books



previous page: Miss Beecher's Housekeeper And Healthkeeper
  
page up: Household Books
  
next page: A Manual Of Home-Making

Common Sense In The Household. A Manual Of Practical Housewifery | by Marion Harland



To my fellow-housekeepers, north, east, south and west, this volume, the gleanings of many years, is cordially dedicated.

TitleCommon Sense In The Household. A Manual Of Practical Housewifery
AuthorMarion Harland
PublisherCharles Scribner's Sons
Year1884
Copyright1880, Charles Scribner's Sons
AmazonCommon Sense in the Household

Common Sense In The Household. A Manual Of Practical Housewifery

By Marion Harland.

"We go upon the practical mode of teaching, Nickleby. When a boy knows this out of book, he goes and does it. This is our system. What do you think of it?" - Nicholas Nieklsby.

New York: Charles Scribner's Sons 1884.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1871, by Charles Scribner & CO., In the Office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington.

Copyright, 1880, by Charles Scribner's Sons.

Grant, Faires & Rodgers, Electrotypers and Printers, Philadelphia.

-Introductory Of Revised Edition
It is not yet quite ten years since the publication of Common Sense in the Household. General Receipts.In offering the work to the publishers, under whose able management it has prospered so wonderf...
-Familiar Talk With My Fellow Housekeeper And Reader
A talk as woman to woman, in which each shall say, I and you, and my dear, and you know, as freely as she pleases. It would not be a womanly chat if we omitted these forms of expression. An i...
-Familiar Talk With My Fellow Housekeeper And Reader. Part 2
And the - you sigh, with a sense of resentment upon you, however amiable your disposition, for the provocation is dire - cookery-books and young housekeepers' assist-tants, and all that sort of th...
-Familiar Talk With My Fellow Housekeeper And Reader. Part 3
In a humble home, and in a humble way, I hear you add, perhaps. You are not ambitious; you only want to help John, and to make him and the children comfortable and happy. Heaven reward your ho...
-Note
In looking over this book the reader will notice certain receipts marked thus - +. I do not claim for these greater merit than should of right be accorded to many others. I merely wish to call the att...
-Soups
The base of your soup should always be uncooked meat. To this may be added, if you like, cracked bones of cooked game, or of underdone beef or mutton; but for flavor and nourishment, depend upon the j...
-Vegetable Soups
Green Pea. (No. 1.)+ - 4 lbs. beef - cut into small pieces. 1/2 peck of green peas. 1 gallon water. 1/2 cup of rice-flour, salt, pepper and chopped parsley. Boil the empty pods of the peas in the ...
-Vegetable Soups. Part 2
Asparagus ( White soup.) 3 lbs. veal. The knuckle is best. 3 bunches asparagus, as well bleached as you can procure. 1 gallon water. 1 cup milk. 1 tablespoonful rice flour. Pepper and salt. Cut of...
-Vegetable Soups. Part 3
Potato A dozen large mealy potatoes. 2 onions. 1 lb. salt pork. 3 qts. water. 1 tablespoonful butter. 1 cup milk or cream. 1 well-beaten egg. Chopped onion. Boil the pork in the clear water for ...
-Meat Soups
Beef Soup (a la Julienne)+ 6 lbs. of lean beef. The shin is a good piece for this purpose. Have the bones well cracked, carefully extracting the marrow, every bit of which should be put into the soup...
-Meat Soups. Part 2
Beef Soup (brown) 3 lbs. beef cut into strips. 3 onions. 3 qts. water. Put beef and water into the saucepan and boil for one hour. Meanwhile, slice the onions and fry them in butter to a light brown...
-Meat Soups. Part 3
Giblet Soup Feet, neck, pinions, and giblets of three chickens, or of two ducks or two geese. 1 1/2 lb. veal. \ lb. ham. 3 qts. water. Crack the bones into small pieces, and cut the meat into strips...
-Meat Soups. Part 4
Chicken Soup+ 2 young fowls, or one full-grown. 1/2 lb. corned ham. 1 gallon of water. Cut the fowls into pieces as for fricassee. Put these with the ham into the pot with a quart of water, or enoug...
-Fish Soups
Oyster Soup (No. 1)+ 2 qts. of oysters. 1 qt of milk. 2 tablespoonfuls butter. 1 teacupful water. Strain the liquor from the oysters, add to it the water, and set it over the fire to heat slowly ...
-Fish Soups. Continued
Eel Soup Eel soup is made in precisely the same manner as catfish, only boiled longer. A chopped onion is no detriment to the flavor of either, and will remove the muddy taste which these fish someti...
-Fish
Boiled Codfish. (Fresh.)+ Lay the fish in cold water, slightly salted, for half an hour before it is time to cook it. When it has been wiped free of the salt and water, wrap it in a clean linen cloth...
-Fish. Part 2
Salt Codfish Stewed With Eggs Prepare the fish as for balls. Heat almost to boiling a pint of rich, sweet milk, and stir into it, gradually and carefully, three eggs, well beaten, a tablespoonful of ...
-Fish. Part 3
Baked Halibut+ Take a piece of halibut weighing five or six pounds, and lay in salt and water for two hours. Wipe dry and score the outer skin. Set in the baking-pan in a tolerably hot oven, and bake...
-Fish. Part 4
Baked Salmon+ Wash and wipe dry, and rub with pepper and salt. Some add a soupgon of cayenne and powdered mace. Lay the fish upon a grating set over your baking-pan, and roast or bake, basting it fr...
-Fish. Part 5
Pickled Salmon. (Salt.) Wash the salmon in two or three waters, rubbing it lightly with a coarse cloth to remove the salt-crystals. Then soak over night in tepid water. Exchange this in the morning f...
-Fish. Part 6
Broiled Shad. (Fresh.)+ Wash, wipe, and split the fish. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, and lay it upon a buttered gridiron, inside downward. When the lower side is browned, turn the fish. One of medi...
-Fish. Part 7
Baked Sturgeon A piece of sturgeon weighing five or six pounds is enough for a handsome dish. Skin it and let it stand in salt and water for half an hour. Parboil it to remove the oil. Make a dressin...
-Fish. Part 8
Boiled Salmon-Trout+ Clean, wash, and dry the trout; envelop in a thin cloth fitted neatly to the shape of the fish, lay within a fish-kettle, cover with salted water (cold), and boil gently half an ...
-Fish. Part 9
Fried Cat-fish+ Skin, clean, and remove the heads. Sprinkle with salt, and lay aside for an hour or more. Have ready two or three eggs beaten to a froth, and, in a flat dish, a quantity of powdered c...
-Fish. Part 10
