourth grown, when our earliest plum...
-Forestry. Communications. Forestry Notes
At the close of the last College year, September 1st, I was unable to report the result of some experiments which were then incomplete. I now proceed, somewhat at random, to speak of experiments and w...
-North American Ginseng
Judging from an article that recently appeared in the Commercial Bulletin, of Boston, the North American ginseng root (Panax quinquefolium) is an important product, being still imported in large quant...
-Cedar Wood For Lead Pencils
In regard to Juniperus Virginiana, at a recent meeting of the Delaware County Institute, Col. Willcox de-i scribed the cedar industry of Florida. The de-mand for this wood by the pencil makers has bee...
-Natural History And Science. The Home Of The Torreya Taxifolia
(Continued from page 185.) Between Micanopy (Mick-an-o-py) and Gainesville, a broad, unbroken prairie-like tract, probably the bed of a former lake, and composed of soil of inky blackness and excee...
-Botanical Rambles In California
I have just returned from a trip with Dr. Parry to Aqua Caliente and vicinity. The Doctor is good company and knows everything. We made some good finds while there that I suppose he will let the world...
-Italian Botanists
Revue de V Horticulture Beige has an interesting paper on Italian Botanists, many of whose names are familiar to all. At Naples were the gardens of Sallust, who loved horticulture as well as botany. D...
-Bees In New Zealand
It is the misfortune of progress that many assumed facts are admitted on insufficient evidence, and speculations founded on them often come to naught. A good illustration of this is in the reputed rel...
-"Humble Bees
The two queens, the survivors of a shipment of eighteen consigned to Mrs. Bel-field, were turned out on Mr. Bristol's farm on Saturday morning They were strong and healthy, and flew away briskly again...
-Pig-Nuts
The daily papers are full of accounts of the wonderful properties of the pig-nut in fattening horses in Germany. And the horses like them. They chew them with a relish whenever they get hold of one....
-Botany And Gardening
In these days the study of botany enters so largely into polite education, that it has become an essential part of a gardening education, and it is found by experience that those nurserymen or seedsme...
-Lietzia Brasiliensis, Rgl. Et Sch
Gartenflora 1880 T. 1005. New tuberous-rooted Gesneriacea offered for the first time, being in habit and foliage similar the well known sorts of Gesneria, as for instance G. caracasana, but the form o...
-Editorial Knowledge Of Common Things
Last month we thought proper to refer to the unpardonable want of knowledge in the editorials of daily newspapers, wherein, of all the departments one might reasonably look for correct information. Th...
-Insect Catching Flowers
We have noted in past issues the singular power possessed by the flowers of Asclepias, Physianthus albens (the proper name for which, by the way, is Aranja albens), and other plants. Mr. Peter Henders...
-The Sea Gull And The Pelican
The gull it appears is the guller and not the gulled. Mr. Joseph Willcox of the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences has been studying the grey pelican of Florida. In the morning it gorges itself ...
-Blue Wood Anemones
The enclosed specimens were found by Mr. Edward Little in a copse about a mile from Tunbridge in Kent, growing in a patch by themselves amongst a a large number of those of the usual color. He failed ...
-Arizona Scenery
Mr. Lemmon in a letter to the Rural Press gives the following sketch: At the historic old adobe city of Yuma, on the other bank of the Colorado, we paused for only an hour. Not a green plant to be se...
-The English Sparrow
The Gardeners' Chronicle says: It is not in England alone that Mr. Fish's complaints of the sparrows (see Gardeners' Chronicle, July 10 p. 54) find an echo. Everywhere in Europe, and even in Algiers,...
-Easy English Names
Mary J------writes: I see the force of much that you say about English names, yet surely if a reform could be brought about, would not botany be easier than now with its hard Latin and Greek names...
-Verbena Rust
L. I., Brooklyn, N. Y. The Verbena rust is not a new trouble, though some years it is much more prevalent than others. This year and last it has almost disappeared. It is not an insect as you suppose ...
-Indian Cookers
W F.P., says: Since writing you the modern 'diet of worms,' I have learned the art and mystery of cooking them having just returned from a visit to the desert where I interviewed a respectable old sq...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Where Shall I Seek A Home?
Thousands who intend to push out for a new country and grow up with it are asking themselves, Where shall I go? By reference to the map of our country it will be seen that a belt some three hundred m...
-Notes And Queries No. 26
Want of forethought is emphatically exhibited by the new paper makers. When they found that paper could be made from the tulip-poplar tree they at once began to buy it up and cut it down wholesale. No...
-Ivy
There are few things that bear the heat of a room as well as ivy. In Germany there is a very pretty use made of it; thus, a box to fit the window-sill is prepared by a slight drainage, and filled with...
-Give Me A Notice
Time and again have we to tell our readers that no business matter of any Kind Can Appear In Our Reading Pages. We print it in capitals to avoid any mistake. Here is a good friend who professes to ...
-Chromo-Lithograph Advertising
We are glad to note the increasing use of chromo-lithography in advertising. Mr. Henderson, Mr. Dreer, Mr. Heinl, Mr. Pennock, Mr. A. Scott, and more recently Mr. Stone with the Pocklington grape have...
-Exotic And Indigenous Flowers
There seems to be a strange misconception about these terms. Last month we had to score a few bad. marks against our young pupil of the Press Now it is the Public Ledger, which says: Is it because...
-American Pomological Society
Our readers must not forget that the American Pomological Society will hold its meeting this year at Boston, on the 14th and 15th of September. Col. Wilder will preside. It may be the last occasion wh...
-Mr. Walter Hill
Mr. Hill, the Government botanist of Brisbane, Australia, having reached his sixtieth year, retires from the charge of the Botanic Garden, under the civil service rules of that part of the world. But ...
-August, 1881. Vol. XXIII. Number 272. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Passing through a street in Philadelphia, on which blocks of first-class houses had been erected on both sides, but evidently by two different owners, there appeared to be a wonderful difference in su...
-Communications. Vanilla Crass
I should like to call attention to the vanilla grass, as it is known but in few localities, having been modestly kept in the background too long for general good. The seed was gathered in a wild fi...
-A Golden Alternanthera
This, called Alternanthera paronychioides major aurea, is causing quite a sensation around Boston. Messrs. Sheppard, of Lowell, introduced it last fall from England, and their utmost exertions, so far...
-Raising Seeds
But seeds are funny things anyway. I sow Chinese Primroses, Cyclamens and Browallias and expect that every seed will germinate and grow up, cockscombs about half, mignonette the same, and so on. Somet...
-Lily Culture
It is now believed that the disease of the lily and gladiolus, by which they lose their leaves before they are mature, arises from the hot soil in which they are grown. There is but little doubt that ...
-Garden Gossip From South Carolina
May I take the liberty of asking if you have visited this State, and if so, if you have seen the Rev. Mr. Drayton's Azalea and Camellia garden on the Ashley River? If not, I can assure you it would be...
-Shade For The City Poor
Over a number of the pathways in Central Park arbors are thrown, the vine-covered roofs of which shade a group of seats and a bit of surface, yielding the pedestrian the opportunity of taking a double...
-Philadelphia City Squares
After a little while the citizen will be writing to his favorite paper about the dirt and filth of the city squares, and no doubt the City Commissioner will have all sorts of advice about employing be...
-Chrysanthemums In Japan
We do not know whether the Japanese have a national flower, as England has the rose, Scotland its thistle, or Ireland the shamrock, but the regard which they seem to give the Chrysanthemum approaches ...
-Flower Culture On Canadian Farms
The Toronto Globe says: The taste for flowers is decidedly on the increase, particularly among people living in the country. The genuine Ontario farmer, of the school which is now passing away, is a ...
-The Cypress Groves Of The City Of Mexico
The following interesting sketch of the famous trees of Taxodium distichum, is from the pen of Moses Thatcher, in the Contributor of Salt Lake City: For quiet repose and peaceful meditation, the cypr...
-Ridley Park
An English gentleman spending a few weeks near Philadelphia, recently, expressed himself particularly pleased with the suburban gardening, which he said reminded him more of England than anything he h...
-New And Rare Plants. The Weeping Dogwood
Our readers may remember that a few years ago Dr. Thompson, of Maryland, advertised for sale the original plant of a weeping dogwood, found by him in that State. The plant was purchased by one of our ...
-Saxifraga Sarmentosa
Mrs. J. P., Lynn, Mass., writes: Is Saxifraga sarmentosa usually hardy in New England? I have had it come up in my wild garden, among the ferns and wild flowers, for two seasons. The bed is somewhat ...
-A Beautiful Seedling Rose
Mr. H. B. Ell-wanger, Rochester, N. Y., writes: By this mail I send a bloom of a seedling rose, which I think will afford convincing proof, were any needed, that we can produce just as fine roses in ...
-Rose Jaune Deprez
Mrs. A. T. M'C, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., writes: It may not be exactly in order to trouble you with so small a matter, but I have tried in many other ways to find a favorite old rose that I fear is no long...
-Porphyrocoma Lanceolata
The lance-leaved Porphyrocoma, Porphyro-coma lanceolata is an old hothouse plant of rare beauty, belonging to the natural order Acanthaceae. It is a plant of very easy culture, and is to be found only...
-Abutilon "Firefly."
This novelty of the present year comes to me from England, from the Home of Flowers, at Swanley, with the compliments of H. Cannell & Son. Mr. Cannell says of it in his Floral Guide: Firefly (Swa...
