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The Horticulturist, And Journal Of Rural Art And Rural Taste #10 | by P. Barry, A. J. Downing, J. Jay Smith, Peter B. Mead, F. W. Woodward, Henry T. Williams



Abelia To Blue Glass

TitleThe Horticulturist, And Journal Of Rural Art And Rural Taste #10
AuthorP. Barry, A. J. Downing, J. Jay Smith, Peter B. Mead, F. W. Woodward, Henry T. Williams
PublisherJames Vice, Jr.
Year1853-1874
Copyright1853-1874, James Vice, Jr.
AmazonHorticulturist and Journal of Rural Art and Rural Taste

Devoted To Horticulture, Landscape Gardening, Rural Architecture, Botany, Pomology, Entomology, Rural Economy, Etc.

Edited By P. Barry, Author Of The "Fruit Garden".

Edited by A. J. Downing, Author Of "Landscape Gardening," "Designs For Cottage Residences," " Fruits And Fruit Trees Of America," "Country Houses," Etc., Etc.

Conducted By J. Jay Smith, Editor of the N. A. Sylva.

Volumes III - XXIX (1853-1874)

-1st. Vitis Rotundifolia (V. Vulpina, Of Gray)
Stem, moderately large; perfectly smooth, even in the oldest vines. Leaves, small, seldom over three or four inches across; thin, smooth; shining on both sides, most so beneath; rounded cordate, not l...
-2d. Vitis Aestivalis
Stem, climbing, lofty. Leaves, rounded, heart-shaped, sublobately-angled; sometimes distinctly three or five-lobed, with rounded sinuses; acuminate, irregularly-toothed, or serrate, with the teeth muc...
-Vitis Aestivalis. Continued
About a year later, Prof. Jackson sent to his brother, in this place (Athens), rooted plants, from which most of those now cultivated here were derived. We believe the Herbemont identical with this vi...
-878 Broadway, New York, March 13,1857. J. J. Smith, Esq
Dear Sir: The great interest you take in all things relating to horticulture and the universal popularity of your journal, induces me to send you a plan of ventilation for permanent roofed greenhouses...
-A. J. Downing
In reply to the call of Prof. Turner, in our last, we have been kindly famished with the following interesting reminiscences by the author of A visit to the House and Garden of A. J. Downing in our ...
-A. J. Downing, Esq
In the December number of the Horticulturist, one of your correspondents and yourself, unite in denouncing the Sage Grape as a humbug. It is true, there are a great many humbugs in horticulture. Th...
-A. Veitch, Nsw Haven, Conn
As a lawn in good condition is an object of great attraction about any place, large or small, too much care cannot be bestowed upon selecting the most suitable varieties of seeds with which to sow it ...
-A. W. Stetson's Seedling Grape No. 4
In Hovey's Magazine for March we have a very interesting article on the season of 1852, with notes on new fruits, by the Hon. J. S. Gabot, President of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, from wh...
-Abelia Bopbstris
A small spreading bush, with deciduous, bright green foliage. The branches are very slender, covered with fine down, and deep reddish brown, when fully exposed to the sun. The leaves are opposite, ova...
-Abennes
THAT celebrated improver, Shenstone, the poet of the Lea-sowes, occupied and amused himself in beautifying his place with artificial objects, avenues, lakes, and rustic designs. One of his plans was t...
-Abies Brunoniana
This very beautiful tree is closely allied to A. Canadensis, but may readily be distinguished by its much larger foliage. It grows about seventy to eighty feet high, with spreading, pendulous branches...
-Abies Deodara. Cedrus Deodara - The Sacred Cedar Of India
If there is a person who doubts the extreme beauty and gracefulness of this tree, I will just ask him, has he ever seen one fair, healthy specimen, twenty, thirty, or forty feet in height? (Of these h...
-Abies Douglasii Stairii
Of this new variegated Spruce, introduced in England, and first sent out this spring, the English journals are printing very complimentary notices. The Gardeners' Chronicle says of it, in an article o...
-Abies Menziesii, Menzies' Spruce
This very distinct species has proved perfectly hardy in this region as well as farther north; this, however, may be expected from the high latitude whence it comes on our northwestern coast Though no...
-Abies Pindrow . Picea Pindrow
This I may safely call one of the finest Silver Firs in the world. Our own north-west coast, with California, produce some noble trees - as A. grandis, nobilis, amabilis, Douglasii, etc. - trees which...
-Abies Pinsapo
The pleasure-grounds at Ribston, England, which are extensive, varied, and very beautiful, contain many fine specimens of trees and shrubs; the evergreens are particularly fine. There are a great many...
-Abies Webbiana. Picea Webbiana
This near allay of Pindrow has been much confused with it. To an ordinary observer there does not appear much difference; yet the line of distinction is well defined. Dr. Griffith informs us: This sp...
-Abutilon Sellowianum Marmora-Turn
A very beautiful variegated abutilon, exceeding in size of foliage any yet in cultivation. Its leaves measure from 6 to 7 inches in diameter, and the variation is of a lovely golden yellow. Introduce...
-Acacias
Of the whole class of New Holland plants, few are more interesting than Acacias. The strange variety in the phyllodes or leaves, the profusion and fragrance of their blossoms, and the season of the ye...
-Acacias. Part 2
Acacia Drummondi What is there to be desired in an Acacia that is not to be found in this ! Its habit, which is at once neat and compact, and its flowers, which are conspicuous and produced in profus...
-Acacias. Part 3
Acacia Pentadenia Acacia Pentadenia is another fine Acacia, well adapted for pot culture. Branches erect; and altho' making a nice compact bush, it does not become too dense, but is of a nice slender...
-The Acacia Dealbata - Hardy In France
French horticulture, always seeking to increase our enjoyments, has accomplished a valuable result for the ornament of our parks and landscape gardens. After several years of experiment, it has succee...
-Acacia Tree
This is a well-known American tree, better or more commonly known as the Locust. It grows very rapidly, in the early stages of its progress, so that in a few years, from seeds, plants of eight and ten...
-Accidental Monstrosity
The late dry season was singularly free from accidental monstrosities among flowers. We have not met with a single Rose sprouting into a branch from the middle, or producing there even a cluster of le...
-Account Of Mrs. Lawrence's Garden, Near London
[We quote the following description of the place most celebrated in England for the high cultivation of the plants and the richness and variety of the exotic flora it contains. Mrs. Lawrence's plants ...
-Account Of Mrs. Lawrence's Garden, Near London. Part 2
We cannot but remark on the felicity with which the oval figure has been chosen for framing these little scenes, and how well the shape and size of the aperture fulfil its intention. Any more irregula...
-Account Of Mrs. Lawrence's Garden, Near London. Part 3
A walk through the plant houses supplies continual food for wonder and admiration. The conviction is pressed upon us at every step that the power of cultivation can no further go. And everything is ...
-Account Of Mrs. Lawrence's Garden, Near London. Part 4
In the-greenhouses the most perfect ventilation is provided for by opening all the side lights, so that during the hottest weather the houses may be kept comparatively cool; and, after the occurrence ...
-Acer Circinatum
This is a most beautiful hardy deciduous tree from Oregon, with purple and white flowers, and leaves rich crimson in the autumn. It was introduced by the Horti-cultural Society. There is probably no h...
-Acer Negundo Variegatum
In Battersea Park, London, where there is gathered many gems of ornamental planting, there is a mass of this maple which forms a very attractive feature. The plants are still young but growing fast, a...
-Acer Villosum
A noble tree, from the Himalayas, with the aspect of a Sycamore. It was introduced by Messrs. Osborne and Co., of the Fulham Nursery. Dr. Wallich tells us that this is a very large tree, inhabiting th...
-Achimenes And Gloxinias
Mr. Beaton describes his method of treating these favorites, thus: We manage a select collection of Achimenes, and a very choice assortment of hybrid Gloxinias, without forcing, and the way we do the...
-Achimenes In Baskets
For the decoration of a stove or conservatory during summer and early autumn, we know of no more useful plants than Achimenes, and if carefully removed to a cool temperature as soon as the blossoms ex...
-Acknowledgements
From William 0. Shearer, of Philadelphia, large and fine seedling peaches from a city garden, well worthy of name; we shall call them the Shearer peach. From a friend on Staten Island, grapes and ...
-Acknowledgments
From Geo. Leslie, Toronto, C. W., seedling Cinerarias. Beauty of Toronto - white center, purple edge. Blue Bonnet (Kennedy) - dark blue, large, but a loose, open, imperfect flower; the color alone is ...
-Acknowledgment Of Fruits
WE are under obligations to many of our horticultural friends for specimens of fruit, and for which all have our thanks, though in some cases we are a little tardy in acknowledgment: From Mr. 0. F. B...
-An Acre Or Hollyhocks
Till within these last few years this flower was used as an ornament in the plantation or shrubbery border only; but it is now becoming an especial favorite with the professional and amateur florist, ...
-The Acuminate Onion
A few bulbs of this charming plant were sent from California to the Horticultural Society, by Mr. Hartweg, and flowered last spring in the Chiswick Garden, in a greenhouse. It is, however, in all prob...
-Ad Interim Fruit Report - January 17,1854
The Fruit Committee respectfully report that they have received, green Notches; greenish-yellow about the crown and on the unexposed portion. Stem - half an Inch long and one-twelfth thick, inserted i...
-Adantium Capillaire - Madien Hair Fern
Early in the month of May may be observed by those who suffer their eyes to be occupied by what is going on among the lowly plants and herbs that spring up in their path, a most charming fern, known b...
-Additional Remarks On The Sequoia (Wellingtons) Gigantea. Translated From The Revue Horticole
Our readers now know what to think of the giant trees of California, which so much interested the attention of the horticultural public, and persons in general, during the closing months of the past y...
-Address Of Henry T. Williams
The chairman called upon Henry T. Williams, as the next speaker, who responded as follows: It is four years now since I purchased my farm at Dover, Del., and within that time little Delaware has co...
-Address Of John Jay, Esq
The Address of Mr. Jay, entitled A Statistical View of American Agriculture, its Home Resources and Foreign Markets, delivered at New York, before the American Geographical and Statistical Society, ...
-Address Of John Jay, Esq (2)
The area of our territory, which is about three millions of square miles, will soon be treated of by Mr. Poor, the Chairman of the section on Topography. Without proposing to trench upon the duties o...
-Address Of John Jay, Esq (2). Continued
Another investigation led to the startling result, that of every hundred traders, but seven succeed in acquiring wealth. From such reverses the farmer is comparatively free. Of eleven hundred and twe...
-Address Of President Wilder
It has been the custom of Mr. Wilder to present an address at each opening of the American Pomological Society. These have always possessed a degree of excellence; but the last is the best of them all...
-Address On Horticulture
IT is matter of congratulation, that several citizens of Union Springs, New York, should have had the good taste to print this address. It contains a world of practical observation, and relates just...
-Address On Horticulture. Continued
Some shrubs suffer much from exposure to cold winds. In the open ground the White Antwerp Raspberry has been much injured, while ten rods off, under the lee of red cedars, it has done well. The common...
-Address On Horticulture (2)
(Concluded From P. 85, Feb. No.) The vigor of the vine may be increased and prolonged by layering thrifty shoots, which form roots of their own, and in effect become new and independent, though still...
-Address of President Wilder. Thinning Of Fruits
[Continued from p. 586]. One lesson which experience has taught us, is the importance of thinning the fruit, especially of apples and pears. This branch of Pomology has received comparatively but lit...
-The Adirondack Grape
We have received from Mr. Bailey, of Plattsburgh, a bunch of this new grape, which is said to ripen two weeks before the Isabella. We regret to say that the specimen was too imperfect to enable us to ...
-Adrian Horticultural Society
The Annual Meeting of this Society was held on the evening of the 5th of January. This Society, we learn, is in a flourishing condition. The following were the officers elected for the present year: ...
-Adulteration Of Coffee
We make the following extract from a report to the American Institute on the Adulteration of Food in New York. There can no doubt, that in some instances the vilest substances are compounded with the ...
-The Advent Of Man Upon The Earth
The following passage from Hugh Miller's Testimony of the Rocks, is full of thought and truth: Not until the introduction of man upon earth, do we find a creature whose works sensibly affect and modi...
-The Advertising Sheet
Nothing marks the increased influence of the Horticulturist more than the demand for space in its advertising sheet; it seems likely to exceed, in extent of pages, the work itself. The present month's...
-Affinities
I would here again recommend a more careful study of affinities between the stock and the graft. Whatever be the opinions in regard to the manner and degree of influence which the scion has upon the s...
-Affleck's Almanac
It would afford me much pleasure to have a small place in your journal to notice a work published by Thomas Affleck, of Washington, Adam's county, Miss., in which I conceive he is attempting to teach ...
