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British Dogs, Their Points, Selection, And Show Preparation | by W. D. Drury



Since the last Edition of "British Dogs" was issued, many breeds but then little known have become popular; while others quite unknown have come "to stay." This, combined with a more extended knowledge of the management of existing varieties, has rendered a new Edition absolutely necessary. As is fairly well known, the old work was in two volumes - a form that was somewhat cumbersome and necessarily expensive. The present work has been compressed into one volume, and this without sacrificing any of those important details that have characterised the work since its inception. The aim has been to produce a modern work upon modern dogs; and in doing so the claims of the fancier have been studied equally with those of that wider section known as the dog-loving public...

TitleBritish Dogs, Their Points, Selection, And Show Preparation
AuthorW. D. Drury
PublisherCharles Scribner's Sons
Year1903
Copyright1903, Charles Scribner's Sons
AmazonBritish Dogs: Their Points, Selection And Show Preparation

With Illustrations Of Typical Dogs Third Edition

By W. D. Drury, Kennel Editor Of "The Bazaar"

With The Collaboration Of The Following Specialists

Basset-hounds ..

A. Croxton Smith

Beagles...

.. W. Crofton

Bedlingtons

.. C. H. Lane

Black-and-tan Terriers

W. K. Taunton

Bloodhounds ..

E. Brough

Border Terriers

J. T. DODD AND

John Robson

Borzois...

Capt. Borman

Brussels Griffons

.. C. H. Lane

Bulldogs

St. John Cooper

Bull-terriers

H. J. Steavenson

Chows and other Chinese Dogs

W. K. Taunton

Collies ..

Panmure Gordon

Dachshunds

H.Jones

Dalmatians

C. H. Lane

Deerhounds

R. Hood Wright

Dingoes

W. K. Taunton

English Setters

Rev. D. W. W. Horlock

Esquimaux and other Northern Dogs

- W. K. Taunton

Foxhounds..

.. W. Crofton

Gordon Setters..

Dr. Reid

Great

Danes

Mrs. Violet Horsfall

Harriers..

.. W. Crofton

Irish Setters..

J. H. H. Swiney

Irish Terriers ..

G. Perry

Irish Wolfhounds.

R. Hood Wright

Labradors

Hon. A. Holland-

Hibbert

Maltese Terriers.

.. C. H. Lane

Mastiffs...

W. K. Taunton

Otter-hounds ..

.. E. Buckley

Pointers...

W. Arkwright

Poodles...

.. C. H. Lane

Pugs ...

Miss Holdsworth

Retrievers ..

Harding Cox

St. Bernards ..

.. Mrs. Jagger

Spaniels...

W. Arkwright

Toy Spaniels ..

Mrs. L. E. Jenkins

Toy Bulldogs ...

St. John Cooper

Toy Terriers ..

