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The Horticulturist, And Journal Of Rural Art And Rural Taste #14 | by P. Barry, A. J. Downing, J. Jay Smith, Peter B. Mead, F. W. Woodward, Henry T. Williams



Pot-Culture To Reviews

TitleThe Horticulturist, And Journal Of Rural Art And Rural Taste #14
AuthorP. Barry, A. J. Downing, J. Jay Smith, Peter B. Mead, F. W. Woodward, Henry T. Williams
PublisherJames Vice, Jr.
Year1853-1874
Copyright1853-1874, James Vice, Jr.
AmazonHorticulturist and Journal of Rural Art and Rural Taste

Devoted To Horticulture, Landscape Gardening, Rural Architecture, Botany, Pomology, Entomology, Rural Economy, Etc.

Edited By P. Barry, Author Of The "Fruit Garden".

Edited by A. J. Downing, Author Of "Landscape Gardening," "Designs For Cottage Residences," " Fruits And Fruit Trees Of America," "Country Houses," Etc., Etc.

Conducted By J. Jay Smith, Editor of the N. A. Sylva.

Volumes III - XXIX (1853-1874)

-Portland (Maine) Horticultural Society, Organized Nov., 1859
President, T. C. Hersey. Vice-Presidents, Wm. Ellis, Geo. F. Shepley, Wm. P. Fessenden, John B. Brown, J. Jowitt. Recording Secretary, John W. Adam. Corresponding Secretary, John W. Dana. Treasurer, A...
-Portraits Of Eminent Men, In The Ministry & Laity
AND Is THUs CONSTITUTED, EDITORIALLY AND MECHANICALLY, A RELIGIOUs FAMILY NEWSPAPER OF THE FIRST CLASS. TERMS, $2 PER YEAR. Subscribers paying for the Year to commence 1st January next, will receive...
-The Portulaca
There is no other plant among our hardy annuals from which, in my opinion, the cultivator will derive so great an amount of enjoyment, in proportion to the time and trouble required for-its cultivatio...
-Portulacoas
In my communication last month, I described only one new variety, viz. the crimson and yellow, and that had not developed its full character. Shortly after, another bloomed, even more beautiful than t...
-Pot Culture
The conditions of air and moisture are attained by an efficient system of drainage, on which, indeed, the success of pot cultivation mainly depends. Water must be often applied, and yet, unless it pas...
-Pot Culture Of Grapes
We doubt whether the culture of grapes in pots will ever become popular or general, as it is a costly mode of producing fruit. It is true that, under a given surface of glass, as much fruit may be rai...
-Pot Culture Of The Gladiolus
The season has arrived when the most of us are beginning to think of selecting our bulbs, especially for growing in pots. Liliums, hyacinths, tulips, etc., have each their place assigned for the above...
-Pot Culture Of The Veerena
As the Verbena merits a place, and most justly, among popular florists* flowers, perhaps a few hints on its cultivation in pots may be acceptable to those who have not hitherto adopted that mode of cu...
-Pot Pourri
This, we presume, is what you mean by a perfume made of sweet-scented leaves, etc, for fancy jars. Mix half a pound of common salt with a quarter of a pound of saltpetre, a quarter of an ounce of s...
-Potassa And Soda
Soda is generally considered of little value, and if the reader will consider the position of the vineyard under consideration, he will see that the soil is very probably highly impregnated with soda ...
-The Potato And Buttonwood Diseases
Dear Sir - After all the time that has elapsed since the potato disease made its appearance, and the many speculations that have appeared, pray inform me if anything is considered as settled on the su...
-The Potato Disease
Any experiment that tends to throw additional light upon the disease in potatoes, is deserving of consideration, because, although it may not explain the cause satisfactorily, yet it is only by the ac...
-Potato Onion
This variety is distinct in habit from the other kinds. It differs in the producing of a number of offsets, or side bulbs, each of which, with good culture, is like to the one planted. The distance ap...
-Potato Produce
The gross average return per acre of numerous varieties was from - Tons. Cwts Qrs Lbs 1 oz sets ................................................ 10 19 ...
-Potato Seed
A quantity of Potato seed has lately been procured, by the Agricultural branch of the Patent Office, from Germany, with the view of experimenting in the United States with different varieties of this ...
-Potatoes
Mr. C. E. Goodrich, of Utica, has given the subject of potato culture much attention. We have admired his fine exhibition at our State Fairs, and the freedom with which he communicated information. We...
-Potting
In removing young growing plants into larger sized pots, the roots should not be disturbed; indeed, they should be removed before the roots become so numerous as to spread round the sides of the pots....
-Potting Strawberry Plants
ABOUT the first to twentieth of June the runners of the strawberry will be in a good condition to pot. One who has never tried this best of all plans to get thrifty plants for a new bed, would be asto...
-Potting The Cuttings
The most convenient way of disposing of the cuttings is to dibble them into shallow pans filled with wet silver sand, as fast as they are prepared. The best way for those who may have to leave the cut...
-Poudrette
Will you have the goodness to answer the following questions? Would it be advisable to form a poudrette company in such a city as Poughkeepsie, when night-soll is plenty and where charcoal can be bou...
-Poughkeepsie Horticultural Club
We are very glad to learn that this Club holds monthly conversational meetings, and is doing much good. Horticulture will be more surely advanced by such meetings than by even public exhibitions; and ...
-Poultry
Almost every one keeps poultry, and while we have no interest ourselves in the different breeds, we have of late been at times much amused at the bragging spirit shown in some poultry articles, and es...
-Poultry (2)
We have received the following letter, which we publish for the benefit of our readers, at least all of those who take an interest in the subject of which it treats. The writer has been long known to ...
-Poultry (3)
F. W. Woodward, Esq. : Dear Sir - My communication in the August number of the Horticulturist, upon the subject of Brahmas, grew to such dimensions as to influence me to omit some paragraphs of commen...
-Poultry (3). Part 2
I have a native fondness for poultry; and the leisure moments which I sometimes devote to them are given more for the pleasure I find in them than for any profit which accrues in their management. I a...
-Poultry (3). Part 3
With the exception of eggs sold, I have set them myself, and found them almost invariably fertile. (I will say here, that out of six eggs sent to Illinois, five hatched). The chicks, when hatched, lo...
-Poultry (4)
We have recently received a letter from J. C. G., of Granville County, N. C, wherein the writer inquires whether the accuracy of the statement made by our correspondent E, touching the weights of ce...
-Poultry (5)
Mr. Editor : A friend of the writer, who is beginning to take a lively interest in poultry-growing, propounds the following questions, and desires answers thereto : 1st. What months are considered m...
-Poultry (6)
Mr. Editor : In your valuable magazine for September you had a contribution from my highly esteemed friend P. W. of Tauntou, Mass., on that variety of French chickens called Houdans. From a pretty cri...
-Poultry Department. Conducted By A. M. Hal8ted. Crevecceur Fowls
Our experience with Crevecoeur fowls during the past year having been solicited from many parties, we present it in this form. On February 19, 1867, we received from Europe two cocks and six hens, an...
-Poultry Department. Conducted By A. M. Halsted
With this number we present to our readers a Poultry Department believing that in so doing we are meeting the wants of many who, with a few acres, or even a few rods of ground, devoted mainly to hor...
-Poultry Raising And Profits. From Moore's Rural New Yorker
John Crane, Schuyler Co., N. Y., writes : I send you the results of my experience in rearing the Brahma variety of fowls, with my expenditures, receipts, and profits, for insertion in your paper. The...
-Pound
For a very late market pear there is nothing to excel this old variety. The tree is a strong, healthy grower, and bears immense crops of magnificent fruit - often weighing over two pounds each! It is ...
-Pounxylvania Fruit Growers' Society
The fourteenth annual meeting of this society will be held this time at Reading, about twenty miles from Philadelphia, commencing January 15th, 1873. Some important features are introduced for the fir...
-Practical Diagrams Of The Rules For Laying Out Gardens, Forming Curved Lines
How To Form A Volute Where The Border Is Of Equal Breadth The usual mode of forming a volute or spiral line is one of the simplest problems in geometry, and therefore requires no explanation here. Th...
-Practical Gardeners And Horticultural Societies
Dear Sir: It appears that my remarks on the Penn. Horticultural Society have been misunderstood by Mr. Buist. Being myself a member of the society, I cannot well avoid knowing something of its rules a...
-Practical Hints On Growing Calceolarias
Among the many objects of delight, there are few more interesting to the cultivator of plants, than the Calceolaria. I scarcely know what genus of plants is more interesting, when we take into conside...
-Practical Hints On The Culture Of Gooseberries
As you invite practical communications from your practical readers, I offer for your consideration and disposal, the following article, believing the account of my successful method of cultivating ...
-Practical Hints To Amateurs
You may plant peas, for the earliest crop, as soon as the frost is out of the ground, and it is fit to dig. Choose a warm, sheltered spot, and use rotten stable manure and ashes in preparing the soil,...
-Practical Hints To Amateurs (2)
Grafts may be cut now, as well as later in the winter, if more convenient to you. Keep them in a cool place, half buried in earth or sand, till you want them. If not wanted till spring, bury them out ...
-Practical Hints To Amateurs. July
If you have a crop in your kitchen garden which looks sickly, water it once or twice with guano water (a handful of guano to a pail of water), stirring the soil with the hoe before applying the water....
-Practical Hints To Cultivators Of Pears On Quince
The pear-loving and pear-cultivating public, have of late years had their attention frequently called to the advantage of growing pear trees worked upon quince stock, both by the writers upon such the...
-Practical Horticulture For Colleges
A LARGE number of communications have been received, approvatory of the several articles which have appeared in this journal on the subject of imbuing the youthful minds of this country with a love of...
-The Practical Papers
Dialogue, John and the Old Gentleman; er, the old way not always the best. Some farmers, even in these days of improvement and widely disseminated agricultural knowledge, are quite willing to aband...
-The Practical Papers - I. How To Set Out A Tree
As the season of the year so favorable to the transplanting of trees is drawing near, a few pratical hints derived from experimental theory may not be without profit to the interested. We frequently h...
-Practical Papers - No. II. Let The Birds Live! By Olapod Quill
Let the birds live! Boy or man, why do you so relentlessly pursue unto maiming or death every little beautiful bird that alights in your garden? God made them to live, to make vocal with their clear w...
-Practical Papers, No. III - The Birds
In the last paper, under the title of Let the Birds Live ! I gave some reasons why all who own gardens and farms should let these little benefactors live unmolested. In this paper I would further urg...
-Practical Papers, No. V. - How To Grow Grapes In Gardens
The other morning, in conversation with a gentleman upon the subject of the cultivation of the grape, the readiness with which fine crops might be obtained and the pleasure to be derived to the cultiv...
-Practical Papers. VI. - Pruning Grapes In The Garden
In my last paper I stated the manner in which grapes should be planted in garden plots and small pieces of ground, with a fair prospect of yielding fruit, if properly pruned and attended to as they sh...
-The Practical Poultry Keeper
The public have been favored, within the past two years, with two separate editions of the above work, by as many different publishers. A fact has since come to our notice that will, when gene...
-Practical Results In Grape Culture
Having no new theory to advocate, or any disposition to attack the opinions of others, I merely propose, in a short article, to give you an account of my own mode of raising grapes, which you are at l...
-Practical Theory Of Fertility
The chemical condition of a soil necessary to fertility (when reduced to its lowest terms, after separating the adventitious by means of a comparison of the reports of a great many analyses of soils, ...
-Practical Theory Of Fertility. Continued
The proposed excess of caustic lime will be advantageous in an open field, to kill off all plants, including weeds, and thus prepare it for the new crop as soon as the lime shall have become mild; but...
-A Practical Treatise On The Culture And Treatment Or The Grape-Vine
The third edition of this work, enlarged and revised, has just been issued by 0. M. Saxton, of New York, the well known, enterprising agricultural book publisher. It is a useful and much needed book, ...
-Practice In Rustic Work
These are some people who must be always cutting, notching, or carving with a knife. Sometimes they seek to perpetuate their precious memory by the formation of certain well-known letters in the bark ...
-The Practice Of Pruning
The practice of pruning receives the increased attention of Dr. Lindley in his new edition of the Theory of Horticulture; some of this, as it illustrates principles, we shall copy. Though, in this cou...
-The Practice of Pruning; The Peach. From The New Edition Of Lindley' Theory Of Horticulture
The mode of bearing is as follows: - A, represents the branch of a Peach tree. The figures 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, denote the respective ages of the portions of branch opposite. The asterisks at the sides of t...
-The Praibies
I noticed a communication on Western Prairies in your valuable work, from the pen of an able writer, Why are they not Forests? I wish to differ from him a little; also from the popular opinion of t...
-The Prairie Farmer
A Weekly Agricultural, Horticultural And Family Paper, Devoted Especially To Western Interests And Enterprises. The Prairie Farmer has now occupied the field of twenty-two years, and is increasing in...
