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Landscape Gardening | by Frank A. Waugh



A taste for rural improvements of every description is advancing silently, but with great rapidity in this country. While yet in the far west the pioneer constructs his rude hut of logs for a dwelling, and sweeps away with his axe the lofty forest trees that encumber the ground, in the older portions of the Union, bordering the Atlantic, we are surrounded by all the luxuries and refinements that belong to an old and long cultivated country. Within the last ten years, especially, the evidences of the growing wealth and prosperity of our citizens have become apparent in the great increase of elegant cottage and villa residences on the banks of our noble rivers, along our rich valleys, and wherever nature seems to invite us by her rich and varied charms.

TitleLandscape Gardening
AuthorFrank A. Waugh
PublisherFrank A. Waugh
Year1921
Copyright1921, Frank A. Waugh
AmazonLandscape Gardening

To John Quincy Adams, LL.D., Ex-President Of The United States; The Lover Of Rural Pursuits, As Well As The Distinguished Patriot, Statesman, And Sage; This Volume By Permission, Is Respectfully And Affectionately Dedicated, By His Friend, The Author.

-Original Preface By A. J. D
A taste for rural improvements of every description is advancing silently, but with great rapidity in this country. While yet in the far west the pioneer constructs his rude hut of logs for a dwelling...
-Preface By The Editor
The present Tenth Edition of Downing's famous Landscape Gardening takes extensive liberties with the original materials, rearranging and recombining them with little regard to their early relationship...
-Chapter I. Historical Sketches
L'un a nos yeux presente D'un dessein regulier l'ordonnance imposante, Prete aux champs des beautls qu'ils ne connaissaient pas, D'une pompe Strangere embellit leur appas, Donne aux arbres des lois, ...
-Historical Sketches. Part 2
Landscape Gardening is, indeed, only a modern word, first coined, we believe, by Shenstone. The most distinguished English landscape gardeners of recent date, are the late Humphrey Repton, who died i...
-Historical Sketches. Part 3
With regard to the literature and practice of Landscape Gardening as an art, in North America, almost everything is yet before us, comparatively little having yet been done. Almost all the improvement...
-Historical Sketches. Part 4
Lemon Hill, half a mile above the Fairmount water-works of Philadelphia, was, 20 years ago, the most perfect specimen of the geometric mode in America, and since its destruction by the extension of th...
-Historical Sketches. Part 5
Blithewood, formerly the seat of R. Donaldson, Esq., (now John Bard, Esq.), near Barrytown, on the Hudson, is one of the most charming villa residences in the Union. The natural scenery here, is nowhe...
-Historical Sketches. Part 6
The Manor House of the Patroon (as the eldest son of the Van Rensselaer family is called) is in the northern suburbs of the city of Albany. The mansion, greatly enlarged and improved a few years sin...
-Historical Sketches. Part 7
Belmont, the seat of J. P. Cushing, Esq., is a residence of more note than any other near Boston; but this is, chiefly, on account of the extensive ranges of glass, the forced fruits, and the high cul...
-Historical Sketches. Part 8
In New Jersey, the grounds of the Count de Survilliers, at Bordentown, were very extensive; and although the surface is mostly flat, it has been well varied by extensive plantations. At Mount Holly, a...
-Chapter II. Beauties And Principles Of The Art
Here Nature in her unaffected dresse, Plaited with vallies and imbost with hills, Enchast with silver streams, and fringed with woods Sits lovely. - Chamberlayne. II est des soins plus doux, un a...
-Beauties And Principles Of The Art. Part 2
To the lover of the fine arts, the name of Claude Lorraine cannot fail to suggest examples of beauty in some of its purest and most simple forms. In the best pictures of this master we see portrayed t...
-Beauties And Principles Of The Art. Part 3
But all nature is not equally Beautiful. Both in living things and in inorganized matter, we see on all sides evidences of nature struggling with opposing forces. Mountains are upheaved by convulsions...
-Beauties And Principles Of The Art. Part 4
We must not be supposed to find in nature only the Beautiful and the Picturesque. Grandeur and Sublimity are also expressions strongly marked in many of the noblest portions of natural landscape. But,...
-Beauties And Principles Of The Art. Part 5
In water, all the wildness of romantic spots in nature is to be imitated or preserved; and the lake or stream with bold shore and rocky, wood-fringed margin, or the cascade in the secluded dell, are t...