-After Cultivation
Asparagus is a very hardy plant, and will bear almost any amount of frost when established; nevertheless, it is well to cut off the withered tops in the fall, and cover over a mulching of some 'suitab...
-Agalmyla Staminea - (Long-Stamened Agalmyla)
The large silver medal was awarded to Messrs. Veitch & Son, of Exeter, for a beautiful new Gesnerwort, named Agalmyla staminea (Fig. A), obtained rom Java, through their collector, Mr. Thomas Lobb. Th...
-The Agapanthus
We class this splendid subject among neglected plants, because in the few places where it is seen, it is hardly worthy of the name, from the imperfect manner in which its growth and flowers, in nearly...
-Agave Americana - Endogen
We might add considerably to this list, but it already supplies a sufficient number of illustrations of our general remarks. Years Palms of ..... 200,300 Cereis......
-Age Of Trees
(From The London Gardeners' Magazine Of Botany.) IN speaking of the age of trees, we insensibly use the term age, in the same manner as we do when speaking of animals. We talk of old trees, old anima...
-Ages Of Trees. Condensed From An Article By Professor Asa Gray
THE celebrated Sycamore-maple, AcerPseu-do-Platanus, stands near the entrance of the village of Trons, in the Grisons, the cradle of liberty in the Rhcetian Alps; under the once spreading branches of ...
-Agricultural
Washmgton, April 19, 1856, - Much activity exists in the agricultural branch of the Patent Office, under the direction of Mr. J. D. Brown. A number of gentlemen, in various parts of the country, are e...
-Agricultural And Horticultural Libraries
If the past should be reviewed by the Horticultural and Agricultural press, they could not fail to draw a very gratifying conclusion from the results of their labors. Although it is scarcely more than...
-Agricultural Books Published By C. M. Saxton, Barker & Co
No. 25 PARK ROW, NEW YORK. Sent by Mail to any part of the U.S. on receipt of price.. 1 AngerfearFarmer's Encyclopedia-- A work of great value ............ $4 00. 2 Allen's American Farm Book.........
-The Agricultural Department At Washington
The guiding power of this Department has, by reason of the death of Isaac Newton, been changed; but whether it Will be for the better, so far as horticulture is concerned, remains to be seen. The Comm...
-Agricultural Education
Dear Sir: The literary character of the principal editor of the Evening Post, gives importance to whatever he may write upon education, its means and ends. I enclose an article from his paper of to da...
-Agricultural Excursion To The West
Editors love a little freedom during the summer, especially when they can combine pleasure, instruction and business in one grand rural excursion. Such an one, of more than usual prominence, left New ...
-The Agricultural Exhibition At Louisville
We have watched the proceedings of this Society with great interest, from day to day. as the papers brought the detail of its important events. Col. Wilder was, as usual, very happy in his speeches an...
-Agricultural Humor
Of the Amherst, Mass., Cattle Show, the Springfield Republican says: There is a quaint humor in the making up of the committees upon stock, etc., which is a new feature in Cattle Shows. For instan...
-Agricultural Illustrations
In the whole range of agricultural and horticultural esthetics we candidly think nothing has a more pleasing and permanent effect than illustrations. It is almost as good to look upon the picture of a...
-Agriculture And Horticulture In California
We have received the third number of the California Former, published at San Francisco, California. From this number we glean several interesting items. The Committee on Agriculture have introduced a...
-The Agriculturist Strawberry Show
This came off on the 20th, and was really a fine affair. It is too late to go into detail, but we may say that the exhibition was quite a large one, the varieties numerous, and the berries large and h...
-Agricutural College Of The State Of Michigan
A bill has been passed by the Legislature of Michigan establishing an Agricultural School and Experimental Farm, to be located within ten miles of the Capitol - Lansing. The purchase of land is to be ...
-Ah English National School House
Our engraving of this month, shows one of the National School Houses at Tamon, lately erected at the cost of about 1,000. It is interesting chiefly as a study of the quiet domestic character which th...
-Aiken Grape
The origin of this grape is somewhat obscure. While its foliage and hardihood make it a native of this country, we have testimony that the first vine of it now known was brought to Cleveland from Germ...
-The Air-Pressure Churn
We are particularly fond of testing new inven- tions, especially those relating to Horticulture, or in any way pertaining to rural life. Mr. Hilton, the agent, 58 Cortland street, recently sent us an ...
-Akebia Quinata
In England, this is classed as a curious greenhouse climber, and practically it is unknown here to lovers of popular flower gardening. Recently, a correspondent of The London Garden wrote an enthusia...
-Albany And Bensselaer Horticultural Society
The firs! exhibition for 1853, took place at the N. T. Slate Agricultural Society Rooms on the 22d June; the floral display, both in beauty and variety, eclipsed that of any former exhibition: and tak...
-Albany And Rensselaer County Horticultural Society
We have received the list of premiums, rules, and regulations for 1853. The following is the list of officers and committees: President - HERMAN WENDELL, M. D. Vice Presidents - Henry Vaii, C. P. Wi...
-Albany And Rensselaer Horticultural Society
The following is the list of premiums awarded at the Annual Show of this Society, held at Van Vechten Hall, Albany, September 7th and 8th, 1853 : Fauna. Apples For the best and most extensive collec...
-Albany And Rensselaer Horticultural Society (2)
We have received a pamphlet containing lists of officers, committees, and regulations for 1854. Summer exhibition, June 15th; Annual exhibition, September 6th and 7th; Winter exhibition, February 21st...
-Albany And Rensselaer Horticultural Society. Annual Meeting, Feb. 16
The following officers were elected for the ensuing year: President - HERMAN WENDELL, M. D., of Albany. Vice Presidents - Henry Vail, of Troy, C P. Williams, of Albany; E Dorr, of Albany; Wm. Newgom...
-Albany and Bensselaer Horticultural Society
The annual meeting of the society was held at the State Agricultural Rooms, February 4th, 18o2 - V. P. Douw, President, in the chair. The Treasurer, Mr. Tucker, presented his report : - Receip...
-The Alexander Pear
The fine native pear to which I have given the above name, originated at the village of Alexander, in Genesee County, the seed having been planted thirty-five or forty years since, by a Mrs, Churchill...
-Alexandre Lambre
Size - medium. Form - roundish, Bergamot shape. Calyx - moderately sunk in flat basin. Stem - rather stout, less than one inch in length, and generally inserted without depression. Color - yellowish-g...
-Alien's Hybrid Grape
The horticultural friends of Mr. J. F Allen have been for some years aware that He has been experimenting, to produce a hybrid Grape, possessing the requisites which no one hitherto has combined, of s...
-All The Year Round
The January number of this serial is at hand, with a rich table of contents. It is published by J. M. Emerson, 37 Park Row, New York. Annual Meeting of the Fruit Growers' Society Of Western New York,...
-Allamanda Grandiflora
When well grown and flowered, this is one of the handsomest of the Allamandas, and it is not very difficult to manage. Let us begin with a young plant in a fire-inch pot, bought in spring from the nur...
-The Allen Hot-Houses
At most of the more important nurseries there are houses devoted to the culture of various kinds of plants. For instance, the camellia is always given a section; and others devoted to winter flowering...
-Allium Acuminatum
A few bulbs of this charming plant were sent from California to the Horticultural Society by Mr. Hartweg, and flowered in the Chiswick garden, in a greenhouse. It is, however, hardy, if kept in a plac...
-Almonds
To those who wish to be reminded of the sweet South, by having almonds fresh and ripe from the tree, the orchard house will give one more tribute. Almond-trees in pots require exactly the same treat...
-The Alpine Heights
The pen and the pencil may attempt, and not unsuccessfully, to reproduce the soft gradations of the beautiful or the abrupt contrasts of the picturesque; but they are alike powerless and paralyzed bef...
-Alternantherae
Prepare at once a good stock of cuttings of Alternantherae; this is a most useful plant for ribbon borders, edgings, or for carpet bedding of which we will speak in due season; the Alternantherae requ...
-Alton (III.) Horticultural Society. Varieties Of Apples, Good Cider
The reports of the regular meetings of this wide-awake Society always afford us items of valuable knowledge. The secretary will please accept our thanks therefor. At the meeting April 2d, we notice th...
-Alton Horticultural Society
This Society embraces some of the most intelligent fruit and plant growers of the Western States, whose observation extends over a country rich in fruits of all kinds and soils of almost every descrip...
-Alvord's Hybrid Melon
We are indebted to Mr. D. W. Alvord, Greenfield, Mass., for seeds of his new Hybrid Melon, a cross, as he writes, of the White Japan and Long Persian, made in 1863. The seeds were handed our amateur f...
-Amaranthus Salicifolius
WITH us the past summer it has been all that was promised, and more too, which is rarely the case with those high-flown English descriptions. The plants grow very rapidly, and attain a height of nearl...
-Amaryllis
These beautiful bulbous plants will be found to repay the grower who has heat at command. My way of growing them is to give alternately a season of excitement and a season of rest. To do this, they sh...
-Amaryllis Seed Sowing
The seed should be gathered when ripe, and we prefer to sow it at once in pots well drained, and filled to within an inch of the rim with a compost of two thirds rich yellow loam, and one third sandy ...
-An Amateur "Orchid"
This title belongs pre-eminently to our friend, Mayor Van Vorst, of Jersey City. Not that he grows Orchids alone; for he has at this moment in bloom the best collection of Azaleas that we have ever se...
-An Amateur's Views On The Propagation Of New Varieties Of Fruit
Within the past few years much has been said and written, and numberless queries propounded in respect to the adaptability of certain varieties of fruit in particular localities or soils, or for the p...
-The Amelia Peach
The Amelia is a seedling variety originating with Mr. George Husmann, of Hermann, Mo., well known as a skillful viticulturist and an enthusiastic promoter of horticulture. The original tree in his gr...
-American Architecture
Whatever may be the prospect for American architecture in the good time coming, there can be little doubt of the fact as it at present stands, that it is in many ways far from satisfactory. Over the l...
-American Architecture. Continued
When we look at the ruins of old Rome, we say, what a great people! what temples! what mighty works I And undoubtedly Rome was truly great in individuals - very great in a strong and clever minority, ...
-The American Blight Or Wooly Aphis
A correspondent of the London Gardener's Chronicle asks a remedy for this pest, and receives the following reply: Prune your tree hard in, then paint it over down as far below the ground as you can ...
-An American Boarding-House In The Country
In connection with this subject, it may be well to remark here, that it is a great object to visitors to reside in the interior, and thus have an opportunity of visiting familiarly the sugar and coffe...
-The American Buttonwood, Platanus Occidentalis
London and other writers some years ago stated that the American buttonwood or plane-tree was attacked with the same disease in England as had affected it here. The following remarks of Sir W. Hooker,...
-American Cherries
In the Revue Hortacole for May 16, we find noticed under the head of New American Cherries by M. Naudin, the seedings of Mr. Walsh of Charlestown, near Boston which were briefly discussed at the la...
-American Evergreens
The Fir, the Pine, and the Larch, says Baxter, constitute a perfectly natural demus or family, and, next to the Oak, are the most valuable of our timber trees; but independent of their nature in this ...
-American Evergreen Trees
There is a lamentable poverty of evergreens, said Mr. Downing, in the grounds of many country places in this country. Our plantations are mostly deciduous; and while there are thousands of persons ...
-American Exotic And Botanic Garden Company
The American Exotic and Botanic Garden Company, of Brooklyn, was organised in March, 1872, having for its object the formation of a winter garden, or a Crystal Palace, for the exhibition of rare speci...
-The American Floating Ball Washing Machine
Whatever housekeepers may please to say or believe on the subject, there can be no doubt that one-half, at least, of the cost of clothing, in America, goes in the washing - the rubbing poor stuff on h...
-American Fruits In England
British gardening has become celebrated for the great improvements it has effected in floriculture, and the whole process of rural adornments. Strangely enough, pomology has been, to a great extent, n...
-American Gooseberries
THE gooseberry has never assumed a very important position among American fruits, because attention has been given mainly to the foreign sorts which do not prove well adapted to our climate; some of t...
-American Grapes for European Vineyards
It would not be at all surprising if our American grapes, so utterly despised heretofore in Europe, should soon be planted extensively there in vineyards, as it seems they are not attacked by the mild...
-American Grapes, And The London Gardeners' Chronicle
In looking over a late London Gardeners' Chronicle, I see that Dr. Lindley has again been showing the black feather. The American native crape-vines have been tried in Southern Europe, and the Londo...
-The American Holly
The finest evergreen shrub or tree north of Mason St Dixon's line, and one which is most neglected - nay which one never sees in a nursery, pleasure ground, or garden, is the American Holly. It is not...
-The American Horticultural Annual For 1867 - Price 50 Cents
The above is the title of a book of 152 pages, published by Orange Judd & Co., New York, commencing with a calendar for monthly operations in the orchard and garden. The pages embody valuable tables a...