-Prairie Roses
In June last I wrote an article on the prairie roses, 15 in number, which were in my possession, and with a few exceptions, in bloom. This article was published in the Syracuse Daily Journal, about th...
-Prairie Rose - Mrs. Hovey
I noticed, in a former number of the Horticulturist, that a doubt was expressed by one of its contributors whether this fine rose was ever white, as it has been represented. In our correction of this ...
-Premature Decay Of The Peach-Tree
Fifty years since the peach tree grew vigorously, and almost spontaneously, in many sections of New-England, where the soil and climate were congenial. In more recent times, it has flourished with equ...
-Premiums
The publisher has noticed, the present season, that unusual numbers of the Horticulturist have been included in the lists of premiums to be given at fairs; and especially notes those offered by the Su...
-Premium List
Apples For the largest and best collection of Apples, correctly named, from any State or Society, three of each variety, 1st Premium, The Society's Silver Medal and Fifty Dollars. 2d ...
-Preparation
Although January, and in some of the States, months before anything can practically be done in the flower-garden, yet it is not too soon to be thinking over and sketching out plans for forming the flo...
-Preparation Of Cuttings
In preparing a cutting we are guided in a certain measure by the fact that roots form with greatest facility from joints or buds. It is true that a callus will form on the cut surface, although the cu...
-Preparation Of Newgrounds
THE season being at hand for the execution of ground-work in the improvement of new places, we have thought that a few hints might be offered on the subject not altogether unprofit-ably. Wherever we l...
-Preparation Of The Plants
When transplanted in the spring, half-dead leaves should be pulled off and the roots shortened about one-third of their length, as this induces them to throw out a new set of fibrous roots from the en...
-Preparatory Culture In The Hot-Bed
Having procured your seed tubers, bury them in an ordinary hot-bed, about the 20th of April in Central New York. Place them lengthwise, and nearly end to end, in rows across the bed, the rows about si...
-Preparing Fruit Gardens
R., (Hartford, Ct.) First give the soil a heavy dressing of stable manure and ashes - then trench it two spades deep. Plant your trees in good composted soil, and mulch them with three inches of tan-b...
-Preparing Soil For Planting
Dear Sir: I am quite an admirer of your monthly calendar of operations, and hope you will not quarrel with me for saying that I consider it the very best part of your work. I think, however, that a li...
-Preparing The Ground, Planting The Vines
This is probably as well understood in America as in France. In Burgundy, Champagne, and some other districts it is the practice to renew the vigor of the vines by laying down the cane and rooting th...
-The Present And Future Of American Horticulture
The new position we find ourselves most unexpectedly placed in as conductor of this journal, has naturally induced more than ordinary reflection, not only on the existing state, but on the future pros...
-The Present And Future Of American Horticulture. Continued
The tables of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, at their last exhibition, made a display of this fruit that has never been equalled in any country. Truly we shall in a short time have a great p...
-The Present State Of Horticulture In America
The most highly esteemed favour which the early missionaries at Tahiti could confer on the king and queen was to furnish them each, on state occasions, with a specimen of that splendid novelty, the S...
-Preservation Of Flower Stakes
Of all my experiments to preserve flower sticks against rot, the following is the only mode that has proved fully successful: Heat ordinary coal tar to the boiling point; pour into a tub or barrel to...
-The Preservation Of Grapes In Winter
I have long been in the habit of saving Grapes for winter use between bats of cotton. I hare always found a tendency to mold, from, as I suppose, the too close texture of the cotton bats. Last autumn ...
-Preservation Of The Woods And Forests
THE questions, how long, at the present rate of waste and j.- to\J l*AA VOU AIAVL WAXW DMMNU OCTT ****** , ***. TW OHWO eww HVtWHViWK rapidly. This affords un...
-Preservation Of The Woods And Forests. Part 2
A tree, undoubtedly, is one of the most beautiful objects in nature. Airy and delicate in its youth, luxuriant and majestic in its prime, venerable and picturesque in its old age, it constitutes in i...
-Preservation Of The Woods And Forests. Part 3
Forests protect a country from the violence of winds. The lively author of Life in Mexico' writes, 'M. de Humboldt, who examined the will of Cortes, informs us that the conqueror had left sug...
-Preservation Of Trees On Town Plats
In all parts of the Western States are springing up towns that grow with great rapidity. Some of these are destined to rival the Atlantic cities in population and importance; many others will become s...
-Preservation Or Graves
Dear Sir.- I enclose you a recipe for the preservation of grapes, as given by my friend Dr. Blatchford. I ate some of his grapes a few weeks since as fresh and as luscious as if they bad not been mor...
-Preservation Or Ripe Fruit
To A. J Downing, Esq.- About the season when the Madeleine Pear is ripe, (in July,) I expected a friend, who I knew would be delighted with the taste of this fruit. He did not however arrive until the...
-Preserving Cherries From Birds
Dear Sir: If you or any of your readers ever loved a tree or flower, and especially a cherry tree on your own premises, covered with a fine crop of particularly early fruit, which you had set your h...
-Preserving Cut Flowers
A correspondent of the Gardner's Chronicle relates how successful he was in keeping fresh flowers for a long time. About six weeks ago, and when flowers were not so plentiful as they are now, my wif...
-Preserving Flower Stakes From Rot
I have now in my possession flower stakes which have been in constant use for over nine years, and their points are yet perfectly sound and good. I take common coal tar and bring it to the boiling poi...
-Preserving Fruit
We have frequently been asked, what is the best mode of preserving fruit, and whether there are not chemical means of keeping it, so that it may be preserved fresh and wholly unchanged for a long time...
-Preserving Fruit In A Fresh State
Wm. R. and Eliza Smith, of Macedon, N. Y., have devoted nearly their whole time during the fruit season the present and past year, in perfecting their process for preserving soft and perishable fruits...
-Preserving Fruits Fresh
In the February No., 1850, of the Horticulturist, you published an account of the mode of preserving fruit in tin cans, by which (those who succeeded) were to have it in all its freshness and delicacy...
-Preserving Grasses, Ferns And Flowers
EVEN The Horticulturist has its artistic fancies, and it is a pleasure to turn away from the consideration of such practical things as the garden, vineyard, and orchard, and bestow a little time and t...
-Preserving Plants In Winter
Nothing has more discouraged the cultivation of flowers than the supposed difficulty of preserving them in winter; and as this apparently formidable obstacle disappears as the amateur acquires experie...
-Preserving Shade Trees
Aware of the interest you take in the subject of ornamental shade trees, I wish to call attention, or rather to draw out from yourself or your corre-spondents, some information in regard to the best m...
-Preserving The Peach
After several years' trial, I am confident that the application of fine brimstone (flour of sulphur) to the base of the tree will preserve it, first moving away the earth about three inches deep, and ...
-Preserving The Sweet Potato
Many and various articles appear in our agricultural and horticultural journals of the day upon the different races of the vegetable kingdom; but strange it seems to us, that thus far we have not been...
-President Of The American Pomological Society
One of the most gratifying evidences of progress and refinement, is the general love and appreciation of fruits and flowers. These have been too often considered as the mere superfluities of life, but...
-President Wilder Strawberry
The following description of a new strawberry bearing the name of one of our most valued horticulturists, we take from the American Journal of Horticulture, which states it as the substance settled u...
-President Wilder's Address
We give below the address of President Wilder, at the Eighth Session of the American Pomological Society, held at Philadelphia, Sept 11-13, 1860. It is a valuable document, and will be read with much ...
-A Pretty Parlor Vine - The Cobaea Soandons
We have often thought of writing a word encouraging attention to this as the best vine for parlor gardening we know, but we are intercepted by a correspondent of Mr. Vick, and we will let him tell his...
-A Preventive For Woolly Aphis. Aphis Lanigera
This is, undoubtedly, the greatest enemy known to the apple-tree. They seem to destroy the tree by attacking the roots under ground, and not the tree above ground, as is supposed by many. As far as my...
-Price Of Berries And Profit
The average price for ten years past of the blackberries we have sold of all kinds, has been fifteen and six-tenths cents per quart, which gives about the following result per acre : 2,000 quar...
-Prices Of Works On Botany And Gardening
A part of the Library of the London Horticultural Society was brought to the hammer a few weeks since. As the sale gives a list of books not generally distributed in America, and also throws some ligh...
-Prime At Our Horticultural Shows
Your Wording Gardener talks both sensibly and practically on the subject. Frequent and manifest injustice is practiced by the judges, or viewing committees, at all our exhibitions, both horticult...
-Primula Stuartii, Wall. Nat. Ord. Primulacem. Native Of The Himalaya
An alpine, herbaceous plant Leaves radical, numerous, long, broadly lanceolate, acute, gradually gliding at the base into a short footstalk, which is much grooved on the upper side; margin acutely ser...
-A Princely Home In The Suburbs Of New York - How Railroad Princes Live
THE following sketch is from a correspondent of the Boston Transcript: Forty miles from New York city by steamboat, up the East river, through Hell Gate, and out into Long Island sound, one comes to a...
-Princess Alice Maud Strawberry
As one of the objects of the Horticulturist, is the dissemination of correct information in respect to the varieties and character of fruits, I propose to give what I have reason to believe is the tru...
-Principles Of Beauty In Grecian Architecture
The most brilliant epoch of Grecian architecture, and to which we are to look for perfection in the art, was comprized in the short space of about two hundred years, including the respective ages both...
-Printers9 Ink
Some of our readers may remember that four or five years ago the claims of printers' ink as a protection against the canker worm were very generally and thoroughly discussed in all the Eastern Agricul...
-Private Architecture
The institutions of a nation may be inferred from its buildings much more certainly than a man's character from the bumps on his cranium. Castles on hill-tops, huts in the open fields, a few grand chu...
-Prize Essays By The American Institute
We learn that the American Institute is about to offer valuable prizes for the best Essays on the cultivation of various kinds of fruit, such as the Pear, Grape, Strawberry, etc. It will also offer a ...
-Prize Essays Of The American Institute
We have alluded to a list of prizes offered by the American Institute for essays on given subjects. Among these we find a silver medal for the best new varieties of spring Wheat, winter Wheat, Oats, f...
-The Prize Strawberry
The prize of $100, offered some three years ago by the Cincinnati Horticultural Society, has been awarded this season to Mr. McAvoy, a cultivator of that vicinity. As Cincinnati is noted as the finest...
-Prizes At Our Horticultural Shows
Dear Sir - I believe if gardeners would interest themselves more in diffusing a knowledge of the culture of plants in general, it would promote not only a higher state of culture, but induce many to p...
-Prizes In Horticultural Societies
Mr. Downing - I have read with great attention the article on the prizes at the horticultural exhibitions of Philadelphia, by a Working Gardener. I agree with him, that if gardeners would interest ...
-The Producers
The production of flowers by our nurserymen is simply a matter of business, and but little art is required in the pursuit. The art of flower-raising, of which we often hear, is more the result of the...
-Productive Crop
The Salem (Mass.) Gazette says: - We were informed by Mr. Asa Bushby, jr., of South Danvers, that he lately gathered 6000 bunches of onions-from half an acre of land, which sold, delivered at our wh...
-Prof. Harris On The Cubcclio
This able entomologist has sent the following letter to the Boston Cultivator, as a guide to cultivators. As the recommendation of one who has studied the habits of this insect very thoroughly, it is ...
-Prof. Stephens
The analyses quoted by me in the Essay were given with a view to show the general principles on which the value of night soil depends. Much of the value of such materials will depend on the manner in ...
-Professor Johnson's Report
The First Annual Report of Prof, S. W. Johnson, Chemist to the Connecticut State Agricultural Society, and Professor of Analytical and Agricultural Chemistry in Yale College, has been kindly forward...
-The Proficient, The Amatuer, And The Public
The position of the proficient and amateur, may be said to be correlative, and each, to a certain extent, necessary to the success of the other, whatever their profession or calling; and thus each may...
-Profit And Method Of Forest Liaising
THE net profits of one acre of timber plantation, in fifty years, exceeds Fifteen Thousand Dollars. This proposition I will demonstrate by facts and figures. First In my estimate I will use the Whi...
-Profit Of Apple Growing
The apple is the great standard among fruits, as wheat is among grains, or potatoes among vegetables. Some localities, of course, give better returns than others, but everywhere the apple is looked to...
-Profit Of Grape Culture In Missouri
George Long, in writing to Coleman's Rural World gives his experience with grapes the past season, as follows: I have twenty-five acres under charge, of which there were 8,400 vines in bearing, mostl...
-Profit Of Fruit Culture
This subject being introduced, some statements were made of the large profits derived from the culture of the Lady Apple. W. H. Denning, of Dutchess county, had annually sold forty dollars worth of fr...