-Beauties And Principles Of The Art. Part 6
The raw materials of wood, water, and surface, by the margin of many of our rivers and brooks, are at once appropriated with so much effect, and so little art, in the picturesque mode; the annual tax ...
-Beauties And Principles Of The Art. Part 7
For the same reason, there is something unpleasing in the introduction of fruit trees among elegant ornamental trees on a lawn, or even in assembling together, in the same beds, flowering plants and c...
-Chapter III. On Wood And Plantations
He gains all points, who pleasingly confounds, Surprises, varies, and conceals the bounds. Calls in the country, patches opening glades, Joins willing woods, and varies shades from shades; Now breaks...
-On Wood And Plantations. Part 2
Happy is he, who in a country life Shuns more perplexing toil and jarring strife; Who lives upon the natal soil he loves, And sits beneath his old ancestral groves. To this, let us add the complace...
-On Wood And Plantations. Part 3
As uniformity, and grandeur of single effects, were the aim of the old style of arrangement, so variety and harmony of the whole are the results for which we labor in the modern landscape. And as the ...
-On Wood And Plantations. Part 4
It is proper that we should here remark, that a distinct species of after treatment is required for the two modes. Trees, or groups, where the Beautiful is aimed at, should be pruned with great care, ...
-On Wood And Plantations. Part 5
But in the Picturesque landscape garden there is visible a piquancy of effect, certain bold and striking growths and combinations, which we feel at once, if we know them to be the result of art, to be...
-On Wood And Plantations. Part 6
The grand object in all this should be to open to the eye, from the windows or front of the house, a wide surface, partially broken up and divided by groups and masses of trees into a number of pleasi...
-On Wood And Plantations. Part 7
We do not intend that this principle should apply so closely, that extensive grounds naturally picturesque shall have nothing of the softening touches of more perfect beauty; or that a demesne charact...
-On Wood And Plantations. Part 8
Suburban villa residences are, every day, becoming more numerous; and in laying out the grounds around them, and disposing the sylvan features, there is often more ingenuity, and as much taste require...
-On Wood And Plantations. Part 9
The cottage ornee may have more or less ground attached to it. It is the ambition of some to have a great house and little land, and of others (among whom we remember the poet Cowley) to have a little...
-On Wood And Plantations. Part 10
In a tree, says Uvedale Price, of which the foliage is everywhere full and unbroken, there can be but little variety of form; then, as the sun strikes only on the surface, neither can there be much...
-On Wood And Plantations. Part 11
The larch, to .which we shall hereafter recur at some length, may be considered one of the most picturesque trees of this division; and being more rapid in its growth than most evergreens, it may be u...
-On Wood And Plantations. Part 12
The only rules which we can suggest to govern the planter are these: First, if a certain leading expression is desired in a group of trees, together with as great a variety as possible, such species m...
-Chapter IV. Treatment Of Ground
Strength may wield the ponderous spade, May turn the clod and wheel the compost home; But elegance, chief grace the garden shows, And most attractive, is the fair result Of thought, the creature of a...
-Treatment Of Ground. Part 2
This arrangement of trees bordering an extended approach road, in connection with the various other groups, masses, and single trees, in the adjacent lawn, will in most cases have the effect of concea...
-Treatment Of Ground. Part 3
Walks are laid out for purposes similar to drives, but are much more common, and may be introduced into every scene, however limited. They are intended solely for promenades, or exercise on foot, and....
-Treatment Of Ground. Part 4
In New England, the buckthorn * is preferred from its rapid and luxuriant growth; and in the middle states the osage orange is becoming a favorite for its glossy and polished foliage. The privet is a ...
-Chapter V. Treatment Of Water
The dale With woods o'erhung, and shagg'd with mossy rocks. Whence on each hand the gushing waters play, And down the rough cascade white-dashing fall, Or gleam in lengthened vista through the trees. ...
-Treatment Of Water. Part 2
The first subject which will demand the attention, after the spot has been selected for the lake or pond, and the height of the head and consequent depth of water determined upon, is the proposed form...
-Treatment Of Water. Part 3
All this can be easily effected while the excavations of those portions of the bed which require deepening are going on. And the better portions of the soil obtained from the latter, will serve to rai...
-Treatment Of Water. Part 4
Except in these two instances, islands should be generally placed opposite the salient points of the banks, or near those places where small breaks or promontories run out into the water. In such situ...