-American Horticulture
This rather singular that nearly every allusion made to American horticulture, in the British journals, is stamped with prejudice and either real or affected ignorance. We are sorry to have to say thi...
-American Horticulture. Continued
Our buildings, fences, and roads, appear to them rude and temporary in comparison with the solid, substantial, costly and finished structures they have left behind; and hence they conclude that we hav...
-American Horticulture As Seen By An Englishman
MR. W. Robinson, of London, England, an associate editor of The Field, and the author of that successful volume, Parks, Promenades and Gardens of Paris, visited us the early part of October, and sp...
-American Institute - Annual Fair
We attended the Annual Fair of the American Institute, held at New York during the past month, for the purpose of inspecting the horticultural and floral departments, and we proceed to lay before our ...
-The American Journal Of Horticulture
This new competitor for public favor is now in its fifth month. We have received the four numbere already out, and have carefully perused their contents before we should venture to speak our opinion a...
-The American Plane-Tree
This tree, in New England, is generally known and called the Button wood. Sycamore is a name often given it; and it is sometimes call Plane tree. In England it is called the Occidental Plane, to disti...
-American Plate Glass Manufactory
We are happy to learn, as we do from the following notice which appeared in the N. Y. Courier & Enquirer of the 12th ult., that the manufacturing of Plate Glass has bean commenced in this country with...
-American Pomological Congress
In compliance with a resolution passed by the American Pomolngical Congress, during its session at Cincinnati, in October, 1860, it becomes my duty publicly to announce that the next session will be h...
-American Pomological Society
The time has not been fixed, but we will no doubt be able to answer it in our next. We hope it will be so arranged, if possible, that members can attend the exhibition of the Massachusetts Horticultur...
-American Pomological Society (2)
Samuel Walker, Esq., of Roxbury, Mass., general. Chairman of the Fruit Committee appointed by the American Pomological Society, has issued to the Chairman of each State Committee the following circula...
-American Pomological Society (3)
The sixth biennial meeting of the American Pomological Society was held in Rochester, September 24-26. Nearly all portions of our extended country, from Maine to California, were represented (there be...
-American Pomological Society (3). Continued
Mr. Field called attention to a series of articles published lately in the Horticulturist, condemning the culture of pears on the quince stock. He thought people were likely to be misled by them, and ...
-American Pomological Society (4)
In our last number, we gave some interesting proceedings of this Society - all we received in time. The Rural New Yorker continues the report, from which we make the following abstract. When the Trans...
-American Pomological Society (5)
Seventh Session, held at Mozart Hall, New York City, September 14,15 and 16,1858. The fruit which had arrived was arranged in a hall devoted to the purpose, where it was found impossible to exhibit m...
-The American Pomological Society (6)
The eighth biennial session of this Society opened at Philadelphia on the 11th of September, and continued three days. The morning session was occupied chiefly in organizing, and appointing a nominati...
-The American Pomological Society (6). Continued
From Connecticut Specimens Delaware Grape from Wm. Perry & Son, Bridgeport. From New York - Frost & Co., Rochester, 20 var. Pears and Grapes - Ellwanger & Barry, do., 233 var. Pears, 80 of Apples, an...
-American Pomological Society (7)
The undersigned give notice that the eleventh session of this Society will commence in the city of St. Louis, Mo., on Wednesday, Sept. 11, 1867, at eleven o'clock a.m., at Mercantile Library Hall, and...
-American Pomological Society (8)
The Secretary of the above Society has issued a circular inviting contributions of knowledge upon all subjects relating to fruits and their culture, for the purpose of collation and publication in the...
-The American Pomological Society (9)
THE next biennial meeting of this society will be held at Richmond, Virginia, in Assembly Hall, Eighth street, between Grace and Franklin, on the 6th, 7th and 8th of September, 1871. The circular just...
-The American Pomological Society (9). Continued
The prime object or purpose of the Pomological Society, is to bring together intelligent and practical fruit men from all parts of the country, and-in council, by a free interchange of experience and ...
-American Pomological Society - Third Session
These Proceedings will soon be ready for distribution, and, judging from some early pages with which we have been favored, the publication will be a great improvement on all the previous ones, not onl...
-The American Pomological Society. - Its Eleventh Biennial Session
On the 11th of September, 1867, the American Pomological Society commenced its eleventh biennial session in the city of St. Louis, Mo., with its long time-honored President, Marshall P. Wilder, in the...
-American Pomological Society. Fourteenth Session, And Quarter Centennial Celebration
WHEREAs the American Pomological Society, at its last session, accepted the invitation of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, to hold its Quarter Centennial Celebration, and Biennial Session, in ...
-The American Pomological Society/!
Held its Seventh Session in New York, commencing on the 14th ult, and continuing three days. The discussions, as usual, were of great interest, and will be published in the usual form; the only offici...
-American Pomologies! Society
In our notice of the meeting of this society, last month, the list of officers elected, as well as the notice of Mr. Buist's resolution, were not given. We copy the annexed from the Genesee Farmer; T...
-American Pomolooical Society
We are indebted to President Wilder for the following circular. We hope its importance will not be overlooked. In conformity with a Resolution adopted at the last meeting of this National Associatio...
-The American Red Spruce. Abies Rubra
The American Red Spruce has a half drooping habit, especially of its young branches, and its whole form while rising to a cone is decidedly picturesque. As a tree to aid in creating a romantic effect ...
-American Shade Trees
Among all the materials at our disposal for the adornment of country residences, none are at once so highly ornamental, so indispensable, and so easily and completely manageable as trees; and our reso...
-American Shade Trees (2)
This family of trees are highly ornamental, and their cultivation in the park, lawn, and road-side should be much extended. Whether we regard the beauty of their flowers and opening in early spring, o...
-American Shade Trees (3)
It is gratifying to see the increasing interest taken in the cultivation of trees, for it indicates the advancement of civilization and refinement. But there is yet a large class so wanting in good ta...
-American Shade Trees (4)
There are few things better calculated to attach us to our homes than rural embellishments. This is true, whether we apply the term to our neighborhood or individual abode. The public grounds about th...
-American Strawberries In England - Returning The Compliment
The following extract from Turner's Florist will show in what estimation American Strawberries are held in England, at least by some parties. The animus of the article will find a ready explanation in...
-American Versus British Horticulture
WHEN a man goes into a country without understanding its language - merely as a traveller - he is likely to comprehend little of the real character of that country; when he settles in it, and persists...
-American Versus British Horticulture. Continued
A case of this kind, which has recently come under our notice, is too striking an il-rnstratkm not to be worth mentioning here. In one of our large cities south of New-York, where the soil and climate...
-Ammonia In Horticulture
The labors of modern chemists have shown us, and it is one of their grandest discoveries, that it is the Azote to which manures owe all their value, and that their fertilizing properties are just in p...
-Ammonia In Hothouses
Whan it was discovered that ammonia is derived from the atmosphere, and that it descends in rain, a new light was thrown upon the refreshing and invigorating effect of heavy showers, which act not mer...
-Among The Flowers, Or Gardening For Ladies
WHY is it that so many ladies of taste, who love to adorn their persons with flowers, and to decorate their rooms with floral designs or collections of flowering plants, have so little desire to enhan...
-Among The Flowers, Or Gardening For Ladies. Continued
Some of our horticultural sisters may wish to try their hand at raising vegetables, but as most ladies turn more readily to the cultivation of flowers, these must receive at ention first; perhaps, at ...
-Among The Roses
AN ardent rose lover, whose enthusiasm bubbles over in glowing words, writes to the Canada Farmer, of some of his favorites: A perfect little gem is Madame Alfred de Rougemont; my first experience in...
-Amorphophallus Rivieri
A most curious addition to our Ornamental Foliaged Plants. Was introduced from China by Mr. Riviere, the head gardener of the Luxembourg garden in Paris. The plant has several peculiar characterist...
-The Ampelopsis Or Virginia Creeper
What a magnificent plant this is! I do think that it is one of the most beautiful things in the country, although its flowers are of little or no account. Several years since, when the borer was destr...
-Ans
Listen to him, but next time endeavor to be out of sight about the time you expect him ; or go to see him, do as he does, and see how he likes it. If he does not wince,, be always as patient as you ca...
-Analysis Of The Strawberry
B. Kirt-la no gives the following analysis in the Family Visitor, showing a large amount of potash in proportion to other constituents, much silica, and more magnesia and common salt, than are usually...
-The Ancectochilus
In a former number of the Revue Horticole, we spoke of a plant, remarkable for the beauty of its leaves, the Begonia Hex, the culture of which is rapidly increasing, notwithstanding the recent date ...
-Andromeda Arborea
I recently found several Sorrel trees (Andromeda Arborea) growing upon a steep hill, which I estimated at about 500 feet in height, on the south side of the Ohio river, opposite the city of Portsmouth...
-Anemone Japonica. The Japanese Wind-Flower
This is a very vigorous growing herbaceous perennial, of great beauty. It has the kind of compound, ternate lobed leaves, possessed by many of the Anemones, bat in this case they are large, and coarse...
-Angers And Its Nurseries
Aside from the information derived from a description of the cities of France that have a direct horticultural importance by those of the readers of the Horticulturist who contemplate visiting that co...
-The Angers Quince As A Hedge-Plant
We have recommended various plants and trees for hedge purposes, and have often found cases where profit from the fruit was sought to be connected with the usefulness and beauty of the screen in the g...
-The Anna Grape
We had purposed to give as a frontispiece this month a seedling Camellia, raised by the late Mr. Becar; but as the engraver, through a misunderstanding, finished instead the Anna Grape, we give the la...
-Annals Or Pomology : Published By The Belgian Royal Commission. Brussels, 1658
Some time ago we mentioned the announcement of this work. Under the circwnstances we naturally formed very high expectations of the merits, not only of its scientific accuracy bat of its artistic exec...
-Announcement
With this number we close our record of the past year's progress in pomology, floriculture, and rural topics, and look with a feeling of much satisfaction at our pages, filled with descriptions and il...
-Annoying An Actress
Madame Theo, one of the most popular actresses in Paris, who is married, and whose reputation is above reproach, has for some time been subjected to a peculiar kind of persecution which threatens to d...
-The Annual Cattle Sale At Mount Fordham
One of the pleasantest events of last month, in the rural districts, was the annual sale of stock at Mount Ford ham, on the 24th of June last. Mount Fordham, (as all our agricultural readers know,)...
-Annual Horticultural Exhibition Of The Pennsylvania Society, In September At Jayne's Hall
Multum in parvo may well be applied to such a sight. In the great Chinese Museum, our exhibition was almost a national one; the Committee, however, very ingeniously made the most of their space, and c...
-Annual June Exhibition Of The Horticultural Society Of The Valley Or The Genesee
This exhibition came off on the 21st instant at Rochester, and was one of the best and most numerously attended the Society has ever held. During the day the hall was visited by highly respectable del...
-Annual Meeting Of The Bangor (Maine) Horticultural Society
At the annual meeting of the Bangor Horticultural Society held at the office of A. W. Paine, Esq., on Saturday May 96, 1853, at 8 o'clock, P. M., agreeable to public notice, for the choice of officers...
-Annual Meeting Of The New York State Ag. Society
The Annual Meeting of this Society was well attended, and an unusual degree of interest manifested in regard to the reports of committees and the arrangements for the future. One of the most prominent...
-Annual Meeting of The Genesee Valley Horticultural Society
This meeting was held on the 5th of February. The following officers were chosen for the ensuing year: President - J. J. THOMAS, Macedon. Vice Presidents L. Wetherell, Rochester; H. P. Norton, Broc...
-Annual Report Of Kew Gardens
Sir W. J. Hooker's annual report on these justly celebrated gardens, has been issued in pamphlet form, and a good synopsis will be found in the Gardener's Chronicle for July 2, 1859. The duties of the...
-Annuals In Pots
SOME of our readers, especially among the old gardeners, may not be inclined to regard annuals with much favor as winter-blooming plants; their favorites are the substantial hard-wooded plants. In a...
-Annuals In Pots. Continued
The hole should be deep and large enough to admit the roots. In some cases, where the plants are older and the roots of some size, the pot should be partly filled with dirt, the plant held as before, ...
-Annuals, And Their Cultivation
Perhaps many well versed in floriculture will think that this article is not worth the paper on which it is printed - that it states facts as familiar to them as household words, and which they learne...
-Anoectochilus Striatus, Var. Pictus
A distinct lovely species, supposed to have been brought by Mr. Gibson from the Khosea Hills, India. It is a beautiful plant, with a distinct stripe of golden yellow down the centre of each leaf. Whoe...
-Another "Imfortant Secret" In Cultivation
Professor Terra-Culture Comstock thought, or pretended to think, that he made a great discovery in the art of culture, and modestly demanded from the State, or the nation several thousands of dollar...