-A Profitable Peach Orchard
A well known peach grower near Chestertown, favored the party with figures of his gross receipts from a peach orchard of three hundred and twenty-five acres, during a term of nine years. Trees in this...
-Profitable Pear Trees
Win. S. Lapham of Macedon, N. Y., has a pear tree of the Vir-galieu or White Doyenne pear, standing in a corner of his house yard, which is probably over 25 years old, and which yielded the present ye...
-Profitableness Of Raising Pears
At the last meeting of the Oshkosh Horticultural Society, Wis., this subject came up for discussion. Mr. Brainard remarked that his faith was very strong in its success; he thought that a man could ra...
-Profits From Small Farms
THE following account of how a small farm and truck patch of twenty acres was managed upon Long Island, is taken from a paper read by J. W. De Lee Ree, president of the Farmers' Club at Farmingdale, N...
-Profits In Small Fruits
At the Pennsylvania Fruit Growers' Convention, Mr. A. S. Fuller spoke as follows: - Competition is brisk, and this leads me to believe that there are but two classes of small fruit growers who can ma...
-Profits Of Fruit
Each year records are made of private revenues from the growth and sale of fruits. Without reproducing these records of receipts, amounting to from three to five hundred dollars per acre from strawbe...
-Profits Of Gardening In New Jersey
At meeting of the farmers near Woodbury, N. J., a short distance from Philadelphia, where the entire farm industry is raising market vegetables, valuable facts were elicited respecting the pro...
-Profits Of Gooseberries
A friend writes us saying that from a row of the Houghton Gooseberry bushes, one hundred and ninety feet long, two years planted out, he has this season gathered and sold four and one quarter bushels ...
-Profits Of Horticulture In Pennsylvania
Extracts from Address of Josiah Hoopes before Annual Meeting of Pennsylvania Fruit Growers' Society at Chambersburgh, January 17, 1871. THE cultivation of small fruits with us is necessarily accompan...
-Profits Of Horticulture In Pennsylvania. Continued
During the fourth and fifth years the trees commenced bearing, and the product was fifty dollars per acre. The sixth and seventh, $100 per acre, and the eighth, ninth and tenth years, an average of $2...
-Profits Of Market Gardening
Mr, J. J. H. Gregory delivered three lectures, recently, at Cornell University on Market Gardening and Market Farming, in which we are glad to see he gave some common sense ideas about the cost and ...
-Profits Of Pear Culture
It was stated by a gentleman present that Martin Smith, of Tarrytown, had sold $600 worth of Virgalieu pears (at $4 per bushel,) from less than an acre, beside nearly $100 worth of Bartletts. Another ...
-The Profits Of Pear Culture As A Market Fruit
In looking at the remarkable statements which have been made at various times in the fruit conventions, and reading them over again as they have circulated in the periodicals, one would suppose that t...
-Profits Of Pear Growing In England
Pear growing, it will be Been from the following extract, can not be an unprofitable culture in England, with all the defects of climate. If we were to go into some details in this way, in regard to p...
-The Profits Of Poaches
To show what peaches have paid in past years, we quote the following figures from the note book of Mr. . G. Fennimore, of Delaware. Mr. Fennimore has been one of the oldest and most successful grower...
-Profits Of Small Fruits
An Kssay delivered before the Annual Meeting of the Pennsylvania Fruit Growers' Society, at Chombersburg, Jan 18, 1871. SMALL fruits, not small in value, bat so-called because they are found growing ...
-Profits Of Small Fruits. (Continued.) Raspberries
An Essay delivered before the Annual Meeting of the Pennsylvania Fruit Growers' Society, at Chambersburg Jan. 18th, 1861. By Wm. Parry, Of Cinnaminson, N. J. THE raspberry, coming next to the strawb...
-Profits Of Small Fruits. Blackberries
An Essay delivered before the Annual Meeting of the Pennsylennia Fruit Grousers' Society, at Chambersbury, Jan. 18th, 1801. By Wm. Parry, Of Cinnaminson, N. J. BLACKBERRY bushes, formerly considered...
-Profits Of The Cold Grapery
In the Horticulturist of February, 1852, at the request of the late A. J. Downing, I gave a practical account of the Cold Grapery at this place which was planted in March, 1850, and, as the question, ...
-Profits Or Fruit Culture In Oregon
The following statement of P. W. Gillett of Astoria, shows that the inhabitants of Oregon have not been idle in fruit culture, and are likely to reap a fair reward for their labors: - Fruit-growing, ...
-A Profusely-Yielding Strawberry Bed
This strawberry bed was, perhaps, thirty-five or forty feet long, and an oblong-square - the earth a stiff, yellow clay. It had been well prepared, by manuring, before the plants were put in it, which...
-Progress
This is the fourteenth year of our Association. Eight years have elapsed since the Society held its session in this city. Most sincerely do I congratulate yon upon the attendance at this meeting. But ...
-Progress In Horticulture - Is There Any?
IT is not an uncommon thing to hear people say after attending a horticultural exhibition, and luxuriating their eyes upon the display of exquisite fruits, Oh yes! it is all very well for a few rich...
-Progress Of Horticulture In Western New-York
There is probably no subject that has engaged the attention of the staid citizens of the middle and western part of our Union, during the past decade, more than orcharding and gardening,and that too w...
-The Progressive Decline Of The Vital Powers Of A Plant
Mr. Townley is given somewhat to speculation in this, and a previous article, on the Decline of Fruits; and he certainly manages his subject with much ingenuity. I don't say that he is not right; but ...
-The Progressive Decline of The Vital Powers Of A Plant
We commend the following interesting and valuable article, to the notice of our readers. Ed. A. J. Downing, Esq. - Dear Sir: When considering various explanations which had been advanced to account f...
-The Progressive Decline of The Vital Powers Of A Plant. Part 2
The expedients which at various times have been resorted to with a view to prevent the disease, such as by obtaining the seed-tubers from late situations, or by raising them before the haulm had natur...
-The Progressive Decline of The Vital Powers Of A Plant. Part 3
The life of an animal is marked by three distinct stages, progressive, conservative, and declining. In youth, the greatest amount of food is assimilated; the body increases ra-piply in size, and the l...
-The Progressive Decline of The Vital Powers Of A Plant. Part 4
Now why is this? Owing to a difference in constitutional vigor, certainly; but do not these plants afford indications of a progressive alteration in the abundance and viscidity of the fluids? The tub...
-Progressive Gardener's Society (2)
This Society is doing a good work by its conversational meetings. The discussions thus far possess so much interest that we gladly make room for them, and hope they may be continued. The names of the ...
-The Progressive Gardener's Society, Philadelphia
This Society holds stated meetings for the discussion of subjects pertaining to Horticulture, and it would be well for the cause if all similar Societies held meetings for a like object These discussi...
-The Progressive Gardeners' Society
The gardeners of Philadelphia have recently organized a Society under this name, the object of which, we learn from the Morning Pennsyl-vanian, is Mutual improvement in the branches connected with th...
-Progressive Gardeners' Society (2)
The following is a continuation of the proceedings of this Society from oar last number. It begins with the last part of Prof. .Stephens's essay on Manures. In considering the application of manure t...
-Prolific Character Of Fruit-Trees In California And The West
We hear it often remarked that the fruit trees of this State are remarkable for tendencies to an over-abundant crop, and that it holds good in every description of fruit We know this to be so, not onl...
-A Promising Peach
On the 23d of last month we received from Messrs. J. Capps & Son, nurserymen, of Mount Pulaski, Illinois, the following note: We send you herewith a specimen of a remarkably early peach, which origi...
-The Pronunciation Of Horticultural Names
To amateurs of fruits and flowers the pronunciation of horticultural names is among the most familiar of the minor sources of vexation. This petty annoy-ance, were it of those to which one is only ver...
-The Pronunciation Of Horticultural Names. Continued
Thus, his typography of Wis-tar-ta, exhibited not only the pronunciation, but the origin of the term, as in honor of Dr. Wistar. Of American writers, Mr. Hovey, in his Magazine of Horticulture, has,...
-Propagating Pears From Roots
I now propagate for myself and intimate friends the most choice varieties of pears, which I obtain by means of the roots. Not a single one fails in this new process. It is immaterial in what manner th...
-Propagating Plants
That the stock upon which a graft is inserted has an influence upon its future growth, is well known. If it were not so, then grafting, budding, and similar modes of propagating plants would not have ...
-Propagating Plants By Budding
Budding is the art of taking a bad with a small portion of the bark adjoining from one plant and inserting it in that of another, or into some other part of the same plant from which it was taken. Th...
-Propagating Plants By Budding. Continued
The expert budder holds the bud between the thumb and forefinger of his left hand while making the incision in the stock; and as the knife leaves it, he catches the lower joint of the bark attached to...
-Propagating Plants By Cuttings Of Ripe Wood
Many kinds of plants whose stems and branches are composed of what is called ligneous fiber, are readily propagated by cuttings of the ripened wood. Sometimes wood of two or more years old is used for...
-Propagating Plants By Cuttings Of Ripe Wood. Part 2
Fig. 88. There are some plants that do not emit roots readily from any other point except near their buds, and therefore it is evident that they should be cut at this point, so as to expose that pecu...
-Propagating Plants By Cuttings Of Ripe Wood. Part 3
Rank substances, such as undecayed vegetable or animal matter, should never be allowed near cuttings; and where it may be necessary to use manure, it should always be old, well decomposed, and thoroug...
-Propagating Plants By Grafting
Grafting is governed by the same physiological principles as budding. There must exist an affinity between the stock and cion; if not, a permanent union is impossible. With some of the modes in use,...
-Propagating Plants By Grafting. [Continued From January Number.] By A. 8. Fuller
Roots are often used for stocks instead of the stems of plants. Cions may be fitted to a root, or a section of one, in precisely the same manner as they are upon stems or branches. The mechanical part...
-Propagating Plants By Layers
The same principles given for propagating plants by cuttings are also applicable to layers. In fact, a layer is only a cutting that is allowed to remain attached to the parent plant until it has produ...
-Propagating Plants By Suckers And Division of The Roots
Dr. Asa Gray, in his Structural Botany, page 102, defines a sucker as a branch of subterranean origin, which, after running horizontally and emitting roots in its course, at length, following its n...
-Propagating Plants By Suckers And Division of The Roots. Continued
When trees have been subjected to this mode of propagation for several successive generations, it increases their natural tendency to produce suckers, until with some kinds the habit will become a ver...
-Propagation
The only advisable method of propagating is by seed. So soon as the soil is in good working order after the breaking-up of frost, prepare aa much surface as may be required, by digging and pulverizing...
-Propagation And Culture
Most of the kinds grow freely.enough from cuttings placed in sand, tinder a bell-glass or miniature-frame, if taken off soon after they nave done flowering, or, indeed, at any time after January, prov...
-Propagation And Culture Of Trees - The Way I Do
I have derived great pleasure and profit from the perusal of the writings of those engaged, as I am, in growing fruit trees, whether for sale or in the orchard. Nor has anything that I have seen appea...
-Propagation And Winter Forcing Of Roses
At a Conversational Meeting of the New York Horticultural Society, as reported by the American Agriculturist, A Bridgeman read the following remarks on Roses: My practice does not, I presume, differ...
-Propagation By Budding
As the season for budding approaches, we presume a chapter on the subject will be acceptable and timely to such of our readers as have not familiarized themselves with this interesting and useful art....
-Propagation By Cuttings
This is one of the most common and available modes of extending plants. A cutting is simply a part of a plant taken off and placed in a position to form roots, and become in all respects a living repr...
-Propagation By Mere Leaves
Richard Bradley, in the last century, published a translation from the Dutch of Agricola, on the Propagation of Plants by Leaves, in which it was asserted that, by the aid of a mastic invented by th...
-Propagation By Seeds
The perpetuation of the greater portion of the known species of plants is directly by their seeds, which in their wild state they perfect with great uniformity; but when cultivated, the vital forces a...
-Propagation Of Fanoy Pelagoniums
About the beginning of February is as good a time as any for taking cuttings; select some good tope from the very best sorts that are out; get as many thumb-pots as you will require for the purpose; f...
-Propagation Of Fish
Information of the highest importance on the artificial propagation of fish was laid before the late meeting of the British Association. Experiments with salmon, made at Perth, Scotland, have been ...
-Propagation Of Plants
As this subject has of late been considerably discussed in various horticultural journals, I am tempted to offer my mite of experience on what seems to roe a much more simple matter than most of those...
-Propagation Of Plants By Cuttings
This is one of the most common and universally practised modes of extending plants. A cutting is simply a part of a plant taken off and placed in a position to form roots, and become in all respects a...
-Propagation Of Plants By Cuttings Of The Green Wood
When propagating from the young growing wood or succulent stems of herbaceous plants, it should be borne in mind that we are operating with an active vegetation instead of one that is dormant. In the...