Chowder (No. 2.) Slice six large onions, and fry them in the gravy of fried salt pork. Cut five pounds of bass or cod into strips three inches long and one thick, and line the bottom of a pot with th...
-Shell-Fish
How To Boil A Lobster Choose a lively one - not too large, lest he should be tough. Put a handful of salt into a pot of boiling water, and having tied the claws together, if your fish merchant has no...
-Shell-Fish. Part 2
Water-Turtles, Or Terrapins Land-terrapins, it is hardly necessary to say, are uneatable, but the large turtle that frequents our mill-ponds and rivers can be converted into a relishable article of f...
-Shell-Fish. Part 3
Scalloped Oysters+ Crush and roll several handfuls of Boston or other friable crackers. Put a layer in the bottom of a buttered pudding-dish. Wet this with a mixture of the oyster liquor and milk, sl...
-Shell-Fish. Part 4
Oyster Pie+ Make a rich puff-paste; roll out twice as thick as for a fruit-pie for the top crust - about the ordinary thickness for the lower. Line a pudding dish with the thinner, and fill with crus...
-Shell-Fish. Part 5
Raw Oysters It is fashionable to serve these as one of the preliminaries to a dinner-party; sometimes in small plates, sometimes on the half-shell. They are seasoned by each guest according to his ow...
-Shell-Fish. Part 6
Clam Fritters+ 12 clams, minced fine. 1 pint of milk. 3 eggs. Add the liquor from the clams to the milk ; beat up the eggs and put to this, with salt and pepper, and flour enough for thin batter; la...
-Poultry
Poultry should never be eaten in less than six or eight hours after it is killed; but it should be picked and drawn as soon as possible There is no direr disgrace to our Northern markets than the prac...
-Poultry. Part 2
Roast Turkey After drawing the turkey, rinse out with several waters, and in next to the last mix a teaspoonful of soda. The inside of a fowl, especially if purchased in the market, is sometimes very...
-Poultry. Part 3
Turkey Scallop+ Cut the meat from the bones of a cold boiled or roasted turkey left from yesterday's dinner. Remove the bits of skin and gristle, and chop up the rest very fine. Put in the bottom of ...
-Poultry. Part 4
Boiled Chickens Clean, wash, and stuff as for roasting. Baste a floured cloth around each, and put into a pot with enough boiling water to cover them well. The hot water cooks the skin at once, and p...
-Poultry. Part 5
Broiled Chicken It is possible to render a tough fowl eatable by boiling or stewing it with care. Never broil such! And even when assured that your broiler is young, it is wise to make this doubl...
-Poultry. Part 6
Baked Chicken Pie+ Is made as above, but baked in a buttered pudding-dish, and, in place of the potatoes, three hard-boiled eggs are chopped up and strewed among the pieces of chicken. If the chicken...
-Poultry. Part 7
How To Use up Cold Duck+ I may say, as preface, that cold duck is in itself an excellent supper dish, or side dish, at a family dinner, and is often preferred to hot. If the duck has been cut into at...
-Poultry. Part 8
Roast Goose Clean and wash the goose - not forgetting to put a spoonful of soda in next to the last water, rinse out well, and wipe the inside quite dry. Add to the usual stuffing of bread-crumbs, pe...
-Meats
Roast Beef The best pieces for roasting are the sirloin and rib pieces. The latter are oftenest used by small families. Make your butcher remove most of the bone, and skewer the meat into the shape o...
-Meats. Part 2
Beef-Steak And Onions Prepare the steak as above directed. While it is broiling put three or four chopped onions in a frying-pan with a little beef-dripping or butter. Stir and shake them briskly unt...
-Meats. Part 3
Breakfast Stew of Beef+ Cut up two pounds of beef - not too lean - into pieces an inch long; put them into a saucepan with just enough water to cover them, and stew gently for two hours. Set away unt...
-Meats. Part 4
Beef Pie, with Potato Crust+ Mince some rare roast beef or cold corned beef, if it is not too salt; season with pepper and salt, and spread a layer in the bottom of a pudding-dish. Over this put one ...
-Meats. Part 5
Dried Beef The most common way of serving dried or smoked beef is to shave it into thin slices or chips, raw; but a more savory relish may be made of it with little trouble. Put the slices of uncooke...
-Mutton And Lamb
Roast Mutton The parts which are usually roasted are: - The shoulder, The saddle, or chine, and The loin and haunch (a leg and part of the loin). The leg is best boiled, unless the mutton is young a...
-Mutton And Lamb. Continued
Mutton Stew+ Cut up from three to four pounds of mutton, - the inferior portions will do as well as any other, - crack the bones, and remove all the fat. Put on the meat - the pieces not more than an...
-Veal
Despite the prejudice, secret or expressed, which prevails in many minds against veal, - one which the wise and witty Country Parson has as surely fostered among reading people, as did Charles Lamb ...
-Veal. Part 2
Veal Chops Are more juicy and less apt to be tough and solid than cutlets. Trim the bone as with mutton chops, and fry, dipping in beaten egg and cracker-crumbs. Add a little parsley and a minced sha...
-Veal. Part 3
Stewed Fillet Of Veal Stuff, and bind with twine as for roasting. Then cover the top and sides with sliced ham which has been already boiled, securing with skewers, or twine crossing the meat in all ...
-Veal. Part 4
Stewed Calf's-Head Wash the head in several waters, and taking out the brains, set them by in a cool place. Tie the head in a floured cloth and boil it two hours in hot water slightly salted. Wash th...
-Veal. Part 5
Sweet-Breads (Roasted.) Parboil and throw into cold water, where let them stand for fifteen minutes. Then change to more cold water for five minutes longer. Wipe perfectly dry. Lay them in your dripp...
-Veal. Part 6
Minced Veal Take the remains of a cold roast of veal fillet, shoulder, or breast, and cut all the meat from the bones. Put the latter, with the outside slices and the gristly pieces, into a saucepan,...
-Veal. Part 7
Calf's Liver (Boasted.) Soak the liver in salt and water an hour to draw out the blood. Wipe perfectly dry, and stuff with a force-meat made of bread-crumbs, two slices of fat salt pork, chopped smal...
-Veal. Part 8
Veal Marble Boil a beef-tongue the day before it is to be used, and a like number of pounds of lean veal. Grind first one, then the other, in a sausage-cutter, keeping them in separate vessels until ...
-Pork