-Parentage
Mr. George states that he sometime since flowered a small red variety, which had a very lively shade of color, and determining to make this a seed parent, it occurred to him to use it on the pollen of...
-The Cape Jasmine
In the Gardener's Monthly for April, 1881, page 110, Miss M. W. asks for information concerning the Cape Jasmine. In reply I would say that it is a native of China, from whence it was introduced in...
-Centaurea Gymnocarpa
I have noticed in the Monthly inquiries about the dying out of the Centaurea gymnocarpa. I believe the principal cause of the Centaurea dying in the summer is its being planted out when it is too much...
-Ornithocalum Aureum, Or Golden Star Of Bethlehem
It may be interesting to some of the readers of the Gardener's Monthly to hear of a plant, which although frequently found in greenhouses on the other side of the water, is rarely met with in this cou...
-Epidendrum Vitellinum Majus
Having read with interest the article on Epidendrums in your May number, page 139, I could not help writing a few lines on the above, which, I think, is a most charming orchid and of easy culture, pro...
-How To Make Wax Flowers
Wax flowers make a pretty substitute for natural flowers. They may be made with such skill as closely to resemble the natural plant in everything save perfume, and the manufacture of them affords an o...
-New And Rare Plants. Bomarea Carderi
Lilies and Amaryllids have much in common. One of the chief distinctions is that the lilies have the fruit superior, the amaryllids fruit inferior. By this we mean that the petals and sepals, in these...
-Variegated Fuchsias
H. J. Purdy & Co., Seneca Falls, N. Y., write: We also have several plants of a variegated fuchsia raised by us from a sport from Arabella Improved. The leaves retain their color now to the third gen...
-Bulbs On The Stems Of Lilium Candidum
Mrs. M. P., Lynn, Mass., says: Amongst a lot of Lilium candidum I had in the greenhouse this last winter, one plant when of proper size to be crowned with flowers, as all well behaved lilies should b...
-August, 1881. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Some years ago there was much enthusiasm in our country over cold graperies, by which the European grape could be grown under glass; for it is almost superfluous to say no long-continued success has e...
-Strawberry Propagation
At the meeting of the Germantown Horticultural Society on May 9th, I was very much interested in the various remarks made by the speakers present relating their experiences and methods of the propagat...
-Insects Injurious To Nursery Stock And Best Methods Of Destroying Them
It is of first importance to know the nature and habits of insects that trouble you, when to expect them, when and where their eggs are laid, and whether they are most readily destroyed in the egg, la...
-General Remedies
Paris green and London purple are the most effective where a strong poison can be applied. They are not soluble or only a small per cent., hence to use them with water it must be continually stirred. ...
-Five Of The New Strawberries
The extra strawberry season of 1881 in the Hudson River Valley may now be said to be closed, and I note for the pages of the Monthly a few particulars in regard to new strawberries which are not yet g...
-The Kieffer Pear
Some remark has been made as to the unqualified praise we gave this fruit recently. But nothing was further from our intention than that our praise should be regarded as unqualified. On the contr...
-The Manchester Strawberry
A large party of experienced fruit-growers visited this variety on its native grounds when it was in its prime. It is a chance seedling. It is represented as of a brilliant scarlet color, oblate conic...
-Temperature Of A Cold Grapery
W. H. W., Maiden, Mass., says: - Will you please tell me, either by mail or through the Gardener's Monthly, at about what temperature a cold grapery should be kept? [A cold grapery, as generally ...
-Growth Of A Cherry Tree In Western Nevada
In our last year's volume we noted the receipt of some fine apples from Nevada. As showing that other fruits will also do well in this new State, we give the following interesting note from a lady res...
-Earliness Of The Waterloo Peach
C. W. W., Wilson, N. C, says, under date of July 1st: - I have just picked my first specimen of the famous Waterloo peach, raised from buds bought of Ell-wanger & Barry, in the summer of 1879. It is ...
-Lettuce, Black-Seeded Simpson
W. C, Bel-videre, N. J., writes: - I have sent you today, by express, a head of lettuce - Black seeded Simpson. Will you kindly express your opin-ion in your valuable Gardener's Monthly; that is if y...
-The Eucalyptus As A Forest Tree
It is supposed that the urgency to plant forests of a tree that will not stand a degree of frost, could only come from American daily papers. It was supposed that at least in England, where gardening ...
-Oiling Floors
The Art Interchange instructs its readers how to color a pine floor which is to be partially covered with rugs, a fashion which prevails to a great extent just now. Obtain at any house painter's store...
-Ox The Uses Of Hornbeam Wood
Notwithstanding that the wood of the Hornbeam is remarkable for its close grain, even texture and consequent strength, it is seldom used for structural purposes. To a certain extent this is attributab...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Darnel
There seems to be a difference of opinion as as to whether the term Darnel is synonymous with rye grass and applied to all the species of Lolium, or whether it should be confined to L. temulentum. Bot...
-The Betel Tree
Of all the graceful palms of the tropics, the Betel or Areca Palm of Linnaeus probably holds the first place, both because of its beauty and the value of its fruit. This tree attains its greatest perf...
-Annual Aerial Roots
Let us take a glance at what is termed annual aerial rootlets, and investigate the theory, and see if they are only annual and aerial. Not a few may consider it a piece of vanity in hesitating to beli...
-Petrified Forests
In 1871, when the writer of this spent some weeks in the Rocky Mountains, the petrified remains of a forest of redwood, oak, and other trees, petrified, thrown up from a lower level by volcanic action...
-Insects In Clematis
The roots of many clematises are knotted, like as appear the roots of the grape vine when attacked by Phylloxera. The plants so attacked dwindle away in a year or two Professor Riley decides it not to...
-The Yucca Moth
Much interest is still felt by keen observers of nature in the Yucca moth. It seems to be a certainty that except in a very few instances the common Yucca filamentosa bears no seed except when the Pro...
-Gordonia Pubescens
We believe this plant has never been found since its original discovery by William Bartram. All the plants known are only those under culture. We found on a recent visit to the Bartram Gardens that th...
-Disease In The House-Fly
In the fall of the year it is not uncommon to see a fly, dead, and attached to a pane of window glass by a small, webby fungus, which has grown from the fly. This form of fungus is similar to that whi...
-History Of The Bean
The common bean, Faba vulgaris, is vaguely believed, like the pea, to be a native of Egypt, perhaps because received from that country by the ancient Greeks, in whose authors there is a mention of it....
-The Dunn Oak
A new oak is described by Dr. A. Kellogg, as follows: The Dunn oak (Quercus Dunii). - From Lower California, presented by Mr. G. W. Dunn. This is a small tree, or commonly a clustered shrub, rarely e...
-Names And Synonyms Of Plants
Charles Crucknell says: Is not the nomenclature of the palms somewhat confused? Your correspondent says Pritchardia Gaudichaudii is quite a common palm under the name of P. pacifica. Why is it grown ...
-Hybridizing
H. M. N., Chattanooga, Tenn., writes: - Is there any such plant as a double fragrant pansy? If there is, where can it be procured? And how are special kinds of pansies most rapidly increased? Also, c...
-Plant Variations
Our correspondent, E. P. P., of Clinton, is very fortunate in his successes in getting variegations and queer teratalogical specimens. In a recent letter he says: Once more my two Rostiezer pear t...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Notes And Queries No. 27
The Telegraph Plant is the Desmodium gyrans, whose leaves move like pump-handles. It is noticed by Darwin thus: No one supposes that the rapid movements of the lateral leaflets are of any use to th...
-Too True Not To Be Mentioned
Sam, you are not honest. Why do you put all the good peaches on the top of the measure, and the little ones below? Same reason, sah, dat makes de front of your house marble and back gate chiefly sl...
-Editorial Letter. Philadelphia To Wil-Liamsport
In the decoration of our gardens, we may often find abundant material close at hand. When in Europe, a few years ago, I found the Heracleum lanatum, one of the most conspicuous ornaments in Battersea ...
-Our Correspondents
We hear frequent commendations of the Gardener's Monthly, but we always feel that as much is due to the zeal and generous kindness of our correspondents as to any superior editorial management. As sho...
-Fine Writing
Many of our correspondents send us excellent common sense papers, but regret that they cannot write in a style they think desirable for the public eye. But the language of the school-room is not alway...
-Legend Of The Marigold
The Gardener's Chronicle has some very interesting sketches of popular flowers, telling the story of the tales told about them. Of the Marigold it says: The garden Marigold, another gaudy summer flow...
-Improved Modern Traveling
Moses Thatcher, an intelligent gentleman of Salt Lake City, believes that at the confusion of tongues which followed the building of the Tower of Babel, some descendants of Noah built boats and starte...
-Geographical
The advertisement of a leading English firm tells us that it was raised by Nantz & Neuner, of Louisville, New York! In a little piece of ground like England, where you may land at one edge in the mo...
-Nursery Catalogues
These are getting now so voluminous that no one has time to read them. Only those which present some special features make their profitable way through the community. It is interesting to note how tho...
-Dr. Maxwell T. Masters
The name of this gentleman is familiar to most of our readers as the editor of the London Gardener's Chronicle, to which he succeeded on Dr. Lindley's death. He is also known to others as one of the ...