-Propagation Of Plants By Cuttings. Management Of Cuttings Continued
As remarked in a previous number, there is a certain state of maturity in all plants, at which period they can most readily be propagated. Some emit roots from young growths if simply thrown i...
-Propagation Of Roses By Cuttings
It is generally believed by amateurs and others, that Moss, Provins, French, Damask, and Bourbon Roses, etc, are difficult to increase by cuttings; but by the following method, these sorts may be rais...
-Propagation Of Roses By Layers
While on the subject of Roses, we may here repeat the following on propagating this flower by layers, from the Country Gentleman: June, or one-seasoned roses, are to be met with in almost every gar...
-Propagation Of The Anemone Japonica
If a root of this plant be taken from the ground, after flowering, it will be found to resemble brown cord, divided into a great number of ramifications. Upon its surface will be perceived a great mul...
-Propagation Of The Camellia
Though the mode of multiplying the camellia by means of leaf-buds has been some time introduced, it is not yet so extensively known and employed as it deserves to be. Many amateurs and cultivators are...
-Propagation Of The Grape-Vine From Cuttings Of Green Young Shoots
Mr. Ferdinand Rubens, the author of a very valuable work on the Grape-vine, referred to by Dr. C. W. Grant in the fourth edition of his catalogue, communicates to a friend of his in this country the o...
-Propagation Of Trees
I havE written nothing about Horticulture so long, that I feel almost ashamed to begin again. Yet I do not know but it is as well for me not to begin. For the past three or four years, I have been so ...
-Propagation Of The Double Chinese Primrose. Edward Decker, Gardener To J. Q. Jones, Esq., New Brighton, 8taten Island
Now is the time to commence preparing a stock of this most beautiful and indispensable winter and spring flowering plant We suppose you are already in possession of an old plant or two to commence ope...
-The Proper Expression Of A Rural Cemetery
One of the strongest desires of man is that of expressing himself to his fellows, and asserting bis own individuality. The ways in which, by expressing his individuality, one sways the sentiments, and...
-The Proper Expression Of A Rural Cemetery. Continued
II. It is also befitting that a permanent and ornate cemetery should aim at fulness and accuracy in its historical expression. Every burial-place is a repository of unorganized history. An Indian grav...
-The Proper Situation Of Trees On Lawns From One To Three Acres In Extent
I will start with the thesis that a place in the country designed as a residence the year round, is not complete if it does not embrace among its collection of trees many evergreens; not that I would ...
-The Properties Of Thecarnatioh
First. The flower should be not less than two and a half inches across. Second. The guard or lower petals, not less than six in number must be broad, thick, and smooth on the outside, free from notch...
-The Proportion Of Meant To Ends
And here let me retrace my steps to illustrate a point in Industrial Economy which I have already incidentally touched, but have not illustrated as its importance deserves, and as the prevailing misco...
-Protect The Crowns Of Trees
Experience is a good teacher, and it has taught us that the action of severe frosts, followed by rapid thaws on the surface roots and crowns of trees, creates very great in-jury, often resulting in de...
-Protecting Fruit On The Prairies
Suppose two farmers settle in the open, bleak prairies of the West. Each plants an orchard. One in the broad plain, exposed to sun and wind; the other surrounds his lot with a doable row of Norway fir...
-On Protecting Native Grapes In Winter
It is our duty to profit by experience. The results of the past year have taught a lesson to be improved by vineyardista, as a matter of pleasure as well as profit. Among those who laid down their Gra...
-Protecting The Birds
Do you not think this matter comes within the jurisdiction of Societies? I send you our local paper, with some remarks called forth by a proposition brought forward in the Common Council to import Eng...
-Protecting Trees Prom Cattle
The beauty of individual specimens, as well as groups of trees, is often marred, to a great extent, by the means employed to protect them from cattle. None of these are more objectionable than the abo...
-Protecting the Timber Interest
The growing interest in forest planting in the United States recalls to our mind the way the timber question was met once by the English government in China. The timber supplies began to grow short. A...
-Protection Against Mice In Winter
The mischief committed by mice during the winter in gnawing trees is not only an annoyance, but often a serious loss. Various preventives have been suggested, and we have recommended some which we kno...
-Protection In Winter
Although Celery is very hardy in a natural or poorly grown state, it is soon injured by frost when gorged with luxuriance, or blanched; therefore, as we have it in cultivation, winter protection is ne...
-Providence (R. I) Horticultural Society
This Society held its Fall Exhibition on the 13th of September. The exhibition, on the whole, was a fine one - fully equal to any previous show; though vegetation had suffered much in consequence of t...
-Pruing Fruit-Trees
From observation and experience I have learned some facts relative to trimming trees, which may be useful to the right time to trim fruit trees? But I have never heard the more important question ask...
-Pruned And Trained As Small Trees
The Hawthorne, (three varieties,) Buckthorn, Privet, White Lilac, Purple Fringe, Sassafras, and Moose Wood or Striped-bark Maple, are very ornamental. The two last are natives ; the Privet is also occ...
-Pruning
PRUNING, properly considered, is one of the most important operations connected with the growth and management of trees and plants. That many do not so regard it, we hare the most abundant evidence. O...
-Pruning (2)
(West Jersey.) The best time to head-back the old forest trees you describe, is immediately before the sap starts. Brush over the wounds, in all cases, with the liquid shellac, (gum-shellac dissolved ...
-Pruning (3)
Single specimens of shrubs on a lawn are frequently allowed to grow tall and unsightly, to the extent of requiring supporting stakes, detracting much from their beauty of form and foliage during summe...
-Pruning - Shade Trees - Pears On Quince
Will you please to answer, through your first number, if convenient, the following queries, or give us an article or articles on them. 1. At what times in the year should the different kinds of pruni...
-Pruning And Management Of The Peach-Tree
In August last, Mr. F. Malleson, Gardener to His Majesty the King of the Belgians, at the Royal Gardens, Claremont, having seen M. Lepere's trees, expressed himself as having been highly gratified wit...
-Pruning And Management Of The Peach-Tree. Continued
12. Double buds generally consist of a wood bud and a flower-bud. Fig. 2 shows this kind of buds: a, wood-buds; c, flower-buds. 13. In the triple buds, such as are seen at d, Fig. 3, two are flower-b...
-Pruning And Management Of The Peach-Tree (2)
150. First Pruning Second year of planting. Fig. 1 represents the results of the first summer's growth. We begin by cutting off the piece c, closely to the angle formed by the two branches. This port...
-Pruning And Management Of The Peach-Tree (2). Continued
156. These means may be greatly assisted by disbudding, pinching, summer-pruning, and even by defoliation; and these operations may be employed separately or combined, according to the age and growth ...
-Pruning And Management Of The Peach-Tree (3)
169. Fifth Pruning Sixth year of planting. The operations of the fifth pruning are exactly the same as those of the fourth. The extremeties of the four branches a, b, c, d, are pruned to an equal len...
-Pruning And Management Of The Peach-Tree. II. Propagation Of The Peach By Budding
31. It is by budding that the Peach tree is propagated. The proper stocks for it are the Almond, the Saint Julien and Damask Plums, and the Peach itself. Lately the Myrobalan Plum has been budded on, ...
-Pruning And Management Of The Peach-Tree. III. Training The Principal Branches
99. This, to speak properly, is the first nailing which is made After the winter pruning. In consists in fastening to the wall, or trellis, all the principal branches of the tree. By this operation we...
-Pruning And Management Of The Peach-Trees. Defoliation
144. The object of this is, to remove leaves that shade the fruit so as to deprive it of the amount of light necessary to give it the proper flavor and color. 145. The leaves are taken off at several...
-Pruning And Management Of The Peach-Trees. Disbudding, Or Removal Of Young Shoots
122. Disbudding is the suppression of all the useless or badly-disposed shoots and laterals, with the intention of concentrating the sap, of encouraging the growth of the young shoots retained, and of...
-Pruning And Management Of The Peach-Trees. On Pinching
125. This is a most important operation. It consists in the suppression of the herbaceous extremities of young shoots. These are taken off by pinching them between the nails of the thumb and fore fing...
-Pruning And Management Of The Peach-Trees. On Summer-Pruning
136. The object of this operation is to remedy any bad results of winter-pruning, of pinching, and of omissions in the disbudding; also to concentrate the sap in the tree, by removing those useless pr...
-Pruning And Management Of The Peach-Trees. Thinning The Fruit
132. The danger of frosts, which are often so fatal to the blossoms of the Peach tree, obliges us, at the time of pruning, to retain more flowers than is absolutely necessary; and if the weather be fa...
-Pruning And Management Of The Peach-Trees. Winter-Disbudding
120. This operation is performed at the same time as the winter-pruning and nailing. Although it is but little practiced at Montreuil, I shall notice it lest it should be supposed that we are ignorant...
-Pruning And Management of The Peach-Tree. Section V. - The Practice Of Pruning Applied To The Peach-Tree Trained In The Square Form. L Formation Of The Tree
146. It has been shown (55) how the young tree was planted. We will now return to that point, and examine the operations which it must each year undergo, in order that it may assume the square form of...
-Pruning Dwarf And Standard Pear Trees
The following question was discussed : What is the best form of pruning the Dwarf Pear Tree? and what the best for the Standard, and the best season for doing it? W. P. Townsend, of Lockport, said he...
-Pruning Dwarf Pears
Many suppose, when reading of the necessity of pruning dwarf pear-trees, to make them bushy and induce early bearing, that the lower limbs should all be taken off and only an occasional end branch be ...
-Pruning Evergreen
Little attention is commonly given to pruning or shortening in the branches of evergreen trees. Some of them naturally assume a handsome form, while others might be much improved by the operation. We ...
-Pruning Evergreens (2)
I Will suppose, for example, you have a dozen evergreens, two of a kind. Some you wish to grow in form of pinnacles and you select the Norway spruce, because it is a strong-growing variety, and let th...
-Pruning For Pear Blight
I observe there ha3 been great complaint the past season about pear blight. Now if I can point out a remedy for this ruthless destroyer, I know I shall receive the thanks of many. If I have not found ...
-Pruning Grape-Vines
Mr. Bizzell writes us that we do not seem to have understood the advantages of the new mode of pruning Grape-vines, as set forth in his letter in our March number. We have read that letter again very ...
-Pruning Of Pear-Trees
Barry, in his Fruit Garden, very truly remarks: Too many people imagine that trees can take care of themselves, as trees in the forest, on the ground that nature preserves a balance in all her works;...
-Pruning Or Not
There are examples in abundance to support the efficiency of systematic pruning, and again there are frequent instances to support those disciples of nature who believe a tree is better if left to its...
-Pruning Prairie Roses
No other hardy plant can show such a cataract of bloom, or display it with more elegance than these magnificent roses. But they should stand well away from the eye, like an oil painting; and as for fr...
-Pruning Roses
The introduction of a wood-cut of a closely-pruned Rose in last year's Almanac, induced some subscribers to ask for more information which it seemed to foreshadow; we therefore present the following g...
-Pruning Shrubbery
THERE is, perhaps, no subject in horticulture so little understood by amateurs as pruning. The gardener, when he prunes trees and shrubs, does it for the purpose of regulating the crop of fruit or flo...
-Pruning Spiraeas
It may not be generally known that the different varieties of Spiraeas must not be pruned at the same period, and that the success in bringing their blossoms to greatest perfection will depend on the ...
-Pruning The Pear-Tree
We recommend to all practical men the article by B., New Jersey, in our present issue, on pruning the Pear-tree. It contains the essence of what it is desirable to know on the subject, in a condense...
-Pruning The Raspberry
The accompanying figures represent the wood of the preceding summer's growth. The portion with buds, marked a a, is from the upper part of the shoot; that with buds, marked b b, is taken from the low...
-Pruning The Roots
This is practiced as well to promote fruitfulness as to lessen the dimensions of trees. The roots, as has been shown, are the organs that absorb from the ground the principal food of the tree, and in ...
-On Pruning Trees At The Time Of Transplanting
HOW should trees be pruned at the time of transplanting or should they be pruned at all are yet open questions among planters. As the subject will at this season of the year be one of the most general...
-On Pruning Trees At The Time Of Transplanting. Continued
Transplanted trees are, until re-rooted, in the same situation, nearly, as trees cut down or rooted up and left on the surface of the ground - that is, they must relv mainlv on the sap existing in the...
-Pruning Trees For Shape
About this time last spring I had a visit from an Indiana farmer. He was a quaint looking old gentleman clad in home-spun jeans, and with a profusion of black hair reaching down between his shoulder...
-Pruning Trees In Spring
When pruning trees in the spring, Temember that for every bud or inch of wood you cut away, two more will be formed; and if you do not so cut as to throw the elongation from the last bud on the shoot ...
-Pruning When Transplanting
We consider it important to shorten back all fruit-trees, shrubs, and vines when transplanting. It lessens, by reducing the number of buds, the demand for supply on the Toots as soon as that laid up i...