At the South, where, in spite of the warm climate, the consumption of pork is double that of the North, the full-grown hog is seldom represented by any of his parts at the table, fresh or pickled, unl...
-Pork. Part 2
Roast Leg Of Pork One weighing about seven pounds is enough, even for a large family. If the pig be young, the leg will be even smaller. Score the skin in squares, or parallel lines running from side...
-Pork. Part 3
Roast Pig A month-old pig, if it be well-grown and plump, is best for this purpose. It is hardly possible that any lady-housekeeper will ever be called upon to do the butcher's work upon the bodies o...
-Pork. Part 4
Pork Steaks Those from the loin are best, but they can be cut from the neck. Remove the skin and trim neatly. Broil over a clear fire, without seasoning, adding pepper, salt, a pinch of sage, another...
-Pork. Part 5
Souse Of Pigs' Ears And Feet Clean the ears and feet well; cover them with cold water slightly salted, and boil until tender. Pack in stone jars while hot, and cover while you make ready the pickle. ...
-Pork. Part 6
Cheshire Pork-Pie Cut two or three pounds of lean fresh pork into strips as long and as wide as your middle finger. Line a buttered dish with puff-paste ; put in a layer of pork seasoned with pepper,...
-Pork. Part 7
Bologna Sausage (Uncooked.) 6 lbs. lean pork. 3 beef. 2 beef suet. 4 ounces salt. 6 tablespoonfuls black pepper. 2 teaspoonfuls powdered cloves. 1 teaspoonful allspice. One minced onion,...
-Pork. Part 8
Brawn (No. 1.) Pig's head weighing 6 lbs. 1 lb. lean beef. 1 teaspoonful salt. 1/2 teaspoonful pepper (black or white). 1/2 teaspoonful cayenne pepper. 1/2 teaspoonful mace. A pinch of cloves. ...
-Pork. Part 9
How To Cure Hams Having pickled your haras with the rest of your pork as just directed, take them, after the lapse of sixteen days, from the packing barrel, with the shoulders and jowls. At the South...
-Pork. Part 10
Baked Ham Soak for twelve hours. Trim away the rusty part from the under side and edges, wipe very dry, cover the bottom with a paste made of flour and hot water, and lay it upside down in the drippi...
-Pork. Part 11
Fried Ham If raw, soak as for broiling. Cook in a hot frying-pan turning often until done. Serve with or without the gravy, as you please. In some parts of the country it is customary to take the mea...
-Pork. Part 12
Pork And Beans Parboil a piece of the middling of salt pork, and score the skin. Allow a pound to a quart of dried beans, which must be soaked over night in lukewarm water. Change this twice for more...
-Company
Laying to your conduct the line and plummet of the Golden Rule, never pay a visit (I use the word in contradistinction to call) without notifying your hostess-elect of your intention thus to favor h...
-Company. Continued
As to party and dinner-giving, your safest rule is to obey the usage of the community in which you live in minor points, letting common sense and your means guide you in essentials. Be chary of undert...
-Game. Venison
I once received a letter from the wife of an Eastern man who had removed to the Great West, in which bitter complaints were made of the scarcity of certain comforts - ice-cream and candy among them - ...
-Game. Venison. Part 2
Neck This is roasted precisely as is the haunch, allowing a quarter of an hour to a pound. Shoulder This is also a roasting-piece, but may be cooked without the paste and paper. Baste often with bu...
-Game. Venison. Part 3
Hashed Venison+ The remains of cold roast venison - especially a stuffed shoulder - may be used for this dish, and will give great satisfaction to cook and consumers. Slice the meat from the bones. P...
-Game. Venison. Part 4
Crust Of Pasty 1 1/2 lb. of flour. 12 oz. butter. Yolks of 3 eggs-Salt. Ice-water. Dry and sift the flour and cut up half the butter in it with a knife or chopper until the whole is fine and yellow;...
-Rabbits Or Hares
The tame rabbit is rarely if ever eaten. The wild hare of the South - in vulgar parlance, old hare, although the creature may be but a day old - exactly corresponds with the rabbit of the Northern f...
-Rabbits Or Hares. Continued
Fricasseed Rabbit. (Brown.) Cut off the head - joint, and lay in soak for an hour. Season the pieces with pepper and salt, dredge with flour, and fry in butter or nice dripping until brown. Take from...
-Squirrels
The large gray squirrel is seldom eaten at the North, but is in great request in Virginia and other Southern States. It is generally barbecued, precisely as are rabbits; broiled, fricasseed, or - most...
-Pheasants, Partridges, Quails, Grouse, Etc
The real pheasant is never sold in American markets. The bird known as such at the South is called a partridge at the North, and is, properly speaking, the ruffled grouse. The Northern quail is the ...
-Pheasants, Partridges, Quails, Grouse, Etc. Continued
Game Pie - (Very fine) This may be made of any of the birds named in the foregoing receipts. Grouse and quails together make a delightful Christmas pie. Clean and wash the birds; cut the quails in ha...
-Wild Ducks
Nearly all wild ducks are liable to have a fishy flavor, and when handled by inexperienced cooks, are sometimes uneatable from this cause. Before roasting them, guard against this by parboiling them w...
-Wild Turkey
This stately stalker of Southern forests and Western prairies is eagerly sought after by the lovers of good eating in those regions. The dark meat and game flavor proclaim his birthright of lordly fre...
-Small Birds
Roast Snipe Or Plovers Clean and truss, but do not stuff. Lay in rows in the dripping-pan, or tie upon a spit, sprinkle with salt, and baste well with butter, then with butter and water. When they be...
-Sauces For Meat And Fish
These are no longer the appendages of the rich man's bill of fare only A general knowledge of made sauces, as well as the more expensive ones imported from abroad and sold here at high prices, is a pa...
-Sauces For Meat And Fish. Part 2
Sauce For Boiled Or Baked Fish 4 ounces butter. 1 tablespoonful flour. 2 anchovies. 1 teaspoonful chopped capers, or nasturtium seed, or green pickle. 1 shallot. Pepper and salt to taste. 1 table...
-Sauces For Meat And Fish. Part 3
Sauce For Lobsters 5 tablespoonfuls fresh butter. Teacupful vinegar. Salt and pepper to taste, with a heaping teaspoonful white sugar. 1 teaspoonful made mustard. Minced parsley. Beat the butter to...
-Sauces For Meat And Fish. Part 4
Mushroom Sauce 1 teacupful young mushrooms. 4 tablespoonfuls butter. 1 teacupful cream or milk. 1 teaspoonful flour. Nutmeg, mace, and salt to taste. Stew the mushrooms in barely enough water to cov...