.. C. H. Lane

Yorkshire Terriers

E. S. De Pass

-Preface
Since the last Edition of British Dogs was issued, many breeds but then little known have become popular; while others quite unknown have come to stay. This, combined with a more extended knowledg...
-Chapter I. Early Dogs
COEVAL with primeval man apparently existed a type of dog equally primitive, though upon this head even palaeontology does not give us much assistance. None the less, fragments of bone unearthed from ...
-Early Dogs. Part 2
The fashion of hunting led in all probability to the separation of Domestic dogs into two distinct groups - those that hunt by sight as distinguished from those that hunt by scent; for there can be no...
-Early Dogs. Part 3
As well as the huge dogs just described, there existed a variety that was its very antithesis in conformation - a Greyhound-like dog. This was employed for coursing the hare, or it may be for hunting ...
-Early Dogs. Part 4
Land, Water, and Toy Spaniels are also described by the Doctor, as are also Sheepdog, Mastiff, Turnspit, and many others that were apparently mongrels, though from their associations, the work that th...
-Chapter II. The Mastiff
Much has been written upon the origin of the Mastiff, but the writers are by no means agreed upon the subject. There can, however, be no doubt that a dog possessing many of the qualities of our Mastif...
-The Mastiff. Part 2
At the Alexandra Palace Show held in 1880 Mr. Woolmore brought out Crown Prince, a Mastiff about which there has been more discussion than probably any other. It was thought by many that his Dudley no...
-The Mastiff. Part 3
The next thing to do is to select the stud dog, and here again the pedigree must be carefully examined with a view to ascertain in what respects the dog is likely to suit the bitch. In speaking of exa...
-The Mastiff. Part 4
These are a few points to which Mastiff breeders of the future should give their attention, and we would commend to their favourable notice the following extract from an interesting letter of Mr. Sidn...
-Chapter III. The Thibet Mastiff
These dogs are comparatively rare in England, and only occasionally met with at our shows; but they are such magnificent animals that it is to be regretted that they are not bred here, as they are rea...
-Chapter IV. The St. Bernard
The St. Bernard, both before and since its introduction into England, has been surrounded with a halo of romance. The stories related of these magnificent dogs, their picturesque appearance, noble bea...
-The St. Bernard. Part 2
In 1854 my Barry I. was born in Lowenberg - short-haired, white, with red head. As he resembled neither in hair nor colour the preceding generation, the owners thought him a mongrel, and sold him as v...
-The St. Bernard. Part 3
Albert Smith, the celebrated traveller, was the first person to introduce a couple of St. Bernards into England, and he brought them on to public platforms, when giving his lectures, for illustration....
-The St. Bernard. Part 4
At that period the foremost breeders and exhibitors of the St. Bernard were Messrs. Smith & Baker, Leeds; the late Mr. Shillcock, Birmingham; J. F. Smith, Sheffield; Joseph Royle, Manchester; Captain ...
-Chapter V. The Great Dane
Right at the head of the list of giants among Domestic dogs stands the Great Dane, Boarhound, Tiger Mastiff, or German Mastiff - a dog that is unsurpassed for immense strength combined with activity a...
-The Great Dane. Part 2
Great Danes are fairly hardy, but cannot stand damp or draughty kennels. Most of them have good constitutions, and they do not suffer from being in-bred. If kept in the house all day and turned out at...
-The Great Dane. Part 3
At this stage the puppies require no regular exercise. A large paddock or yard with shade, a warm, dry house to sleep in, plenty of large bones to gnaw and play with, and plenty of sunshine are, howev...
-The Great Dane. Part 4
The description and standard of points of the Great Dane adopted by the Great Dane Club are as follow: - General Appearance The Great Dane is not so heavy or massive as the Mastiff, nor should he to...
-Chapter VI. The Newfoundland
Around the Newfoundland centres a halo of romance hardly less bright than that investing the St Bernard. Both are life-savers, and, strange to say, both are importations so far as this country is conc...
-Tests for Water Dogs
1st. Courage displayed in jumping into the water from a height to recover an object. The effigy of a man is the most suitable thing. 2nd. The quickness displayed in bringing the object ashore. 3rd. ...
-Tests for Water Dogs. Continued
The Newfoundland Club has been established many years and has worked well in the interest of the breed. It has drawn up a description of the breed on the lines given below: - Symmetry And General App...
-Chapter VII. The Bloodhound
He who attempts to discover the origin and trace the history of any one of our breeds of dogs, beyond a comparatively few generations, will, in most or all cases, speedily find himself in a fog, tosse...
-The Bloodhound. Part 2
In 1620 we have an account of two packs of the black and tan St. Huberts belonging to the Cardinal de Guise and the Marquis of Souvray. The St. Huberts were transported to England at the time of the C...
-The Bloodhound. Part 3
As the term Brach is so often met with in old sporting writers, and as the above quotations show that it was certainly applied to the Bloodhound, as well as to other varieties of hounds, it may be a...
-The Bloodhound. Part 4
Now, in the above case a comparatively untrained puppy was found to be of great use; and had it not been for her the two men would never have been caught. There is no doubt they were members of the or...
-The Bloodhound. Part 5
Hounds soon learn to try back when they have overrun the line and to cast themselves, and should never be interfered with as long as they are working on their own account. There is no more heartbreaki...
-The Bloodhound. Part 6
Since then the most noted hounds have been the writer's Burgundy, Bardolph, Belinda, Banner, Baretta, Brunhilda, Barbarossa, Benedicta, Betula, Babbo 96, Boscobel 96, Brocade, and Bettina, Craven's Cl...
-Chapter VIII. The Greyhound
Of dogs hunting by keenness of sight and fleetness of foot, the Greyhound possesses an inherent right to occupy the highest place in the group. The modern Greyhound, the most elegant of the canine rac...
-The Greyhound. Part 2
In addition to speed, the dog must have strength to last out a severe course, nimbleness in turning, the capacity to catch and bear the hare in his stride, good killing powers, and vital force to give...
-The Greyhound. Part 3
The judge must, however, consider, and, if need be, describe, not only the general appearance of the animal, and the impression he conveys to his (the judge's) mind, but, as it were, take him to piece...
-The Greyhound. Part 4
The eye Arrian says, should be large, upraised, clear, and strikingly bright. The best look fiery, and flash like lightning, resembling those of leopards, lions, or lynxes. The clear, bright, and ...
-The Greyhound. Part 5
As regards size, the medium-sized dog is preferred by most. There is a considerable difference, in both height and weight, between the dog and the bitch. Prejudice against small dogs received a shock ...
-The Greyhound. Part 6
The classes of Greyhounds seen at our shows vary very much as to numbers. As a rule they are not well filled, and it is the exception rather than the rule to find any coursing dog of merit entered. Oc...
-Chapter IX. The Whippet
Though it is not until recent years that the Whippet, or Snap-dog, has come into such prominence as to warrant its recognition by the Kennel Club as a variety, yet for many decades the animal has been...
-The Whippet. Part 2