-Pruning, And Other Matters Of Interest. (A Letter Not Intended For Publication)
J. Jay Smith, Esq. - Dear Sir: All plants that are deciduous are not dormant, in the literal meaning of the word. Even in winter, plants derive nourishment from the soil, and are constantly adding to ...
-The Pruning, Cleansing, And Dressing ,Op Fruit-Trees
All pruning should be done the moment the leaves have fallen, whatever be the period at which they are required to be forced. To go into detail about pruning in general would occupy too much space. Bu...
-Prunning Roses
Roses, to produce large and perfect flowers, must be pruned severely every year; hence, the advice given applies to roses of any age, provided that they have been cut back before. Old plants, having b...
-A Prussian Seed Farm
AN admirable feature in the commercial gardens of Europe is the clustering of specialties in the exact spot where each is the most certain to succeed. In fact, years of constant trial have so full...
-A Prussian Seed Farm. Continued
The beds are raised about two feet high, and thoroughly enriched with well-rotted horse-stable manure. The seeds are sown about the first of April, and the heads are fit to cut by the middle of July. ...
-Psylla Pyri, Or Pear Psylla
I have found this minute and destructive insect on my pear trees as late as the middle of December, the imperfect insect or pupa still busily employed in sucking the sap by means of its rostrum or pie...
-Public Grounds Especially Adapted To The Culture And Exhibition Of Subtropical And Flowering Plants
THERE are many opportunities for using tender and subtropical plants where the cost is of little consequence, that is, for the decoration of public grounds. Many persons thinking that trees only are s...
-A Public Park For Baltimore
Now that our large cities are provided with Rural Cemeteries on a large scale, which excel in beauty, magnitude, and embellishment, any of their European prototypes, and which are peculiarly American ...
-Publicatons Received
California, by Marshall P. Wilder - Mr. Wilder's Lecture republished by request. O. S. Wildey - Woodward & Co., Madison, Wis. - Catalogue Fruit and Ornamental Trees. Storrs, Harrison & Co., Painesvi...
-The Publisher's Farrwell
SIX and a half years ago the plan of The Horticulturist was matured and brought before the public. Many of its supporters and subscribers have been so from the commencement, and are familiar with its ...
-Purchasing Fruit And Ornamental Trees
How few understand, when selecting fruit or ornamental trees, that there are very material points to observe to secure trees that will thrive and do well. Every person who wishes to improve his ground...
-The Pure Juice of The Grape
J. J. Smith, Esq. - Dear Sir: The following aneodote (which I picked up lately) may amuse some of your temperance readers. My friend, Dr. S., told me that about thirty yean ago - when our native wines...
-Pure Native Wines - What And Where Are They?
During the past two or more years every journal, agricultural, horticultural, political, literary, and religious, throughout the length and breadth of the States, has had more or less to say i...
-Pure Native Wines - What And Where They Are
Under this head, our readers will remember an article in our June number. It was written with the best of feeling toward all wine-makers, and as a guide to those who intend planting the vine with a vi...
-Purifying Water
In every age, and in every hot climate, from the healing of the waters of Marah until the present time, some vegetable has been employed to render noxious water palatable. In some parts of Ceylon, esp...
-Purple Side-Saddle Flower - Sarracenia Purpurea
Whoever may have occasion to wander out among the numerous sphagnons swamps that diversify the sandy plains in the neighborhood of Albany, any time during the month of June, will not fail to have his ...
-Put Flowers On Your Table
Set flowers on your table-a whole nosegay if you can get it, or but two or three, or a single flower, a rose, a pink, nay, even a daisy, Bring a few daisies and buttercups from your last field work, a...
-Pyramid Pruning
I never see anything like proper pyramid pruning in this country. Having given attention to the mode pursued by our brother gardeners in France, permit me to give critically the mode so followed; that...
-Pyramidal China Asters
Among all the beautiful annuals cultivated at the present time, we know of none more worthy of attention than these charming pyramidal Asters, recently introduced by the French florists. M. Truffant, ...
-Pyramidal Flower Beds
A correspondent of the London Garden describes the mode by which he makes pyramidal flower beds, about six feet in diameter and six feet high - one or two of which, well made and planted, have a strik...
-The Pyramidal Pear Trees, In The Garden Of Plants
The most beautiful sight, in the way of hardy fruit tree culture, that greeted our eyes last season, in Europe, was that of the Pyramidal Pear Trees in the Jardin des Plantes. On one side of this gre...
-Pyrethrins, Vars
New and valuable hardy herbaceous perennials. The varieties from which the enclosed flowers were taken were obtained by Mr. Bliss from the continent of Europe, and are perfectly hardy having withstood...
-Pyrumania
Gentle reader, whoever thou art, whether of the honorable craft of nurserymen, or a plain amateur, be not ireful. If of the latter class, methinks I hear you say, A true bill. Doubtless such is the ...
-Pyrumania - No I. Pear Fever
Pyrumania, or the Pear Fever, is an endemic disease, affecting more violently the inhabitants of the rural districts, and chiefly those recently from city life. This disease has several remarkable ph...
-Quaint And True
Good, honest John Evelyn published, in 1686, his Kalendar, or Gardeners' Almanac, with the following introduction: As Paradise (though of God's own planting) was Paradise no longer than the man was p...
-A Quaint Old Book On Horticulture
A New Orchard And Garden; On, The Best Way Of Planting, Gafting, And To Make Any Ground Good For A Rlch Orchard: Particularly in the North, and generally for the whole Kingdom of England, as in Natur...
-The Qualifications Of A Good Gardener
In the columns of your widely spread journal there has appeared from time to time various articles respecting the qualities of gardeners, and as I believe that you have their true interest at heart, y...
-Quality
Here, after all, is the failing point of this crop. In a dry, warm season, when grown in rather poor, sandy soil, they are often quite eatable, and are very they are quite watery and stringy - so much...
-Quebec
A walled city will long, we trust, be a novelty to our people; but it is a curiosity, and this sight alone would repay a visit. Historical interest of no common kind attaches to it, but our business i...
-A Queen's Book
Our table is graced by an elegant octavo of five hundred pages, with plates, with the following title: The Natural History of Dee Side and Braemar. By the late William Macgillivray, LL. D., Author of...
-Queries About Roses, Evergreens, Shrubs And Plants
Editor Horticulturist: - We would like to know a list of ten best roses for outdoor culture here. Our winters are severe enough to kill the Queen of Prairie and English Moss, so we do not expect to gr...
-Queries Answered By Mr. Anderson
Q. How many years did Mr. Anderson's windmill pump continue in operation! A.. About four years. Q How frequently did it fail to operate from getting out of order? A. It was seldom out of order - no...
-Query - Is Mildew A Parasite?
Is it the educt of organic or inorganic disease? or is it the product of external circumstances? Is it a disease in the sap of the plant, brought up and through its organism, and left as an excrement ...
-Ques. 6. Is it advisable to plant, in western New York, the White Doyenne Pear for orchard purposes, in view of its present liability to crack and spot in certain localities?
S. B Gavitt, of Wayne county, would not recommend it generally in western New York; although there are soma localities where, with a sandy or gravelly soil, it seems to have done well. Mr. Smith, of ...
-Ques. 7. What is to be understood by the term a standard, and what by the term a dwarf tree?
Mr. Townsend remarked that there was a great misapprehension among tree-planters as to these terms. Calls a standard tree a plant growing upon a seedling stock of a variety where the plant will, when ...
-Ques. 9. In transplanting trees, is pruning the tops and roots of importance? and if so, under what circumstances?
Dr. Beale thought this an important matter. Mr. Barber. - In taking up trees, we should take up all the roots we can. Injured roots should be examined, and the injured parts cut away. Where the roots...
-"What Are The Characteristics Needed In A Native Grape To Constitute It" Best" As A Fruit For The Table?"
Those who have eaten grapes no better than the Isabella, or imperfectly-ripened Catawba, have taken grapes as we take the lot of life - a mingling of good and ill, in which, from untoward circumstance...
-Question 1st. "What Are The Characteristics Needed In A Native Grape To Constitute It" Best" As A Fruit For The Table?". Continued
Let us now, for a few moments, take up for examination our favorite among the foreign kinds, the Grizzly Frontignan. Here we have a large amount of the acids that lie at the base of excellence in the ...
-Question 2d. "Are These' Characteristics Inconsistent With Those Needed For The Best Grape For Wine?"
The answer to this will require but very little consideration, for if our views of the former question are correct, the inference will be already present in the minds of those who have followed our co...
-Question 3d. What Is The Comparative Value Of The Native And Foreign Grape As Objects Of Culture For Profit?
This question fitly leads, for even a most cursory view of it will lay open to our sight the great importance of the subject commercially since the advent of the new varieties of grapes, which are wor...
-Question 6th. Is Not Some Good System Of Training Indispensable To The Continued Productive-Ness And Longevity Of The Vine?
This question suggests a very wide field of speculation, upon which we will not step this; evening. A very few remarks will be sufficient to set forth clearly our affirmative position, and by the kind...
-Question. - Do Your Remarks Apply To The Isabella And Catawba?
Mr. Fuller. - No. We have not had experience enough in this country to know what we can do. Some varieties we can cut clear down; others we prune to a well-developed bud. I would leave two good buds o...
-Question. - Do Your Remarks Apply To The Isabella And Catawba?. Continued
Mr. Fuller. - If the Delaware was grown under glass as well as out of doors, I should doubt its being a native. [Then we should, for the same reason, have to doubt the nativity of the Isabella, Diana...
-Question. - Which Is The Best Time To Lay Out Arbor Vitae Hedges?
A member answered to-morrow morning at 7 o'clock, which Mr. Burgess endorsed. Mr. Burgess. - I used to kill toads in my strawberry patch. One day I killed one, and it contained 2 caterpillars, 4 snai...
-Questions For Horticulturist
1. Are there two kinds of Celery, the solid and hollow? or is this difference in the stalks brought about by the manner of cultivation or accident 7 I know it is claimed that there are two sorts, but ...
-Quick Returns
To American florists we can recommend this branch of business as something well worthy of their attention. It is plain that the grower gets a quick return with little labor; and with a great saving in...
-The Quince
The quince trees throughout a large extent of country have for several years, at least, been infested by an insect apparently of the moth species. Of the natural history, or even the existence of this...
-The Quince (2)
Compared with the money returns derived from the sale of its fruit, the quince has received less attention and less extended cultivation than it deserves.* No fruit-tree can be more easily grown, non...
-Quinces And Plums
Quinces have been affected also, by a similar blight, not so fatal as to the pear, but more so than on the apple, which soon recovered of their own accord, and bore their fruit as usual. For two year...
-Quinces In Central New York
Twelve years ago few people believed that Quinces could be grown in the valley of the Mohawk, although it was known that they were cultivated at Clinton, in the south part of the county. About that ti...
-Quinces On Thorns
Some of the most beautiful Quinces we have seen the past autumn, were grown upon the common white thorn, so abundant in many of the fields in the country, that they seem quite a nuisance. There is no ...
-Quinn Pear
Several specimens of this pear were handed to us by P. T. Quinn, of Newark, N. J., on Jan. 2d, who stated that the fruit had been kept in an ordinary cellar, without any particular care having been ta...
-R. R. Scott
There are many topics connected with this subject to which I should feel disposed to advert, did time permit; but, limited as we are, I could not do justice to them. I shall therefore only remark, tha...
-R. R. Scott, Of Pa
In certain localities the quince stock does not succeed; near Philadelphia, in a strong gravelly subsoil they utterly fail, while the standards are good. Mr. Scott presented two specimens of pear wood...
-Rabbits, In Severe Seasons
I am always pleased to see the birds, rabbits, and even the musk-rat, rogue though he be, in my garden and nurseries, and occasionally give them aid and comfort when necessary, more especially by e...
-Rachel Devereaux; Or, The Wolf Of Vignoble
BY MRS. HELEN CORWIN FISHER, Author of Carrie Emerson Wild, The Curse of the Everleigh? etc., etc. Mrs. Fisher is well known to the readers of the Weekly as the writer of the pleasant and entertai...
-Raidence Of Marshall P. Wilder, Esq., At Dorchester
To a person interested in Horticulture and Pomology, we know of no place in America That offers so many attractions. The collection of bearing fruit trees, (Pears especially,) is unequalled. A week wo...
-Railroad Excursion
The Illinois Central Railroad Company have the credit of being the first managers of a line of transportation, with sufficient acumen to recognize the value to the country, and thereby the increased v...
-Railroads In A Social Point Of View
Mr. Editor - Dear Sir: As you have incidentally touched, in the last volume, upon a most important topic - the railroad as a transporter - permit a horticultural correspondent to say a few words respe...
-Railway Travelling And Mushrooming
I was travelling last week, writes a correspondent, by a railway on the English side of the borders of South Wales, when we happened to pass a field spangled with a most luxuriant growth of mushro...