-Catsups And Flavored Vinegars
Made Mustard+ 4 tablespoonfuls best English mustard. 2 teaspoonfuls salt. 2 white sugar. 1 white pepper. 2 salad oil. Vinegar to mix to a smooth paste - celery or Tarragon vinegar if you have it...
-Catsups And Flavored Vinegars. Part 2
Imitation Worcestershire Sauce 3 teaspoonfuls cayenne pepper. 2 tablespoonfuls walnut or tomato catsup (strained through muslin). 3 shallots minced fine. 3 anchovies chopped into bits. 1 quart of ...
-Catsups And Flavored Vinegars. Part 3
A Good Store Sauce 2 tablespoonfuls horse radish (grated). 3 large pickled onions (minced fine). 2 dozen whole black peppers. A pinch of cayenne. 1 tablespoonful salt. 1 quart vinegar from walnut...
-Salads
The dressing of the salad should be saturated with oil, and seasoned with pepper and salt before the vinegar is added. It results from this process that there never can be too much vinegar; for, from...
-Salads. Part 2
Excelsior Lobster Salad with Cream Dressing+ 1 fine lobster, boiled and when cold picked to pieces, or two small ones. 1 cup of best salad oil. 1/2 cup sweet cream, whipped light to a cupful of frot...
-Salads. Part 3
Summer Salad 3 heads of lettuce. 2 teaspoonfuls green mustard leaves. A handful of water-cresses. Four or five very tender radishes. 1 cucumber. 3 hard-boiled eggs. 2 teaspoonfuls white sugar. 1...
-Salads. Part 4
Salmon Salad+ 1 1/2 lb. cold boiled or baked salmon. 2 heads white lettuce (or celery). 3 hard-boiled eggs. 2 tablespoonfuls salad oil. 1 teaspoonful salt, and same of cayenne. 1 ...
-Vegetables
Rules Applicable to the Cooking of all Vegetables. 1. Have them as fresh as possible. Stale and withered ones are unwholesome and unpalatable. Summer vegetables should be cooked on the same day they ...
-Potatoes
Boiled Potatoes (with the skins on.) Boil in cold water with a pinch of salt. Have them of uniform size, and cook steadily until a fork will pierce easily to the heart of the largest. Then pour off th...
-Potatoes. Part 2
How To Stew Old Potatoes+ This is a good way to cook potatoes which are so rank and tough as hardly to be eatable in any other form. Pare and quarter, if large. Soak in cold water one hour. Put into...
-Potatoes. Part 3
Potato Ribbon Pare and lay in ice-water for an hour. Choose the largest and soundest potatoes you can get for this dish. At the end of the hour, pare, with a small knife, round and round in one conti...
-Potatoes. Part 4
Broiled Potatoes Cut whole boiled potatoes lengthwise, into slices a quarter of an inch thick, and lay upon a gridiron over a hot, bright fire. Brown on both sides, sprinkle with pepper and salt, lay...
-Cabbage
Boiled Cabbage Pick off the outer green leaves, quarter, examine carefully to be sure there are no insects in it, and Jay for an hour in cold water. Then put into a pot with plenty of boiling water, ...
-Collards Or Cabbage-Sprouts
Pick over carefully, lay in cold water, slightly salted, half an hour; shake in a cullender to drain, and put into boiling water, keeping at a fast boil until tender. A piece of pork seasons them plea...
-Cauliflower
Boiled Cauliflower Pick off the leaves and cut the stalk close to the bottom of the bunch of flowers. Lay in cold water for half an hour. Unless very large, do not cut it; if you do, quarter neatly. ...
-Cauliflower. Part 2
Young Turnips Boiled Whole Pare smoothly, and trim all into the same size and shape. Lay in cold water half an hour. Put on in boiling water, with a tablespoonful of butter, and stew until tender. Dr...
-Cauliflower. Part 3
Pea Fritters or Cakes+ Cook a pint or three cups more peas than you need for dinner. Mash while hot with a wooden spoon, seasoning with pepper, salt, and butter. Put by until morning. Make a batter o...
-Cauliflower. Part 4
Boiled Onions Cut off tops and tails, and skin them. Lay in cold water half an hour, then put into a saucepan with enough boiling water to cover them. Cook fifteen minutes and drain off the water, re...
-Cauliflower. Part 5
Stewed Tomatoes+ Loosen the skins by pouring scalding water upon them ; peel and cut them up, extracting the cores or hard parts of the stem end, and removing all unripe portions. Stew in a saucepan ...
-Cauliflower. Part 6
Raw Tomatoes Do not loosen the skins with scalding water. It impairs the flavor and destroys the crispness. Pare with a keen knife, slice and lay in a glass dish. Season with pepper, salt, and vinega...
-Cauliflower. Part 7
Succotash This is made of green corn and Lima beans, although you can substitute for the latter string or butter beans. Have a third more corn than beans, when the former has been cut from the cob an...
-Cauliflower. Part 8
Salsify or Oyster-Plant. (Stewed.)+ Scrape the roots, dropping each into cold water as soon as it is cleaned. Exposure to the air blackens them. Cut in pieces an inch long, put into a saucepan with h...
-Cauliflower. Part 9
Another Way Scrape and boil until nearly done. Cut into small squares, and put into a saucepan, with two small onions, minced; a little chopped parsley, pepper and salt to taste, and half a cup of ra...
-Cauliflower. Part 10
Stewed Beets Boil young, sweet beets, until nearly done; skin and slice them. Put into a saucepan with a minced shallot and parsley, two tablespoonfuls melted butter, a like quantity of vinegar, some...
-Cauliflower. Part 11
Artichokes Strip off the outer leaves, and cut the stalks close to the bottom. Wash well and lay in cold water two hours. Immerse in boiling water, the stalk-ends uppermost, with an inverted plate up...
-Mushrooms
Imprimis Have nothing to do with them until you are an excellent judge between the true and false. That sounds somewhat like the advice of the careful mother to her son, touching the wisdom of never...
-Mushrooms. Part 2
Baked Mushrooms Take fresh ones, - the size is not very important, - cut off nearly all the stalks, and wipe off the skin with wet flannel. Arrange neatly in a pie-dish, pepper and salt, sprinkle a l...
-Mushrooms. Part 3
Okra Boil the young pods, in enough salted hot water to cover them, until tender. Drain thoroughly, and when dished pour over them a sauce of three or four spoonfuls melted (not drawn) butter, a tabl...
-Mushrooms. Part 4
Boiled Rice Pick over carefully and wash in two waters, letting it stand in the last until you are ready to boil. Have ready some boiling water slightly salted, and put in the rice. Boil it just twen...
-Eggs
To guess (I do not say determine) whether an egg is good, shut one eye; frame the egg in the hollow of the hand, telescope-wise, and look at the sun through it with the open eye. If you can distinctly...