-Miss M. Evelyn Hunter
We are sure our readers will be sorry to learn of the death of this young lady, whose interesting sketches of Virginia wild flowers in our magazine during the past few years, gave promise of great fut...
-Hand-Book Of Practical Landscape Gardening
By F. R. Elliott. D. M. Dewey, publisher, Rochester, N. Y. When one travels through the country and notes how poorly some farms and rural residences are in all their surroundings, which, with a very s...
-Select Extra-Tropical Plants, Suited To The Industries Of Australia
By Baron Ferd. Von Mueller. Published by the Colonial Government. This is a new edition of a very valuable work which the Government of New South Wales has encouraged under the intelligent supervision...
-The Nurserymen's Meeting At Dayton
The writer once heard a bank officer say, I am surprised at the extent of this business; I thought it was but a tup-penny sort of a thing, and wondered where the profits could come out of a few five-...
-Colorado State Horticultural Society
We noted recently the rapid rate at which Denver has sprung into the ranks of horticulture. It has now a State Horticultural Society, the first meeting being held in June, at Denver. Strawberries, goo...
-September, 1881. Vol. XXIII. Number 273. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
When we come to practical culture there is much that must be repeated, but yet there are many things brought out in our contributors' columns that become confirmed as good doctrine, and we are able fr...
-Communications. Rose Notes
The readers of the Monthly will most likely see reports of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society's June exhibition before these Notes, are laid before them. But such a magnificent display as was t...
-Some Ornamental Shrubbery
Salisburia has not taken its proper place in decorative art. Mr. Parsons in Harpers' gave a first appeal to its value as a vine - more properly as a plant, to cover a house, in most respects superior ...
-Evergreen Hedges
The American arborvita? is most planted here, but I think is not the best in all respects The Siberian is more hardy, requires less trimming, is of a finer shade of green, and the plants are not much ...
-September, 1881. Rarer Ornamental Trees And Ornamental Gardening
(Prize Essay for Massachusetts Horticultural Society.) To explain the meaning and fair application of such words as promising, new and hardy, and to suggest a tasteful and effective arrangement of ...
-Hardiness Of Vegetation
Notes on the comparative hardiness of plants are always valuable. When any one thing has been found to endure every variety of unlucky experiences, it is so much in its favor. But it must not be forgo...
-Duplication Of Names
Nurserymen in England are not, as a general thing, as careful as they might be in getting the correct name of a plant before it is distributed, and hence we have often the annoyance of buying the same...
-Ampelopsis Veitchi
This is one of the most valuable of all the climbers introduced during late years. It clings to the wall as ivy does, and will resist the coldest weather just as the common Virginian creeper does. It ...
-Lilies As Food
The roots of our native lilies were articles of food with the Indians. According to a note of Mr. Van Volxem to the Gardener's Chronicle concerning Lilium auratum, it seems they are eaten also in Japa...
-Lilium Longiflorum Floribundum
Under this name Messrs. Kift & Sons, of West Chester, introduce a lily of which the enclosed is a representation. The flowers and foliage indicate that it has a close relationship to the form of L. lo...
-A Fine English Garden
Mr. W. T. Harding writes: During my horticultural rambles I have seen some excellent examples of 'Nature's art.' Amongst them M. T. Bass, Esq., the noted brewer of Burton, has probably one of the mo...
-September, 1881. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Those who have no greenhouse, and yet are desirous of preserving many half hardy plants through the winter, employ cold pits. Choose the driest situation in the garden, and sink about five feet in dep...
-Communications. Rhynchospermum Jasminoides
In the Gardener's Monthly for April, 1881, page 110, Miss M. W. inquires if the Rhynchos-permum jasminoides can be successfully grown as a house plant? To this query I regret to have to answer No. ...
-Mildew
Of the many different species of parasites classified under the misapplied name of mildew, it is purposed to speak of only one - the Sphaerotheca pannosa, or rose-blight; that variety found mostly on ...
-Amaryllis Speciosa
An inquirer asks about the treatment of Amaryllis speciosa. This Amaryllis, if rightly named (and so many are not), is a fall or winter-blooming variety - those which bloom in summer, fall, and freque...
-The Whildin Flower-Pot
Everybody knows that the hole at the bottom of a flower-pot is to let the water out. Plants need watery air, - but water is only for aquatics. But in ordinary flower-pots, after the hole is made, the ...
-Shading For Houses
Properly-constructed and serviceable blinds are expensive, and exterior contrivances of this kind are of little value unless they can be secured from damage from wind, etc. The old practice of whitewa...
-September, 1881. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Among the higher mountains of northeast Pennsylvania this season the writer noticed plums hanging from the trees in immense profusion. Inquiring if this was always the case, it appeared not; that if...
-Communications. Name And Origin Of The Bidwell Strawberry
On page 240, of the current volume of the Monthly, the editor supposes that the name should be spelled Bidwill. In this he is certainly in error. Since this fruit has come to attract so much not...
-An Apple Tree On A Plum Stock
An intelligent and well-known contributor to the London Journal of Horticulture, Mr. G. Abbey, has examined a supposed successful case and seems to believe that it has been done. He can see where the ...
-American Apples In London
The Gardener's Magazine says: - American apples are now being landed at Liverpool in large quantities. In the fortnight ending October 23, no less than 100,000 barrels were received, and the market is...
-Dishonest Agents
A lady from a Western City Writes: This Spring A Mr --------, agent of the --------- Nurseries, was in our neighborhood soliciting orders for fruit trees, for which he asked prices very much above w...
-Palm Oil Soap
Mr. Ed. S. Morris places on our table some samples of palm oil soap, made, as we understand, in Philadelphia, from the crude oil of Elaeis guineensis, sent from the Colony of Liberia. We placed the so...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Will Red Clover Not Visited By Bees Produce Seeds?
For three years some experiments have been made to test this question. Three years ago some young heads of red clover were tied up in cloth sacks before any flowers had opened. A similar number of the...
-Cordonia Pubescens
In your notice of Gordonia pubescens in August number, is this paragraph: We believe this plant has never been found since its original discovery by Wm. Bar tram. The tree was first discovered a...
-A French View Of English Names For Plants
The following interesting view was contributed by Mr. Sisley to the London Garden. Although I have pleaded several years ago in the French horticultural papers against vulgar names for plants, I ha...
-The Snow Plant Of The Sierra Nevada Sarcodes Sanguinea
This pretty scarlet-flowered root parasite is called Snow Plant, because it was once thought that it bloomed only amidst ice and snow. This is now known to be fallacious. Snow-slides sometimes occur, ...
-Common Names
As already noted, the chief objection to common names comes from the fact that there is no recognized authority in naming them. Anybody may give the name he chooses, and scores of people do so choose ...
-Flowers Poisoning Bees
One season the writer of this noted innumerable humble-bees, dead under the flowers of a Wistaria, and concluded they had been poisoned by the flowers of this plant; but the next and succeeding years ...
-Indian Pitcher Plants
Our Sarracenias are objects of intelligent wonder with Europeans; but India and Australia have similar curiosities, one of which is represented here. This is a Nepenthes, of which there are numerous s...
-Translations
People worry themselves sick over translations from the Greek, Latin or He brew, without stopping to reflect that it is next to impossible to render the correct meaning from one modern language to ano...
-Bees And Cloyer-Seed
In 1875 the editor of this magazine read a paper before the meeting of the American Association at Detroit, in which he stated, Mr. Darwin says he protected some from bees, and they bore no seeds; so...
-Maples In Arizona
Writing to the Arizona Journal, Mr. J. G. Lemmon says: - But one botanical explorer has before reported maple trees from within the limits of Arizona; yet a fine grove of sugar maple, which may be d...
-Pinus Arizonica
Of this Mr. Lemmon, who has recently been exploring in Arizona, says: Among the remarkable varieties there is time to mention only one pine. In 1S75 Dr. Roth-rock, of the Wheeler survey, discover...
-Pinus Reflexa
Mr. Lemmon in a note to the Arizona Journal says: This large and valuable pine tree, until lately was considered a variety of a certain white pine found on the Sierra Madre mountains, Mexico, but of ...
-Gardening
Of all the manual employments gardening is surely the most attractive. Take the cotton mill worker and compare his intellect with the gardener, to whom is ever recurring delights in observing and admi...
-Australian Wool
In 1788 there were twenty-nine sheep in Australia, as against sixty-two millions at the present time. This is progress indeed. Teasel, Dipsacus fullonum is a biennial plant of the south of Europe, ...
-The Grape Enemy
To show the anxiety felt abroad to keep the phylloxera at a distance, a lady writes that crossing the border from Men-tone, their party returned with a magnificent bouquet and were relieved of it by t...
-Horticulture In America
Prof. Chas. Joly, in the volume of the Journal de la Societe Nation-ale d'Horticulture, pays a liberal compliment to the progress of horticulture in America. He has seen the addresses of 8,000 nursery...
-Dyer's Nursery, Near Providence, R. I
This famous nursery was founded in 1824, and during the past seventy years has furnished most of the beautiful trees that abound in that section. Not far from the entrance, in front of the Dyer mansio...
-Linden's Catalogue
Mr. J. Linden has published for the use of Americans an edition of his catalogue in the English language. As an illustration of the difficulties surrounding the translation of one language to another ...
-Tenth Annual Report Of The Secretary Of The State Horticultural Society Of Michigan
By Charles W. Garfield, Secretary. This is a magnificent work of 619 pages. To say the least, few State reports come to our table equal to this in value. A good idea is the Secretary's Portfolio....