-The Rainy Season
Most persons who read of the rainy season in the tropics, have probably an erroneous opinion of the duration of the showers. Residents in Cuba assure us that the expression is a misnomer as we under...
-Raising And Fruiting Pot Vines As Practiced In England
(Member of the Imperial and Central Horticultural Society Of Paris.) During the course of November, when the wood of the vines from which cuttings are to be taken is sufficiently ripe, they are cut s...
-Raising Early Peas
The course prescribed by your correspondent in the March number, for starting peas early, is certainly a good one, and worthy of the adoption of every lover of so rich and healthful a vegetable. We ha...
-Raising Fruits From Seed
We know of no subject on which we can more profitably offer a few observations at this time of the year than that of raising fruit from seed. We are every year ransacking foreign countries for new var...
-On Raising Fruits From Seed (2)
No man, either in Europe or America, who has any knowledge of the fruit-growing capacities of the United States, entertains the slightest doubt but that we are to be the greatest fruit-growing and fru...
-On Raising Fruits From Seed (2). Continued
Mr. Knight's system of obtaining new and improved varieties, depended entirely on hybridization or artificial impregnation so lightly esteemed by Dr. Van Mons. This is somewhat difficult to practice ...
-On Raising New Grapes By Hybridizing
Dear Sir - I have been very much interested in reading over Dr Valk's article in the Horticulturist for October, describing bis success in hybridising our hardy grapes with the exotic varieties. Too m...
-Raising New Varieties Of Pears From Seed
This branch of fruit-culture is so full of interest, so worthy the attention of all pomologists, and above all has been so strangely neglected of late years - indeed, since the early life of the late ...
-Raising New Varieties Of Pears From Seed. Continued
It remains to be seen whether a seedling Pear can be brought into an earlier fruit-bearing state by being grown under glass, and gently forced, so as to give it a long season of growth. I commenced th...
-Raising Norway Spruce From Seed
Having been a reader of your journal for some time, and often had a desire to pass a remark on many of your practical observations, has induced me to do so at this time. I perceive in the April numbe...
-Raising Or How To Raise The Finest Strawberries
The following is the best way that I know, of cultivating the strawberry in our favorable soil: Select, in the early spring, a rich deep mellow, gravelly loam, if possible, in rather low moist ground...
-Raising Peas - Kitchen-Garden Talk
This is one of those vegetables, said Cobbett, which all men most like. You know there is not a tolerable kitchen-garden in all Europe or North America, where peas are not cultivated, so it is wor...
-On Raising Potatoes From Seed
Having derived much pleasure an information from reading accounts of the experiments recorded in the Horticulturist, I feel it right to contribute what little lays in my power towards the general good...
-Raising Seedling Potatoes
Nearly every species of vegetable is changed, and usually improved, when transplanted from its native wilds into cultivated grounds. 1st. The Perennial gains in size of fruit or seed, but usually not...
-Raising Seedling Potatoes. Continued
A seedling of the Wild Bogota, of which one hill, in the second year of its growth (1853), yielded thirteen pounds of tubers, and one hundred and forty balls, failed from this cause in every hill in 1...
-The Ramble. - A Fragment
Oft in the stilly night, Ere slumber's chain has bound me, Fond memory brings the light Of other days around me. Who has not felt the pleasure, - to some temperaments, perchance, a melancholy one, - ...
-Rambling Notes In February
Seated by a comfortable fire this very foggy day, the Horticulturist, past, present, and to come, has been much the subject of contemplation; its late editor, present in vivid memory, and constantly r...
-A Rampant Wisteria
The foreign journals speak of a beautiful Wisteria - recently in full bloom - covering the front of a well known hotel near Slough, in England, and running around each end for some distance, making al...
-Random Notes
I was much pleased with the communication from your new correspondent Mr. French, and hope he may write often, as it will add considerably to the interest of the Horticulturist. Is there no way to ind...
-Random Notes Of A Winter's Evening
With the comparative leisure of winter, is it not well to take a retrospective glance at what has been accomplished; to be pleased with what has been well done, and to compare notes of what is in prog...
-Random Notes Of A Winter's Evening. Continued
An experiment made here, with salt, in potato culture, may be useful to record: It has been contended that common salt, both was, and was not, valuable to the growth of this crop. I experimented somew...
-Random Notes On Southern Horticulture
I was taking a stroll the other morning among the old faishioned gardens of New-Orleans, which are just beginning to be inviting, after the gloomy and cheerless winter, when it occurred to me that a f...
-Random Notes On Southern Horticulture. Continued
But there are many quiet, snug little gardens and delicious retreats, scattered here and there, through the city and its suburbs, giving a little variety to the ungainly masses of brick and mortar tha...
-Rapid Growing Shade Trees
The same editor, in advising a new beginner how to plant his ornamental grounds, says : It often becomes very desirable to plant trees that grow fast, and to select those which will furnish a shade ...
-Rapid Growth Of Trees
The Larch tree is unanimously acknowledged the most rapid in its growth, and most speedily profitable. The European excels the native American variety both in height and breadth. Mr. Douglas, of Wauke...
-The Rare Trees And Pleasure Grounds Of Pennsylvania
If in this country, where the people from the highest to the lowest, profess to be patriots, they can once be persuaded that planting is a patriotic work, or where all are close calculators of profit ...
-The Rare Trees And Pleasure Grounds Of Pennsylvania. Continued
And the waters disappear. In this smiling retreat Mr. Hamilton delighted to gather together a variety of rare trees and plants, and did much by his enthusiasm, to cultivate a love for such p...
-Rasberries
I have seven varieties of raspberries, which shall be named in the order of their ripening. The Kirtland showed its first ripe berries on the 13th of June, and yielded good picking every day or two f...
-Raspberries
The experience of the present season convinces us that the Red Antwerp, so extensively grown for market in Orange county, N.Y., is different from the true Red Antwerp. It is much more conical, the gra...
-Raspberries (2)
The old canes that have fruited should be pruned out at once. The young canes should also be thinned out where they are too much crowded. Allow six canes to remain for the present, and next April cut ...
-Raspberries (3)
Grapes and strawberries have, during the past few years, received so much attention, that we fear other small fruits have in a great measure been neglected. This is particularly true of the Raspberry...
-Raspberries (4)
The discussion on raspberries gave the autumn or so-called ever-bearing sorts a pretty general reputation as being of little value, while the Clark Raspberry was indorsed as valuable among the Antwerp...
-Raspberries - Soil, Culture, And Varieties
The growing of small fruits as productive and remunerating crops, not only to the market gardener, but to almost every family owning a small garden plot, has become so general and so well appreciated,...
-Raspberries - Soil, Culture, And Varieties. Continued
Fig. 121. - False Red Antwerp. Varieties We shall not attempt to go over all the varieties of Raspberries that are now in cultivation, but will touch upon a few of the leading popular sorts, and n...
-Raspberries At The West
The cultivation of raspberries everywhere within the reach of daily transportation to large cities has become one of the items of rural commerce, and it is important to gain all the knowledge we can a...
-Raspberries Cultivation And Value As A Market Crop
The following is a short abstract of a discussion before the Oshkosh, Wisconsin, Horticultural Society : Mr. J. Brainard said, that as the subject had been adopted at his request, he would state that...
-Raspberry
EDITOR of The Horticulturist: - Dear Sir - By the suggestion of D. H. Brown, Esq., of New Brunswick, I send you two berries, a section of the wood, and a leaf of a new raspberry, found on my premises ...
-Raspberry And Blackberry
The following interesting facts were given by different cultivators present: - Charles Downing said that the variety known as the Hudson River Antwerp, was the only sort cultivated largely for the Ne...
-Raspberry Varieties
The other species to which allusion was made is the Rubus Strigosus, an upright grower, which is increased by suckers from the roots and by planting root cuttings, but not from the tips. Our native Re...
-Rationale Of Draining Land Explained
The reason why drained land gains heat, and water-logged land is always cold, consists in the well-known fact that heat cannot be transmitted downwards through water. This may readily be seen by the f...
-Rats, And Other Matters
Some people believe that Rats take a tenth of the farmer's produce. They are certainly very destructive pests, both in town and country; the person who would invent a certain mode of destroying them w...
-Ravages Of The Curculio Prevented
The accompanying box will show evidence for itself, that I have, for the second year, found means of arresting the fearful progress of the curculio, which is by syringing the trees, after the fall of ...
-The Ravenswood Pear
We present for a Frontispiece this month a pear known around New York as the Ravenswood. It Is a wilding, found some years since in the woods at Havens-wood. Its fine quality being discovered by a gen...
-Rawle's Janet
ONE of the most remarkable sorts of apple trees we are acquainted with, is the Rawle's Janet. As a profitable late keeper few kinds excel it on good sites. Orchards for profit should be only on good s...
-Read's Anglo-American Apple
This is to say that I have a seedling Apple that will excite all fruit growers, when once brought to notice. As I am in possession of most of the leading varieties of the present time, and these in be...
-The Real Monument To Downing
Mr. Editor: I was greatly interested to see the representation of the monument erected in the grounds of the Smithsonian institute, in your last volume, and though I should, with you, have greatly pre...
-Rearing Chickens
A writerin the London Cottage Gardener gives the following excellent directions for rearing chickens, translated from M. Jacque's French work, Le Poulailler. When a hen takes to her nest she is the...
-The Reason Why
Various and valuable matter loads our tables, which has accumulated during several weeks' absence in the tropics, and which will receive attention immediately. Those who do not hear from us before thi...
-Rebecca
Enough, but not one word too much, has been said of that grape. I have two vines growing, but they have not fruited. Had a taste of a berry of it at the fair, through the kindness of Dr. Brinckle. Re...
-Rebecca Grape
This delicious new Grape is an accidental seedling, that sprung up in the garden of Mr. E. M. Peake, of Hudson, New York, and has been in bearing for the last five years. Specimens were shown, in 1856...
-Received
Catalogue of Fruits of the Downing Hill Nursery, Atalanta, Georgia. By William H. Thurmond. An Address before the Crawford County (Penn.) Agricultural and Horticultural Society. By Alfred Huidekoper,...
-The Recent Flower Show At Paris
The Societe d'Horticulture de la Seine held its show in the Champs Elysees, on the 9th inst., and four following days. To give more eclat to this exhibition, England, Germany, and Belgium were each in...
-Reciprocity: The Country Visiting Teh City
Is it fair that we should be always harping on the advantages that citizens derive from the country? That we should ignore the pleasures and information which may be obtained by country folks, however...
-Reciprocity: The Country Visiting Teh City. Continued
If persons in moderate circumstances would receive such during the travelling season in their houses, space would be left in the same apartments in the winter, when the rush of travel is over, for tho...
-The Reconstruction of Our Forests
My Dear Horticulturist: You were so kind as to embody in an article for your November number, on the use of steam power in the more common affairs of life, some thoughts I communicated on the subject....
-Record of Horticulture And "Independent " Criticism
Messrs. Woodward, of the Horticulturist, have put out a neat volume of 136 pages (price $1 00), called the Record of Horticulture. The editor is Mr. A. S. Fuller, who gives his notes on horticultural ...
-The Red Astrachan Apple
Among the most beautiful of Apples are a few varieties which it is said are of Russian origin. These are the Red Astrachan, Duchess of Oldenburg, Borovitsky, Alexander or Emperor Alexander, and Tetof...
-Red Cedar And Mildew
In a communication from W. C. Strong, in the October number of the Horticul-turist, these sentences occur: In this connection, I would ask if any vine-growers have noticed any immunity from mildew t...
-The Red Maple, Acer Rubrum
Deciduous - is a very showy tree, and can be readily transplanted. In the spring it is adorned with clusters of the richest scarlet pendent seed vessels, which present a most striking appearance among...
-The Red Spider
This troublesome pest in orchard houses, etc, is thus to be got rid of, according to a most experienced gardener: Sulphur on hot-water pipes, and also on walls outside exposed to the sun, are great he...
-Red Spider Remedy
A subscriber, with a small parlor conservatory, (say 9 ft by 6 ft.) protected from frost by double glass, understands smoking down the Green Fly, Ac, asks (after searching in vain for some antidote) f...
-Reduction Of Terms
We renew our offer of three months on trial, for 30 cents, to any address ; cannot our readers induce their friends to try it ? Surely there are a goodly number that will be entertained with it at thi...
-References To Flan
a. Mansion house, b Veranda, c Gardener's cottage, d. Carriage house and stable, e. Rustic summer-house, overrun with grapes, and the posts with ivy. f. Grape arbors. g. Offices, A. Stable yard. k. Dw...
-References To Plan
A. House. B. Barn. C. Rose clumps. D. Central figures of flower garden. E. Lawn. F. Grape arbor. G. Vegetable grounds. H. Fruit department. K. Yard. L. Piazza. .S. Rustic seat. V. Vase. The ground mea...