-Eggs. Part 2
Dropped Or Poached Eggs Strain some boiling water into a frying-pan, which must also be perfectly clean. The least impurity will mar the whiteness of the eggs. When the water boils, break the eggs se...
-Eggs. Part 3
Baked Eggs Break six or seven eggs into a buttered dish, taking care that each is whole, and does not encroach upon the others so much as to mix or disturb the yolks. Sprinkle with pepper and salt, a...
-Eggs. Part 4
Eggs au Lit (in bed)+ Mince some cold fowl - chicken, turkey, or duck (or some cold boiled veal and ham in equal quantities - very fine, and rub in a Wedgewood mortar, adding by degrees some melted b...
-Sweet Omelettes
Omelette Soufflee - (Fried.) 6 eggs. 4 tablespoonfuls sugar (powdered.) 1 teaspoonful of vanilla. 2 tablespoonfuls butter. Beat the whites and yolks separately. Add the sugar to the yolks, a littl...
-Sweet Omelettes. Part 2
Bonny-Clabber, or Loppered-Milk+ Set a china or glass dish of skimmed milk away in a warm place, covered. When it turns - i. e., becomes a smooth, firm, but not tough cake, like blanc-mange - serve i...
-Sweet Omelettes. Part 3
Cottage Cheese Heat sour milk until the whey rises to the top. Pour it off, put the curd in a bag and let it drip six hours, without squeezing it. Put in a wooden bowl, chop fine with a wooden spoon,...
-Bread
If eminence of importance entitled a subject to preeminence of position, that of which we are now about to speak should have stood foremost in this work. It is not a pleasant thing to think or write a...
-Bread. Part 2
Yeast (Hop.)+ 4 large potatoes, or six small. 2 quarts cold water. Double handful hops, tied in a coarse muslin bag. 4 tablespoonfuls flour. 2 white sugar. Peel the potatoes, and put them with t...
-Bread. Part 3
Yeast Cakes+ 2 quarts water (cold.) 1 quart pared and sliced potatoes. Double-handful hops, tied in coarse muslin bag. Flour to make stiff batter. 1 cup Indian meal. Boil the potatoes and hop-ba...
-Bread. Part 4
Family Bread ( White.)+ Having set your sponge over night, or, if you bake late in the afternoon, early in the morning, sift dry flour into a deep bread-tray, and strew a few spoonfuls of fine salt o...
-Bread. Part 5
Family Bread (Brown.)+ I wish it were in my power, by much and earnest speaking and writing, to induce every housekeeper to make brown bread - that is, bread made of unbolted, usually called Graham f...
-Bread. Part 6
Rye Bread Set a sponge, as above, but with half the quantity of water. In the morning mix with this: 1 quart warm milk. 1 tablespoonful salt. 1 cup Indian meal. And enough rye flour to make it i...
-Bread. Part 7
French Rolls. ( No. 2.) 1 quart milk ; new, warm milk is best. 1 teacup yeast. 1 quart and a pint of flour. When this sponge is light, work in a well-beaten egg and two tablespoonfuls melted butte...
-Bread. Part 8
Mrs. E------'s Biscuit (Soda.)+ 1 quart flour. 2 heaping tablespoonfuls of lard. 2 cups sweet - if you can get it - new milk. 1 teaspoonful soda. Rub the soda and cream-tartar into the flour, and...
-Bread. Part 9
Dried Rusk+ 1 pint of warm milk. 2 eggs. 1/2 teacup of butter. Half a cup of yeast. 1 teaspoonful salt. Set a sponge with these ingredients, leaving out the eggs, and stirring in flour until you h...
-Bread. Part 10
Crumpets (Sweet.) 1 pint raised dough. 3 eggs. 3 tablespoonfuls butter. 1/2 cup white sugar. When your bread has passed its second rising, work into the above-named quantity the melted butter, the...
-Bread. Part 11
Rice Muffins+ 1 cup cold boiled rice. 1 pint of flour. 2 eggs. 1 quart of milk, or enough to make thin batter. 1 tablespoonful lard or butter. 1 teaspoonful salt. Beat hard and bake quickly. Homi...
-Bread. Part 12
Nonpareil Corn Bread+ 2 heaping cups of Indian meal. 1 cup of flour. 3 eggs. 2 1/2 cups milk. 1 teaspoonful lard. 2 white sugar. 1 teaspoonful soda. Beat the eggs very thoroughly - w...
-Bread. Part 13
Batter Bread, or Egg Bread.+ Half a cup cold boiled rice. 2 eggs. 2 cups Indian meal. 1 tablespoonful lard or butter. 1 teaspoonful salt. 1 pint milk. Beat the eggs light, and the rice to a smoot...
-Bread. Part 14
Flannel Cakes+ 1 quart milk. 3 tablespoonfuls yeast. 1 tablespoonful butter, melted. 2 eggs, well beaten. 1 teaspoonful salt. Flour to make a good batter. Set the rest of the ingredients as a spo...
-Bread. Part 15
Risen Waffles 1 quart milk. 1 heaping quart flour. 5 tablespoonfuls yeast. 2 eggs. 1 tablespoonful melted butter. 1 teaspoonful salt. Set the mixture - minus the eggs and butter - over night as ...
-Shortcakes, Etc
Sunnybank Shortcake (for fruit.)+ 2 scant quarts flour. 2 tablespoonfuls lard. 3 butter. 2 1/2 cups sour or buttermilk. Loppered cream is still better. 2 eggs, well bea...
-Cakes
Use none but the best materials for making cake. If you cannot afford to get good flour, dry white sugar, and the best family butter, make up your mind to go without your cake, and eat plain bread wit...
-Cakes. Part 2
Icing+ Whites of 4 eggs. 1 pound powdered white sugar. Lemon, vanilla, or other seasoning. Break the whites into a broad, clean, cool dish. Throw a small handful of sugar upon them, and begin whip...
-Cakes. Part 3
Mrs. M.'s Cup Cake+ 1 cup butter. 2 sugar. 3 cups prepared flour. 4 eggs. 1 cup sweet milk. Bake in a loaf, or as jelly-cake. Cream-Cake+ 2 cups powdered sugar. 2/3 cupful butter. 4 eg...
-Cakes. Part 4
Cocoanut Cones 1 lb. powdered sugar. 1/2 grated cocoanut. Whites of 5 eggs. 1 teaspoonful best arrowroot. Whip the eggs as for icing, adding the sugar as you go on, until it will stand alone, t...
-Cakes. Part 5
Lady-Cake (No. 2.)+ 1 lb. sugar. 3/4 lb. sifted flour. 6 oz. butter. The whipped whites of ten eggs. Flavor with bitter almond, and bake in square, not very deep tins. Flavor the frosting with va...
-Cakes. Part 6
Chocolate Icing (Simple.) 1/4 cake chocolate. 1/2 cup sweet milk. 1 tablespoonful corn-starch. 1 teaspoonful vanilla. Mix together these ingredients, with the exception of the vanilla ; boil it t...
-Cakes. Part 7
Pound Cake (No. 1.) 1 lb. sugar. 1 flour. 3/4 butter. 9 eggs. 2 teaspoonfuls cream-tartar. 1 soda. Cream the butter and sugar with great care; beat the yolks and whites separately; sift the...
-Cakes. Part 8
Almond Cake 1 lb. powdered sugar. 1 flour. 1/4 butter. 8 eggs. T coffee-cupful sweet almonds, blanched by putting them into hot water, and, when stripped of their skins and perfectly cold, beate...
-Cakes. Part 9