The modus operandi will be best illustrated by the following description of a race meeting held at Farn worth Recreation Grounds, near Bolton, when there were sixty odd heats of three dogs. The course...
-The Whippet. Part 3
Up to the present the handicap is the only form of racing in vogue; but there is no reason why this should be so, for, as Mr. Tatham in a most interesting series of papers that he contributes to the D...
-Chapter X. The Irish Wolfhound
Probably no dog has been the subject of so much contention or misapprehension as Ireland's historic hound. This has been due in great part to the exaggerated statements respecting the size to which it...
-The Irish Wolfhound. Part 2
Mr. G. W. Hickman, who has equally devoted time and ability to an examination of the subject, suggests that - There is not a particle of direct evidence to identify the Irish Wolfhound with the Deer...
-The Irish Wolfhound. Part 3
By some the Irish Wolfhound is thought to have disappeared with the last Irish wolf - somewhere about 1710; but in a work on Canine Madness, by Dr. James, and published in 1733, he refers specifical...
-The Irish Wolfhound. Part 4
It has already been suggested that the Irish Wolfhound makes an excellent companion and guard. The variety, however, is not one to be confined to a lonely backyard, chained to an apology for a kennel....
-Chapter XI. The Scotch Deerhound
From his superior size and rough coat the Deerhound has a more imposing appearance than his refined brother the Greyhound, and many would place him at the head of the family. He is frequently referred...
-The Scotch Deerhound. Part 2
At this point, perhaps, in steps the fancier, or, the man who takes up the breed rather from its appearance than its practical qualities. At first he accepts what he finds, and does not get far away f...
-The Scotch Deerhound. Part 3
From the above remarks and authorities it will be gathered that very large dogs are of little use in deerstalking. It must not, however, be supposed that I would necessarily confine the show Deerhound...
-The Scotch Deerhound. Part 4
In modern times the breed of Mr. Menzies, of Chesthill, is doubtless the oldest strain we have note of. A gentleman who knows the district well, and purchased a dog called Ossian at Menzies of Chesthi...
-The Scotch Deerhound. Part 5
Lochiel's Pirate was one of the finest dogs I ever saw; he stood about 29m., had good bone, fine symmetry, and a hardish coat of a fair length, and altogether looked what a Deerhound should - a combin...
-The Scotch Deerhound. Part 6
It must not be imagined that the breeders enumerated by any means exhaust the list of those who are entitled to rank as among the more noteworthy even. No article upon the Scotch Deerhound would be co...
-Chapter XII. The Borzoi, Or Russian Wolfhound
If for nothing else, we have at least one thing to be grateful for to Russia - she has given us the Borzoi, one of the most beautiful of the canine race, combining at once strength, symmetry, and grac...
-The Borzoi, Or Russian Wolfhound. Continued
It will be noticed that the Borzoi Club list of points give the height of dogs as from 28m. upwards. At the present day dogs of 28in. would hardly be looked at by the majority of our judges; indeed,...
-Chapter XIII. The Barukhzy And Allied Eastern Hounds
Belonging to the interesting Greyhound family, but approximating more closely to the Deerhound than to the Greyhound proper, is a curious-looking hound sometimes found in this country under the name o...
-Chapter XIV. The Circassian Orloff Wolfhound
Yet another interesting variety of the Greyhound group is the Circassian Orloff Wolfhound. Although we have not had many specimens in this country, yet the variety is one that is worthy of encourageme...
-Chapter XV. The Pyrenean Wolfhound
Under various names, such as Pyrenean Sheepdogs, Pyrenean Mastiffs, etc., dogs of the Wolfhound type are sometimes met with at our shows. These are of stronger build, and shorter, in proportion to hei...
-Chapter XVI. The Collies
The origin and history of the Scotch Collie as a distinct breed are still unsolved questions. There are no solid facts to base even a theory upon, and, as in the case of many other dogs, we are left t...
-The Collies. Part 2
As will be gathered from this, there are two varieties of Collie as generally accepted - the Rough and the Smooth; but there is also a third, the Bearded Collie (Fig. 41), which is often found in the ...
-The Collies. Part 3
Other peculiarities that distinguish the Collie, and that are also the inherited result of education and long practice, specially aided by the selection of the best to propagate their kind, must of ne...
-The Collies. Part 4
Amongst those in authority who believed that our modern Collie is a degenerate as regards intelligence was the late Mr. D. J. Thomson Gray. He said: The craze for high-set ears and extra long heads h...
-The Collies. Part 5
Another very prevalent but equally erroneous, if somewhat ingenious, theory at one time advanced was that the Collie owed some of its beautiful appearance to a cross with the Gordon Setter. There is, ...
-The Collies. Part 6
Smooth-coated Collies are treated as a distinct variety. It is, however, needless to give a separate chapter to them, for, as previously stated, in all points except coat this variety is a facsimile o...
-The Collies. Part 7
The mane and frill should be very abundant, the mask or face smooth, as also the ears at the tips, but they should carry more hair towards the base ; the fore legs well feathered, the hind legs above ...
-Chapter XVII. The Old English Bobtailed Sheepdog
Few varieties of British dogs are so well known by the absolute novice as the Old English Sheepdog, Bobtail, or Drovers' Dog. Nor is the reason far to seek. Long ere fickle Fashion set her seal upon t...
-The Old English Bobtailed Sheepdog. Part 2
It has been held that the docking of the tail generation after generation resulted in pups being born tailless. Now, although such a result might follow if the practice were continued long enough, yet...
-The Old English Bobtailed Sheepdog. Part 3
It has been claimed as a characteristic of the Bobtailed English Sheepdog, that he has the peculiar habit of running over the backs of sheep when in flock in order to head them, and on that account i...
-Chapter XVIII. The Otter-Hound
Although many writers describe the Otter-hound as a dog of mixed breed, all refer him back to the old Southern Hound, or the Bloodhound, for his origin, whatever crosses may have been resorted to for ...
-The Otter-Hound. Continued
At length one of the searchers lifts his head, yet still in silence, to call the attention of the huntsman, who immediately hastens to the spot, where on his knees he carefully examines that to which ...
-Chapter XIX. The Foxhound
The Foxhound may fairly claim to be the means of circulating more money than all the other members of the canine race put together. It has been estimated that there are now about 160 packs hunting the...
-The Foxhound. Continued
Still, allowing to the fullest extent for the different sort of hound required to meet the needs of a different sort of country, the English Foxhound should in make and shape follow closely certain we...
-Chapter XX. The Harrier
The Harrier is an unsatisfactory breed about which to write, for it has no real title to be called a breed; and yet we read of the Harrier ages before many now well established were even thought of....
-The Harrier. Part 2
The so-called Harrier of to-day in most externals is a facsimile of the Foxhound. The large and bagging lippes of the days of Caius, with the attendant abundance of dewlap, have been bred out; the n...
-The Harrier. Part 3
It is about a hundred years since the fashion of late meets came into vogue, and the hunter's horn ceased to proclaim the morn in competition with shrill-voiced chanticleer. With this change, and to m...
-Chapter XXI. The Beagle