-Another Chat About Old Books
The December number of the Horticulturist was a prominent item in my mail matter one day last week. I opened it, and looked first in front and then at the end to see if I could find a list of contents...
-Another Class, Comprising Acacia, Cytisus, Chorizema, Daphne, Correa, And Polygala
If the pots are full of roots, as they often are on being received from a nursery, - should be shifted into pots a size larger, in a soil consisting for the most part of turfy loam, with a small quant...
-Another Day's Ride
Our first day's ride left us at night at Poughkeepsie, thoroughly fatigued. We propose to give an account of our second day's run, for that is about the only word that will give a proper idea of the c...
-Another Man
Mr. Field,living on Long Island, who wrote a book* on Pear Culture, a while ago took particular pains to assail me personally in the New York Tribune, to establish his theory. I could show some precio...
-Another Man. Continued
It is useless to charge failures to climate, for there is no climate in the world superior to ours for growing the pear. To this some of the best Pomologists in the world who had visited this country...
-Another Of Rogers's Hybrid Grapes
Editors of the Horticulturist: - In the present number of the Horticulturist, you notice No. 15, of Rogers's Hybrid Grapes. This season I fruited No. 1, and am highly pleased with it, being the first...
-Another Step
The jurors at a recent cattle show at Poissy (France) made another step towards testing the value of the animals; after the weight had been ascertained, the jury, were entertained at a dinner, where p...
-Another Word For Evergreens
I cannot allow the excellent article of the Rev. Mr. Gridley, in the April number of the Horticulturist (entitled A Word for Evergreens) to go down to posterity without adding another word on this s...
-Answer
The month of April is the best time to plant strawberries in the whole year. If you wish the largest and finest fruit, you must make the soil deep and rich. The best manure for the strawberry, is eit...
-Answers To Coresspondents
(T. T. S.). Cornus is derived from Cornu, a horn, from the wood being thought to be as hard and durable as horn. The Cornus sanguinea grows in the shade and drip of trees, and is very ornamental in wi...
-Answers To Correspondents
I am more puzzled to get early radishes than any other article. Is it because I do not give them enough air! or that the seed is placed too near or too far from the glass! Bottom heat or not, they all...
-Answers To Correspondents (2)
James Truitt asks some questions to which we reply: - 1st. By Wich Willow, J. T. probably means Willow Twig apple, a full description of which he will find on page 204 of Downing's Fruits and Fruit...
-Answers To Correspondents (3)
Although a novice in fruit-culture, I propose to state a few facts which I have learned by observation the present season, and propose a few questions for information from you. I have a dwarf Pear tr...
-Answers To Correspondents (4)
In the October number of the Hhorticulturiest for 1852, page 459, chloride of calcium was said to be used by French horticulturists to absorb the moisture of fruit rooms; and in a note upon the same p...
-Answers To Correspondents (5)
I think highly of two articles in your August number - the one on Shelter, and the other on Raising Fruits from Seeda On these views I have been humbly practicing, as you may recollect by my priv...
-Answers To Correspondents (6)
Allow me to ask a faror, and answer me under the bead of correspondence. I consider myself a novice In the nursery business, and labor under great disadvantages in budding Peaohes. I generally sutler ...
-Answers To Correspondents (7)
Cultor says, please give me the names of the enclosed thorns, marked A, B, and of the vine, marked C. In setting out native thorns is it better to sow the seed and set out the young plants thus deri...
-Answers To Correspondents (8)
I SEND you several portion of bark taken from diseased Pear trees in my orchard, for your examination. The first appearance of the disease is very slight - quite a small brown speck. As It progresses,...
-Answers To Correspondents (8). Part 2
The blight comes Instantaneously on them, so that in 24 hours or less a fine, growing, healthy tree, or a portion of it, will be transformed into a black unsightly mass. I have examined different aut...
-Answers To Correspondents (8). Part 3
What kind of manure is best for Strawberries? What should be the relative proportion of staminate to pistilate plants when planted in rows or in alternate strips? Is McAooy's Superior a valuable Straw...
-Answers To Correspondents (9)
What form of insect Is the parent of the slugs so destructive to Pear and Cherry leaves? Is there any preventive for the nuisance? The dusting with ashes or lime, or drenching with tobacco water, to ...
-Answers To Correspondents (10)
(A. C. Ivy.) 3y a little management you may have your ivy to cling perfectly. Whenever a branch grows without attaching itself to the wall, cut off the loose part close to a leaf, beneath which the at...
-Answers To Correspondents (11)
(Grape-Votes.) 1. What time should grape-vines be trimmed? 2. When should the slips be set? 3. And what time should young plants be transplanted? Augustus Rice. 1. November is the best time to prune ...
-Answers To Correspondents (12)
Greenhouses have been much the subject of former volumes of the Horticulturist. In vol. 5, pages 110 and 184, as well as elsewhere, our correspondent will find much information. It is a subject of gre...
-Answers To Correspondents (13)
(S. W. Johnston.) The Magnolia Michauxii of some catalogues is the Magnolia Macrophylla, certainly one of the most beautiful of ornamental trees. It was named after the elder Miohaux, and we have alwa...
-Answers To Correspondents (14)
(A. D.) According to Dr. Gray, the Washington Elm at Cambridge, Mass. - a tree of no extraordinary size - was some years ago estimated to produce a crop of seven millions of leaves, exposing a surface...
-Answers To Correspondents (15)
We never object to answering the queries of correspondents, provided they do not require too long a reply, and that they are on topics of general interest, or such as are not readily found in books: -...
-Answers To Correspondents (16)
(D. P. B., College Hill, Ohio.) The most satisfactory mode of forming a plantation for shelter or screens of the kind you mention, is to plant an irregular-formed strip inside the boundary line, varyi...
-Answers To Correspondents (17)
(Geo. LESLIE, Toronto.) Your seedling Cineraria flowers came safe to hand. They are all very pretty, and some of them well worthy of being named and propagated. No. 1 is the best in form, with a good,...
-Answers To Correspondents (18)
J. B * * * * writes the publisher of this work that he has concluded his mind can do without it, as it contained so much last year about Cuba, and he declares himself to be only interested in apples...
-Answers To Correspondents:- Cumberland, Maryland
Dear sir: I have various books and papers on gardening, etc, but I see but little said about the following named common greens, than that nothing can be more wholesome or cheaper: 1. Sorrel. 2. Cows...
-Answers To Corrspondents
Is there any danger of getting too much manure around young Pear trees? I have two which do not appear to thrive well In preparing the ground for setting them, I put into the holes a half bushel of th...
-Ants
However these pests may plague you, all you have to do, says the Midland Florid, is to make deep holes with a crowbar, say two or three feet, and carefully withdraw the instrument, so that the hole ma...
-The Antirrhinum
The antirrhinum is becoming extremely popular, a position it well merits, not only for its easy culture and propagation, but for its beautiful flowers, which are variegated in color, from pure white a...
-Antwerp Family
The Hudson River Antwerp probably . has the greatest reputation as a market berry; still, its cultivation is confined to a few localities. Fig. 134. - Clarke. Where it does succeed, it is certainl...
-Antwerp Raspberries
Dr. Hexamer in a letter to the Tribune mentions an instance of large receipts by a grower on the Hudson River, who speaks as follows in a letter to the Dr.: My raspberries are what is commonly called...
-Aphis (Pemphigus) Stamineus
This name is proposed for a large species of Aphis which forms follicles on the leaves of the silver-leaved Maple (Acer eriocarpum). The specimens were sent to us by our ex-President, Caleb Cope, Esq....
-The Aphis In A New Position
While in Newburgh recently, our attention was arrested by the peculiar appearance of the Oats, which seemed to be very black. A close examination revealed the startling sight of millions of the brown ...
-The Apiary
Since I have been a reader of the Horticulturist, I find that your contributors have entirely neglected this important branch of rural economy. The locality of the apiary allies it to horticulture eve...
-Apios Tuberosa - Ground Nut
This tuber is again discussed as a substitute for the potato. It was called Glycine Apios by Linnaeus; Apios tuberosa by modern botanists, and Saa-gaa-ban, by some of the North American Indians, is a ...
-Appendix
14th. That the sun will rise tomorrow is a moral certainty, but the existence of this newly discovered principle in vegetation, can be demonstrated to a philosophical and mathematical certainty, as th...
-Apples
Mr. Charles Downing, of Newburgh, in a private letter, lately received, makes the following interesting statements: I have fruited the past year the following, which all prove to be Pomme Royal or Dy...
-Apples (2)
Baldwin New York, Del, N. J., Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, Ohio, Missouri, Ill. Roxbury Russet - New York, N. J., Vermont, Maine, Mich., Ohio, Missouri, Ind., Ill. Northern Spy - New York, New Jers...
-Apples (3)
American Sum'r Pcarmain, Buldwm, Bullock's Pippin, Danvers Winter Sweet Early Harvest, Early Strawberry, Fall Pippin, Fameuse, Summer Rose, Swanr, Vandervere, White Seek-no-Further, Wine A...
-Apples (4)
Ellijay - Fruit large, rather oblong, somewhat irregular, skin smooth, lemon yellow, with patches of greenish russet, sprinkled with small black dots, often with a bright blush in the sun, calyx close...
-Apples (5)
The capacity of Virginia to grow the best apples is demonstrated by the samples laid before us by Mr. Franklin Davis, of Staunton. Barely have we seen finer specimens of the best sorts. The Fall Pippi...
-Apple - Moore's Extra
Specimens received from Jame9 Truit Quincy, Ky. Origin, Scioto Co., O. Tree, upright in nursery; spreading upright in orchard, with strong, stout branches; an annual regular but not profuse bearer. F...
-The Apple Orchards By L. Durand, Derby, Ct
Much of late years has been written and said about apple orcharas and their cultivation. On most all farms of any extent in the Eastern or Northern States there are more or less of old apple orchards....
-Apple Orchards In England
There are but few orchards in England, except in certain districts, and in these they abound, and are often very extensive. The inquiry naturally arises, What has given those districts their distinct...
-Apple Orchards In England. Continued
*Journal of the Royal Agricultural Society, vol. iv. p. 381. There is but little else that we can learn from the English orchardists, except what to avoid of their practices. The cider orchards, in g...
-The Apple Scale, Or Bark Louse
THIs insect is attracting much interest among western orchardists. Cultivators understand the nature and extent of its depredations, and the difficulty of ridding their trees of this pest. All are anx...
-Apple Trees
The bark on the side of the tree next the sun, south and south-west, is always brighter colored than on the north side. Young shoots show this more conspicuously. If the natural color be reddish, the ...
-Apple Tree Borers
Sir: In New-England there is no greater pest to the cultivator, than the Apple Tree Borer. In some parts it has destroyed whole orchards. Many persons, in fact most persons, fold their hands in despai...
-Apple Worm
EDITOR Horticulturist: The apple worm, or larva of (corpocapsa pomonella), by Dr. J. Weed, in your September number, is truly a valuable article. Too much cannot be said on the subject. The necessity ...
-The Apple-Shaped Quince Or Orange-Shaped Quince
Where are the Quinsins? asked the little son of El Medico, in our May number, after having examined the pictures of a bound volume of the Horticulturist. We promised you a picture of one, Frank, and...
-The Apple-Tree Borer And Curculio
Cultivators of fruit, perhaps more than any other class of husbandmen, are subject to more drawbacks and embarrassments than patience can often endure without grumbling, and they are always glad to he...
-Apples - Are They Running Out
We hear much of the deterioration of varieties, and even of their entirely running out and failing altogether. And, again, we hear much of trees suited to one locality or distnct, and not to another. ...
-Apples And Pears
Because an Apple is very large it does not follow that it is also very good; therefore great size alone should not be made the criterion of merit. As regards Pears, in deciding between competing varie...
-Apples At The South
A. J. DOWNING, Esq. - Your list of Fruits for the South, ma recent Horticulturist, has induced me to end you the following rough -notes upon our apples, as they may be of some interest to those of you...
-Apples At The South. Continued
Ripens here first of June, or a little after. 4. Striped June Size - medium, not quite so large as Red June; form - roundish, sometimes a little conical; skin - thin, ground greenish yellow, very mu...
-Apples For Extreme Northern Sections. The Marengo Winter Crab
By reason of numerous letters the past year my attention has been drawn to the consideration of varieties of fruits adapted to our extreme Northern civilized limits of population. Very few varieties o...
-Apples For Illinois And Adjoining States
At the meeting of the Northwest Pomological Society, held at Chicago in October, 1858, a resolution was passed That each member should hand to the Secretary, a list of such fruits, oyer his own name,...
-Apples For The South
William Summer, in American Penological Report, says of the cultivation and varieties for the South, as follows: Fruits were first obtained from the best nurseries at the North and from Europe. The r...