Huckleberry Cake+ 1 cup butter. 2 cups sugar. 3 cups flour. 5 eggs. 1 cup sweet milk. 1 teaspoonful soda dissolved in hot water. 1 qt. ripe, fresh huckleberries, thickly dredged with flour. Sti...
-Cookies, Etc
Mrs. B.'s Cookies+ 6 eggs, whites and yolks separately. 1 cup butter. 3 cups sugar. Flour to make batter just stiff enough to be moulded with well-floured hands. Flavor with lemon. Make into round c...
-Cookies, Etc. Part 2
Ginger-Snaps (No. 3.) 1 pint molasses. 1 teacup sugar. 1 teaspoonful ginger. 1 allspice. 1 cup butter. 5 cups flour. Roll thin and cut into small cakes. Bake in quick oven. Aunt Margaret's J...
-Cookies, Etc. Part 3
Lady's Fingers Are mixed like drop sponge-cakes, but disposed upon the paper in long, narrow cakes. They are very nice dipped in chocolate icing, or caramel. Aunt Margaret's Crullers+ 1 lb. butter....
-Cookies, Etc. Part 4
Sponge Gingerbread (eggless.)+ 5 cups flour. 1 heaping tablespoonful butter. 1 cup molasses. 1 sugar. 1 milk (sour is best). 2 teaspoonfuls saleratus, not soda, dissolved in hot water. 2 te...
-Cookies, Etc. Part 5
Fruit Gingerbread 2 lbs. flour. 3/4 lb. butter. 1 lb. sugar. 1 lb. raisins, seeded and chopped. 1 currants, well washed. 2 cups molasses. 1/2 cup sour cream. 6 eggs. 1 heaping teaspoonful soda ...
-Pies
Use none but the best butter in pastry. Cooking butter is a good thing, said a grave epicure to me once, an admirable thing - in its place, which is in the soap-fat kettle or upon wagon-wheels! ...
-Pies. Part 2
Family Pie-Crust (No. 2.)+ 1 lb. flour, 3/4 butter. 1 teaspoonful soda. 2 teaspoonfuls cream-tartar. Ice-water to make into a stiff dough. Chop half the butter into the flour until it looks like...
-Pies. Part 3
Mince Pies (No. 2.)+ 2 lbs. lean fresh beef, boiled, and when cold, chopped fine. 1 lb. beef-suet, cleared of strings and minced to powder. 5 lbs. apples, pared and chopped. 2 raisins, seeded an...
-Pies. Part 4
Mock Mince-Meat+ 6 soda crackers - rolled fine. 2 cups cold water. 1 cup molasses. 1 brown sugar. 1 sour cider. 1 1/2 cup melted butter. 1 cup raisins - seeded and chopped. 1 currants. 2 eggs...
-Pies. Part 5
Pippin Pies 12 fine ripe pippins, pared and grated. 1 lb. white sugar. 1/2 lb butter 6 eggs - whites and yolks separately beaten. 1 lemon - grated peel and juice, with nutmeg. Cream the butter a...
-Pies. Part 6
Lemon Pie (No. 2.) 1 apple, chopped fine. 1 egg. 1 lemon, chop the inside very fine and grate the rind. 1 cup sugar. Butter, the size of a walnut. This is just enough for one pie. Take the thick whi...
-Pies. Part 7
Cocoa-nut Pie (No. 1,)+ 1/2 lb. grated cocoa-nut. 3/4 white sugar (powdered.) 6 oz. butter. 5 eggs - the whites only. 1 glass white wine. 2 tablespoonfuls rose-water. 1 tablespoonful nutmeg. ...
-Pies. Part 8
Custard Pie 4 eggs. 1 quart of milk. 4 tablespoonfuls white sugar. Flavor with vanilla or other essence. Beat the yolks and sugar light, and mix with the milk ; flavor, whip in the whites, which ...
-Pies. Part 9
Strawberry Pie Cap and pick over the berries, arrange in layers, besprinkle with a good coating of sugar, in a shell of pastry. Fill it very full, as strawberries shrink very much in cooking. Cover w...
-Servants
Some years ago - more than I care to count over - I read a lively little book entitled, The Greatest Plague of Life. I have forgotten who wrote it, if I ever knew. It was in the form of an autobiogr...
-Servants. Part 2
It is not strange that the deceived mistress should, from that day, write down Abigail a monster of ingratitude, and forget the faithful service of years in the smart of wounded feeling; when the tru...
-Servants. Part 3
For how much of this are mistresses responsible? Has this creed of distrust been learned by experience of injustice or exaction, or is it one of the popular prejudices, which are harder to overthrow t...
-Puddings
I have, for convenience sake, classed among pies all preparations baked in crust in a pie-dish. Many of these, however, are called puddings, such as custards of various kinds, lemon, cocoa-nut, and or...
-Puddings. Part 2
Brown Betty+ 1 cup bread-crumbs. 2 cups chopped apples - tart. 1/2 cup sugar. 1 teaspoonful cinnamon. 2 tablespoonfuls butter cut into small bits. Butter a deep dish, and put a layer of the chopp...
-Puddings. Part 3
Tapioca Pudding+ 1 cup tapioca. 1 quart milk. 5 eggs - whites and yolks beaten separately. 2 tablespoonfuls butter, melted. 2 sugar. Soak the tapioca, in enough cold water to cover it, two hour...
-Puddings. Part 4
Fruit Bread Pudding+ 1 quart milk. 5 eggs. 2 tablespoonfuls melted butter. 2 . . (heaping) sugar. 1/4 lb. raisins, seeded and chopped. 1/4 currants, well washed and picked over. Handful of shre...
-Puddings. Part 5
Cracker Pudding+ 1 quart milk. 1 cup powdered cracker. 5 eggs. 2 tablespoonfuls melted butter. i teaspoonful soda - dissolved in boiling water. Heat the milk slightly, and pouring it over the cra...
-Puddings. Part 6
Cracker And Jam Pudding 3 eggs. 1/2 cup cracker-crumbs 1/2 cup sugar. 1 tablespoonful butter. 1 teacup milk. 1/2 lemon - juice and grated rind. 3 tablespoonfuls jam. Soak the cracker in the mi...
-Puddings. Part 7
Batter Pudding (No. 2.) 1 quart milk. 10 tablespoonfuls flour. 7 eggs. 1 teaspoonful salt. 1/2 soda, dissolved in hot water. Wet the flour gradually with the milk to a very smooth paste; next ...
-Puddings. Part 8
Cocoanut Pudding 1/2 lb. grated cocoanut. i cup stale sponge cake, crumbed fine. 1 cup sugar. 1 large cup rich milk - cream, if you can get it. 6 eggs. 2 teaspoonfuls vanilla, or rose-water. Cre...
-Puddings. Part 9
Rhubarb Pudding Prepare the stalks as for pies; cover the bottom of a buttered pudding-dish with slices of bread and butter; cover with the rhubarb cut into short pieces; sprinkle abundantly with sug...
-Puddings. Part 10
Boiled Puddings You can boil puddings in a bowl, a mould, or a cloth. The mould should have a closely-fitting top, and be buttered well - top and all - before the batter or dough is put in. These mou...
-Puddings. Part 11
Fruit Valise Pudding+ 1 quart flour. 1 tablespoonful lard, and same of butter. 1 teaspoonful soda, dissolved in hot water. 1 saltspoonful salt. 2 cups milk, or enough to make the flour into soft ...
-Puddings. Part 12
Suet Dumplings (plain.) 2 cups fine bread-crumbs, soaked in a very little milk. 1 cup beef suet, freed from strings, and powdered. 4 eggs, whites and yolks separated, and beaten very light, 1 tables...
-Puddings. Part 13
Orange Roley-Poley+ Make a light paste as for apple dumplings or valise pudding, roll in an oblong sheet, and lay oranges (sweet ones), peeled, sliced, and seeded, thickly all over it. Sprinkle with ...