-Treatment Of Water. Part 5
Natural brooks and rivulets may often be improved greatly by a few trifling alterations and additions, when they chance to come within the bounds of a country residence. Occasionally, they may be dive...
-Chapter VI. Embellishments
Nature, assuming a more lovely face, Borrowing a beauty from the works of grace. Cowper. Each odorous bushy shrub Fenced up the verdant wall; each beauteous flower; Iris all hues, Roses and Jessamin...
-Embellishments. Part 2
The width of a terrace around a house may vary from five to twenty feet, or more, in proportion as the building is of greater or less importance. The surrounding wall, which supports its level, may al...
-Embellishments. Part 3
A very pretty and fanciful substitute for the sculptured vase, and which may take its place in the picturesque landscape, may be found in vases or baskets of rustic work, constructed of the branches a...
-Embellishments. Part 4
The French flower-garden is the most fanciful of the usual modes of laying out the area devoted to this purpose. The patterns or figures employed are often highly intricate, and require considerable s...
-Embellishments. Part 5
The mingled flower-garden, as it is termed, is by far the most common mode of arrangement in this country, though it is seldom well effected. The object in this is to dispose the plants in the beds in...
-Embellishments. Part 6
For the use of those who require some guide in the selection of species, we subjoin the accompanying list of hardy and showy shrubs, which are at the same time easily procured in the United States.* A...
-Embellishments. Part 7
The constant changes which daily growth and development bring about in vegetable forms, the interest we feel in the opening of a favorite cluster of buds, or the progress of the thrifty and luxuriant ...
-Embellishments. Part 8
Whatever be the style of the architecture of the house, that of the conservatory should in every case conform to it, and evince a degree of enrichment according with that of the main building. Though...
-Embellishments. Part 9
On a ferme ornte, where the proprietor desires to give a picturesque appearance to the different appendages of the place, rustic work offers an easy and convenient method of attaining this end. The da...
-Embellishments. Part 10
If a few of the rocks to be employed in the rockwork are sunk half or three-fourths their depth in the soil near the site of the proposed rockwork, so as to have the appearance of a rocky ridge just c...
-Embellishments. Part 11
A simple jet issuing from a circular basin of water, or a cluster of perpendicular jets (candelabra jets), is at once the simplest and most pleasing of fountains. Such are almost the only kinds of fou...
-Chapter VII. The Philosophy Of Rural Taste
ALL travellers agree, that while the English people are far from being remarkable for their taste in the arts generally, they are unrivalled in their taste for landscape gardening. So completely is th...
-The Philosophy Of Rural Taste. Continued
The Romans, tried in the alembic of the great German writer, are found still colder in their love of nature's charms than the Greeks. A nation which manifested a marked predilection for agriculture a...
-Chapter VIII. The Beautiful In Ground
WE have sketched, elsewhere, the elements of the beautiful in a tree. Let us glance for a few moments at the beautiful in ground. We may have readers who think themselves not devoid of some taste for...
-The Beautiful In Ground. Continued
The surface of ground is rarely ugly in a state of nature, because all nature leans to the beautiful, and the constant action of the elements goes continually to soften and wear away the harshness and...
-Chapter IX. The Beautiful In A Tree
IN what does the beauty of a tree consist? We mean of course what may strictly be called an ornamental tree, not a tree planted for its fruit in the orchard, or growing for timber in the forest, but s...
-Chapter X. On The Drapery Of Cottages And Gardens
OUR readers very well know that, in the country, whenever any thing especially tasteful is to be done, when a church is to be dressed for Christmas, a public hall festooned for a fair, or a salon de...
-On The Drapery Of Cottages And Gardens. Part 2
Many of you in the country, as we well know, are compelled by circumstances to live in houses which some one else built, or which have, by ill-luck, an ugly expression in every board or block of stone...
-On The Drapery Of Cottages And Gardens. Part 3
Where you want to produce a bold and picturesque effect with a vine, nothing will do it more rapidly and completely than our native grapes. They are precisely adapted to the porch of the farmhouse, or...
-On The Drapery Of Cottages And Gardens. Part 4
The common Trumpet Creeper all of you know by heart. It is rather a wild and rambling fellow in its habits; but nothing is better to cover old outside chimneys, stone outbuildings, and rude walls and ...