The Beagle is the foot hound of our country, indigenous to the soil, and able to boast of an alliance with the sport-loving Britons so far as we are able to trace back through the misty pages of ancie...
-The Beagle. Part 2
Speaking generally, 16in. is accepted as the maximum height allowable in the Beagle, and those that run to this limit seldom display the type to perfection; they are usually desired by those who have ...
-The Beagle. Part 3
Another variety is the Rough, or Wire-haired, Beagle. The absolute purity of his descent is doubtful, a cross more or less remote of the Terrier or the Otterhound being generally alleged. He is, howev...
-The Beagle. Part 4
Having obtained his hounds, the Master will then require to kennel them. The most expensive kennels are not always the best, and some of the most primitive have kept Beagles in comfort and free from d...
-Chapter XXII. The Basset-Hound
Since the time of the gentleman who at one time wrote over the nom de guerre of Snapshot, and who is better known to the present generation of doggy men as Wildfowler, the Basset-hound has, in thi...
-The Basset-Hound. Part 2
As regards the coats of Bassets a jambes torses, there are both rough, half-rough, and smooth-coated specimens; but the last two predominate greatly; in fact, I have but rarely seen very rough Bassets...
-The Basset-Hound. Part 3
In short, there is no doubt that, for purposes of shooting, Bassets, of whatever breed, are pre-eminently excellent. They run very true, and are more easily taught the tricks of game than full-sized h...
-The Basset-Hound. Part 4
There is reason for believing that the preceding article on the breed, contributed to the original edition of British Dogs by Wildfowler, was a powerful incentive to that study of the Basset which...
-The Basset-Hound. Part 5
It is well known that the formation of a fair pack of Foxhounds is the work of very many years, even with the great number of drafts to choose from. With Bassets, the number a buyer can select from is...
-The Basset-Hound. Part 6
From the opinions and experiences quoted, it is evident that the Basset may be turned to account in many branches of sport; and, notwithstanding some slight discrepancies in the statements, the whole ...
-Couteulx Hounds
These hounds are exemplified by two types: - 1. Fino de Paris type. 2. Termino type. Before proceeding to give the differences between the two types, it would be, perhaps, as well to understand how ...
-Couteulx Hounds. Part 2
It has frequently been urged that the points of a dog, of whatever breed, must, if worthy of appreciation, be capable of demonstration in terms comprehensible to every one. Mr. Millais was certainly n...
-Couteulx Hounds. Part 3
General Appearance 1. The Head should be large, the skull narrow but of good length, the peak well-developed. The muzzle should be strong, and the jaws long and powerful ; a snipy muzzle and weakness...
-Chapter XXIII. The Dachshund
Bewick says that the Kibble-hound of his day was a cross between the old English Hound and the Beagle, which would give a low hound, but not a swift one; indeed, lowness and swiftness are incompatible...
-The Dachshund. Part 2
We do know that the premier Dachshund of the present day has drawn a wild fox from his fastness, and finished him, unaided, in about four minutes; but an unsnubbed, fully matured badger of five or six...
-The Dachshund. Part 3
In 1891 I exhibited Pterodactyl (24,854) at Spa under a German judge, who awarded him first prize in his class, but he was not permitted to compete for the prix d'honneur; and Pterodactyl was one of ...
-The Dachshund. Part 4
The Dachshund standard, as settled by the Dachshund Club, November, 1881, is as follows: - Head And Skull Long, level, and narrow; peak well developed; no stop ; eyes intelligent and somewhat small;...
-The Dachshund. Part 5
This class of Dachshund serves as a sort of general utility dog. If a hare or a rabbit be wounded by a shot, the dog will find or retrieve it; a varmint be found in a trap, it will kill it; if there b...
-The Dachshund. Part 6
From the humane point of view this is a distinct merit, for the Dachshund is powerfully mawed, and makes no great fuss of cleanly killing a wounded hare and bringing it to bag. Of course we could find...
-Chapter XXIV. The Pointer
The pointing dog was first introduced into England about two hundred years ago This seems clear; because before the eighteenth century no trace of him can be found in either the pictures or books on s...
-The Pointer. Part 2
The Pointer is now, and has ever been, most essentially a sporting dog. Although his origin is not quite clear, nor the country from which he was imported into England satisfactorily made out, still,...
-The Pointer. Part 3
A fear has often been expressed that, by breeding for pace, the staunchness of the Pointer would be detrimentally affected. I am pleased to say I do not find this to be the case. He is now, in this re...
-The Pointer. Part 4
As regards the advisability of the backing dog remaining stationary in Brace Stakes while his master and the pointing dog road up the game, in contradistinction to drawing up behind the gun - opinions...
-The Pointer. Part 5
The following are the points of the old-fashioned working Pointer, to which pure type, happily, sportsmen and exhibitors alike seem to be reverting: - Head This should be lengthy ; the eye being jus...
-Chapter XXV. The English Setter
The origin of the Setter is involved in hopeless mystery, and it would not be particularly interesting or of any great importance to endeavour to penetrate it by giving the various and irreconcilable ...
-The English Setter. Part 2
Now, if we think of the very large number of these sportsmen, both gentlemen and farmers, who all had dogs, we cannot help coming to the certain conclusion that Pointers and Setters were far more nume...
-The English Setter. Part 3
It always seemed a great pity that he gave himself away to the public by publishing his miraculous in-and-in pedigrees, which can be seen in the Kennel Club Stud Book. He probably believed them to s...
-The English Setter. Part 4
And now we come to the most celebrated strain of the modern Setter - indeed, we may safely call it the only English Setter now existing that deserves the name of a distinct strain. This was originally...
-The English Setter. Part 5
The shape and make of a Setter should, as far as the body is concerned, be as similar as possible to that of a perfectly shaped hunter - of the long and low type; a long neck, sloping shoulder, short ...
-The English Setter. Part 6
Where, twenty-five years ago, there was one show, there are now one hundred; where three prizes at most were given for one particular breed, there are now a dozen or more, and the merits of the winner...
-The English Setter. Part 7
The Pointer is a splendid dog, an admirable, a hard-working servant; he will do the practical part of his business as well as the Setter, it may be better - i.e. if you take all the Pointers in Englan...
-The English Setter. Part 8
She got cleverer and cleverer at this game as time went on, until at last she became the most killing dog to shoot to that it was possible to have. The following incident in her career corroborated...
-Chapter XXVI. The Black-And-Tan Setter Or Gordon Setter
Whether the dog under consideration should be called the Black-and-tan or the. Gordon Setter is a subject open to controversy; but of one thing there is no doubt, as the authentic records of breeders ...
-The Black-And-Tan Setter Or Gordon Setter. Part 2
The effect of such exhibitions on this particular variety of Setter has undoubtedly been most beneficial, as it has on all our sporting dogs. Many will cavil at this statement, perhaps, and point to a...
-The Black-And-Tan Setter Or Gordon Setter. Part 3