-Kansas State Board Of Agriculture; Second Biennial Report
From J. K. Hudson. Secretary. A few years ago the writer of this was sitting in a leading hotel in a far Southern State discussing with representative Southern gentlemen what could best be done to mak...
-Ontario Agricultural Commission
Report on Manitoulin Island, by William Saunders, of London, Ontario. There is no reason why the western portion of British America should not be as prosperous as our own Minnesota and contiguous terr...
-Mr. Charles Downing
This truly veteran Pomologist passed into his eightieth year on the 10th of July. He is still able to walk a mile or so at a time, and that he may yet be spared to walk his mile some years longer with...
-Professor Beal
A correspondent from Cambridge, Mass., writes: The article on 'Forestry Notes' in the July number, page 212, of the Gardener's Monthty, by Prof. Beal, is very interesting and valuable; but if the se...
-Prof. L. M. Underwood
A Philadelphia bookseller writes: The notice which you gave of Underwood's ferns brought me an order for a copy, and I sent to the author, who is also his own publisher, for his bookseller's prices....
-Atlantic City
During a recent, visit to this famous seaside resort, we were much interested in the progress gardening is making there. When the city was first started, people regretted that trees would not grow, an...
-Abiel Chandler
It is our misfortune at times not to hear of the death of friends till some time after. Abiel Chandler, who died at Concord, New Hampshire, on the 22d of April, in his seventy-fourth year, was one of ...
-B. S. Fox
Pomologists, especially those interested in pear culture, will learn with regret of the decease of this excellent man. He was one of the earliest to engage in the nursery business in California, and h...
-Major-General Robert Patterson
This gentleman, whose reputation is as national as it is local, died recently in Philadelphia, in his ninetieth year. He continued strong and active, and attended regularly to business up to a day or ...
-Proceedings Of The California Academy Of Sciences, June 5th, 1881
Prof. Davidson, San Francisco, President. By this issue it will be a pleasure to those who know of the good work of this society in the past, to know that at length it is nearly out of debt, and the p...
-Epitome Of Gardening
By Mr. Thos. Moore, with an introduction by Dr. M. T. Masters, Edinburg. Published by Adam and Charles Black. This epitome of gardening was written as a treatise on horticulture for the pages of th...
-Catalogue Of The Phaenogamous And Vascular Plants Of Michigan
By Chas. F. Wheeler and Erwin F. Smith. Published by the authors at Hubbardston, Mich. Price, 50 cents. This interesting catalogue, prepared for the Pomological Society's report, has been issued se...
-Manual Of Conifers
By James Veitch & Sons. Published by the authors, Exotic Nurseries, Chelsea, London, England. This is a general review of the whole order of Coniferae, with a synopsis of the hardy kinds cultivated in...
-Marine Algae Of New England And Adjacent Coast
By W. J. Farlow, M. D., from the U. S. Fish Commissioners' Report for 1879. This work by Dr. Farlow describes all the known sea weeds of that portion of the United States which runs from Eastport, ...
-Fruits And Fruit Trees Of America
By Charles Downing. Third appendix to the second revised edition. Mr. Charles Downing's edition is an essential to every intelligent Pomologist, and will long remain a memento of the talents and indus...
-Railroad Journeyings
Central Railroad of New Jersey. Tourists' Guide. The railroads have in a great measure taken the places of country seats. Instead of a home in the country in which one can retire from the heats of ...
-Talks About Flowers
By Mrs. M. D. Wellcome, Yarmouth, Maine. There are some three dozen of these little talks in separate chapters, and about such little matters as lady gardeners especially like to have such little chat...
-September, 1881. Horticultural Societies. Editorial Notes
Mississippi Valley Horticultural Society, of which Mr. Parker Earle is President, says: The next annual meeting of the Mississippi Valley Horticultural Society will be held in Cincinnati, Ohio, on th...
-October, 1881. Vol. XXIII. Number 274. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
It is very much to be regretted that landscape gardening as an art, is not more generally understood, as some attention to what it teaches would increase many-fold the pleasures of gardening. It would...
-Communications. Rarer Ornamental Trees And Ornamental Gardening
(Prize Essay for Massachusetts Horticultural Society.) (Continued from page 261.) Let us look at a few of the varieties that may strike us as specially noteworthy. First, and perhaps most popula...
-Bermuda Crass
This grass will not keep green during the winter in places subject to frost, especially if the surface of the ground be slightly frozen. Nor can it be successfully cultivated where the ground freezes ...
-Ellerslie
If any one wishes to see what art combined with nature can produce, he has only to take a short excursion to the park of the late Hon. William Kelly, near Rhinecliff, and enjoy himself to the fullest...
-Nymphaea Tuberosa
The writer had for the first time the opportunity of examining this water lily, during a hasty call at the home of Dr. Warder at North Bend, Ohio, and was pleased to find it much more distinct from ot...
-Fuchsias As Bedding Plants
People generally regard these as poor bedding plants, and they usually are. They are nice during the spring time, then red spicier comes and the end is near for the season. Near Lexington, in Kentucky...
-Eucryphia Pinnatifolia
A remarkably distinct and handsome shrub, introduced by us from Southern Chili. It grows from eight to ten feet high in its native country, and is furnished with smooth glossy green pinnate foliage, w...
-Juncus Zebrinus
This striking novelty is thus described in The Garden, vol. xxi., p. 336, where a wood-cut of the plant is given: - The zebra-striped rush is apparently a form of our native species. Like the zebra ...
-Magnolia Soulangeana Nigra
This is a fine introduction, belonging to the M. conspicua section, and perfectly hardy. The flowers are very like those of the hybrid, M. Soulangeana, but easiby distinguished from them by the rich p...
-Magnolia Stellata
An exceedingly beautiful and very interesting addition to our hardy flowering shrubs. It is a small tree or shrub with deciduous foliage, the leaves being variable in size, from two to five inches lon...
-Chrysanthemums
My neighbor, Dr. Wolcott, grows lots of chrysanthemums, and this year for comparison's sake, grew some in pots and others planted out, but otherwise alongside of one another, and with equal care. The ...
-The Boston Public Ground
J. B., Frederic-ton, X. B., writes: You say, p. 253, 'never mind the fine writing; tell us what you know in the fewest and plainest words you can think of. It will all the better suit us and most ...
-October, 1881. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
In many places arrangements are now made for growing plants for cut flowers. There are benches for holding the plants which are grown in the earth, and not in pots. In some instances plants are grown ...
-Communications. A Visit To John Saul's Nursery
Finding that I would have to stay in Washington on a hot night in August, I gladly accepted an invitation from my friend, Mr. John Saul to drive out to his nursery and stay over night with him, where ...
-Epidendrum Bicornutum
This is a remarkably handsome orchid, growing fifteen to eighteen inches in height. It is rather a difficult plant to grow, and I believe by all considered a miffy character, although with me it thriv...
-Chorozema, Their Treatment, & C
These are some of the most beautiful and interesting plants of the New Holland genera, and most of the species are well worth cultivating. The following account of the method of growing and flowering ...
-Large Night Blooming Cereus
At the Soldiers' Home at Dayton, Ohio, last June, the writer saw some immense specimens of Cereus grandiflorus in tubs; they were perhaps ten feet high and four feet thick, for we are writing from mem...
-Greenhouses Of Col. Durrett, Louisville' Ky
The following interesting sketch is from the Louisville Courier Journal. The lovely place of Col. R. T. Durrett, at the corner of Brook and Chestnut streets, is just now the object of pilgrimage t...
-A New Begonia
One of the most interesting and certainly one of the most beautiful of the plants collected during the present year by Dr. I. B. Balfour, in the Island of Socotra, is a remarkably pretty species of Be...
-Dracaena Goldieana
When in Europe, a few years ago, the Editor was admitted to a private view of some novelties just received by Mr. Bull, among which was the Dracaena Goldieana, which Mr. B. regarded as one of the rich...
-October, 1881. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Of the many new points brought out by the Gardener's Monthly, through its excellent contributors at different times, few have been of more practical value than that trees may live through heavy trials...
-Communications. Bassett's Fruit Ladder
The accompanying figure represents a fruit ladder which I think about as convenient as any I have seen. The figure shows for itself and the ladder may be made of dimensions required and of any materia...
-A New Early Peach, Fredenburch
William H. Fredenburgh, of Kingston, N. Y., has brought to me several specimens of a seedling peach, the pit of which was planted by his wife five years since on the north side of the house, with a no...
-Kieffer's Hybrid Pear
I think the position of some of the friends of this pear, on the question of its being blight-proof, is misunderstood. Because it has not blighted on Mr. Kieffer's grounds, certainly is no evidence th...
-Raspberries In Variety
Planting, as thousands of us do, and as many more thousands should do, simply for home use, a rod or two in the garden, our aim should be, I think, to reduce the number of varieties from year to year,...
-Keeping Apples
I was quite interested in Mr. E. P. Powell's article in your March number, on How to Save your Apples. It is a matter in which I am deeply interested, and which I have been writing about. With your ...
-Grape Vines In Georgia
In Milton County, Georgia, I recently visited a grape vine of unusual size. It was thirty two inches in circumference; one foot from the ground the bark and sap-wood sound and healthy, but the heart f...