-Chapter XI. A Few Hints On Landscape Gardening
NOVEMBER is, above all others, the tree-planting month over the wide Union. *  Accordingly, every one who has a rood of land looks about him at this season to see what can be done to improve and embel...
-Chapter XII. Hints To Rural Improvers
ONE of the most striking proofs of the progress of refinement in the United States is the rapid increase of taste for ornamental gardening and rural embellishment in all the older portions of the nort...
-Hints To Rural Improvers. Part 2
We should say that two grand errors are the fertile causes of all the failures in the rural improvements of the United States at the present moment. The first error lies in supposing that good taste ...
-Hints To Rural Improvers. Part 3
For landscape gardening, on a large scale, and in its best sense, there are no places in America which compare with those on the east bank of the Hudson, between Hyde Park and the town of Hudson. The ...
-Chapter XIII. On The Mistakes Of Citizens In Country Life
No one loves the country more sincerely or welcomes new devotees to the worship of its pure altars more warmly than ourselves. To those who bring here hearts capable of understanding the lessons of tr...
-On The Mistakes Of Citizens In Country Life. Part 2
The third class of the disappointed, consists of those who are astonished at the cost of life in the country. They left town not only for the healthful breezes of the hilltops, but also to make a smal...
-On The Mistakes Of Citizens In Country Life. Part 3
Nothing can be more unsatisfactory than either of these positions. If he is seduced into expenditures en grand seigneur to keep up the style in which the mansion or villa has been erected, he finds th...
-Chapter XIV. On Citizens Retiring To The Country
IN another essay we offered a few words to our readers on the subject of choosing a country seat. As the subject was only slightly touched upon we propose to say something more regarding it now. The...
-On Citizens Retiring To The Country. Part 2
Everything which a citizen does in the country, costs him an incredible sum. In Europe (heaven save the masses), you may have the best of laboring men for twenty or thirty cents a day. Here you must p...
-On Citizens Retiring To The Country. Part 3
But some of our readers who have tried the thing may say that it is a very expensive thing to settle oneself and get well established, even on a small place in the country. And so it is, if we proceed...
-Chapter XV. How To Choose A Site For A Country Seat
HOW to choose the site for a country house is a subject now occupying the thoughts of many of our countrymen, and therefore is not undeserving a few words from us at the present moment. The greater p...
-How To Choose A Site For A Country Seat. Continued
Those, therefore, who wish to start with the advantage of a good patrimony from nature will prefer to examine what mother Earth has to offer them in her choicest nooks before they determine on taking ...
-Chapter XVI. How To Arrange Country Places
How to lay out a country place? That is a question about which we and our readers might have many a long conversation, if we could be brought on familiar terms, colloquially speaking, with all parts o...
-How To Arrange Country Places. Continued
Having fixed upon and arranged the blind side of the house - which, of course, will naturally be placed so as to connect itself directly with the stable and other out-buildings, - the next point of at...
-Chapter XVII. The Management Of Large Country Places
COUNTRY places that may properly be called ornamental *  are increasing so fast, especially in the neighborhood of the large cities, that a word or two more touching their treatment will not be looked...
-The Management Of Large Country Places. Continued
Certainly, nothing can be a more beautiful sight in its way, than the numerous herds of deer, short-horned cattle and fine sheep, which embroider and give life to the scenery of an English country hom...
-Chapter XVIII. Country Places In Autumn
NOVEMBER, which is one of the least interesting months to those who come into the country to admire the freshness of spring or the fulness of summer and early autumn, is one of the most interesting to...
-Country Places In Autumn. Continued
This is not only the season to plant very hardy trees, it is also the time to feed those which are already established and are living on too scanty an income. And how many trees are there upon lawns a...
-Chapter XIX. The Neglected American Plants
IT is an old and familiar saying that a prophet is not without honor except in his own country, and as we were making our way this spring through a dense forest in the State of New Jersey, we were tem...
-The Neglected American Plants. Continued
The native holly grows from Long Island to Florida, and is quite abundant in the woods of New Jersey, Maryland, and Virginia. It forms a shrub or small tree, varying from four to forty feet in height,...
-Chapter XX. A Word In Favor Of Evergreens
WHAT is the reason, said an intelligent European horticulturist to us lately, that the Americans employ so few evergreens in their ornamental plantations? Abroad they are the trees most sought after...