-Fritters, Pancakes, Etc
Have plenty of nice sweet lard in which to fry fritters, and test the heat by dropping in a teaspoonful before you risk more. If right, the batter will rise quickly to the surface in a puff-ball, splu...
-Fritters, Pancakes, Etc. Continued
Jelly Fritters 1 scant cup sponge-cake crumbs - very fine and dry. 1 cup boiling milk. 4 eggs. 2 tablespoonfuls powdered sugar. 1 teaspoonful corn-starch, wet in a little cold milk. 2 tablespoonf...
-Sweet Sauces Or Pudding Sauces
Hard Sauce+ Stir to a cream 1 cup of butter. 8 cups of powdered sugar. When light, beat in | teacup wine. Juice of a lemon. 2 teaspoonfuls nutmeg. Beat long and hard until several shades lighter i...
-Sweet Sauces Or Pudding Sauces. Continued
Milk Pudding Sauce+ 2 eggs, beaten stiff. 1 large cup of sugar. 5 tablespoonfuls boiling milk. 1/2 teaspoonful arrow root or corn-starch, wet with cold milk. 1 teaspoonful nutmeg, or mace. 1 table...
-Custards, Blanc-Mange, Jellies, And Creams
A good rule for custard is five eggs to a quart of milk, and a tablespoonful of sugar to each egg, although a good plain custard can be made with an egg for each cup of milk and four tablespoonfuls of...
-Custards, Blanc-Mange, Jellies, And Creams. Part 2
Floating Island+ 1 quart of milk. 5 eggs - whites and yolks beaten separately. 4 tablespoonfuls (heaping) white sugar. 2 teaspoonfuls extract bitter almond or vanilla. 1/2 cup currant jelly. Beat ...
-Custards, Blanc-Mange, Jellies, And Creams. Part 3
French Tapioca Custard+ 5 dessert spoonfuls tapioca. 1 quart of milk. 1 pint of cold water. 3 eggs. 1 teaspoonful vanilla, or other essence. 1 heaping cup of sugar. A pinch of salt. Soak the t...
-Custards, Blanc-Mange, Jellies, And Creams. Part 4
Almond Blanc-mange+ 1 quart of milk. 1 oz. Cooper's gelatine 3 ozs. of almonds, blanched and pounded in a mortar, with 1 tablespoonful of rose-water, added to prevent oiling. 3/4 cup sugar....
-Custards, Blanc-Mange, Jellies, And Creams. Part 5
Velvet Blanc-mange+ 2 cups of sweet cream. 1/2 oz. Cooper's gelatine, soaked in a very little cold water one hour. 1/2 cup white sugar (powdered.) 1 teaspoonful extract of bitter almonds. 1 glass w...
-Custards, Blanc-Mange, Jellies, And Creams. Part 6
Flummery 2 oz. almonds - a few bitter among them. 1 tablespoonful orange-flower or rose-water. 1 pint cream. 1 oz. Cooper's gelatine, soaked one hour in one cup cold water. 1 cup milk. 1/2, suga...
-Custards, Blanc-Mange, Jellies, And Creams. Part 7
Wine Jelly+ 3 cups of sugar. 1 pint of wine - pale Sherry or White. 1 cup of cold water. 1 package Coxe's gelatine.' Juice of two lemons and grated peel of one. 1 quart of boiling water. 1 good...
-Custards, Blanc-Mange, Jellies, And Creams. Part 8
Orange Jelly+ 2 oranges - juice of both and grated rind of one 1 lemon - juice and peel. 1 package Coxe's gelatine, soaked in a very little water, one hour. 1 quart boiling water. 1 1/2 cup sugar, a...
-Ice-Cream And Other Ices
If you wish to prepare ice-cream at an hour's notice, you cannot do better than to purchase the best patent freezer you can procure. I had one once which would freeze cream admirably in half an hour. ...
-Ice-Cream And Other Ices. Part 2
Chocolate Ice-cream+ 1 quart of cream. 1 pint new milk. 2 cups sugar. 2 eggs beaten very light. 5 tablespoonfuls chocolate rubbed smooth in a little milk. Heat the milk almost to boiling, and po...
-Ice-Cream And Other Ices. Part 3
Pine-apple Ice-cream+ 1 quart of cream. 1 large ripe pine-apple. 1 lb. powdered sugar. Slice the pine-apple thin, and scatter the sugar between the slices. Cover it, and let the fruit steep three ...
-Ice-Cream And Other Ices. Part 4
Orange Ice+ 6 oranges - juice of all, and grated peel of three. 2 lemons - the juice only. 1 pint of sugar dissolved in 1 pint of water. Prepare and freeze as you would lemon ice. Pineapple Ice ...
-Ripe Fruit For Dessert
Oranges May be put on whole in fruit-baskets, or the skin be cut in eighths half way down, separated from the fruit and curled inward, showing half the orange white, the other yellow. Or, pass a shar...
-Preserves And Fruit Jellies
Use none but porcelain, or good bell-metal kettles for preserves and jellies. If the latter, clean thoroughly just before you put in the syrup or fruit. Scour with sand, then set it over the fire, wit...
-Preserves And Fruit Jellies. Part 2
Preserved Pears Are put up precisely as are peaches, but are only pared, not divided. Leave the stems on. Peach Marmalade+ Pare, stone, and weigh the fruit; heat slowly to draw out the juice, stirr...
-Preserves And Fruit Jellies. Part 3
Quince Cheese Is marmalade boiled down very thick, packed into small pots. It will turn out as firm as cheese, and can be cut in slices for luncheon or tea. Apple Butter This is generally made by t...
-Preserves And Fruit Jellies. Part 4
Damsons Are put up in the same manner as plums, but pricked instead of skinned. Preserved Orange Peel. (Very nice.)+ Weigh the oranges whole, and allow pound for pound. Peel the oranges neatly and ...
-Preserves And Fruit Jellies. Part 5
Preserved Ginger+ Pare the roots of fresh green ginger and lay in cold water fifteen minutes. Boil in three waters, changing the hot for cold every time, until very tender; drain, and lay in ice-wate...
-Preserves And Fruit Jellies. Part 6
Green Tomato Preserves. (Good.) 8 lbs. small green tomatoes. Pierce each with a fork. 7 lbs. sugar. 4 lemons - the juice only. 1 oz. ginger and mace mixed. Heat all together slowly, and boil unti...
-Preserves And Fruit Jellies. Part 7
Baked Quinces Pare and quarter; extract the seeds and stew the fruit in clear water until a straw will pierce them ; put into a baking-dish with a half cupful of sugar to every eight quinces; pour ov...
-Fruit Jellies
Currant, Blackberry, Strawberry, etc+ Put the fruit into a stone jar; set this in a kettle of tepid water, and put it upon the fire. Let it boil, closely covered, until the fruit is broken to pieces;...
-Canned Fruits And Vegetables
Within a few years canned fruits have, in a great measure, superseded preserves. They are cheaper, more wholesome, and far less difficult to prepare. Attention to a few general rules will insure succe...
-Canned Fruits And Vegetables. Continued
Canned Plums+ Prick with a needle to prevent bursting; prepare a syrup allowing a gill of pure water and a quarter of a pound of sugar to every three quarts of fruit. When the sugar is dissolved and ...
-Brandied Fruits