-Peaches In The West
Though peaches were so general a failure this year, there were occasional spots where some were found. A few trees on the grounds of the editor in German-town had a fair crop. At Dr. Warder's at North...
-Plum Culture In California
A correspondent of the Petaluma Courier says: - The best kinds for pitting are the Columbia, Gross Prune and Washington; for prunes, the Petite Prune d'Agen, and the Yellow Egg for canning. Almost an...
-Day Lily Fodder
The Prickley Comfrey may have a competitor. Says a correspondent of the Dublin Record: Mr. Elles, of Longleat grew the Day Lily for cattle in 1826, and in the same year the rough comfrey (Symphytum a...
-Mushrooms
The Irish Gardener's Record says: The first thing to do in the way of pre paring materials for growing mushrooms is to obtain a quantity of fresh horsedung that has not been heated. This latter condi...
-Raw Tomatoes
The following funny piece - funny from an American point of view - is from the London Gardener's Chronicle. That the tomato is truly a first class hepatic renovator is now so well known here that no o...
-Berckman's Grape
At a recent meeting of the Germantown Horticultural Society, some bunches fruited in the vicinity of Philadelphia were exhibited, and the exhibitor confirms the following from Mr. Berckman's pen, as f...
-Fay's Prolific Currant
This new variety makes a pretty colored lithograph, as we note by one before us. The whole branch is given, and this renders it difficult to judge of the exact merits of the variety, as examined bunch...
-Hames Apple
Mr. Coles, of Atlanta, one of our most careful pomologists, believes that notwithstanding the great number of varieties now known, this one will be a valuable addition to the list for Southern plantin...
-A Good Plum Stock
T. V. Munson, Denison, Texas, writes: I send you by mail to day, samples of fruit (green ripens in October), and leaves of a Plum, which grows wild here in various soils, usually in heavy limestone ...
-Forestry. Communications. Catalpa As A Timber Tree
There is in nature no quality more decided than the manner in which she adapts vegetation to the various conditions of climatic change. When by transplanting a tree we bring to bear upon it difference...
-Forestry In Connecticut
Connecticut gives to every person who will plant and care for trees along any highway an annual bounty for each quarter of a mile so planted. The trees are to be elm, maple, tulip, ash, basswood, blac...
-Timber Of Cupressus Lawsoniana
Among the valuable works of Professor Sargent in his recent investigations in American Forestry, the London Gardener's Chronicle says: From an economic point of view perhaps the most striking and imp...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Poison From Kalmia Latifolia
In the August number, page 248, under the head of Kalmia latifolia poisonous, you ask for conclusive proof on the subject. In the course of conversation with a friend in Alabama (who, by the way,...
-Ipomcea Grandiflora
Your correspondent makes a good point against the Botanists. In the confusion with synonyms among the forty odd genera and over six hundred species, with numberless varieties, included under convolvul...
-Kalmia Latifolia Poisonous
I have never seen a case of poisoning from Kalmia latifolia; but when I lived in Massachusetts, sheep were occasionally killed by eating the leaves when late snow storms covered up the grass after the...
-Notes From South Carolina
Unavoidably detained at the South during these terribly warm months (June and July) I have taken refuge at a little village on Charleston Harbor, S. C, very primitive, very untidy and sadly needing wh...
-Talinum Teretifolium
Mr.Thomas Meehan, before the Academy of Natural Sciences, remarked that the point he made recently in regard to Drabaverna, that mere light alone evidently failed to account for the special opening ti...
-Cats And Catmint
We never knew that it was doubted that cats had a peculiar affection at times for catmint, until we accidentally came across the following a few days ago, in Dr. Darlington's Flora Cestrica. De Th...
-Bug-Nut
Just as we expected the effort made by well meaning persons to replace the hard names of Botany by easy English names, has opened the sluice, and plants which have already any number of names, are get...
-Drought In Texas
Mrs. S. E. B. of Houston, Texas, August, 25th, says: We have had excessive drought which injured all our fruit crops, Peaches, Grapes, Strawberries. Strawberry plants are almost extinct. The temperatu...
-Sugar Maple
H. G. S. asks: Can you tell the readers of the Monthly, where in the earth the maple tree gets the sugar from, and why this tree should be the only one to possess this power. I have often asked th...
-Fruiting Of Yucca Angustifolia
Mr. D. S. Grimes writes: Enclosed you will find a few seeds of the Yucca angustifolia not yet ripe, but furnishing proof that this Yucca does bear seed, which has been doubted by some of your corresp...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Motes And Queries No. 29
W. W. asks for a list of medium sized ornamental trees, and if possible that some of them should produce something. The question is interesting and demands a considerate reply, because nothing is m...
-Soldiers' Gardens
Good example, fortunately, as well as bad, is contagious. Government gardens devoted to vegetables and flowers will assuredly demonstrate the capabilities of soils and climates before the eyes of sett...
-Botanical Rambles
It appears that the interesting sketch and botanical rambles from San Barnardino, were intented only for the delectation of the editor, and this will explain how some friends received so enthusias...
-Biological Lecture At Montreal
The following paragraph is from the report of the meeting of the American Association as given in the Cincinnati Commercial: President George J. Brush called the meeting to order and announced tha...
-New English Names
Honest old Parkinson, who wrote on Gardening in the time of Queen Elizabeth, had a suspicion against those who were continually introducing new English names. He says: Some have called the yellow Lu...
-Our Agricultural Colleges
An address by Professor W. J. Beal. Among the many useful labors of Professor Beal, this is by no means the least. One may be at no difficulty in reaching the conclusion after reading this pamphlet, t...
-Prof. C. V. Riley And The Yucca Moth
At the Boston meeting of the American Association, Mr. Riley read a paper, which was ordered by the committee to be published in its proceedings. The volume has just been issued, and besides the paper...
-The A. B. C. Of The Railroad Question
From L. E. Chittenden, N. Y. There are few classes in the community more interested in good honest treatment from railroad corporations that the horticultural. At present they are in a general way tre...
-A Manual Of The Cultivated Grasses Of The South
By C. W. Howard, Dilton, Georgia. Just now Grasses for the South is an important topic, and anything in relation thereto is interesting. At the outset we must remember that the needs of the So...
-Scraps And Queries. Pyrethrum Cinerariaefolium
A correspondent from San Barnardino says: You advertise a Pyrethrum cinerariaefolium for a firm in Stockton. There is no such plant known in our California Botany, and I believe it is an arrant humb...
-October, 1881. Horticultural Societies. Communications. American Pomolocical Society
Address of President M. P. Wilder, at Boston, Mass, Sept. 14, 15, 16, 1S81. Members and Friends of the American Pomological Society: Once more, through the merciful Providence of Him who healeth...
-Progress And Influence
In most of my former addresses I have spoken of the importance of American Pomology, and of the best means for the promotion of it throughout our land. But in the presence of so many eminent practitio...
-Atlanta Cotton Exposition
This which commences on the fifth of October, promises to be of interest, not only to Georgia, but to all the United States, and to all the interests therein. Horticulture and Pomology have not been f...
-Autumn Fairs And Exhibitions
As we write, the various fairs and exhibitions are being held over the whole country, and we have in this wholesale way to return thanks for the scores of admission tickets and invitations now lying b...
-November, 1881. Vol. XXIII. Number 275. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Insects on fruit trees and vegetables worry the gardener, but they are no less the plague of those who garden for the pleasure of looking at beauty, as well as those who labor for something to eat. It...
-Communica Tions. Under The Hawthorns
Happy is the man who understandingly communes with nature, and, Finds tongues in trees, bocks in the runn'ng brooks, Sermons in stones, and good in everything. So wise, and happy a mortal, would...
-Hardy Trees
I thought a few notes on the effects of the pas winter might not be amiss at this time. Picea Parsonsiana was slightly browned; Nordman-niana much marbled, with loss of half its leader; oasiocarpa sli...
-November, 1881. Rarer Ornamental Trees And Ornamental Cardening
(Prize Essay for Massachusetts Horticultural Society.) (Continued from page 292.) Eleagnus longipes, the Japan oleaster growing near, is another striking and curious plant. It is of small size, wit...
-Language In Flowers
The working of names with leaf plants, in Mosaic beds, or otherwise in flower gardens, is often attempted, but not always with neatness. Some of the government grounds at Ottawa the past season, have ...
-Hardy Double White Primroses
These still stand unrivalled as hardy edging plants. Like other members of the Primrose family, they delight in cool shaded quarters in summer, for if fully exposed to strong sunshine they lose most o...
-Hardy Cactuses
We have often wondered why our numerous species of hardy Cactuses are not more often seen in American gardens. A rock garden of cactaceous plants would be an unique feature in a well kept garden Thoug...
-Wild Flowers For A Child's Garden
A Nevada correspondent writes: In a spring number of Mr. Vick's magazine he suggested that children should cultivate some wild flowers of their vicinity. One of my little ones selected Mimulus Lewisi...
-November, 1881. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Nurserymen who have opportunities of knowing tell us that of late years there has not been the same taste for extensive, out-door gardening as at one time. Not but that there are not many pretty place...
-Communications. Large Rose Bushes
An interesting description in the June number of the Monthly of a Lamarque rosebush at the greenhouses of Mr. Wm. Syred, of St. Louis, Mo., reminds me of a Lamarque and a Solfataire at the nursery and...