-A Word In Favor Of Evergreens. Part 2
We place the white pine, therefore, among the first in the regards of the ornamental planter. Perhaps the most popular foreign evergreen in this country is the Norway spruce. In fact it is so useful ...
-Chapter XXI. Hints On Flower Gardens
WE are once more unlocked from the chilling embraces of the Ice-King! April, full of soft airs, balm-dropping showers, and fitful gleams of sunshine, brings life and animation to the millions of embry...
-Hints On Flower Gardens. Continued
After this we would add to the effect of our selection of perpetual blooming plants, by abandoning altogether the old method of intermingling species and varieties of all colors and habits of growth, ...
-Chapter XXII. A Chapter On Roses
A FRESH bouquet of midsummer roses stands upon the table before us. The morning dew-drops hang heavy as emeralds, upon branch and buds; soft and rich colors delight the eye with their lovely hues, and...
-A Chapter On Roses. Part 2
The ambitious inhabitants of the land, watered by the Nile, have sent thee, O Caesar, the roses of winter, as a present, valuable for its novelty. But the boatman of Memphis will laugh at the gardens...
-A Chapter On Roses. Part 3
There are odd, crotchety persons among horticulturists, who correspond to old bachelors in society, that are never satisfied to love any thing in particular, because they have really no affections of ...
-A Chapter On Roses. Part 4
Half A Dozen Remontantes La Reine, deep rose, very large. Duchess of Sutherland, pale rose. Crimson Perpetual, light crimson. Aubernon, brilliant crimson. Lady Alice Peel, fine deep pink. Madam Dam...
-Chapter XXIII. A Talk With Flora And Pomona
WE beg leave to inform such of our readers as may be interested, that we have lately had the honor of a personal interview with the distinguished deities that preside over the garden and the orchard, ...
-A Talk With Flora And Pomona. Continued
These last words, we confess, startled us so much, that we opened our eyes rather widely, and called upon the name of Dr. Van Mons, the great Belgian - spoke of the gratitude of the pomological world,...
-Chapter XXIV. Influence Of Horticulture
THE multiplication of horticultural societies is taking place so rapidly of late, in various parts of the country, as to lead one to reflect somewhat on their influence, and that of the art they foste...
-Influence Of Horticulture. Continued
The condition of a western emigrant is not greatly dissimilar. That long covered wagon, which is the Noah's ark of his preservation, is also the concrete essence of house and home to him. He emigrates...
-Chapter XXV. On Feminine Taste In Rural Affairs
WHAT a very little fact sometimes betrays the national character; and what an odd thing this national character is! Look at a Frenchman. He eats, talks, lives in public. He is only happy when he has s...
-On Feminine Taste In Rural Affairs. Part 2
It may be very large, and very grand, but it is all the worse for being connected with any other room; for that destroys the privacy which an Englishman so much loves. Does any one, familiar with the...
-On Feminine Taste In Rural Affairs. Part 3
This did not finish our grand tour; for, on my return, she admitted me into her boudoir, and showed me the secrets of her own admirable housewifery, in the exact accounts which she kept of every thing...
-On Feminine Taste In Rural Affairs. Part 4
Every lady may not be born to love pigs and chickens (though that is a good thing to be born to); but, depend upon it, she has been cut off by her mother nature with less than a shilling's patrimony...
-Chapter XXVI. A Spring Gossip
IF any man feels no joy in the spring, then has he no warm blood in his veins! So said one of the old dramatists, two hundred years ago; and so we repeat his very words in this month of May, eightee...
-A Spring Gossip. Part 2
Spring, in this country, is not the tedious jade that she is in England, - keeping one waiting from February till June, while she makes her toilet, and fairly puts her foot on the daisy-spangled turf....
-Chapter XXVII. Economy In Gardening
MR. COLMAN, in his Agricultural Tour,*  remarks, that his observations abroad convinced him that the Americans are the most extravagant people in the world; and the truth of the remark is corroborated...
-Economy In Gardening. Continued
We saw a striking illustration of this lately, in the case of two neighbors, - both planting extensive orchards, and requiring, therefore, a good deal of extra labor. One of them had all the holes for...
-Chapter XXVIII. A Chapter On Lawns
LANDSCAPE GARDENING embraces, in the circle of its perfections many elements of beauty certainly not a less number than the modern chemists count as the simplest conditions of matter. But with somethi...