Brandied Peaches or Pears+ 4 lbs. fruit. 4 lbs. sugar. 1 pint best white brandy. Make a syrup of the sugar and enough water to dissolve it. Let this come to a boil; put the fruit in and boil five mi...
-Candies
Molasses Candy+ 1 quart good molasses. 1/2 cup vinegar. 1 cup sugar. Butter the size of an egg. 1 teaspoonful saleratus. Dissolve the sugar in the vinegar, mix with the molasses, and boil, stirring...
-Pickles
Use none but the best cider vinegar; especially avoid the sharp colorless liquid sold under that name. It is weak sulphuric acid, warranted to riddle the coat of any stomach, even that of an ostrich, ...
-Pickles. Part 2
Pickled Mangoes+ Young musk or nutmeg melons. English mustard-seed two handfuls, mixed with Scraped horseradish, one handful. Mace and nutmeg pounded, 1 teaspoonful. Chopped garlic, 2 teaspoonful...
-Pickles. Part 3
Pickled Onions Peel the onions, which should be fine white ones - not too large. Let them stand in strong brine for four days, changing it twice. Heat more brine to a boil, throw in the onions, and b...
-Pickles. Part 4
Pickled Water-melon Rind. (Extremely nice.) Equal weight of rind and white sugar. 1/2 ounce white ginger to a gallon of pickle. 1 pint vinegar to every pound of sugar. 1 tablespoonful turmeric to a g...
-Pickles. Part 5
Sweet Pickle - Plums, Pears, Peaches, or other Fruits+ 7 lbs. fruit, pared. 4 white sugar. 1 pint strong vinegar. Mace, cinnamon, and cloves. Pare peaches and pears; prick plums and damsons, tomat...
-Drinks
Coffee Never buy the ground coffee put up in packages, if you can get any other. The mere fact that after they have gone to the expense of the machinery and labor requisite for grinding it, the manuf...
-Drinks. Part 2
Chocolate+ 6 tablespoonfuls grated chocolate to each pint of water. As much milk as you have water. Sweeten to taste. Put on the water boiling hot. Rub the chocolate smooth in a little cold water, a...
-Drinks. Part 3
Elderberry Wine 8 quarts of berries. 4 quarts of boiling water poured over the berries. Let it stand twelve hours, stirring now and then. Strain well, pressing out all the juice. Add 3 lbs. of sug...
-Drinks. Part 4
Orangeade Is made in the same manner, substituting oranges for lemons. Strawberry Sherbet. (Delicious.)+ 1 quart of strawberries. 3 pints of water. 1 lemon - the juice only. 1 tablespoonful oran...
-Drinks. Part 5
Cherry Bounce 4 lbs. of sour and the same quantity of sweet cherries. 2 1/2 lbs. white sugar. 1 gallon best whiskey. Crush the cherries to pieces by pounding in a deep wooden vessel with a smooth bi...
-The Sick-Room
The sick-chamber should be the most quiet and cheerful in the house - a sacred isle past which the waves of domestic toil and solicitude glide silently. This is not an easy rule to obey. Whoever the i...
-The Sick-Room. Part 2
The Sick-Room. BeeF Tea+ 1 lb. lean beef, cut into small pieces. Put into a jar without a drop of water; cover tightly, and set in a pot of cold water. Heat gradually to a boil, and continue this st...
-The Sick-Room. Part 3
Arrowroot Wine Jelly+ 1 cup boiling water. 2 heaping teaspoonfuls arrowroot. 2 white sugar. 1 tablespoonful brandy or 3 tablespoonfuls of wine. An excellent corrective to weak bowels. Arrowroot...
-The Sick-Room. Part 4
Tapioca Blanc-mange+ 1 cup of tapioca soaked in two cups cold water. 3 cups boiling milk. 3 tablespoonfuls white sugar. Rose-water or vanilla. Soak the tapioca four hours, and stir, with the wate...
-The Sick-Room. Part 5
Calves' Feet Broth 2 calves' feet. 2 quarts cold water. 1 egg, beaten up with two tablespoonfuls milk for each cupful of broth. Pepper and salt. Boil the feet to shreds; strain the liquor through ...
-The Sick-Room. Part 6
Iceland or Irish Moss Jelly+ 1 handful moss, washed in five waters, and soaked an hour. 1 quart boiling water. 2 lemons - the juice only. 1 glass of wine. 1/4 teaspoonful cinnamon. (Measure scanti...
-The Sick-Room. Part 7
Mint Julep+ Some sprigs of green mint, slightly bruised in a tumbler with a teaspoon. Put in a generous teaspoonful of white sugar; add gradually, stirring and rubbing lightly, enough water to fill t...
-The Nursery
All food intended for infants should be very thoroughly cooked. The numerous varieties of farinaceous substances - biscotine, farina, rice-flour, arrowroot, etc., however nourishing may be their prope...
-The Nursery. Continued
Barley It sometimes happens that milk disagrees with a delicate infant so seriously that it is necessary to substitute some other article of diet for a few days. I have known barley water to be used,...
-Sundries
Cleaning Pots, Kettles, and Tins. Boil a double handful of hay or grass in a new iron pot, before attempting to cook with it; scrub out with soap and sand ; then set on full of fair water, and let it ...
-Sundries. Part 2
Washing Windows Dissolve a little washing-soda in the water if the glass is very dim with smoke or dirt. Do not let it run on the sash, but wash each pane with old flannel; dry quickly with a soft, c...
-Sundries. Part 3
How To Wash Silk Mix Together 2 cups cold water. 1 tablespoonful honey. 1 soft soap. 1 wineglass alcohol. Shake up well; lay the silk, a breadth at a time, on a table, and sponge both sides with...
-Sundries. Part 4
Black Lace 1/2 cup rain water, or very soft spring water. 1 teaspoonful borax. 1 tablespoonful spirits of wine. Squeeze the tumbled rusty lace through this four times, then rinse in a cup of hot w...
-Sundries. Part 5
How To Stop The Flow Of Blood Bind the cut with cobwebs and brown sugar, pressed on like lint. Or, if you cannot procure these, with the fine dust of tea. When the blood ceases to flow, apply laudanu...
-Soaps
Hard Soap 6 lbs. washing soda. 3 unslaked lime. Pour on 4 gallons boiling water. Let it stand until perfectly clear, then drain off. Put in 6 lbs. clean fat. Boil until it begins to harden - abo...
-Cook Books
Ice Cream And Cakes A New Collection of Standard Fresh and Original Receipts for Household and Commercial Use. By An American 1 Vol,, 12mo, - - Price, $1.50. Fond as Americans are of Ice-Cream and ...
-Cook Books. Part 2
The book is a beautiful one, and it will be a treasure in the hands of all who can appreciate the beautiful, and are asking the important question - 'How shall we furnish our homes?' - Christian at ...
-Cook Books. Part 3
Surly Tim, and other Stones. One vol., i6mo, cloth, $1.25. Each of these narratives has a distinct spirit, and can be profitably read by all classes of people. They are told not only with true art, ...









TOP
previous page: Miss Beecher's Housekeeper And Healthkeeper
  
page up: Household Books
  
next page: A Manual Of Home-Making