Till recent years breeders in Scotland preferred a deeper tan in their dogs, and this was quite marked in the important exhibitions at Kennel Club shows and Birmingham, where the Northern and Southern...
-The Black-And-Tan Setter Or Gordon Setter. Part 4
While this variety probably owes much to the Red Setter, and we have a number of examples of this introduction - as Moll IV., bred by a Champion Irish Setter out of a Black-and-tan bitch - still, thos...
-Chapter XXVII. The Irish Setter
A Veteran Sportsman, author of A Correct Delineation of the Canine Race, writing in 1803, says: The sporting gentlemen of Ireland are more partial to Setters than Pointers, and probably they are ...
-The Irish Setter. Part 2
With regard to the appearance of the Irish Setter, the Red Setter Club has published a description, by which it holds these dogs should be judged, the various points being set out as follows: - Head ...
-The Irish Setter. Part 3
Idstone, who was a great admirer of the Irish Setter, says, writing in 1872: They have been jealously protected from any mongrel crosses for many years by their native breeders. On the other hand,...
-The Irish Setter. Part 4
This is but another example of the potency of blood, as every one of these dogs, on one side at least, and some of them, such as Isinglass and Ballycolman, with several crosses, trace to Palmerston. H...
-Chapter XXVIII. The Spaniels
In considering the following descriptions of the principal varieties among British Spaniels, it must be borne in mind that, with the possible exception of the Clumber, they are all ramifications from ...
-The Clumber
The Clumber is the aristocrat of the Spaniel family: in comparison with him his modern Black brother of the benches is a mere upstart, and the Irish Water Spaniel as an unkempt kerne to a polished gen...
-The Clumber. Part 2
At the winter show of the Kennel Club in 1886 Boss III. once more met Psycho, and Boss III. was put back and Psycho again brought to the front. I acted as judge on that occasion, and I put Boss III. b...
-The Clumber. Part 3
Here follow the trial rules of the Sporting Spaniel Society, as far as they relate to the running of the dogs. From them it can be perceived by sportsmen how easy it is to win a prize, if they have an...
-The Sussex
In the last Edition of British Dogs, the article on Sussex Spaniels commenced with a question as to whether this variety had become extinct! This question, at that time asked satirically, could not ...
-The English Springer
This good old English name has been recently revived by the Kennel Club to designate the old-fashioned, medium-legged Spaniels of all colours that are neither Clumber nor Sussex Spaniels, and to disti...
-The English Springer. Continued
You must never allow a fault to pass unrebuked, be it ever so trifling or seemingly excusable. To train a dog properly a man must be always attentively on the watch to nip crime in the bud; and it is ...
-The Welsh Springer
The elevation of this Spaniel to the dignity of a class to himself in the Kennel Club Stud Book was announced in 1902, in the same honour-list as that of his relative the English Springer. The chief ...
-The Field Spaniel
This variety of the Spaniel, born of the dog shows, has achieved great prominence since their establishment, the principal breeders and exhibitors in the earlier exhibition days having been Mr. Burdet...
-The Field Spaniel. Continued
Mr. T. Jacobs, of Newton Abbot, who owns a large kennel of Spaniels, must be held responsible for the crossing of the Sussex and Black Spaniel in the winning show-dogs of to-day to a greater extent th...
-The Cocker Spaniel
Small-sized Spaniels, weighing from 2olb., or even less, to 251b., and of all colours, are still pretty numerous throughout the country, and many of them are as good as they are handsome. These, the C...
-The Irish Water Spaniel
Probably no one has ever ventured to call the subject of this article handsome. For this lack of praise those who have been most prominent as exhibitors of Irish Spaniels are chiefly responsible, for ...
-The Irish Water Spaniel. Part 2
I have derived benefit from crossing with the strains both of Mr. Engelbach and of the late Sir Wm. Verner, and also from that of Mr. W. S. Tollemache, who, for a period of over thirty years, kept the...
-The Irish Water Spaniel. Part 3
The tail is, like the face, a sure indication of the breeding; and, at the risk of repeating myself, I assert that no other breed of dog exists with a smooth tail which carries as much hair elsewhere ...
-The English Water Spaniel
In the Kennel Club Stud Book will be found some meagre lists of Spaniels classed as Water Spaniels other than Irish. What strange varieties this classification was meant to include, and why the Iri...
-Chapter XXIX. The Retrievers
No breed of latter days has sprung into greater favour than that of the Flat-coated Retriever; but whereas he has improved in both quality and quantity, his Curly-coated cousin has sunk in disfavour, ...
-The Retrievers. Part 2
A very long list of winners by Black Drake may be quoted, and instances have more than once arisen where every prize-winner in half a dozen classes has been his child or grandchild. Amongst the most n...
-The Retrievers. Part 3
Amongst the most prominent Retriever judges of the day may be quoted Messrs. S. E. Shirley, E. Allen Shuter, G. R. Davies, C. Phillips, H. R. Cooke, C. J. G. Hulkes, W. Arkwright, and Colonel Cornwall...
-The Retrievers. Part 4
The points of the Retriever have been carefully described by many expert writers, and an elaborate scale has been drawn up for the guidance of both the novice and the would-be judge; but, as has alrea...
-The Retrievers. Part 5
Hind Legs, Thighs, Stifles, And Hocks The thighs should be full of muscle, and large, with the second thighs well developed. The stifles should be long and fairly bent, but not to the extent that is ...
-The Curly-Coated Retriever
As remarked at the beginning of this chapter, the Curly-coated Retriever is not nearly so popular as his Flat-coated relative, and, in the writer's opinion, the genuine show article is not in general ...
-How to Train and Break Retrievers
Although this chapter professes to be a monograph, it hardly comes within the writer's province to enter into the question of rearing and keeping Retrievers, as the best methods are identical with suc...
-How to Train and Break Retrievers. Part 2
It may be urged that the use of a live pigeon as an object of instruction is a piece of unnecessary cruelty; but this need not be so. In the first place, before any puppy is set this task, the breaker...
-How to Train and Break Retrievers. Part 3
If, perchance, the writer is so ill-advised as to let off at a hare that is beyond certain killing distance, and the poor brute makes off with a shattered hind leg, or vitals penetrated by only a pell...
-Chapter XXX. The Labrador
We are so accustomed to regard only the more ornamental varieties of dogs, and perhaps chiefly those to be seen at shows, that there still are breeds which are as caviare to the multitude. The Labrado...
-Chapter XXXI. Northern Dogs
Most of the dogs of the Northern regions resemble the Esquimaux in many respects, all having the pointed muzzle and prick ears, and most of them the same carriage of tail, but none have quite the same...
-Northern Dogs. Part 2
Differences of opinion have been expressed as to the temper and disposition of these dogs. In the last Edition of this book Mr. Temple wrote: I have never owned one, dog or bitch, that when loose wou...
-Northern Dogs. Part 3
Shows have familiarised the present generation of dog-lovers with many varieties that a few decades ago were known scarcely by name to the average Britisher. To-day, in fact, we have in our midst cani...
-Chapter XXXII. The Dingo