-A Chapter On Lawns. Continued
The most essential point being a deep soil, we need not say that in our estimation any person about to lay down a permanent lawn, whether of fifty acres or fifty feet square, must provide himself agai...
-Chapter XXIX. Treatment Of Lawns
AS a lawn is the ground-work of a landscape garden, and as the management of a dressed grass surface is still a somewhat ill-understood subject with us, some of our readers will, perhaps, be glad to r...
-Chapter XXX. Transplanting Of Trees
THERE is no subject on which the professional horticulturist is more frequently consulted in America, than transplanting trees. And, as it is an essential branch of Landscape Gardening - indeed, perha...
-Transplanting Of Trees. Part 2
Any one who is at all familiar with the growth of trees in woods or groves somewhat dense, is also aware of the great difference in the external appearance between such trees and those which stand sin...
-Transplanting Of Trees. Part 3
A little extra labor and cost expended in preparing the soil will, for a long time, secure a surprising rapidity of growth.* * Where expense is not so much an object as success, we cannot too deeply ...
-Chapter XXXI. Our Country Villages
WITHOUT any boasting it may safely be said that the natural features of our common country (as the speakers in Congress call her) are as agreeable and prepossessing as those of any other land, whether...
-Our Country Villages. Part 2
We have in a former number said something as to the practical manner in which graceless villages may be improved. We have urged the force of example in those who set about improving their own proper...
-Our Country Villages. Part 3
The indispensable desiderata in rural villages of this kind, are the following: 1st, a large open space, common, or park, situated in the middle of the village, not less than twenty acres, and better,...
-Chapter XXXII. On The Improvement Of Country Villages
IF you or any man of taste wish to have a fit of the blues let him come to the village of------. I have just settled here; and all my ideas of rural beauty have been put to flight by what I see aroun...
-On The Improvement Of Country Villages. Part 2
The next step to improve the graceless village is to persuade some of those who are erecting new buildings to adopt more tasteful models. And by this we mean not necessarily what builders call a fanc...
-On The Improvement Of Country Villages. Part 3
While we are writing this, we have received the printed report of one of these associations, The Rockingham Farmers' Club, of Exeter, New Hampshire. The whole report is so much to the point, that we r...
-Chapter XXXIII. Shade-Trees In Cities
DOWN with the ailanthus! is the cry we hear on all sides, town and country, now that this tree of heaven (as the catalogues used alluringly to call it) has penetrated all parts of the Union, and be...
-Shade-Trees In Cities. Part 2
And while in the vein, we would include in the same category another less fashionable, but still much petted foreigner, that has settled among us with a good letter of credit, but who deserves not his...
-Shade-Trees In Cities. Part 3
And whoever plants either of these three maples may feel sure that he is earning the thanks instead of the reproaches of posterity. The most beautiful and stately of all trees for an avenue - and esp...
-Chapter XXXIV. Trees In Towns And Villages
THE man who loves not trees, to look at them, to lie under them, to climb up them (once more a schoolboy), would make no bones of murdering Mrs. Jeffs. In what one imaginable attribute that it ought t...
-Trees In Towns And Villages. Part 2
In some parts of Germany the government makes it a duty for every landholder to plant trees in the highways before his property; and in a few towns that we have heard of no young bachelor can take a w...
-Trees In Towns And Villages. Part 3
It is because this principle has been, perhaps accidentally, pursued, that the villages of New England are so celebrated for their sylvan charms. The elm is, we think, nowhere seen in more majesty, gr...
-Chapter XXXV. On Planting Shade Trees
NOW that the season of the present is nearly over; now that spring with its freshness of promise, summer with its luxury of development, and autumn with its fulfilment of fruitfulness, have all laid t...
-On Planting Shade Trees. Continued
Let no person, therefore, delay planting shade trees himself, or persuading his neighbors to do the same. Wherever a village contains half a dozen persons zealous in this excellent work of adorning th...
-Chapter XXXVI. How To Popularize The Taste For Planting
HOW to popularize that taste for rural beauty which gives to every beloved home in the country its greatest outward charm and to the country itself its highest attraction is a question which must ofte...
-How To Popularize The Taste For Planting. Continued
Another season still another desirable tree or plant might be taken in hand and when ready for home planting might be scattered broadcast among those who desire to possess it, and so the labor of love...