-Reform In Physical Education
We have read with great pleasure, an article in the Ohio Cultivator, from the pen of Mrs. Bateham, which is so much to the point, that we must find a place for it, Mrs. Bateham's remarks are so truly...
-Register of Natural History
The Smithsonian Institution, being desirous of obtaining information with regard to the periodical phenomena of animal and vegetable life in North America, respectfully invites all persons who may hav...
-Regulations
The exhibition will open to the public at 1 o'clock, P. M. All articles for competition mutt be brought in by half past 10. Those arriving after this hour, will be received for exhibition only. Compe...
-Reine Hortense
This is a Duke in habit, more upright and vigorous, and with larger and stronger foliage than the Mo~ rellos. As a bearer it is not more than moderately productive; but while it bears regularly and ev...
-Rejected
Apples, 126. Cherries, 32. Pears, 351. Grapes, 2. Apricots, 5. Raspberries, 3. Plums, 31. Strawberries, 75. The benefits conferred upon the fruit-growing community, and the amount of time, labor, ...
-Rejuvenating Old Houses
The Horticulturist, it is presumed, visits not only houses built in the modern style, with all the modern improvements, but is a welcome guest at many an old farm-house, built, perhaps, a century ag...
-Rejuvenating Old Houses (2)
There are undoubtedly many houses of the kind referred to in the previous article, which it is better to tear down than to attempt repairing. But this is not often the case with one which has been kep...
-Rejuvenating Old Houses (3)
At your request, Mr. Editor, I have hit upon a fruitful theme, and I am making my subject longer than I expected. With regard to the arrangement of the rooms, I believe I have before referred, somewh...
-Rejuvenating Old Houses - No, IV
I wish to offer a few words upon the immediate surroundings of this class of old farm-houses. Let it be borne in mind, that these remarks are not intend- ed to refer to the laying out of new places - ...
-Relation And Effects Of Pollen In Cross Fertilization
Db. Hildebrand, of Bonn, has lately been conducting some experiments with maize plants and making observations on the apple, to prove the direct influence exercised by foreign pollen on the properties...
-Relative Importance Of Art
Its rank among the various branches of human pur suit, I will content myself by quoting a celebrated living writer: - There are two ave nues from the little passions and drear calamities of earth, bo...
-Relative Importance Of Art. Part 2
Motion generally is expressive or suggestive of beauty: Thou canst not wave thy staff in the air, Or dip thy padde in the lake, But it form the bow of beauty tans, And the ripples in rhymes the oat f...
-Relative Importance Of Art. Part 3
To its sleepless eye lies open all the human heart, and all the stores of nature A frequenter of the highways and thoroughfares of life, the man of genius, whether poet or painter, or architect, is a ...
-Religion And Architecture
We do not, of course, mean to say, that a beautiful rural church will make all the population about it devotional, any more than that sunshine will banish all gloom; but it is one of the influences th...
-Remarks
This is a capital description of the Apple Scale, by one of the most promising Entomologists in Ohio. - Ohio farmer. Remarks #1 We think our correspondent does not fully understand what we mean by t...
-Remarks (2)
As corroborative of the information in the former number, regarding the grapes at San Jose we quote the following extract from a private letter lately received by us from an intelligent lady in San Fr...
-Remarks (3)
As Mr. Allen's book on the grapevine is the authority on the subject of the Sage Grape, and as the disappointment in this variety arises from a comparison of the merits of the grape itself, with the a...
-Remarks (4)
Dr. Hull's record of his careful experiments with special manures for the strawberry, deserves the attention of cultivators. We may add, for the information of those who know nothing of the soil, that...
-Remarks (5)
We like the straight-forward spirit of Mr. Gowkn's remarks, and find by them, that in the main point at issue we are entirely agreed'That is to say, if Mr. Gow-in simply wishes to affirm that there is...
-Remarks (6)
The White Doyenne, in Pennsylvania, became utterly worthless long before we heard of its injury nearer the sea, in New York City and neighborhood. Some fruit of our own was as hard as a ripe walnut, c...
-Remarks (6). Continued
If the tiles have been carefully laid, this form of draining is the most simple and effectual, and never fails to dry the ground of both surface and spring water, as it is impossible to miss-any sprin...
-Remarks (7)
Whether an apple tree grown from a cion cut from a bearing tree, will come into bearing at an earlier stage of growth, than from a cion taken off a young nursery tree, we do not pretend to know, thoug...
-Remarks (8)
We can give no satisfactory explanation to the question, unless it may be, in that the yearling plants complete their growth earlier in the fall, ripen up more perfectly, and hence go into winter with...
-Remarks (9)
We believe we have already given our opinion that the Osage Orange will make a good hedge no farther north than the peach ripens well. But we have no doubt it will answer at Buffalo. It is found by ex...
-Remarks (10)
We are sorry to be obliged to say, nothing satisfactory has yet been settled, regarding the nature of either of these disease or the remedy. If our correspondent wishes us to add our speculation, to ...
-Remarks (11)
Mr. Allen's account of the origin of the Isabella grape is a valuable contribution to our history of native fruits. There is, we think, no doubt whatever that the Isabella grapes in general cultivatio...
-Remarkable Conifers
Few persons, I imagine, have had the opportunity of beholding finer specimens of the Cembra Pine and of Abies Canadensis (the Hemlock Spruce) than those now growing in the pleasure grounds at Osberton...
-A Remarkable Orchard House
In the garden of E. W. Harlock, at Ely, Cambridgeshire, is an orchard house deserving the above term, not so much on account of its architecture - it is very plainly built - as on account of its conte...
-A Remarkable Tree
A few years ago, a new species of tree was brought from Australia to Algiers. The ex-Emperor Napoleon, in a recent visit to the Jardin d'Acclimation, at Algiers, was much struck with the rapid growth ...
-Remarks On Cold Graperies
The Horticulturist, in a former volume, having treated its readers to a series of articles from the fathers in Grape-culture, I propose to add a chapter of observations from a young beginner. In the ...
-Remarks On Cold Graperies. Continued
Though an unobservant follower, I pin my faith a good deal upon Mr. Chorlton as a Grape-grower; not because his rules are more in keeping with that impatience of results so characteristic of Americans...
-Remarks On Flower Gardening - The Forms And Positions Of Flower Beds - With Names And Positions Of Some Plants When Planting
As a people, we think Americans may justly claim to be floral children, for everywhere over our whole country, in the grounds of the wealthy, the homestead of the farmer, or the cottage yard of the po...
-Remarks On Leaf Blight
This disease, which has by some been mistaken for the .fire blight, and by others deemed worthy of so little attention, that few notices of its presence, or hints for its destruction, have appeared in...
-Remarks On Pruning
Notwithstanding the amount of attention this operation has received from the earliest to the latest contributions to horticultural literature, there is still much room for improvement in its practical...
-Remarks On Some Of The New Chinese Plants
There is now much interest manifested in regard to some of the recently introduced vegetables and plants from China and Japan. As I have had several of them in cultivation two and three years, it may,...
-Remarks On The Dahlia, Historical And Cultural
The Dahlia is a native of Mexico, and was discovered by Humboldt, growing in sandy soils, between four and five thousand feet above the level of the sea. It was first introduced into Europe from that ...
-Remarks On The Degeneracy Of Fruits
There is an opinion prevalent with some pomologists, that fruits of various kinds, apples and pears for instance, degenerate by a continuation of grafting or budding, through a long series of generati...
-Remarks On The Effects Of Geological Position On Certain Coniferae
The general diffusion of foreign Conifers, and their importance, not only as regards the effect which they will eventually prodnce in our landscapes, but as regards their intrinsic economic value, ind...
-Remarks On The Genus Mesembryanthemum
This very showy and neglected flowering tribe of plants are not cultivated near as much as their merits demand. The few remarks I am about to make upon them is with a view of bringing them into notice...
-Remarks On The Grape Disease Of Europe
A few years since, the mildew, a parasitic fungus, made its appearance upon the grape-vines of Madeira, and has since been extending itself over the vineyards of Europe, upon which I propose to make...
-Remarks On The Sweet William - Dianthus Barbatus
Seldom do we meet with a genus possessing more desirable qualities than the above-named. Sweet Williams are easily grown, profuse flowering, and within the reach of all who possess the means of a sing...
-Remarks On The Vegetable Garden
It is somewhat gratifying to find your amateur correspondents inquiring for more practical knowledge with regard to the more economical cropping, and better use of the vegetable garden. This subject h...
-Remarks Upon Hard-Wooded Green-House Plants
In potting delicate and sickly plants, (a few of which I had the good fortune to handle a few months since,) such as Epacris, Erica, Helichrysum, Boronia, etc, indeed, most if not all hard-wooded gree...
-Remarks Upon The Dahlia
Those who have been acquainted with the Dahlia for the last twenty-five years can not but be struck with the marvellous improvement it has undergone during that period. A little previous to that time ...
-Remarks Upon The Dahlia. Continued
These remarks may be appropriately concluded by subjoining a descriptive list of a few of the best which have yet found their way into this section of the country. They have been selected with the utm...
-Remedial Action Of The Ailanthus
The ailanthus, as an ornamental and shade tree, has of late years gone into disrepute on account of the offensive effluvium of its male blossoms, and its planting in Washington was positively forbidde...
-Remedies For Insects
The following valuable remedies for insects are furnished by Charles R. Dodge, Assistant Entomologist of Department of Agriculture, and also the Entomological Editor of The Rural Carolinian, They are ...
-Remedies For The Curculio - A New Ore
The Farmers' Monthly Visitor publishes the statement of Joshua Dean, who, at the suggestion of the editor of that paper, tried with great success a new remedy which had been used with decided effect b...
-Remedy For Girdled Fruit-Trees
Believing that a few words on the above subject will be of interest to those who may have suffered from the depredations of mice in their young orchards during the past severe winter, I make the follo...
-Remedy For The Canker Worm
THE Canker worm, which has for so many years been the worst enemy of the apple grower, in the New England states, has for a number of years been quite troublesome in many parts of Western New York, an...
-A Remedy For The Scaly Aphis
About two years ago I put into a thirty-two gallon cask twenty pounds of sulphur, with about three shovels full of lime, filling up the cask with water, using fully half of the solution at the time, f...
-Remedy For The Striped Bug
Some weeks ago I saw, in the Farmer, a recommendation of the use of ground or calcined plaster as a remedy for striped bugs. My own experience allows me to tell you how I have improved on that remedy....
-Reminiscences - What We Have Learned, And How We Learned It
A country that has passed its novitiate in any great art has good reason to be proud. When this art is at once a blessing and a riches to the individual citizen and the nation, our pride may well be e...
-Removing Pear-Trees To Promote Fruitful-Ness - Mr. Rivers And The Belgian Pear School, Etc. Etc
Mr. Editor: You called my attention to the notice of Rivers' catalogue contained in the Gardener's Chronicle, Mr. Rivers is a very experienced pomolo-gist, and his information is indeed useful, the mo...
-Removino Treesin Winter
Dear Sir: I owe you thanks for the hints about moving trees with frozen balls of earth. I began to put them in practice the beginning of this month, and have already moved twenty trees, Elms, Maples, ...
-Remuneration Of Gardeners
W. C. C.; on this subject we find a quotation from George Glenny, in the Cottage Gardener, which may partly apply to your query. It is from The New Principles of Gardening, by Batty Langley publishe...
-Rendering Barren Fruit-Trees Fertile
It fell to my lot some ten years ago to take charge of some barren old pear-trees, with long spurs full of cankers. Although I took a different course from the one you have lately been advocating to r...
-Renewing Peach-Trees
Peaches are never borne twice on the same wood, but always on the new wood of the previous summer's growth; hence peach trees soon get beyond our reach, if not cut back, or summer pruned. The bearin...
-Renovating Old Orchards
In a former number of the Horticulturist, I detailed some experiments in progress for rejuvenating an orchard of old apple trees, by trenching, special manuring, and cleansing the bark by scraping, wa...
-On Renovating Old Pear Trees
Dear Sir - Many of your readers living in the sea-board states, have in their gardens old pear trees of fine sorts, principally St. Michels, Butter pears, St. Germains, or other well known varieties, ...
-Reply
We took your apples to the Missouri State Horticultural Society, at its annual meeting, at Jefferson City. The variety you call the Kentucky Red we know to be the Ben Davis, but the other varieties we...
-Reply To Al Fresco
The article in the January number of the Horticulturist should have been headed Grape-Vine Swindle. There is no fraud in the grape itself, although there has been in the sale of the vines, including b...
-Reply To Dr. Valk's Strictures
Dear Sir: As the permanent improvement of the native grapes by hybridization with the exotics, is a matter of much national importance, you will perhaps, excuse me for requesting again a corner in you...
-Reply To Dr. Ward On Dwarf Pears
Some remarks which I ventured to make at the Pomological Convention at Rochester, and which received confirmation from Col. Wilder, L. E. Berckmans, and others, not nurserymen, have been uniformly mis...