-Apples Growing In The State of Mississipp
This fruit has been generally planted in laying out orchards in this State for twenty or thirty years past. The earlv and summer varieties succeed well: the trees crow viarorouslv and the fruit withou...
-Apples In Oregon
The Portland Oregonian of the 21st ult, states: Thomas Pritchard, Esq., of this city, has shown us the finest specimens of Apples we have ever seen in any country; many of them measured fifteen and s...
-Apples In The North-West
A correspondent of the Chicago Tribune says : Last week I spent half a day in the Chicago apple market. The result was that, out of more than 2,000 of known named varieties, two varieties stood promin...
-Apples Laid Upon Straw
In June, 1853, I sent to a neighbor a basket of fine Hovey's Seedling and Bishop's Orange Strawberries, thinking to give them a pleasant surprise. The bearer, however, gave me quite as much of one, on...
-Apples Or Western New York
The winter Apples of 1854 have generally been very good and choice. The country has been thoroughly canvassed for what are left up to this writing, (April 16th,) and Roxbury Russets, the most plentifu...
-Apples, Oranges, And Pears
It is a fact, that should be known to fruit growers, that in the fall of 1854, Havana oranges and good apples brought the same price in ourmarket, by the barrel. In 1855 oranges were half the price. W...
-Application Of Indian Architecture
Having already shown the difficulty of adapting either the Grecian or Gothic styles to the character of an English residence, this newly discovered style of architecture seems to present a new expedie...
-Application Of Manure
Question - The application of manure to the surface. At what season is the application most beneficial, and in what condition should the manure be when applied? E. Moody, Lockport, has always been op...
-Application Of Wind As A Power For Raising Water
A garden engine, manufactured by Downs & Co., Seneca Falls, State of Now York, enabled me to preserve many valuable plants, shrubs, and trees, during the severe drouth of last season. It was equally i...
-Apricots
There are no very new varieties of this fruit; but as two or three lately introduced have shown their characters this summer in a more marked manner than heretofore, they deserve a more particular des...
-Apricots (2)
Apricots in pots are very rarely seen, even in large establishments; they are difficult to force, as they will not bear the confined air of a forcing house. I remember, some years since, being much st...
-Apricots (2). Part 2
As soon as the fruit becomes the size of a horse-bean, commence syringing the trees morning and evening with soft water, and continue to do this all through the summer till the fruit begins to change ...
-Apricots (2). Part 3
* It must always be berne in mind, that a low roof, so that the trees are not too far from the glass, is most essential. My trees, seven years old, nearly touch it, - the nearer the glass the finer th...
-Aquaria
Mr. Charles . Hammet makes and furnishes Aquaria at Newport, R. I. His agent in Philadelphia is J. W. Queen, 924 Chestnut Street. It is rather amusing to read his list of prices of the living content...
-The Aquarium
Some years since much interest was created by the invention of Dr. Ward for growing plants in closely glazed cases. It afforded much pleasure to scientific persons and to invalids, and was altogether ...
-Aralialeptophylla. Nat. Ord., Araliaceae
Lately introduced from New Caledonia, by Mr. Milne. Stem upright, round, and smooth, producing branches with difficulty. Leaves about two feet long, lanceolate, narrow, dark green, with reticulated si...
-Arbors
Arbors, covered walks, and shaded resting-places, come within the limits of picturesque grounds, if they are formed of living trees or shrubs. On the Continent, the vine is much used for this purpose;...
-Arbor Vitae Screens
Dr. Hull writes thus in the Prairie Farmer: The finest effect we recollect ever to have seen, in growing a hedge of the arbor vitas, was one in which the plants were set two feet apart, and, after the...
-Arboretums
A. S. (New-York.) We recommend you to Messrs. Parsons & Co., Flushing, Long. Wand, to complete your list of rare trees. They have paid much attention lately, to importing rare trees for arboretums, an...
-Arboricultural Notes. - No. II. Bartram's Garden, Philadelphia
It was the writer's intention to confine himself in these notices to those fine trees in his own immediate neighborhood, and suggest to other pens the pleasure they might confer on the readers of the ...
-Arboricultural Notices
In the hope that these notices may be the humble means of calling attention to many of our beautiful but neglected trees, I shall occasionally lay aside the rule I adopted at the commencement, - namel...
-Arboriculture - Treatment Of The Soil
AT the close of an article on Transplanting, in our March number, we promised A sorne hints on after culture, which we now proceed to give as far as relates to the cultivation of the soil. John J. ...
-Arboriculture - Treatment Of The Soil. Continued
In our own grounds, a plot of Norway Spruce is planted in beds of six rows each, with a distance of about eighteen inches between the rows; the plow and cultivator can not pass between them, and they ...
-Architectural Criticism
In your November number you give a very pretty picture of a Symmetrical Cottage, offered as a model of good proportion, tasteful form, and chaste ornament Of what style is this cottage, that it m...
-Architectural Ornaments
Whoever travels over our country will notice some strange freaks in the way of ornaments to buildings. People seem tired of the old tasteless style, and for want of knowledge and good taste, and not ...
-Architecture - Styles And Changes
A correspondent requests us to give some remarks on the different styles of architecture, for the information of himself and others. In a letter now before us he says: I am often puzzled, when readin...
-Architeotube
We took up the other day a handsome volume with the following title: The American Cottage Builder; a series of designs, plans and specifications, from $200 to $20,000, for Homes for the People. By Jo...
-Ardisia Crenulata
This is a very ornamental little plant, or greenhouse shrub, that may be readily managed as a window-plant. In February, its berries (a great ornament) are in perfection, the plant being at that time ...
-Are Dwarf Apples Desirable
The Tribune, in discussing this subject, virtually admits that they will not pay for market purposes, but in the private garden, nothing in the way of fruit trees is more ornamental than a finely form...
-Are Fruit-Trees Gregarious
IN your issue for November, page 342, Mr. R. W. Furnas, of Nebraska, asks: Are fruit trees gregarious or clannish in their formation or development? My observation is, that that they are not, for I...
-Are The Flowers Of The Azalea Poisonous
A short time since, I endeavored to rescue the Kalmia from what I believed the unjust reputation of being poisonous. I notice that the English horticulturists are now in a flutter about the Rhododendr...
-Around Cincinnati, Ohio
Mount Welcome, August 6, 1858. J. Jay Smith, Esq.: - As you are fond of giving good information to your horticultural readers, and extend to us a great deal that is excellent, perhaps you would be wi...
-Arrangement Of Beds
The location selected next in order is the form of the beds and their arrangement. Allusion has previously been made to the bad taste of planting roses singly on grass: A decidedly better and more pro...
-Arrangement Of Flowers For Decoration. Bouquets, Wreaths
From time immemorial, flowers have been used by all classes and ail nations as commemorative of the happiest as well as the saddest hours of life, and their arrangement in varied forms, or appliance t...
-Arrangement Of Plants
A careful examination of plants showed that they fully occupied the pots; that is, if they were designed to grow any longer, new pots would be required. But they are not intended to grow. One full cro...
-Arrangement Of Summer Flowers
Although some of our readers will have planted out their summer bedding plants ere this number reaches them, yet many will not have done so, and even to those who have, we wish to suggest a word by wh...
-Arranging Flowers For Bouquets
It is an art, requiring no small degree of taste and skill, to arrange cut flowers so as to form an attractive bouquet for the vase or basket. It is something, too, which comes to one intuitively, and...
-The Art Of Increasing Plants By Cuttings
By far the greater proportion of plants that are multiplied by cuttings require artificial heat. Nevertheless, cuttings of many tender plants may be struck in the open ground, or in pots and in frames...
-An Article On Bees
Mr. Downing - Your bee correspondent may be assured from my experience, of the fact that a queen bee has been produced from a worker's egg. I use the common phraseology. The working bees are barren ...
-Artifical Breeding Of Fish
As the amusement of fly-fishing is one which holds a first place in the opinion of every one who understands it; and as the trout and the salmon are the only fish which afford genuine sport to the ang...
-Artificial Feeding Of Fish
It is a matter of surprise that our country residents pay so little attention to the cultivation of fish, in a thousand places where they might conduct their fine little hill-brooks and springs into b...
-The Artificial Fountain
Water is an essential element in the beauty of a landscape, whether it presents itself in the form of sea, lake, river, or running brook, and no landscape gardening can be perfect without its addition...
-The Artificial Fountain. Continued
The supply of water being provided, the next question is as to the design of the fountain and the form of the jet. When the amount of water is as limited as it must necessarily be from so artificial a...
-Artificial Manure For Florist's Plants
Dr. Jeannel in an experiment respecting the use of artificial manures, the results, of which were contributed to the Journal of the Central Horticultural Society Of France, took two plants of Pelargon...
-On Artificial Rockeries
Among the numerous natural embellishments which are so abundantly scattered over the surface of this country, and the natural facilities afforded for beautifying the private pleasure-ground of the wea...
-On Artificial Rockeries. Continued
The rock garden at Chatsworth is perhaps the most extensive specimen of this kind of gardening in Europe of an artificial character, although specimens of rock gardening more extensive, and incomparab...
-Artist's Villa
This is a study for an artist's own dwelling, and is thought to be adapted to a rocky hill site, with thicket overgrown, grotesque and wild. The hairy side of a steep wlldernenss, and nature in f...
-Aru
We would advise you by all means to procure a lawn-mowing machine. When their worth is once properly known they will revolutionize our lawns. We are convinced that by their use we may vastly improve, ...
-Arundo Conspicua
Thomas Moore, the celebrated English florist, expresses surprise that this is not more often met with in gardens, for not even the far-famed Pampas Grass (Gynerium argenteum), grand and massive thoug...
-Ash Berberry - Mahonia
Among all the shrub evergreens, the mahonia for general use is, without exception, one of the most valuable. In general appearance of leaf it much resembles the European holly, a plant that is not har...
-Ashes For Reviving Peach-Trees
S. D. Pratt, of Penn Yan, N. Y., in an article to the Farmer's Club, N. Y., upon his experience with peach trees, says: Remembering Prof. Liebig's theory that, when a vegetable is burned, the part wh...
-Ashes In The Orchard
D. W. Kauffman, of Des Moines, Iowa, writes to the Iowa Homestead that ashes are worth one dollar per bushel to put about fruit trees, and that he would not sell his ashes at that price and do without...
-Asiatic Conifers
In the temperate latitudes of America and Europe, where the winters are long and severe, evergreen trees are objects of particular interest. At this we need not be surprized, neither is the cause diff...
-Asiatic Conifers. Continued
The Forsythia viridissima, Spirea pruni-folia flore pleno, Weigela rosea, Magnolia conspicua, with many other deciduous trees and shrubs, do infinitely better here than in England - they grow more lux...
-Asiatic Conifers (2)
California gives us very beautiful evergreens, and among its conifers some of the loftiest trees in the world; but the Himalayan mountains give a still more decided character to many of the trees and ...
-Asiatic Conifers (2). Continued
Native countries, north of Asia and Nepal. * Paxton's Flower Garden. - Vol I, p. 58. Biota Stricta. Thuya Stricta There appears to be some confusion regarding this plant The true species appears to...
-Asparagus
We will comply with your request Boon; at any rate before planting season. Asparagus #1 We will have an article soon, that will give you the desired information; meantime we will say, that to have i...
-Asparagus Beds
Hitherto our family gardens have allowed but small space to the Asparagus bed. The plants have usually been put out in rows, two feet apart, one foot in the row, and the beds have been limited to abou...
-The Asparagus Beetle
This pest, which we saw on Long Island for the first time about six years ago, in the neighborhood of Bedford, has since worked its way up as far as Astoria on the north, nearly or quite destroying th...
-Asters
Before sowing seed of the German quilled or peony-flowered Asters, make your bed of soil rich and deep by working into it liberally well-rotted compost manure. We call the attention of our readers to...
-Astonishing
The following letter was actually received at the Post Office, Fishkill Landing, N. Y., the past summer. Middletown Point, N. J. August 30, 1858. Andrew J. Downing, Esq., - Dear Sir. - If it is not t...
-Astonishing Success
The annals of horticulture never have, and probably never will again, witness a more wonderful triumph than the two last numbers of the Horticulturist hare unfolded to the world, viz.: an old strawber...
-Astonishing Yield Of Potatoes
We had supposed the potato fever was over, but find it revived again by the report of the judges, Dr. Hexamer and P. T. Quinn, who have made public some interesting items respecting the competition fo...
-Astoria And Ravenswood Hoeticultural Society
This newly started Society held its first meeting on the 8th and 9lh inst., and was very creditable to the promoters and practical talent of the neighborhood. We say the neighborhood, because the fine...
-The Astrachan Crab Apple
Every householder who owns land - if only a small lot - ought to have one tree of the Astrachan apple, both on account of its earliness, and its excellence for cooking. It is so tender as to be cooked...