-Chapter XXXVII. Public Cemeteries And Public Gardens
ONE of the most remarkable illustrations of the popular taste in this country is to be found in the rise and progress of our rural cemeteries. Twenty years ago nothing better than a common graveyard, ...
-Public Cemeteries And Public Gardens. Part 2
But this is not all; as if to show how far human infirmity can go, we noticed lately several lots in one of these cemeteries, not only inclosed with a most barbarous piece of irony, but the gate of wh...
-Chapter XXXVIII. The New York Park
THE leading topic of town gossip and newspaper paragraphs just now in New York is the new park proposed by Mayor Kingsland. Deluded New York has until lately contented itself with the little dooryards...
-The New York Park. Part 2
Pedestrians would find quiet and secluded walks when they wished to be solitary, and broad alleys filled with thousands of happy faces when they would be gay. The thoughtful denizen of the town would ...
-Appendix I. List Of Roses
List of Roses recommended by Prof. A. C. Beal, for New York and the Northeastern states (Bailey's Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture; V: 3009). See page 261. Hybrid Perpetual Alfred Colomb, A. K. W...
-Appendix II. Memoir
ANDREW JACKSON DOWNING was born at New-burgh, upon the Hudson, on the spot where he always lived and which he always loved more than any other, on the 30th of October, 1815. His father and mother were...
-Memoir. Part 2
Behind were the few first years of childhood, sickly, left much alone in the cottage and garden, with nothing in those around him (as he felt without knowing it) that strictly sympathized with him; an...
-Memoir. Part 3
At this time, also, the figure of Raphael Hoyle, an English landscape painter, flits across his history. Congenial in taste and feeling, and with varying knowledge, the two young men rambled together ...
-Memoir. Part 4
But, during these victorious incursions into the realms of experience, the younger partner had himself been conquered. Directly opposite the red cottage, upon the other side of the river, at Fishkill ...
-Memoir. Part 5
Whatever, therefore, leads man to assemble the comforts and elegancies of life around his habitation, tends to increase local attachments, and render domestic life more delightful; thus, not only augm...
-Memoir. Part 6
It was in May of the year 1846 that I first saw Downing. A party was made up under the locusts to cross the river and pass the day at Highland Gardens, as his place was named. The river at Newburgh ...
-Memoir. Part 7
Hence, also, the fact that his introduction to Mr. Murray was a remembered event, because the mind of the boy instantly recognized that society to which, by affinity, he belonged; and hence, also, tha...
-Memoir. Part 8
He knew perfectly well that there is a time for discords, and a place for departures from rule, and he understood them when they came, - which was peculiar and very lovely in a man of so delicate a ne...
-Memoir. Part 9
His step was so leisurely, his manner so composed, there was always such total absence of weariness in all he said and did, that it was impossible to believe he was so diligent a worker. But this com...
-Memoir. Part 10
In the dispositions of most men devoted to beauty, as artists and poets, there is a vein of languor, a leaning to luxury, of which no trace was even visible in him. His habits of life were singularly ...
-Memoir. Part 11
It was in the autumn of 1849 that Frederika Bremer came to America. She had been for several years in intimate correspondence with Mr. Downing, and was closely attracted to him by a profound sympathy ...
-Memoir. Part 12
His love of the country and faith in rural influences were too genuine for him not to be deeply interested in the improvement of cities by means of public parks and gardens. Not only for their sanitar...
-Memoir. Part 13
Among these I may mention, as among the last and finest, the summer residence of Daniel Parish, Esq., at Newport, R. I. Mr. Downing knew that Newport was the great social exchange of the country, that...
-Memoir. Part 14
The thickening smoke poured in after the crowd, who were nearly suffocated. The dense mass choked the door, and Mr. Downing's party instinctively rushed to the cabin windows to escape. They climbed t...
-Appendix III. To The Memory Of Andrew Jackson Downing By Frank A. Waugh
NEWBURGH has fine parks. It is surrounded by the most ingratiating natural landscape. In the foreground flows one of the noblest and most beautiful of all the rivers of the world. Yet for none of thes...
-To The Memory Of Andrew Jackson Downing By Frank A. Waugh. Continued
Andrew Jackson Downing must be remembered to us first of all as a nurseryman. It was in this field that his life began. In this field he learned great lessons which yielded him the most substantial an...









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