-A Reply To The Remarks Of John B. Eaton, of Buffalo, N.Y., In Horticulturist Of September, 1858
Your correspondent speaks first of grape houses, but does not agree with Mr. Saunders in his belief that a curvilinear roof does not in itself possess any important advantages, and that the gain of m...
-Report Of The Commissioners Of The Patent Office For 1855, Issued 1856. Agriculture
This report contains much speculation and matter for future examination. Of course it must partake of the desultory, as remarked in the preface, but it is suggestive and valuable. The Sorghum saccha...
-Report Of The Committee On Flowers
Owing to the exceeding hot and dry weather which was prevailing at the time of, and for ten days prior to, the exhibition, the contributions to this department were not as good as they would have been...
-Report Of The Committee On Pear Blight, Its Cause, Remedy Or Preventive
HON. MARSHALL P. WILDER, President American Pomological Society: - Dear Sir - The Committee appointed at the last annual meeting of this Society, to investigate the cause of pear blight, and, if possi...
-Report On Grapes
The following is a very interesting report, by J. Fisk ALLEN, to the Fruit Committee of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, To the Chairman of the Fruit Committee of the Massachusetts Horticultur...
-Report On Grapes For 1862
Although this has been a great fruit year in the Highlands, grape-growers have been very much disappointed in the quality of their fruit, and many of my friends have disposed of their crops at ruinous...
-Report Or Fruit Committee
The fruit offered consisted principally of strawberries. Of these the display was very good, although the warm and dry weather that preceded the exhibition injured the sue and appearance of the specim...
-Report Or Vegetable Committee
The show of Vegetables was quite small, it being too late for the earlier vegetables grown under glass, John Donnellan presented 4 heads of Lettuce, large and fine, and the committee would have awarde...
-Report Upon Grapes Of The Committee Ad Interim Of The Pomological Society Of Georgia
As several varieties of grapes - some well known to all fruit growers, others imperfectly so, and some entirely new - have been from time to time submitted to the Committee, it has been thought advisa...
-Report of The Cincinnati Committee On Grapes
Just as we are finishing up our last form, the following report comes to hand from Mr. Mottier, who will please accept our thanks. It is a valuable document, coming from three of the most experienced ...
-Report of The Committee Ad Interim Of The Pomological Society Of Georgia
Your Committee would respectfully report that quite a large number of fruits - have been submitted to them for examination, the past season, of which several seem worthy of general cultivation. Among ...
-Reports Of The Massachusetts Horticultural Society For 1857
It is really refreshing to peruse the reports of the Committees of this Society; one values the information of men who have a single eye to the dissemination of truthful facts. In these reports, we fi...
-Reproduction Of Varieties Of Fruit
While a resident of New England, we were often struck with the distinct and marked difference in the Westfield 8eek-no-further. This apple was famous throughout the whole region of our observation, an...
-Repton's Landscape Gardening And Architecture
One of the latest labors of the lamented Loudon, was to collect and edit, in one volume, the works of Repton. This was one of the first of five volumes which he intended to be a complete Encyclopedia ...
-Residence Erected For W. Gummere, Germantown, Pa
The economy obtained in the plan of this building is remarkable. The contract was taken at $5,700, exclusive of range, heater, and mantels, while an ordinary double square house, erected at the same...
-The Residence Of G. C. Lyman, Esq
This is a place of .considerable note, and has in its grounds many of the elements of a fine place, such as abundance of wood and water, and a surface varied by undulations, with a river running throu...
-The Residence Of George Lelland, Esq., Waltham
This is another of those pretty villa residences that have sprung up within the last few years, giving a character to this interesting neighborhood. The grounds are of limited extent, but the green-ho...
-Residence Of Joe. Stickney, Esq., Water-Town
Strange, indeed, is it, to see now slight a circumstance may change and mould a taste for objects previously of no interest whatever. Some years ago, when the taste for the culture of that gorgeous fl...
-The Residence Of John Bartram; Now In The City Of Philadelphia
The house, of which a picture is presented in the present number, may be said to be the cradle of American bojany; from the proprietor emanated the plants and seeds which supplied the means and foster...
-Residence of Samuel B. Parsons,. Flushing, Long Island
The house is built of wood, filled in with brick laid flat in such a way as to leave a space of an inch between the brick and the outer covering. The outer covering is plank, one and a quarter inches ...
-Resolutions Of The Horticultural Society
At a late meeting of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, the following extraordinary preamble and resolutions were adopted in reference to the proposed supplement to the Act of Consolidation, auth...
-Restalrig House, And Mr. R. Morris Smith, Architect
This gentleman mistakes me, and my meaning, in my random remarks on his houses. Mr. Smith's houses are just as good as any other architect's houses - of the kind. And, as I am now taking leave of thes...
-Restalrig House, Residence Of G. G. Logan, Esq., At Germantown, Pa
By R. Morris Smith, Architect, 74 South Fourth Street, Philadelphia. Before venturing to contribute another design to the Horticulturist, it may be well to say a word of apology for my last l...
-Restoration Of Forests
France has been the scene of greatest success in replanting vacant ground with trees. The reign of Napoleon III, will ever bear a memorable name for the decided encouragement which he gave to this bra...
-Restoration Of Frozen Plants
Mr. Editor : - I confess myself somewhat mystified by the philosophic theory of your correspondent, Daniel Barker, in last month's HORTiculturist, on this subject; the reasoning is too profound for my...
-Restoration Of Old Vines In The Grapery
I beg leave to call the attention of the horticultural community to a very important article published in the Gardener's Chronicle, England, Nov. 24th, on the best means of restoring the vigor of old ...
-On Restoring Plants Which Have Been Affected By Frost
During the present season a few remarks on the nature of restoring green-house and other tender plants which may be affected by frost, may not be uninteresting to some of the readers of the Horticultu...
-Results Of A Cheap Vinery
According to promise, I send you the account of the doings of my little vinery, a description of which you saw fit to publish in the Horticulturist about a year since. The building, you will recollect...
-Results Of Advertising
We advertised extensively the past year, and in summing up the results, found that The Horticulturist paid us better than either the Agriculturist, Rural New Yorker, or Country Gentleman. The ...
-Results Of Strawberry Culture By Rows Or Hills
There are advocates of success of strawberry culture under three systems: 1. To get but one or two crops from the ground, allowing the vines to run broadcast, and then plow the bed under, starting a ...
-Retinosporas
We are indebted to Japan for these beautiful little evergreens, although but few of them are hardy in this latitude. The most desirable among the hardy sorts is R. aurea-plumosa, the foliage of which ...
-Retrospect Of The Fruit Season In Massachusetts
In my last, dated early in the spring months, when the opening season existed more in hope than reality, I stated the favorable condition in which our fruit-trees had passed the severe freezing term o...
-Retrshohment Among The New Yorkers
The Courier and Enquiry of July 13th, has the following article, which indicates the beginning of a much needed reform. We rejoice at it, whether it come from necessity or choice. Hundreds of families...
-Retrshohment Among The New Yorkers. Continued
Changes such as this are vastly for the better; and the good efiects which result from them do not cease with the individuals who feel their influence immediately. If an increasing love for the calm a...
-Review
The World a Workshop; or the Physical Relationship of man to the earth. By Thomas Ewbank, 12 mo. New York, 1855. Mr. Ewbank is a thoughtful and suggestive writer; his work on Hydraulics and Mechanic...
-Review (2)
The Rural Poetry of the English Language, illustrating the Seasons and Months of the Year, their Changes, Employments, Lessons, and Pleasures, topically paragraphed, with a complete Index. By James Wi...
-Review (3)
Hooper's Western Fruit Booh. By B. J. Hooper, of Cincinnati. From the press of Moore, Wilstach, Keys & Co., 1857. As a concise descriptive catalogue of fruits, the plan of this work is adapted to the...
-Review (4)
Villas and Cottages. A Series of Designs, prepared for Execution in the United States. By Calvert Vaux, Architect (late Downing and Vaux), Newburgh. Illustrated by 300 Engravings. New York. We have r...
-Review (4). Continued
Rich Americans fear lest their offspring may be looked on as useless members of society, and the instinct that leads them to do so is well enough as far as it goes, but the natural independent comment...
-Review (5)
Japanese Botany; being a facsimile of a Japanese Book, with introductory notes and translations. Philadelphia: Published by J. B. Lippincott & Co. $1.25. When the Japan expedition was first proposed,...
-Review (6)
The Fruit Garden; by P. Barry, of the Mount-Hope Nurseries, Rochester, N. Y. One vol. 8vo., 398 pages. (Charles Scribner, New-York.) Since the issue of the first edition of our work on Fruit-Trees, i...
-Review (6). Continued
To accomplish this the following means must be successively employed. 1. Prune the branches of the most vigorous parts very short, and those of the weak parts long. We know that the sap is attracted...
-Review (7)
The American Pomologist: containg finely colored drawings, accompanied by letter press descriptions of Fruits of American origin. Edited by Dr. W. D. Brinckle. Published by A. Hoffy, Philadelphia. ($2...
-Reviews (8)
Walks and Talks or an American Farmer in England, with Illustrations: By Feed. Law Olmsted. [Putnam's Family Library, No. Ill; price 25 cents]. Here is a book of travels with a smack of novelty about...
-Reviews (8). Part 2
* Mug of ale! - aye, that's it! Mug of ale! - Pill up! Fill up! and the toast shall be Merrie England! Hurrah! Another very perfect sketch of an English rural lands...
-Reviews (8). Part 3
In a moderately dry and temperate summer, more cheese is made than in one which is very wet. The pastures are generally looked upon as permanent; the night pastures are sometimes absolutely so, as i...
-Reviews (8). Part 4
There is a story told of two members of our legislature that came from the rural districts, and were fellow lodgers. One of them was rather mortified by the rough appearance of his companion, who ...
-Reviews (9)
TRANSACTIONs OF THE NEW-YORK STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY, with an abstract of the Proceedings of the County Agricultural Societies. Vol. X. 1851. The annual volume of Transactions of the New York State...
-Reviews (10)
Rural Architecture; being a complete description of Farm-houses, Cottages, and outbuildings. By Lewis F. Allbk. New-York: Saxton, 1 vol. 384 p.p. 12 mo. When a plain practical farmer undertakes to wr...
-Reviews (11)
Rural Homes, or Sketches of Houses suited to American Country Life, with original plan*, designs, etc.: By Gervase Wheeler. (New-York, Charles Scribner.) The multiplication of books upon Rural Archit...
-Reviews (12)
Heat and Ventilation; general observations on the Atmosphere audits Abuses, as connected with the common or popular mode of heating public and private buildings, together with practical suggestions fo...
-Reviews (12). Continued
The owner of such an establishment, as the one alluded to, is generally far from being parsimonious, and very likely fond of giving sumptuous entertainments, and in all his intercourse with his family...
-Review Of The Grape Question
Surely the people of the Quaker City are waking up in regard to the all-absorbing grape question. Besides giving us a score of articles in the several Horticultural journals, they have lately presente...
-Review Of The Grape Question (2)
We are really surprised that the author of this work should claim this as original, or even new; for vine borders upon the same principle, if not in the exact form, were constructed more than one hund...
-Review Of The Grape Question (3)
Both Sides of the Grape Question is the title of the second volume mentioned, and it might well be called all sides of the grape question, as all sides are treated of, but none definitely. The volu...
-Review Of The Season In Egypt
The strawberry, peach, pear, apple, and quince have done well in South Illinois the present season. The strawberry suffered somewhat from drought in some localities, yet still, on well-prepared ground...
-Reviews. The America Hand-Boox Or Ornamemtal Trees
We always welcome every new contribution to the literature of trees. It happens more frequently than otherwise, that the planter who becomes the proprietor of a new place knows nothing of the busine...
-Reviews. The America Hand-Boox Or Ornamemtal Trees. Continued
They have for sale say thirty thousand thrifty specimens of Pinus Lambertiana, the same number of Pinus insignis, and numerous other rare and curious trees, from our new possessions on the Pacific, th...
-Revision Of Catalogue
It has been our custom on former occasions to enlarge and revise our John Filch, in 1788. To hit steamboat Perseverance. General Catalogue by a discussion and vote on each variety. Great advantages h...
-Rhapsodies About Roses
Old England's emblem is the rose; There is no other flower With half the graces that adorn This beamy of the bower! And England's daughters are as fair As any bud that blows! What son of hers that ...
-Rheum Nobile
The present is certainly the most striking of the many fine Alpine plants of Sik-kim; and though in every botanical character, as also in the acid juice of the stem, a genuine Rhubarb, it differs so ...
-Rhode Island Horticultural Society
This Society held its annual meeting January 25, 1864 The meeting was much larger than usual, and more interest seems to be manifested in the prosperity of the Society and the advancement of horticult...









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