-The Atheist And The Acorn
An atheist, cold and cheerless in his creed, was one day resting himself beneath the branches of a spreading oak. It was autumn, and the golden acorns gleamed among the green leaves. He looked up to t...
-Atibrietla Hendersoni
Of this, William Bull says: Whilst the predominating colors in the principal groups of early spring-flowering bedding plants are either white or yellow, the family of Aubrietia offers the most | desi...
-The Atlantic Monthly
The June number of this sterling monthly is at hand. Contents: The Future of American Railways - In a Fog - The Granadian Girl's Song - The Humming Bird - Chess - Spring Song - Model Lodging Houses in...
-The Atmosphere
Dear Sir: I was delighted with the communieation of your friend S, in the July number, and I trust that no consideration will deter him from giving a further account of his experience, no matter how...
-Attempts At A Bush Settlement. By An English Offices. Chapter I
Arriving in Upper Canada, the promised land, where I had deemed it quite an easy task to make the desert blossom as the rose, and meeting with a few old friends whose knowledge of the wants of bush...
-Attempts At A Bush Settlement. By An English Offices. Chapter I. Continued
I set them to work on the top of the hill, and having got the timber down, untrimmed one tree oyer another, until we opened a circular space on the summit We began on the outside of the circle, and by...
-Attractive Strawberries For Market
I would say that fruit that has a high color - glossy and bright, always sells well, even if but of ordinary size; hence, it behooves every grower to give his fruit this peculiar lustre or gloss. This...
-Aucubas
Most of our readers are acquainted with the spotted-leaved variety which is frequently seen as a decorative plant outside during summer and for rooms about Christmas; it is one of the most common plan...
-The Augusta Rose
(P. M., Merwinsville, Conn.) It is not perfectly hardy. Without protection it would be killed to the ground, either in your State or this. The Augusta Rose #1 I infer from reading your last Magaz...
-Auricula (2)
Mr. Editor:- As my'papers on the Carnation and Chrysanthemum have met with your approval, I venture to send you my experience with another special favorite with old florists. We must always remember ...
-The Austin Strawberry
Mr. Carpenter has shown us some plants of this new Strawberry, which are stout enough to bear berries of almost any size. We know Mr. Carpenter bo well, that we do not believe he would have anything t...
-Australian Flora
The Brisbane Courier publishes the official telegram from Mr. Walter Hill, the government botanist, dated from Cardwell, and received by the Queensland secretary for lands: We have examined the Mulg...
-Autumn Apples. Which are the best six fall varieties?
Mr. Hooker considered the Munson Sweet a superb sweet apple, productive, and good either for baking or the table. Mr. Ellwanger said Munson Sweet is the finest autumn sweet apple we have, with a brig...
-The Autumn Exhibitions
NCE more September is upon us, and with it the accustomed round of annual fetes of rural industry commence. Some thirteen or fourteen States have announced their days of holding State Fairs; and in ...
-Autumn Planting
There is no doubt of the benefit of autumn planting for trees or vines, provided they are duly protected against the heaving frosts of winter. We have planted our cherries in September, and always wit...
-Autumn Pruning
MThe old advice to u prune when your knife is sharp, may in the simple cutting away of a stray twig be considered good, but its practice put upon trees or vines as a rule, would, at some seasons, be ...
-Autumn Strawberry
Mr. P. Raabe has exhibited a very fine Fall-bearing strawberry, called the Delice d'Automne, which fruits very finely till frost, and in the green-house, in pots, till December. It has been noticed by...
-Avenue Planting
For avenue planting, those two near relatives, the cucumber tree (Magnolia acuminata) and the tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera), combine many excellent qualities. They are rapid growers, beautiful ...
-Avenues, Flower Beds
We know from experience raised beds may, in some instances, be made very effective and at trifling expense. Take one, two or three - according to size - rough old stumps and place them in the center o...
-The Averill Chemical Paint
Daring an experience of over three years we have had ample opportunity to use for ourselves, and see the merits of this wonderful paint. It is really a remarkable production, and deserves to be ranked...
-The Aviary
In visiting Baltimore we more than once came upon beautiful aviaries - a species of ornament not generally introduced in America, and which it is perhaps as well to avoid, and to encourage the free t...
-Award Of Premiums American Pomological Society. Official List
Apples 1st Premium - State collection, to the State of Nebraska; Silver Medal and $50. 2d - State collection, to the State of Kansas; Bronze Medal and $25. 1st - Individual to J. W. Ross, Perr...
-Azaleas
G. T. The cooler your Azaleas are kept through the winter, so that frost be kept out of the house, the better. So also, your geraniums; and it is wonderful how little water the latter require if a low...
-The Azalea Indica
When man is left to do his own talking and writing, Mr. Editor, it is generally the free, spontaneous evolutions of the mind, and that, too, which lies nearest the heart; so with gardeners. The plants...
-Azaleaa
Azalia Sieftoldii A fine greenhouse shrub, with large bright green glossy leaves. Japan. Azalea Indica, Var. Alexander II A beautiful novel variety, having, large white wavy flowers, as in crispifl...
-Azaleas For Window Gardens
The use of Azaleas for window culture in pots has, as yet, not been often referred to by our horticultural writers; yet, the idea is a most pleasant one. What can be more delightful than an entire win...
-B. Hodge, Of Erie County
This is an important inquiry. With me, three-quarters of the seasons the Isabella does not ripen. It is poor, insipid, and worthless. There now is a sort of grape mania for some better grape. Hundreds...
-B. L. Hoag, Of Niagara County
Have looked carefully at this matter of the Vergooleose; and from all that I have seen should say, that it cracks less in light than in heavy soils. Knew one orchard of standards, planted in a clayey ...
-B. P. Johnson, Esq
Dear Sir: I have examined the punctured twigs and the insects which you sent to me with much interest The insects are tree-hoppers, and the scientific name of them is Membracis bubalus, so called by F...
-Back Volumes
We still have a few bound volumes of the Horticulturist of 1865, '66, and '67, which we will send, postpaid, for $2 50 each, if single volumes only are taken of either years. All three years sent for ...
-Bacon's Incomparable
Its melting, buttery, subacid character, and delicious flavor, are such as lead me to say - if it belongs where it has been placed, in the class good pears - it deserves to be at the top of the list. ...
-Bad Grafting. - How Wood Is Formed
While examining lately some examples of bad grafting, we met with the following remarkable case, which will be regarded with no small interest by those who are desirous of learning how wood is really ...
-Badge Of American Freedom
In a late Oration, by Z. Collins Lee, Esq., before the Horticultural Society Of West Chester, Pa., he regretted that, while the Lily of France, the Rose of Burgundy, the Shamrock and the Thistle, etc,...
-Bagley's Perpetual Raspberries
A basket of these raspberries was received, but in a state that does not allow of description, being utterly destroyed before they arrived. We welcome everything that promises well, but especially are...
-Bagley's Perpetual Raspberry
It will be perceived by our advertising columns, is for sale only by the agent, Andrew Bridgeman, 878 Broadway, New York. Dear Sir: - My poor Delaware Grape is dead! It was a nice layer, carefully se...
-Balloon Spiders
During the last month, I have placed in my parior-window several glass jars in which plants end animals are displayed, fat the way that you may hare seen them, on a grander scale, in the Royal Zoologi...
-The Balsam - Balsamina Hortensis
The Balsam, or Lady's Slipper, as it is sometimes called, is well known, occupying a place in almost every garden. It is a native of the East Indies, China, and Japan. It has succulent stems, and beau...
-The Banana And Plantain
Indifferent observers will scarcely detect a difference between the banana and plantain, except in the fruit, and here the likeness is great; bnt the plantain bears a longer fruit, somewhat differentl...
-Bangor Horticultural Society
At the annual meeting of the Society, held on the 90th Hay, the following officers were elected, viz: - President - Henry Little. Vice-President - Cyrus Gees. Secretary - Allien W. Paine. Cor. Se...
-Barons Or The Committers For 1852, Of The Mamachusetis Hoeticultural Society, With The Schedule Of Prizer For 1858
At the autumn exhibition of this great society, the display of fruits was quite extraordinary. The committee say that visitors universally asserted that it exceeded in numbers and varieties of fruits...
-Barreling Apples And Pears
A sufficient number of, say No. I, in quality of apples should be placed with the stem downward, to cover the head that is to be marked and taken out. Then for No. 1 packages, such apples or pears as ...
-The Bartlett Pear
The sale of the Bartlett Estate, on Boston Highlands, recalls the history of this pear. Mr. Enoch Bartlett, the former owner, was Vice-President of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society for many yea...
-The Bartlett Strawberry
We had intended to give this fine fruit as a frontispiece to our September number; bat the plate not having been done to our satisfaction, we returned it to the engraver, who failed to get it ready in...
-The Bartlett, Or Williams' Bonchretien Pear
We trust the well-informed readers of the Horticulturist will not take it amiss that we offer them in our frontispiece a portrait of one of the best known and most popular pears in America - the Bartl...
-Bartram Pear
Specimens of this desirable Pear were received by me from Mr. Harmer on the 21st of September, 1859. A dish of them was exhibited at the same time by Mr. Harmer, at the Annual Exhibition of the Pennsy...
-Basement
The rear portion is entirely out of ground, so that the kitchen, under the dining-room, and side store-rooms, are light and dry. The cellars are in front, and the station for a furnace would be under ...
-Baskets
The same writer says: Every case I recollect of seeing ivy and flowers associated, the effect was agreeable. I have Been hundreds of ladies admiring, and investigating the modus operandi of hillocks,...
-The Basket Worm
I send a neat print of the Basket-Worm, alias Drop-Worm, and Sack-bearer, from the german Sacktrager, which Hiibner named Canephora or Basket-Carrier. And the Rev. L. Guilding named it Oiketicus, wh...
-Baskets And Bouquets
By Mark Hill - a basket and two bouquets. By J. J. Habermehl - , basket and a pair of bouquets. By Robert Kilvington - a cone bouquet of indigenous flowers, and a pair of bouquets. By H. A. Dreer - a ...
-Beans
The genns Phaseolus, to which our cultivated beans, with the exception of the English, belong, possesses a wide geographical range. It is fonnd indigenous in Asia, Africa, and America, with its adjace...
-Bean Poles, Or No Bean Poles
Like many other old practices, almost every one who grows a variety of the running or vin-ing bean, sets poles from eight to twelve feet high upon which to train them. One of our correspondents writes...
-Beardless Barley
J. W. Briggs, West Macedon, N, Y, sends us specimens of beardless barley, and will do the same to all who inclose a stamp, New Brighton, Staten Island, Sept. 4, 1856. J. Jay Smith, Esq. - Dear Sir: S...
-The Beatrice Peach
A Maryland cultivator says that the peach growers of the United States are particularly indebted to Thomas Rivers, for his success in producing an early variety that is intrinsically good. In the Bea...
-A Beautiful Dwelling
The annexed representation of a house was taken by an amateur daguer-reotypist at our request, to exhibit a tasteful structure of stone, well adapted to the wants of a family requiring all the comfor...
-A Beautiful Flower Farm
THE following account of Mr. C. L. Allen's flower farm, near Queens, Long Island, is given by the editor of The Observer. Most of our readers know, that this is the largest flower farm in this country...
-A Beautiful Home
The eastern bank of the Hudson River, for many miles above New York, is lined with hundreds of splendid country seats, adorned with skill, taste, and wealth. Occasionally we find one surrounded with m...
-Beautiful Illustration
The President of the British Association, St the late meeting in Dublin, introduced the following extraordinarily beautiful illustration: * * In order thai the date palm should ripen its fruit, the m...
-The Beautiful In A Tree
IN what does the beauty of a tree constat? We mean, of course, what may strict-ly be called an ornamental tree - not a tree planted for its fruit in the orchard, or growing for timber in the forest, b...
-The Beautiful In Art
This brings me to the third branch of my study, viz., the beautiful in art itself. Nature drunk in by the mind, as shown under the former head, is the seed for the production of a new world. - the wor...
-The Beautiful In Art. Part 2
The comparative feebleness of art is further apparent when we consider, in the greatest works of art, how few the beauties, how many the faults; how seldom we find a picture that is good in more than ...
-The Beautiful In Art. Part 3
And the monuments of municipal greatness are not among the least of the trophies and achievements of architecture. Ambition has imbodied its of one infinite brightness: may we not go further, and obse...
-The Beautiful In Ground
Paint me as I am - warts and all! said stern old Oli-VER Cromwell, to the artist who was taking his portrait. It is the strangest thing in the world, when God has made a spot - and made it right - t...
-The Beautiful In Nature
Whatever definition of beauty we may adopt, the fact of its existence will not be questioned. It greets us on every hand, more abundantly disclosed, indeed, to the cultivated and observing eye, yet vi...