-Rhodochiton Volubile
The twining Rhodochiton volubile, is an old but rather rare summer climber to be found in only a few collections at the present time. Why it is thus neglected is to me very strange, but I notice th...
-Garden Notes
The novelty Abutilon Firefly, of which I gave a description in the August Monthly, has grown from a tiny plant of four inches to a height of twenty-six inches, two stalks with several collateral branc...
-Cool Orchids-Stanhopeas And Epi-Dendrums
As the desired end of all our endeavors in the culture of plants is to obtain a knowledge of their requirements, that resulting from practical experience is of the most value. Referring to the above o...
-A New Conservatory In The Missouri Botanical Garden
In our pages note has been made of the beautiful winter conservatory, made of brick and glass, in the Tower Grove Park at St. Louis. The excellent idea has occurred to Mr. Shaw that these houses may b...
-Funeral Wreaths In Belgium
Madame Van Houtte, widow of the celebrated Louis Van Houtte, recently died at Ghent, in her 71st year. Describing her funeral, a correspondent of the Journal of Horticulture says: The funeral took...
-Preparing And Forcing The Lilac
The system of culture adopted by the market growers around Paris in the production of white lilac, is not at all difficult to understand or carry out. There are a few points of importance, and when th...
-Ferns
Where the majority of such Ferns as require artificial warmth have been grown, as from time to time recommended, with more air and light and less atmospheric moisture and heat than are often applied t...
-Crotons
Tropical America and the West India Islands have contributed no more beautiful class of plants to European greenhouses than that which embraces the various forms of Croton, and much enterprise has bee...
-Macrozamia Moorei
In the Pharmaceutical Journal of Victoria, Dr. Mueller describes a new! species under this name. Dr. M. does not regard Macrozamia as essentially different from Encephalartos. The pungent summits of t...
-November, 1881. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The immense number of new varieties of fruit which continually appear, makes it very difficult to decide on what to plant, and those not familiar with pomological history, especially, are puzzled when...
-Communications. Weevil-Eaten Or "Buccy" Peas
Last year, 1878, a trusty student at my suggestion, tested some peas with the following results. They are early peas, somewhat mixed, of moderate size and smooth. They were raised the year before. He ...
-The Hampton Court Grape Vine
Of this famous grape vine, a correspondent of a recent number of the Garden says: One sees, hardly with regret, that a large branch of this vine is dying. The old vine has played its part, and may w...
-A Balcony Orchard
We often hear of window and house gardening as concerns flowers; but seldom in relation to fruits. The Gardener's Chronicle says of a gentleman in Paris: There, in his aerial garden, Mr. Lockroy s...
-Hot House Grapes As A Pastime For Amateurs
The comparative ease with which good fruit of all kinds can be had at all seasons in America, makes less necessity for amateur culture than there is in Great Britain; but the house culture of grapes s...
-Worm Eaten Peas
Every one must understand that when a weevil eats the inside of a pea, it depends on the part eaten whether the pea grows or not. If only the cotyledons are eaten there is no reason why the seed shoul...
-The Sand Pear
Prof. Budd in Rural Nev Yorker says the name is from the preference the pear has for growing in sand in the East. The ability to endure tropical heat is the way he puts it. A very common form cultiv...
-Raspberry Culture
It must not be forgotten that the Raspberry is naturalty a Northern or mountain plant, and to succeed with it in warmer latitudes a cool soil is of first importance. As bearing on this subject we give...
-Southern Tea
The tea raised in the South under the patronage of General Le Due has been pronounced of high quality by London experts. It is a great gain to know that we can raise tea that will be readily marketabl...
-Training Vines In Germany
The various methods of training field vines in Europe have often been given in our pages, but the manner is still new to many of our readers. We give the following account of one plan from a recent no...
-Slitting The Old Bark Of Fruit Trees
Green's Fruit Grower says: Looking over a back number of the Gardener's Monthly we find this on the editorial page: 'Young growing trees are very much benefited by having their bark slit by runni...
-The Soy Bean
This - the Soja hispida - has been under culture in American gardens ever since Commodore Perry's memorable expedition to Japan. But no one seems to have known the use of it, and so it soon disappears...
-Pruning
A Long Island correspondent says: - The observations made in Seasonable Hints in Gardener's Monthly, correspond with my practice and experience for forty years. The true theory and art of pruning is ...
-Plum Stocks For Peaches
A., Union Springs, N. J., writes: Will you please inform me of your experience with peach on plum, either on Myrobolan or native stocks and how do they compare, thus worked, with those on their ow...
-Tree Planting
Picking out a sentence, or perhaps half a sentence, as in the following, and then making a chapter on it, is much like the practice of Scriptural polemics. The most contradictory notions can be establ...
-The Recent Forest Fires
Perhaps, one of these days, the course the Gardener's Monthly has taken on the forestry question will be appreciated. It has steadily opposed the whimsical speculations of persons utterly unacquainted...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. A Floral Insect Trap
Just before receiving your July number, which, by the way, absence prevented my receipt of until the middle of the month, I encountered on the edge of the little-used trotting track at Ramsey's, a sta...
-The Shoe-Black Plant
Under this name a well-known ornament of our gardens in summer, the Chinese Rose-Hibiscus, or Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, is well known in Java. A London paper, Colonies and India, says: The ' shoe-bl...
-Flowering Of The Century Plant
Though it is not true that this plant will not flower under a century, it flowers so rarely that the occurrence is always an event in the community. When in Cincinnati recently, the writer saw one on ...
-Autumn Flora Across The Mississippi. Salvia
One who has had the privilege of seeing the flora west of the Mississippi in the autumn season of the year, will not soon forget the scene. From Texas to Kansas and Nebraska, the wild, uncultivated la...
-Night Opening Flowers
L. B. 0, Denver, Col., says: I have a cactus of the cereus family, don't know the name, but the leaf is broad and flat, blossom white; it has had several blossoms during the summer, but they have ...
-The Western Catalpa
A Western correspondent says: Is it in your opinion a settled fact that there are two species of catalpa. Why I ask this is because last fall when gathering seed in Arkansas, I found trees growing si...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. History Of The Weeping Willow
A tradition concerning the origin of the beautiful weeping willow trees of our country and England was recently published in one of our popular juvenile publications, and republished in the Ledger. It...
-Grounds Of D. Landreth
The pleasure grounds of David Landreth & Sons, connected with their seed farm near Bristol, twenty-four miles north of Philadelphia, and facing the River Delaware, is an excellent specimen of landscap...
-John Jay Smith
Our good friend Jacques, with this month drops out of the circle of our esteemed correspondents. That which appeared in our last, was literally written on his death-bed. His love of useful activity ...
-Robert Kilvington
Among the celebrated Florists of Philadelphia who have recently passed away, the subject of this sketch deserves remembrance. He was the son of a Yorkshire squire, and was born in the year 1803. All o...
-The Blue-Bells Of Scotland
In the Flowers and Ferns of the United States, the writer of this suggests that Hairbell or Harebell, as applied to this plant, should be abandoned, for the name at the head of this paragraph, becau...
-Statistics Of Grape Culture
Among the many useful works of General Le Duc is the statistics of grape culture now before us, compiled by the chemist of the department, Dr. Mc-Murtrie. Fifteen hundred circulars were sent out and a...
-Note Sur L' Horticulture En Algerie, Par M. V. Ch. Joly, Paris, 1881
Mr. Joly has recently enlightened his brother horticulturists on English horticulture, and, as we have recently noted, horticulture in America. Now he has an equally interesting paper on Algeria. I...
-The Ivy Green
O, a dainty plant is the ivy green, That creepeth o'er ruins old! Of right choice food are his meals, I ween, In his cell so lone and cold. The walls must be crumbled, the stones decayed, To ...
-Garden Books
G. W. McC, Boulder, Col., writes: Will you kindly answer the following questions in the Gardener's Monthly: (1) What is the best work on botany for a private student and gardener in the latitude o...
-Production Of New And Improved Varieties From Seed
To encourage and extend this most beneficent branch of Pomology is part of the design of this Society, whose purpose and aim is to prescribe the fruits which may be adapted to the various sections of ...
-Raising The Standard Of Quality Of Our Market Fruits
In connection with this department of work let me call your attention to the importance of raising the standard of quality of our market fruits, not only for our own markets, but for exportation which...
-The Graph
In order of discussion I have placed the grape first in our roll. No other fruit, unless it be the strawberry, now attracting so much attention, and perhaps no other, if we except the apple, is of mor...
-Society For The Promotion Of Agricultural Science
As noted in the Gardener's Monthly, last year, a society made up mainly of the members of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, who are interested in agricultural pursuits, was form...
-European Horticultural Shows
Many of the most successful European exhibitions are held on the beautiful grounds of some tasteful amateur patron of the art, and the desire to have a good day with friends, examining the pretty land...
-Entomological Society Of Canada
The annual meeting was held at London, Ontario. In his address President Saunders noted that the Angoumois grain moth Butalis cerealella Oliv, is a small moth, the larva of which is very destructive...
-December, 1881. Vol. XXIII. Number 276. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Gardening does not merely consist in having a piece of ground with some grass, some trees, and some flowers; but it means a study of these things so as to get the most pleasure from the materials at c...
-Communications. The Streets Of Our Capital
Washington has gained more in outward appearance during the last half dozen years than it had before in half a century. It now has forty miles of better pavement than can be found in any other America...