The Dingo - the native dog of Australia - is becoming scarcer year by year. A dog of this breed without any admixture of Collie or other blood is far more difficult to obtain than was the case a few y...
-Chapter XXXIII. The Dalmatian
The origin of the Dalmatian is not quite as obscure as that of many other breeds. There appears to be no valid reason to reject the origin suggested by his name, and, with no arguments against it that...
-The Dalmatian. Part 2
The late Mr. Thomas Walker, of Manchester, was the owner of a Dalmatian dog, accustomed to live in the stables with his horses, and to lie in the stall with one in particular, to which he was much at...
-The Dalmatian. Part 3
The Dalmatian has been accused of concentrating all his affection on the horse, and showing none to his master. This is, however, an unjust charge. Dalmatians, like all other dogs, are very much what ...
-Chapter XXXIV. The Bulldog
Although in many respects the Bulldog and the Mastiff of to-day are so widely different, there are many who believe that both breeds are from the same common stock. The late Mr. Hugh Dalziel was one o...
-The Bulldog. Part 2
On the suppression of bull-baiting by Act of Parliament in the early part of the last century, the Bulldog lost its peculiar occupation, but was preserved from extinction in the families of some of it...
-The Bulldog. Part 3
As a guide to the novice, Fig. 85 is given. It shows all the head points that a good Bulldog cannot possess. One ear is shown of the bat shape, the other buttoned; the nose is too long (or down-faced)...
-The Bulldog. Part 4
Two or three good coats of oil paint, or a coating of Stockholm tar (not gas-tar), will protect the outer walls from the weather, and a fresh coat should be laid on at least once a year. Ventilation m...
-The Bulldog. Part 5
As great strength of bone is greatly to be desired in Bulldogs, the puppies should be fed with a view to its increasing and strengthening in bone. Oatmeal is a bone-forming food of some value, but che...
-The Bulldog. Part 6
The Flews; called the chop, should be thick, broad, pendent, and very deep, hanging completely over the lower jaw at the sides (not in front). They should join the under lip in front, and quite cove...
-Chapter XXXV. The Dogue De Bordeaux
Of comparatively recent introduction from abroad, the Dogue de Bordeaux, or Dogue of the South of France, as it is more familiarly called, is one of the few varieties that have not taken a hold in thi...
-Chapter XXXVI. The Bull-Terrier
Few breeds of British dogs have passed through more troublous times than the Bull-terrier, whose advancement in public favour has been delayed by unknown circumstances. Indeed, it may almost be said t...
-The Bull-Terrier. Part 2
Terriers are used in digging out badgers, being sent to earth after them, where the dog, if an adept at his work, keeps on baying the badger, thus intimating the position of the quarry to the diggers,...
-The Bull-Terrier. Part 3
Maggie May's sire may be Hinks's Prince (2,760), a dog that used to be shown as White Prince, and under that name was disqualified at Northampton, as having been castrated, by the late Mr. John Walker...
-The Bull-Terrier. Part 4
Below is given a description of the Bull-terrier as furnished by the Bull-terrier Club : - General Appearance The general appearance of the Bull-terrier is that of a symmetrical animal, and the embo...
-Chapter XXXVII. The Airedale Terrier
At the earlier dog shows, and, indeed, until the publication of the article by the late Mr. Hugh Dalziel on this breed that first appeared in the Country, and subsequently in the First Edition of this...
-Chapter XXXVIII. The Fox-terrier
If the Fox-terrier is not the most popular of all breeds, at any rate he occupies a very exalted position in the hearts of the dog-loving public ; while equally certain is it that he embodies most of ...
-The Fox-terrier. Part 2
In Samuel Howitt's The British Sportsman is a collection of seventy coloured plates, published in 1812. No. 40 represents a Terrier with a rat in his mouth; the dog is a black-and-tan, with natura...
-The Fox-terrier. Part 3
Again, Mr. Harding Cox, writing elsewhere, says in connection with the Fox-terrier that narrow chests have been obtained at the expense of depth and strength of rib, and consequently power of loin an...
-The Smooth-haired Fox-terrier Variety
Passing on to the consideration of the historical part of this popular dog, we cannot, on the whole, have a better instructor than Mr. Scott, who contributed the article upon the subject to the First ...
-The Smooth-haired Fox-terrier Variety. Part 2
From the Belvoir Kennels thirty-five years ago Sir Thomas Whichcote got Old Tyrant, and he was of a sort that never has been surpassed. This breed was kept very select, and among other direct descenda...
-The Smooth-haired Fox-terrier Variety. Part 3
I will now give my opinion as to how a first-class Fox-terrier should be made. The head should be of fair length, not too long, but in proportion to the size of the dog. The jaw should be muscular, an...
-The Smooth-haired Fox-terrier Variety. Part 4
Passing from the necessarily brief account of the history of the variety, we come to the consideration of the dog as we find him at the present day. And in doing so we take in the standard which the F...
-The Smooth-haired Fox-terrier Variety. Part 5
Lastly, as to the mouth. A level mouth should be a sine qua non, and an undershot dog, or one that is much overshot, should be disqualified. The term undershot, it may be explained for the novice's be...
-The Smooth-haired Fox-terrier Variety. Part 6
The position of the Club, it may be taken, was that they accepted the Fox-terrier inherited from their predecessors, in his general characteristics, and framed a standard to which they wished him to b...
-The Wire-haired Fox-Terrier
Much that has been quoted and written on the Smooth-haired Fox-terrier equally applies to the Wire-haired variety. It seems to be pretty clear that when the Fox or Kennel Terrier came to be bred with ...
-The Wire-haired Fox-Terrier. Part 2
The bitches, strangely enough, seem to be considerably in advance of the dogs in show properties; and probably no one has brought out so many good ones as Mr. G. F. Richardson, who carried all before ...
-The Wire-haired Fox-Terrier. Part 3
Many inquiries should be made of the seller, and the buyer should be very particular as to pedigree and any family defects. These of course should be made before and not after the purchase, as seems t...
-Chapter XXXIX. The Scottish Terrier
Scotland is prolific in Terriers, and for the most part these are long-backed and short-legged dogs. Such are the Dandie Dinmont, the Skye, and the Aberdeen Terriers, the last now merged in the class ...
-The Scottish Terrier. Part 2
Even at this lapse of time Mr. Ludlow as a breeder and an exhibitor stands pre-eminent. To him belongs the credit of not only having bred a host of champions, but also more winners than any half a doz...
-The Scottish Terrier. Part 3
Mr. Thomson Gray, in the above, drew no fancy picture of the game little dog he loved so well, and in every word that he wrote, whether praise or blame, was prompted by one idea - the maintenance of t...
-The Scottish Terrier. Part 4
So far as specialist Clubs are concerned, the Scottish Terrier is well provided, there being no less than four - the Scottish Terrier Club (England), founded in 1887; the Scottish Terrier Club (Scotla...
-Chapter XL. The Irish Terrier
It is certain that during the past two decades no breed of dog has attained greater popularity than the Irish Terrier, and a visit to any of our leading shows will be convincing proof of this, for in ...
-The Irish Terrier. Part 2
The writer holds no brief for Mr. Krehl or any one else, but he must say, in fairness to those who have expressed opinions adverse to those of Mr. Hugh Dalziel, that he has at some considerable troubl...