-The Beautiful In Nature. Part 2
And last in the train comes winter, spreading his white mantle over the earth, hanging crystal pendants on tree and shrub, purifying the atmosphere, giving the sky a deeper blue, and the stars an iute...
-The Beautiful In Nature. Part 3
No one need fear that the beautiful in nature - say what he will of art - win prove a snare to him. Why should it not rather purify his thoughts, and lift them upward, give them higher conceptions of ...
-A Beautiful Rose
In the grounds of one of our New York suburban rural Editors, there bloomed last year a beautiful rose, which seems to have given him an unbounded degree of delight, and to have been the admiration of...
-Beautifying Country Homes
MR. WE1DENMAN has done excellent service to the public in his superb work on Landscape Gardening. He remarks, with truth, that all cannot enjoy the privilege of a stroll in the king of parks, the Cen...
-Beauty Of America - (Apple)
Fruit, from medium to large size; form, globular, flattened, broader than long; stem, short and slender; cavity, narrow, deep, and regular; calyx, small, closed; basin, shallow, with a slight, knobby,...
-Beauty Of American Climate
Mr. Robinson says: O Americans! never blame the climate, for it is an admirable one. The succulent vegetables of the old country grow here, with very few exceptions, and by their sides you gather the...
-The Beauty Of Neglected Things
Far fetched and dear bought is an old maxim; the pertinency of its application is seen in many of our social phases; but in none where its force is more evident, or its rebuke more deserved, than in...
-Beauty Of The Sea-Weeds
Of all the sea-weeds for an aquarium, the Green Lover is, perhaps, the very best. It is very pretty, from its delicate green color, and the various folds and puckers into which it throws itself. Its p...
-Beauty Or Flowers
Who would wish to live without flowers? Where would the poet fly for his images of beauty, if they were to perish forever? Are they not the emblems of loveliness and innocence - the living types of al...
-Bed-Room Decoration
We condense the following from the Cottage Gardener. It presents a pleasing picture which we should be glad to see more common. We think we can see woman's hand in it all. Oh. give him taste ! Tt is...
-Bedding Annuals
The collection of ' annual flowers now embraces some of the most beautiful in form and color, and many people, in their novelty and the cheapness with which the seeds are now obtained, prefer to grow ...
-Bedding Pelargoniums
Numerous attempts have been made for many years, to grow and bloom satisfactorily in the beds of the flower garden what is usually called the section of Show Pelargoniums; but almost universal disap...
-Bedding Plants
A. P. (Trenton, H. J.) You make your beds too rich for the Scarlet Geraniums, and therefore they run to leaf. They want the full sunshine, and a light, deep soil, not rich. Hydrangeas make a splendid ...
-Bedding Roses
One of the first essentials in a bedding Rose is, that it should stand well up on its foot-stalk. For a pole or climber the reverse of this would, of course, be the most graceful; one is to be looked ...
-Bedford
At the annual meeting of the New-Bedford Horticultural Society, held Feb. 6, the following gentlemen were unanimously chosen as the officers of the Society for the ensuing year: President - James Arno...
-Bees
A question about stupifying bees with nitre, may be perhaps satisfied by the following advice: - If you will use chloroform they will find it perfect in its action and preferable to the fungus. The...
-Bee-Hive
Mr. Henry A. Baker, the agent for New Jersey, probably knowing we have a sweet tooth, but for some time quite empty, has sent us Smith's Patent Wire and Straw Hive, which possesses some peculiaritie...
-The Beech
Next in order to the Oak, the Beech claims attention; but in beauty and symmetry it stands almost without a rival. These trees, as single ones in park scenery, attain a magnificence of stature that is...
-Bees Wintered Under Ground
A communication, relative to the preservation of bees during winter, has Just been made at the Royal Central Horticultural Society, by Mr. saillet, Jr. The principal foots contained in it are as follo...
-The Beet. Early Beet
The New York Tribune says that last year was the first that the dark red Egyptian beet was grown to any extent by gardeners near New York, and the results were so favorable, that those who can get eno...
-Began With The January Number
The publishers desire to return their thanks for the liberal patronage bestowed on this work. Its influence on the progress of Gardening and Rural Taste is now too strikingly apparent to need a word o...
-Begonias
X. Z. The Begonia is a hothouse plant, but most of the varieties will thrive very well with green-bouse culture. Zebrina, Fuchsioides, Coccinia, and Maculata, are four of the best. The Begonia #1 In...
-Begonia Bolivensis
We find this elegant variety of the Begonia figured and described in the London Florist Magazine, from which our illustration and description are taken. Fig. 172. - Begonia Bolivensis. Few collec...
-Begonia Fuchsioides
Among the many favorites of our plant houses, few are more deserving of attention than the Fuchsia-likeWegonia. Its graceful habit, the brilliant color of the flowers, the short time required to have ...
-Begonia Prestoniensis
Messrs. Lucombe and Pince's advertisement, at page 561, reminds me of an opinion I was led to form on receiving from them lately fine specimens of the above named plant - that Begonias must soon becom...
-Belmont. Residence Of J. V. D. Berrier, Near Belleville, New Jeremy
A seooNd example is here given of the Americanized Italian Villa, an irregular, picturesque form of house, having the octagon tower, square turret, covered carriage way, and veranda; but in a differen...
-Belts for Screens
What are the directions for planting a belt of evergreens to screen one from his neighbors? There is in Downing's work, and through the Horticulturist, a lack of definite information as to the size an...
-Ben Davis Apple
As the apple Ben Davis continues to attract the attention of some of our Western fruit growers, and as I furnished Mr. Downing with the outline and description of this fruit, afterward published in hi...
-Berberis Darwinii
I cannot but regard this novel introduction as one of the nicest evergreen shrubs in the country, and likely to become a universal favorite, Any dressy, hardy shrubs, which never assume a coarse habit...
-Berberis Japonica
We believe this fine new shrub - the Japanese Berberry, brought from China to England in 1849, by Mr. Fortune, has only just been introduced into the United States, and is not yet offered for sale by ...
-Bergamotte D'Esperen
Size - medium. Form - roundish. Calyx - closed, sunk in a moderately deep, coarsely furrowed basin. Color - dull green, coarsely dotted, with some russet patches, and occasionally with brownish red ch...
-The Bergen Pear
The parent tree of the Bergen is a chance seedling, found in a hedge on lands now owned by John B. Hitching, at Bay Ridge, New Utrecht, L. I., formerly Simeon Bergen, and from appearance about thirty ...
-Berkshire (Mass.) Horticultural Society - Stockbridge Meeting, Sept. 9
Although the meeting was called on very short notice, yet it was well attended, and the exhibitions of flowers, fruits and vegetables were extensive and of very fair quality. The citizens of Stockbrid...
-Berries Lost Baskets
Every season there are a great many complaints made by growers against dealers, of their losing so many baskets. In some instances it may be the fault of the dealers, but as a general thing, the loss ...
-The Berry Trade Of New York. Prices Of Small Fruits In The New York Market
THE last season was a peculiar one. The berries from Virginia, as a general thing, arrived in poor condition, and sold at low figures. If I mistake not, only about four shipments from Norfolk, of larg...
-Berry-Bearing Shrubs
Callicarpa Americana - Flowers very small and insignificant. In October the branches are covered with beautiful purple berries. Propagated by divisions of the root and cuttings. Daphne Mezereum - Mos...
-Best Boil For Vineyards
Looking over the pages of the new Journal of Horticulture, whose claims have been so prominently placed before the American public, our attention was caught by an article from the pen of the Hon. E. W...
-The Best Deciduous Hedge Plant
Discussion at Rochester. Messrs. Maxwell, Barry, Ellwanger and Graves all agreed in naming the Honey Locust as the best. Mr. Chas. Downing has seen old hedges of it a complete failure. Mr. Smith ha...
-The Best Early Apple
The specimens of apples herewith sent, are a variety of early fruit that I do not find described in the books. It has been somewhat disseminated about this State within the last few years, from the to...
-Best Form For An Apple Tree
V. - What is the best form of an Apple tree, and which is the time for pruning? Mr. Sharp thought he might not agree with others in his views of pruning. Would head all fruit trees low. Branches prun...
-The Best Geraniums
A list of the varieties, grown by Mr . Gray, is given in the Report for 1873 of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society: Of the Golden Triculors, Mrs . Pollock has again proved superior for bedding, ...
-Best Manure For Trees
What are the best manures for the apple, pear, and other fruits, and what are the best means to renovate old apple orchards? W. P. Towruend remembered how the old orchard got all mossy, and his fa...
-The Best Market Pears
If a farmer were to say to us that he was about to plant twenty-five pear trees for profit - that is, for market purposes - and that he desired a suggestion as to the varieties and number of each vari...
-Best Plants For Hedges
A gentleman of Skaneateles, N. Y., writes to the Country Gentleman as follows: In the Country Gentleman of the first instant you state ' there is no thorn, properly so called, that can be relied on ...
-The Best Roses
A valued correspondent recently gave us a list of the best roses. The following list is by Mr. Lane, one of the largest English growers next to Mr. Rivers: Hybrid Perpetual Roses - Deep crimsons, the ...
-Best Six Apples
Summer - Too Sweet At the close of the discussion on this subject members were requested to prepare and leave with the Secretary a list of the best six summer, the best six autumn, and the beat twelv...
-Best Six On Quince Roots
Louise bonne de Jersey, Urbaniste, Duchess d'Angouleme, Vicar of Winkfield, Beurre d'Anjou, and Glout Morceau. With regard to the conditions of proper cultivation of fruits, no great success could ev...
-Best Six Pears
The following is a list recommended by J. J. Thomas: For Market Bartlett, Beurre Bosc, Duchesse D'Angouleme, Howell, Beurre D'-Anjou, Lawrence. For Table Giffard, Tyson, Seckel, Belle Lucrative, D...
-Best Time For Cutting Grafts
The Germantowm Telegraph thinks that the advice to cut grafts in the Fall, before the sharp cold of winter injures their vitality, to be packed away in boxes of fine damp moss, damp saw dust, or bu...
-Best Time To Transplant Grape-Vines, Spring Or Fall?
Mr. Ellwanger thought it did not make much difference; but no grape vine should be placed in a wet soil at any season. Mr. Ainsworth thought that if the land be well .subsoiled and undermined, Autumn...
-Best Twelve Winter Apples
IV. - The best 12 winter, to embrace 2 for stock, 2 for baking, 2 for cooking, and 6 for the table. Mr. Ellwanger thought the Fameuse the best early winter apple for the table. Mr. Hooker recommended...
-Best Varieties Of Cherries
For market, it is very important that the fruit be large, handsome, firm, with a tough skin. Some of our most delicious cherries, such as Yellow Spanish and Coe's Transparent, are so tender in skin or...
-The Best Way Of Preserving Fruits And Vegetables
Tour June number has a communication from L., of South Carolina, asking information as to the proper method of preserving fruits and vegetables, with the flavor of those freshly gathered. Though to...
-The Best Way To Graft Grape-Vines
Haying had 6ome experience in grafting the vine, I am desirous of informing your readers of my mode of procedure. I have visited several vineries in this State, and having had conversation with the pr...
-The Best Wine Grapes
You request my opinion as to the best native grape for the production of wine. In expressing my views on the subject, it must be understood that my remarks are confined to this section of country bord...
-Betula Excelsa
In the February number, it is rather assumed that the Betula excelsa and htea are distinct, but nearly similar species of birch. I had never doubted but that the excelsa of Willdenow, Acton, and Bigel...
-Beurre Bachelier Pear
Fruit - size large; form oblong. obvate, pyriform; color, greenish yellow, mostly overspread and marbled with smooth, russet and scattering black dots of irregular size; stem, short, rather stout, som...
-Beurre Burnicq
Size, medium; form, acute pyriform; color, handsome russet; flavor, pleasant sub-acid, aromatic; quality, very good. A very prolific hardy tree, bearing every year. Note The prospect for fruit is ve...
-The Beurre Clairgeau Pear
This is a new French variety, originated by M. Clairoeau, of Nantes, and sent out from the French nurseries in 1848 or '49, we believe. It is a very large fruit, and so far as it has been tested both ...
-Beurre D'Aremberg
We would like to have unbelievers see our trees and decide for themselves. It promises well with us so far. These are some of the varieties of which, if we speak at all and speak the truth, we must s...
-The Beurre De Rowing
We received scions of this variety some five or six years ago, from M. Bavay, of Vilvorde, Belgium, who recommended it as one of the most promising new varieties. We believe it was originated by Van M...
-Beurre Giffard
Dr. Brinckle moved it be placed on the list for general cultivation. Mr. Cabot doubts the tree a good grower. With a slender and long growth on the quince. Mr. Wilder moved it be carried forward. Carr...
-The Beurre Giffard Pear
This and the Doyenne dEte, figured in the November number of our last volume, are both of comparatively recent introduction from France, and prove to be two of the most beautiful and excellent of all ...