-December, 1881. Rarer Ornamental Trees And Ornamental Gardening
(Prize Essay for Massachusetts Horticultural Society.) (Continued from page 325.) On the other hand, if it were not for Magnolia parviflora, we should consider the somewhat longer known Magnolia...
-The Scrub Oak For Hedges
Many years ago Michaux, the botanist, suggested the following method of utilizing a very common shrub, or small tree, found everywhere throughout South New Jersey, and bearing the name of Quercusilici...
-December, 1881. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Editorial Notes
Tuberose - The Diamond. - No evil is without its compensation. In America cultivators of Tuberoses are often annoyed by the double kind reverting to its original single form. But when it does this w...
-City Parks
Philadelphia made a great mistake when she embraced over 2,000 acres in a single park, - which takes so much money that there is none left of any consequence for parks in other parts of her immense te...
-What Does A Gardener Do?
The following is a sketch taken of the Philadelphia City Councils by the Philadelphia Ledger. It is on the question of appropriation for the coming year: - When the items in reference to pumping w...
-Does Ivy Injure Buildings?
This question has been many times proposed and considered. In my monograph on The Ivy, I have treated it at some length, and with the aid of evidence adduced in an important inquiry as to the effect...
-Colors In The Flower Garden
M. Buffon, a good many years ago, made a very interesting discovery, which is practically very useful, and very closely approaches in correctness the diagram principle in determining the colors which ...
-Fern Rockery
Ferns may fairly be characterized, looking at them in a general way, as rock plants; for there are very few indeed of the known species that cannot be successfully grown on or between the crevices of ...
-Renewing Box Edgings
This subject is so well understood that scarcely anything needs to be written about it. Still as the present is a good time (if not done sooner) for renewing old or making new box edgings to wa...
-December, 1881. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
At this season the Calla will be growing vigorously, and will need water more abundantly. A saucer of water under the Calla is much relished by this plant. It is sub-aquatic in its nature. Other plant...
-Pancratium Ovatum
This old acquaintance so long overlooked or forgotten has appeared anew, and certainly it is worthy of long and lasting respect. It is a tropical lily, with large, handsome evergreen leaves, and in ...
-Sanvitalia Procumbens As A Window Plant
My neighbor, Mrs. Needham, has a plant of the double-flowering variety of this Mexican annual in her window, where it is growing like an Oxalis, Othonna or Lobelia - that is, its branchy shoots hang d...
-Flowering Of Eucharis Amazonica
There is an extensive impression in horticultural circles that the Eucharis cannot be flowered satisfactorily in this country; now that idea is utterly erroneous. Mr. Tailby, of Wellesly, makes a remu...
-Drying Flowers
The following note taken from the New York independent of Oct. 9, 1879, may give the information which one of your correspondents desires: To Dry Flowers with Sand. There are many of our brilliant...
-Floral Notes
In Gardener's Monthly for April, Mr. Edward C. Haines mentioned having a double Abutilon of eight petals. I have an Abutilon, John Hopkins, that had a double flower as large as an ordinary single Ho...
-Watering Plants
In the May number of the Monthly Irrigation makes some remarks on watering plants by leaf absorption. There are few persons now who will disagree with him in regard to the conclusions reached b...
-Bouquets In Paris
A correspondent of the Garden says: The Parisian bouquets are mostly far too large. Bunches of Roses 18 in. across in November were not only a great waste of floral beauty, but would also need a s...
-Bananas From Seed
It is generally known that the ordinary Banana never produces seed. The fruit is the pulpy seed vessel, - but the seeds never perfect. Young plants are raised by offsets. The rare and extremely beauti...
-Sweet Scented Begonias
The following interesting scrap is from a work recently published in England by J. W. B. Wetham, - but it is proper to say that in American gardens we have at least two species of Begonias that are de...
-How To Grow Chrysanthemums
Now that the flowering season for these plants is with us, I beg to offer a few remarks upon their culture which may benefit some of your amateur readers. Striking Cuttings Any ordinary garden s...
-History Of Adiantum Farleyense
It is generally supposed to be a sport from Adiantum scutum. I cannot at present remember whether I have ever written to raise the question in the Journal of Horticulture whether it is not really the ...
-Skeleton Leaves
In skeletonizing leaves it is important to select leaves that are quite perfect, for if any of the fibres have been eaten away by insects when the leaves were on the tree, the skeletons will be unfit ...
-Asparagus Plumosus
In this month's magazine, a correspondent inquires whether this plant is yet in the country, and if so it is worth advertising. We quite agree with this, for a more beautiful introduction to culture h...
-Isotoma Longiflora
Mr. John G. Eisele, of Philadelphia, sends a specimen for name, which proves to be this plant. It was first introduced from the West India Islands about one hundred years ago, but seems to have been l...
-Ornamental Grass
Jonathan Primrose writes: Desirous of learning the botanical name of a grass that has been growing in our garden throughout the season, I have taken the liberty of sending you a few of its flower spi...
-Pyrethrum Powder
A. H., Meadville, Pa., writes: In an article ' on the best methods of destroying insects,' in the Gardener's Monthly for August, p. 238, it is stated Pyrethrum powder is death to insects and harmle...
-Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Communications. Pot Crown Strawberry Plants
It is unnecessary to tell the readers of the Gardener's Monthly the advantage of pot-grown plants, since the editor has given them for years. Still the bare statement of facts and experiences in diffe...
-Shading Ripening Grapes
At a recent meeting of the Kentucky Horticultural Society, a report says: Col. Bennett H. Young's exhibit was confined to grapes, which were just as fine as they can be produced. They were protec...
-Fine Peaches
From Mr.Lorin Blodgett we have the last week in October two magnificent Peaches, one white, one yellow, freestones, weighing together one pound. The flavor was truly delicious. We have tasted the rath...
-Improvement In Garden Labels
Those of us who can remember the enormous amount of time garden labels took when made by pocket knives, have reason to be thankful to those who have set their ingenuity to work on machinery for the pu...
-Insects In California
Before 1875, we never heard of a worm in California fruit; in 1877, wormy apples began to appear in our market, an ' this year we have worms in pears, apples and peaches. They are not numerous, it is ...
-A Large Bunch Of Grapes
The heaviest bunch of black grapes that has ever been grown, or, we should say, that has ever been recorded, is now on view at Mr. Noble's, Florist and Fruiterer, 22 South Frederick Street, Dublin. Th...
-Sidney Apple
It is not often that we find a new apple that it seems desirable to name, because we do not forget that there are already two thousand in existence, and it is no use adding to this nomenclature unless...
-Scraps And Queries. Busby Seckel Pear
A .B. Lenape, Pa., says, I send you by mail a Seckel Seedling Pear. Is it in quality equal to its parent? Mrs. Busby thinks it superior; Mr. Busby adds ' taking it all in all' he considers it great...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Kalmia Poisonous To Sheep
It is the general belief among Pennsylvania farmers that laurel leaves are poisonous, and that the instinct of sheep will not prevent them from browsing upon them. Recently I noticed the owner of a...
-Early History Of Some Squashes
In the year 1668, two Catholic missionaries, Claude Troure and Francis de Salignac de Fene-lon, of the society of the Sulpitians proceeded on their journey to the Iroquois villages, located on Quinte ...
-Antigonon Insigne
When we are asked to believe that color is given to flowers, expressly that they may be made attractive to insects, we may remember that color is not confined to flowers. Rocks and stones, sea-weeds, ...
-Autumn Flora Of The New Jersey Coast
Few persons, unfamiliar with the sea coast, can have any idea of the rare beauty of its vegetation in the autumn season of the year. All American scenery is rich with the colored foliage and gay autum...
-Varieties By Grafting
A correspondent sends us the following from a daily paper in proof that there must be something in the common discussions about the influence of stock on the scion: The red and yellow banana are n...
-Fright In Animals
Mr. Joseph Willcox, at a recent meeting of the Delaware County Institute, noted that animals were guided by a sense of smell as well as by sight. A deer was not as much frightened at a near view of a ...
-Chia
We have already noticed in our magazine what Dr. Rothrock had discovered concerning the Chia plant of California. Dr. R. has communicated some further facts about it to the London Gardener's Chronicle...
-How Birds Eat Snakes
It has long been a matter of popular belief that the great kingfisher was an enemy of the snake, perpetually warring upon the tribe in general, and never happier than when dining on serpent au naturel...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Some New Books For The Lovers Of Rural Life
Day Dreams is the significant title of a neat little volume of poems from the pen of W. N. Lockington, Esq., late of San Francisco, but now a resident of Philadelphia. In it the author shows himself t...
-John Jay Smith (See Frontispiece)
By the death of John Jay Smith, the Gardener's Monthly and Horticulturist mourns one of its own family. A. J. Downing, who, in connection with Luther Tucker, of Albany, projected the Horticul-turist, ...
-Ernst Benary
The well known Seedsman, of Erfurt, Germany, calls attention to the gross typographical error in his Fly Leaf advertisement of our October number. The printer has made him price the seeds of Areca Bau...
-History Of The Onion
The Onion, Allium Cepa, is in the Hebrew betsal, plural betsalim, the rudimentary sense of which word appears to be bulb. The excellence of the Egyptian Onions was in the primaeval times proverbial, a...
-The Trailing Arbutus
After the snows their fleecy covers Lift from the ground, Thy prostrate stems the year discovers When buds abound. With lips grown warm at their own pressure, Fair April hies To leave firs...