-The Irish Terrier. Part 3
Mr. Barnett and his famous dogs are too well known to need mentioning here, except to say that he has been one of the most successful breeders, exhibitors, and judges in England for nearly twenty year...
-The Irish Terrier. Part 4
In the early eighties Mr. Frank Butler, of Irish Terrier fame, and the writer had been out ferreting rats. On returning home an old cropped Irish Terrier bitch belonging to the writer had killed a hed...
-The Irish Terrier. Part 5
The Irish Terrier is much too long in the legs, and not in any way suitable for going to earth for fox or badger; such sport must be left to smaller breeds - the Fox-terrier, Dandie, and others. But a...
-The Irish Terrier. Part 6
On no account should a growing puppy be tied up. If this is done, crooked legs are inevitable, the elbows stand out, and the dog is practically ruined. Such a deformity would certainly be of no use fo...
-The Irish Terrier. Part 7
An eminent authority once said of the breed, when writing of Champion Brickbat (who, by the way, won the Sixty Guineas Challenge Cup twelve times in succession), he could always forgive size for quali...
-The Irish Terrier. Part 8
The following are the scale of points and description of the true Irish Terrier, as drawn up by the Irish Terrier Club: - Head Long; skull flat, and rather narrow between ears, getting slightly narr...
-Chapter XLI. The Dandie Dinmont Terrier
Had not Sir Walter Scott written Guy Mannering, there would never have been a breed of dogs named Dandie Dinmont Terriers. He, therefore, must be credited with being the author of the name of a Terr...
-The Dandie Dinmont Terrier. Part 2
Mr. J. C. Macdona, M.P., was the first to give publicity to the following - if authentic - unquestionably important document, which he met with in researches he made, some thirty years ago, into the e...
-The Dandie Dinmont Terrier. Part 3
Following on these came a host of breeders and exhibitors whose names may be learnt from the records of the Kennel Club Stud Book. There are, however, a few names that stand out conspicuously. Such ar...
-The Dandie Dinmont Terrier. Part 4
Dandies are far from being quarrelsome, and can be taken anywhere. They will not interfere with another dog, and will not try to pick quarrels. 'Defence, not defiance,' is their motto. Unlike their co...
-The Dandie Dinmont Terrier. Part 5
Eyes The eyes should be wide apart, large, round, moderately full, very clear, bright, and expressive of great intelligence, set low, and well in front of forehead; colour, a rich brown or hazel, yel...
-Chapter XLII. The Bedlington Terrier
As far back as 1826 Coquetdale was, and had long been, one of the homes of the old rough Terriers from which have sprung the two closely related varieties now famous as the Bedlington and the Dandie D...
-The Bedlington Terrier. Part 2
Although the Bedlington Terrier is only a new- comer, I think he has a great future before him with regard to popularity and esteem. The breed can well afford to depend upon its merits to push its way...
-The Bedlington Terrier. Part 3
However much inbred the originals of the present strain of Bedlingtons may have been, there is now no need for its continuance to the extent of producing a weakened vitality in the produce. The follo...
-The Bedlington Terrier. Part 4
The following description was formulated by the old Bedlington Terrier Club, which ceased to exist some years since. It must, however, be said that the comparison of the Bedlington's head to that of a...
-Chapter XLIII. The Skye Terrier
Discussions concerning Skye Terriers have been numerous in the past, the most notable being that of twenty years ago, which dragged its slow length through the columns of the Country for many months, ...
-The Skye Terrier. Part 2
The fact that Terriers similar to those of the Central Highlands, but probably with a slight admixture of Skye blood in them, were also bred in the island of Mull, seems to have caused confusion in th...
-The Skye Terrier. Part 3
Speed is not so much necessary with the Skye as strength. The chief end of his existence is to go to ground, and power to grapple with his subterranean foe is the first consideration. That power must,...
-The Skye Terrier. Part 4
In all our other varieties of domestic animals we have been changing their outward forms, and improving the breed; but in some breeds of dogs I think we are, to use the favourite expression, improving...
-The Skye Terrier. Part 5
Skye Terriers as puppies are born black and occasionally grizzly grey about the face. Until the puppy is some nine or ten weeks old the hair is smooth, after which it gradually lengthens and sticks st...
-Chapter XLIV. The Clydesdale Terrier Or Paisley Terrier
Outside the somewhat restricted range of the dog Fancy, comparatively few people have any idea of the general appearance of this essentially Scottish variety. It is true that at the larger shows in En...
-Chapter XLV. The Welsh Terrier
Although to many readers it may not be known, it is nevertheless a fact that our Welsh neighbours are very keen dog-fanciers. The writer, having both shown and judged on many occasions in the Principa...
-Chapter XLVI. The Border Terrier
When law and order were established on the Borders, the warlike and thieving instincts of its inhabitants found vent in fox-hunting, brock-hunting, etc. As the Cheviot Hills abound in craggy holes and...
-Chapter XLVII. The Black-And-Tan Terrier
Among the numerous varieties of Terriers now recognised and classified, the Black-and-tan is one of many altogether unfitted for the work which gave the generic name to the whole family; for after the...
-The Black-And-Tan Terrier. Continued
The subject of the illustration (Fig. 106) was only seven months old when the photograph was taken, and consequently was not made up, the dog, therefore, appears longer in the body than a Black-and-...
-Chapter XLVIII. The White English Terrier
Like many other breeds, the White English Terrier has undergone considerable modification since public dog shows came into being. How the modern dog of that name was manufactured one cannot with certa...
-Chapter XLIX. The Poodle
For this variety one is certainly entitled to claim ancient lineage, as on very early monuments and inscriptions dogs more or less resembling Poodles in appearance have been found. We know that in Fra...
-The Poodle. Part 2
Of course, in an animal like the Poodle, in which art has much to do in turning it out in show form, a great deal depends on the skill of the individual person on whom the preparation devolves, and th...
-The Poodle. Part 3
It is strongly recommended by the Poodle Club that only one-third of the body be clipped or shaved, and that the hair be left on the forehead. STANDARD OF VALUE OF POINTS Head and ...
-Chapter L. The Chow-Chow And Hairless Dog
In China there are several different breeds of dogs showing a marked contrast to one another. The one that has become best known and is most commonly to be met with in this country is that which was, ...
-The Chow-Chow And Hairless Dog. Continued
There is another variety of these dogs in which the coat is short; the head much resembles that of a raccoon, and the skin on the forehead is slightly wrinkled. In other prick-eared dogs the inside of...
-Chapter LI. The Pomeranian
There is little doubt that this variety originated in Northern Europe, and, if it did not actually come from the district associated with the late Prince Bismarck, and known as Pomerania, that part of...
-The Pomeranian. Part 2
In mating for colour, although good whites have sometimes resulted from other colours, most of the best whites have been bred from the union of two white parents. Good blacks, blues, as well as browns...
-The Pomeranian. Part 3