-The Beurre Goubault
This variety originated at Angers, France, and has been sent out from the nurseries of M. LE Roy and others there. It has already been considerably disseminated in this country, and as far as we know ...
-Beurre Nantais-Beurre De Nantes Pear
One of the very best of the lately imported varieties; this fruit seems fitted to our climate, as it is found as good in Rochester as in Massachusetts and New Jersey. Fruit, long, pyriform, sometimes ...
-Beurre Sterkmann
Size, medium. Form, obovate pyriform. Color, dull greenish russet. Flesh, juicy, melting. Flavor, rich sub-acid. Ripens in November. Among others whose characteristics give tokens of excellence, may ...
-Beurre Superfin
Size - medium to large. Form - obovate, acute pyriform. Calyx - closed, small, deeply sunk. Stem - rather short and stout, fleshy at the base, set without depression. Color - yellowish green, somewhat...
-The Beurre Van Mons Pear
I send you a description and drawing of the Beurre Van Mont Pear. Perhaps you will recollect that I exhibited it at the second fruit convention, at Castle Garden; and if I mistake not, I sent you some...
-The Beutiful In Ground
WE have sketched, in a former volume, the elements of the Beautiful in a Tree. Let us glance for a few moments at the Beautiful in Ground. We may have readers who think themselves not devoid of some ...
-Biech Tree - Exogen
Ln perennial plants, the tissues which resist climatal change carry on a kind of low vitality, as seen in the trunks of trees, in this country, in the winter. At more favorable periods, these tissues ...
-Biennial Meeting Of The American Pomological Society
THE reunion at Richmond of horticultural friends and members of the Society, was held under many favorable auspices, and proved extremely pleasant and successful. The utmost good nature and cordiality...
-Biennial Meeting Of The American Pomological Society. Continued
California The California collection attracted perhaps the most interest. A great variety was displayed, and almost every specimen was remarkable for its superior quality. The fruit had been carefull...
-The Big Tree Of California. Sequoia Gigantea Of Torrey. (Wellingtonia Gigantea Of Lindley.)
I think the readers of the Horticulturist should have further particulars respecting this wonderful tree, not only the Monarch of the Californian forest as it has been styled, but the Monarch of th...
-The Big Trees At Mariposa
In measuring trees, it is so easy to exaggerate by running your line around the roots rather than the real body, that I place little dependence on the reported and recorded measurements of parties und...
-Bigarreau Monstreuse Demezel
On seeing a cut and description of the above cherry, in the Horticulturist, a few years ago, I think I was among the first to get hold of it. This year it fruited finely with me, and as there has been...
-Bignonia Venusta - But We Wont Tell
Just as I received the last month's Horticulturist, Mr. Editor, I was about sending you a secret or two, concerning that most lovely - not new, but old Bignonia. Not for any particular benefit to be...
-Biographical Memoir Of The Late Francis Andre Michaux
[From the Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, Volume XL p. xvii. Read December 5,1856]. Francois Andre Michaux, the subject of this memoir, belonged essentially to that class of scien...
-Biographical Memoir Of The Late Francis Andre Michaux. Part 2
At this remote period of time, I am altogether without record as to the movements of young Michaux immediately after his landing on our shores. The only source where I expected, naturally, to obtain i...
-Biographical Memoir Of The Late Francis Andre Michaux. Part 3
After sundry explorations along the coast, be' established a botanical garden at Tametave, in which he planted-all the trees and plants which might be objects of usefulness or curiosity. The climate, ...
-Biographical Memoir Of The Late Francois Andre Michaux
[From the Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, Volume XI. p. xvii. Bead December 5,1856]. Michaux remained in Charleston until the first of March, 1803, when he embarked again for Fran...
-Biographical Memoir Of The Late Francois Andre Michaux. Part 2
I should fail in my duty towards one who was the companion and helpmate of the two Michaux, if I omitted here to mention his name. This is the humble Paul Saulnier, the same journeyman gardener who, i...
-Biographical Memoir Of The Late Francois Andre Michaux. Part 3
In a letter dated October, 1852, addressed to the President of the American Philosophical Society, Michaux expresses himself in the following words, with regard to his Sylva Americana: The science of...
-Biographical Memoir Of The Late Francois Andre Michaux. Part 4
With the view of remedying the scarcity of wood under which this country is beginning to suffer, through the rapid and improvident destruction of the native forests, Michaux recommends also to the Ame...
-Biographical Sketches Of Distinguished American Horticulturists
THOMAs HOGG, Sen'r, or Torkville, N. Y. Another of the pioneers of American Horticulture is gone. For more than thirty years Mr. Hogg occupied a prominent place among the professional florists and nu...
-Biographical Sketches Of Distinguished American Horticulturists. Continued
After occupying this position for ten or twelve years, he was obliged to leave on account of ill health, consequent on the fever he had in Essex, which left him with a very debilitated constitution. B...
-Biographies Of Distinguished Pomologists, Botanists, And Gardeners
It is the intention of the editor of this work to prepare, occasionally, short biographies of men who have been distinguished in the walks of Pomology, Botany, Gardening, etc. The number of these will...
-Biota Orientalis, Biota Pyramidalis, And Taxus Adpressa. Translated From The Revue Horticole
My object in publishing this brief article is to clearly establish the difference existing between two species, which, although perfectly distinct, have often been confounded with each other, or regar...
-The Birch
This family consists of graceful trees and shrubs, natives of colder regions of each hemisphere. No trees are more distinguished for their light and feathery foliage, and the graceful sweep of their l...
-The Birds
I once noticed a proposition to stock your city with Birds, in order to rid you of the worms. Some one, I think, recommended a large importation of sparrows. Few people have either the inclination or ...
-Birds And Insects
At this season of the year any thing relating to birds and insects can not fail to prove interesting, more especially when it is borne in mind that their economical relations to each other are becomin...
-Birds, Insects And Other Matters
A man who writes with the perspicuity and force, of J. 0. H., should tell us something to instruct as well as to amuse. There is pith in him, beyond question; and he holds a quarry of information behi...
-Birds, Insects And Other Matters. Continued
What though a ' sparrow' may sometimes fall to the ground at a long shot,' by way ,of improvement,', can such occasional instances he claimed to cause their decrease to so lamentable an extent as to d...
-Birds, Insects, Etc
Mr. tucker - In several notices which I have seen of my article on Birds, Insects, and other matters, published in the July number of the Horticulturist, I observe that the writers have, as with one...
-The Black Birch, Vs. The Tulip Tree
The fragrant birch above him hung Hor tassels in the sky. - Bryant. In the August number of the Horticulturist, I noticed an article entitled Shade Trees in Cities, and headed, Down with the Ai...
-Black Damascus Grape
Attention has been called to the merits of this grape. I have been a grower of it on a large scale for the last twenty years, and it is one of the best black grapes grown, notwithstanding its reported...
-Black Hamburgh Grapes
We are indebted to Charles Butler, Esq., of Hart's Comers, for some fine Black Hamburgh Grapes. Bunch and berry of good size, finely ripened, and covered with a beautiful bloom. Mr. Ellis, his gardene...
-Black Hamburghs In The Open Air
The important question has often been raised by amateurs, Can these de-licions grapes be successfully raised in the open air in the latitude of New York city I am happy to be enabled, from the experie...
-Black Hawk Cherry
This is also a seedling of Prof. Kirtland's, which has fruited regularly since 1845. My notes and figure of it were first made in 1847, and have been compared with the fruit yearly since that time. As...
-Black Knot Oh Plum Trees
There has been much speculation and research for the cause of the black knot on plum trees. Some persons have supposed it caused by an insect. Some years ago I opened the knot and examined it, but did...
-The Black Knot On The Plum
Many causes bare been assigned for the disease in question, none of which, so far as my information extends, are satisfactory. Some have supposed it to be occasioned by diseased sap, or vegetable ulce...
-The Black Spruce
The two species of spruce, the black and the white, or, as they are more commonly called, the double and the single, are distinguished from the fir and the hemlock, in every stage of their growth, by ...
-Black Strawberries
The varieties which are so called, and classed as a distinct species or family in the London Society's Transactions, are not actually so, but are merely very dark colored varieties of the F. Virginian...
-The Black Walnut
This is a fine tree, with spreading branches and broad round head. The bark is rough and furrowed, and darker than that of the butternut tree. As an object of beauty for the adornment of our pleasure ...
-Black Warts On Plum Treks, And The Insect "Mexbracis Bubalus"
As every thing relating to this destructive affection of our plum trees is important, I have taken the liberty to enclose you a letter from Prof. Harris on the subject of the insect named, and also a ...
-Black-Knot On Plum Trees
About ten years ago I purchased from Messrs. Ellwakger & Barry, of Mt. Hope, Rochester, N. Y., a lot of Plum trees of the different leading varieties, planted, cultivated, and drove them right up into...
-Blackberries
We find the following in the proceedings of a late meeting of the American Institute Farmers' Club, as reported in the Agricultor: Toe New Rochklle Blaokberry.-The Secretary reminded the Chair that ...
-Blackberries - Value And Culture
The New Rochelle and other blackberries - what are their value, and the best methods of pruning?' Mr. Barry, being called upon, said the blackberry was easy of culture, productive, and needs a good ...
-Blackberries For Market
WE shall be compelled to discard the Kittatinny and the Dorchester for market, on light soil, much to our regret. The former because it is too soft and arrives in market too dull in color. The latter ...
-Blackberries Need Cultivation
We think some nurserymen are responsible for helping to spread the erroneous opinion that blackberries will grow any where, and will thrive well on poor soil without much attention. We find this not t...
-Blackberry
Cultivated High Bush - well worthy of cultivation - remarkable for size and beauty. The Blackberry #1 The introduction of the New Rochelle Blackberry was an event of considerable importance to horti...
-Blackberry Wine
It is a fact which ought to be universally known, that the blackberry yields a wine of the utmost value. Not only is it very delicious when it is properly made, the flavor being not unlike that of the...
-Bleeding Of Vines
(P. A.) The vine often bleeds excessively when pruned in an improper season, or when accidentally wounded; Mr. Knight, in the Horticultural Transactions, recommends, from practice, four parts of scr...
-Blight
We cannot say that any varieties are free from attacks of this malady, or that any are less liable to it than others, though circumstances occasionally favor that belief. As a general thing, it is les...
-Blight From The Roots
Of late, a theory has been propounded, in certain quarters, that blight in the pear-tree is caused by disease at the root of the tree. If this is founded in truth it would be well to make the followin...
-Blight In Fruit-Trees
EDITOR Horticulturist: - The blight in fruit trees has caused a great deal of thought and investigation by fruit growers for many years. Many pre-ventives and remedies have been suggested and many cau...
-Blight In Pear And Rot In Grape
A correspondent suggests that much if not all the diseases termed blight in the pear, rot in grape, etc., may be attributable to diseased roots. He says, Pear wood, often when making cuttings for g...
-The Blight In Pear Trees
Several nurserymen in Geneva, New York, are now using salt freely in their Pear Nurseries, at from 200 to 400 lbs. per acre yearly, and say that it has a wholesome tendency to correct the disposition ...
-Bliss & Sons' Strawberry Exhibitors
The principal strawberry exhibition near New York, this season, was at the Horticultural store of Messrs. B. K. Bliss & Sons. These enterprising gentlemen offer premiums at their own expense for best ...
-Blood-Leaved Peach
Mr. Meehan, the editor of the Gardener's s Monthly, has on his grounds peach trees, the foliage of which is a very rich crimson red. The fruit is not equal to that of some of the best varieties. The ...
-The Bloodgood Pear
A contributor to The Southern Horticulturist has had this in bearing at Atlanta, Ga., for several years, and finds it always of superior merit, a good bearer, fine size, and quality unexcelled among ...
-Blub Rot Or Plums
J. D. L., of Aiken, S. C, asks of pomologists to give some information relative to the blue rot in plums, which worries his fruit more than the curculio. He also wants to know if any reason can be ass...
-The Blue Ash
A correspondent in Chillioothe, Ills., writes thus: One word as to the prettiest lawn or street tree that grows indigenous in this section. I think the Blue Ash, as it is called here, is, on the wh...
-Blue Glass
The Philadelphia experiments of General Pleasanton upon the organic influence of the violet ray have been repeated in France, and M. A. Poey has communicated to M. Elie de Beaumont, a letter on the in...
-Bluffton, Mo. Verbenas
Among a collection of choice verbenas ordered last spring, we discovered one of the newer sorts, labeled Hybrida, presenting a vigor similar in character to none of its companions. The robust attitude...
-The Body Of The Mill
A piece of pine plank, D, is suspended from the cross-girth of a frame, E, by an iron bolt, F, furnished at its lowered end with a large head, G, and a washer, and secured by a key, H, at the upper en...









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