-Virgilia
P. E. says: I notice you spell this plant Virgilia. It is now clearly demonstrated that the poet's name was Vergil, and, as I suppose our plant was named in his honor, it should be written Vergilia...
-Agricultural, Horticultural And Pomological Societies
A subject of great importance, which I wish to bring before the Society, is the position of Horticultural Societies, Agricultural Colleges, and similar institutions with respect to it. When I refle...
-Necrology
While we rejoice in the prosperity of our Society and the presence of so many old friends who have been spared to this day, and extend fraternal greetings to all who have come up to aid us in the prom...
-The Great Future
In contemplating the rapid progress of American Pomology, its influence in promoting the ' health and happiness of our people, its importance as a source of revenue to our nation, and the agency which...
-Conclusion
In conclusion, gentlemen, let me express again the great gratification that your presence affords me, here in old Boston, here at my old home, where, ere long, I shall cast off the threadbare covering...
-Variegated Corchorus - Yellow Bouvardia
Variegated Corchorus Variegated plants have generally a diseased look, and are not favorites in American gardens; but some bushes of the Kerria japonica variegata, that we saw last summer, impresse...
-Autumn Cauliflowers - Grape From N. H. Lindley & Co
Autumn Cauliflowers We notice that this delicious vegetable is much more common in the Philadelphia markets than it has been heretofore. The prices also bring them within the reach of purses of mod...
-Leny's Winter Peach - The Woodbine
Leny's Winter Peach From Mr. Needham of Washington, D. C, we have a colored plate representing a yellow peach three and three-quarter inches wide. It is said that when gathered in autumn before har...
-Descriptions And Figures Of The Eucalypti Of Australia - The American Entomologist
Descriptions And Figures Of The Eucalypti Of Australia Dr. Muller continues his great labors. This part before us is the sixth, which makes sixty species of these remarkable trees which have now be...
-Neat Little Gardens - The Christmas Rose
Neat Little Gardens In a recent ramble through the Southwest it was pleasant to note the increased attention given to pretty farmers' gardens everywhere. There is no doubt the tree peddler is in ma...
-Hakea - Fruit Growing In Nevada
Hakea The California papers are noting the introduction of these beautiful New Holland plants into California. The whole family - Proteacaea - is so beautiful and so different to the ordinary run o...
-Hardy Peaches - The Philosophy Of Variations
Hardy Peaches V. B., Kingston, N Y., asks: Would Mr. H. M. Engle, the writer of the article on Early Peaches, in the September number of the Gardener's Monthly, be so kind as to name a few varieti...
-Science In Virginia - Eulalia Japonica
Science In Virginia A society has recently been chartered in Richmond, Virginia, for the study of natural science. The charter authorizes the society to hold property to the amount of $25,000. Memb...
-Mealy Buc - Exports Of Apples
Mealy Buc In January Monthly, page 13, Mrs. J. D. S., Upper Sandusky, asks: Is there any way to keep down mealy bug. My way is to apply kerosene oil with a thin, sharp-pointed stick. It can be don...
-The Foreign Grape - Highland Beauty Apple
The Foreign Grape In a recent work on grape culture no less than 538 varieties of the foreign grape have been described. It is moved and seconded that a committee be appointed to cut the number dow...
-Forced Tomatoes - Dr. Asa Gray
Forced Tomatoes On the 15th of January we had a sample of tomato which weighed one pound and half an ounce; and a fine cucumber twenty inches long, from Mr. James Paget, gardener, to Senator Camero...
-The Garden Annual - Improved Florist's Flowers
The Garden Annual By W. Robinson. editor of the Garden, London. The leading feature of this almanack is its list of gentlemen and ladies who have tasteful gardens and keep intelligent gardener...
-Pedigree Roses - Washington Rath-Ripe Peach
Pedigree Roses A correspondent inquires whether any of the varieties raised by Mr. Bennett from especial kinds, and known as pedigree roses, have been tried in our country; and whether they have ...
-The Urbana Wine Company - Barn Plans And Out Buildings
The Urbana Wine Company We are sorry to learn that this company, one of the pioneers in the remarkable success which has followed grape culture over the United States, is not a financial success. ...
-The Fruit Grower - Seedling Carnations
The Fruit Grower Published quarterly at Rochester, N. Y. Charles A. Green, Editor. The first number before us gives promise of usefulness. Certainly it is seldom that so much good material is given...
-Jasminum Gracillimum - Early Strawberries
Jasminum Gracillimum Many new things appear like a flash, and then disappear in the darkness. This one will probably come to stay. It has been just sent out by Messrs. Veitch, and was found by Mr. ...
-Cinnamon And Camphor Trees - Cotoneasters
Cinnamon And Camphor Trees These have been introduced into Australia, and succeed so well as to promise great profit. Mammoth Pearl Potato A correspondent speaks highly of this variety. W...
-Rhus Aromatica - The Tzite Tree
Rhus Aromatica Among pretty early flowering shrubs, this deserves a prominent place. It flowers with the spice bush, and Golden Bell, and though not quite so gay as the latter, is yet a showy plant...
-Cocoanut Fibre Refuse - Williamson's Fern Etchings
Cocoanut Fibre Refuse The English periodicals on gardening are much engaged in recommending the refuse cocoanut fibre for pot plants, and even for grass lawns. It is employed with charcoal intermix...
-Correction - The Snow-Drop Tree
Correction Read Senecio pulcher instead of pulched, as printed on page 166. Gardening In Denver It seems but as yesterday that Denver was a desert waste. But the evidences of high civi...
-Lilium Longiflorum - Ripening Melons
Lilium Longiflorum It does not seem to be generally known that what is often called Lilium longiflorum in gardens is not Lilium longiflorum of Thunberg, but is Lilium eximium of Courtois. Gardeners...
-The Curl In The Peach - Greenhouse Bananas
The Curl In The Peach The following heroic treatment is recommended by a correspondent of the Pacific Rural Press: That to cure the curl-leaf, split the bark on the tree in four or five places w...
-The Products Of Chestnut Trees - Clematis Coccinea
The Products Of Chestnut Trees The Lynchburg Advance says that some counties in that State sell nuts from the woods to the amount of $10,000 a year. Humble Bees And Flowers It is no new o...
-Greenhouse And House Gardening. Communications. Moss Mulching - Large Strawberries
Greenhouse And House Gardening. Communications. Moss Mulching I have found moss very beneficial as a mulch, but not allowed to remain too long; otherwise the young and delicate roots will follow up...
-The Currant Worm - Maakia Amurensis
The Currant Worm F. K. A., Hartford, Conn., says: - Syringe the bush thoroughly with tobacco water, rather strong. One application is enough. Timber Culture A correspondent of a co-temp...
-Fern-Leaved Beech - Hardiness Of Clematis Coccinea
Fern-Leaved Beech Of this, one of the most beautiful of ornamental trees, there is a magnificent specimen in front of the Redwood Library, at Newport, R. I. It was planted about 1840, having been p...
-Red And White Oleander - Mushroom Culture
Red And White Oleander Mr. Jacob Linx-wieller, of Hamilton County, Ohio, has a large oleander with red and white flowers on the same plant. - the two kinds having been grafted on one stock. ...
-Philadelphia Queen Apple - Mr. W. T. Harding
Philadelphia Queen Apple L. says: What is the apple grown in your vicinity as Philadelphia Queen? I have one fruiting for the last year and this, but I see no difference between it and Red Astrach...
-Grave Of Sir Joseph Paxton - Begonia Glaucophylla
Grave Of Sir Joseph Paxton This eminent gardener, who made Chatsworth so famous, a correspondent informs us, lies buried in the churchyard of Edenson alongside of the remains of the Duke of Devonsh...
-Burbidgea Nitida - Cos Lettuce
Burbidgea Nitida P. says: Will some of the readers of the Monthly be so good as to give me some information concerning the treatment of Burbidgea nitida? Plums In Philadelphia Plum ...
-The Largest Vinery In England - Native Plums
The Largest Vinery In England The London Builder states that the largest vinery in the kingdom is being built by Mr. George Bashford, of St. Saviour's, Jersey, the eminent grape grower. It is to be...
-Peach Trees At Chattanooga - Scarlet Snow
Peach Trees At Chattanooga Taking a hasty ride through this famous Tennessee city lately the writer noticed that the Nixon nurseries were growing a very large number of Peach trees, and which had a...
-Prunus Simoni - Double Gladiolus
Prunus Simoni Under this name Professor Bessey has a peculiar peach-like species, which has been found quite hardy in the college grounds at Ames, Iowa. Samuel Miller Among the pleasant f...
-Baumforth's Seedling Raspberry - George Hussmann
Baumforth's Seedling Raspberry At one time some of our best raspberries either were foreign varieties, as Hornet, Soucheltii, North umberland Fill Basket, or were seedlings of foreign kinds; as for...
-Swindling Tree Agents - Bouvardia Rosea Multiflora
Swindling Tree Agents Charles Patterson of Kirksville, Mo, has published his views about Swindling Tree Agents He finds in effect that this class comes from the greed of those who want to get a dol...
-Cereus Macrogenus - Rae Quince
Cereus Macrogenus Under this name L'Horticulture Beige refers to a cactus which it compares to young flowers of the Victoria regia. It rarely flowers in European collections, but has recently favor...









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