Blue Jacket (Fig. 114) belonged to Miss Ives, of Stockport, a young lady who has made a speciality of this colour, and probably owns the largest number of winning specimens in the possession of one ow...
-Chapter LII. The Schipperke
Just as in England we are mainly indebted to the working classes for many of our most beautiful Toy dogs (the Yorkshire Terrier, for instance), as well as for some of our gamest and best all-round Ter...
-The Schipperke. Part 2
The words of Mrs. Heard are words of wisdom, and if only those breeders of the Schipperke would cease from coddling, the constitution, always a hardy one, could be materially strengthened. The writer ...
-Description Of The Schipperke
Adopted at a General Meeting of the Belgian Schipperke Club, June 19TH, 1888 Character And General Appearance The Schipperke is an excellent and faithful little watchdog, who does not readily make ...
-Chapter LIII. The Pug
It is not uncommon for people to be misled by sound as to fact. Quoting from Hudibras in confirmation of this statement: Agrippa kept a Stygian Pug I'th' garb and habit of a dog, That was his tutor...
-The Pug. Part 2
In the First Edition of British Dogs were quoted the opinions in detail given by many eminent breeders of that time; but as since then the Pug Dog Club has been formed, and has practically adopted ...
-The Pug. Part 3
The following is the description of points adopted by the Pug Dog Club: - Symmetry Symmetry and general appearance, decidedly square and cobby. A lean, leggy Pug and a dog with short legs and a lo...
-Chapter LIV. The Maltese
All English writers upon dogs, new and old, agree in one thing, and that is, that in centuries long past Malta furnished Toy dogs for the dainty dames and mincing mistresses of both Greece and Rome....
-The Maltese. Continued
Among the earliest and most successful of exhibitors of this variety was Mr. R. Mandeville, who for a considerable time held undisputed sway. The last time his celebrated Fido competed was at the Crys...
-Chapter LV. The Yorkshire Terrier
Nowhere in England are dog shows so popular as in the counties of Lancaster and York and their immediate borders; and here the Yorkshire Terrier, a manufacture of comparatively recent years, finds its...
-The Yorkshire Terrier. Continued
Yorkshire Terriers that are not required for show need not be treated differently from other Toys kept purely as companions. They may also be allowed to frolic outdoors with canine companions, a pleas...
-Chapter LVI. English Toy Spaniels
English Toy Spaniels, as now designated, are the offspring of royal and aristocratic pets since the time of Henry VIII., early in the fifteenth century, and comprise the four well-known varieties, K...
-The King Charles Spaniel
This variety is perhaps the oldest and best known of the Toy Spaniels. We first hear definitely of it in the Court of King Charles, probably about 1630, before which the different breeds were only kno...
-The Prince Charles Spaniel or Tricolour Spaniel
This is a black-white-and-tan Spaniel (Fig. 121), identical in every respect with the King Charles, though it is not nearly so old a variety, and was doubtless produced by a cross with the black-and-w...
-The Ruby Spaniel
Twenty years ago this variety (Fig. 122) was almost unknown, except as a freak of nature, when one would occasionally appear in a litter of purebred black-and-tans. They are now a recognised and popul...
-The Blenheim Spaniel
This charming Spaniel (Fig. 123) cannot be traced as far back as the King Charles, but it is believed to have been first imported from Spain in the reign of Charles II., by John Churchill, the first D...
-The Blenheim Spaniel. Part 2
Owing to the characteristics of the four varieties being so similar, with the exception of colour, in giving the description they are treated as one, and, with slight alteration, according to the stan...
-The Blenheim Spaniel. Part 3
Highly bred Toy Spaniels are not prolific breeders, especially if many are kept together. An old breeder says : From long experience I have found that when only two or three bitches are kept, they wi...
-The Blenheim Spaniel. Part 4
Our Toys are rather inclined to luxuriate in the idleness and comfort usually at their disposal. But when we are dressed for a walk and invite them to accompany us they quickly testify to their fondne...
-Chapter LVII. The Japanese Spaniel
Until comparatively recent years these beautiful little dogs were too difficult and expensive to procure and in too few hands for them to be anything like common or often seen. Indeed, for a long time...
-Chapter LVIII. Chinese Spaniels, Chinese Pugs or Pekinese Spaniels, Pekinese Pugs
There does not seem to be any valid reason why the first-named variety should be called Pekinese. A far more appropriate name would be Chinese Spaniels, as they are by no means confined to Pekin, but ...
-Chapter LIX. The Griffon Bruxellois
To Belgium the country that gave us the coal-black little Schipperke, we are indebted for yet another variety of pet-dog in the Griffon Bruxellois, and one that promises to out-distance in the race fo...
-Chapter LX. The Italian Greyhound
There is no more elegantly shaped pet dog than the Italian Greyhound. The beauty of form and exquisite delicacy of frame that distinguish a good specimen of this breed, together with the exceedingly g...
-The Italian Greyhound. Continued
In a book on dogs, edited by Henry Webb, and published in 1874, the following is given as being related by the lady who acted so bravely on the occasion in question, and shows that these little dogs p...
-Chapter LXI. The Toy Bulldog
To briefly describe the Toy Bulldog, it is - or should be - a dwarfed specimen of the British Bulldog, its weight not exceeding 2olb., and in type, character, and points an exact reproduction in minia...
-French Bulldogs
Sir, - I see in the newspapers (especially Our Dogs) frequent allusions to the origin of the so-called French Bulldog. I think its origin can be easily traced, as some years ago I was in that fancy, w...
-French Bulldogs. Part 2
In a Toy Bulldog should be found all those qualities most valued in the larger dog - expression, the rose ears, the wide under jaw, with its upward sweep protruding considerably beyond the upper jaw, ...
-French Bulldogs. Part 3
The other points to be looked for have already been dealt with. See that the puppy is well supplied with bone, that his limbs are strong and sturdy, without a suspicion of rickets, and that his skull ...
-Chapter LXII. Other Diminutive Toy Dogs
It is not the worst feature in human nature that displays itself in a liking for the little - a disposition to care for and caress the diminutive. Of course, there are giant minds that find no room in...
-The White Toy Terrier
Occasionally diminutive White Terriers of 31b. or 41b. weight turn up at a show, but do not seem as yet to be looked on as worthy of distinct classification. Those usually seen have been too bullet-he...
-The Chihuahua Dog
Another atom of dog-flesh now and again seen at our shows is the Chihuahua. Those specimens that we have seen appeared to differ considerably as to type. According to a correspondent who wrote about t...
-The Affenpinscher
At one time this Monkey Terrier, as it is called by some, was now and then found at a few of the larger shows. Since the advent of the Brussels Griffon, however, the Affenpinscher is not as often seen...
-The Butterfly Spaniel or Squirrel-Dog
In some quarters there is a disposition to popularise this long-coated toy-dog. It scales somewhat heavier than the Affenpinscher, and, like that variety, is of Continental origin. The names above ado...
-Chapter LXIII. Thibetan Dogs
Elsewhere has been figured and described the large Thibet dog known as the Thibet Mastiff; there is also the huge Thibetan Sheepdog that Mr. Wilson had some few years since, and exhibited at the more ...









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