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The Gardener V3 | by William Thomson



Tips and Articles on Gardening. Articles S-Z.

TitleThe Gardener V3
AuthorWilliam Thomson
PublisherWilliam Blackwood And Sons
Year1869
Copyright1869, William Blackwood And Sons
AmazonThe New Organic Grower: A Master's Manual of Tools and Techniques for the Home and Market Gardener

A Magazine Of Horticulture And Floriculture

Edited By William Thomson, Dalkeith Gardens, Author Of 'a Practical Treatise On The Culture Of The Grape Vine'

-Sage
Common or Red Sage is the variety generally grown. It is an aromatic herb, and is used for flavouring various articles of cookery. In some countries it is used instead of tea, and also said to be smo...
-Salisburia Adiantifolia (The Maidenhair Tree)
Of this beautiful genus this is as yet the only species known to botanists. It is found abundantly not only wild, but in cultivation as an ornamental and timber tree - in many provinces in China and J...
-Salsafy And Scorzonera
Both Salsafy and Scorzonera require precisely the same treatment, consequently I have classed them together. There are few vegetables so much affected by cultivation, for better or for worse, as the...
-Sandall's Plum
This Plum was raised some 60 or 70 years since by the late Mr Sandall, a market-gardener, then living at Crabtree, Fulham. The original tree is now dead. I can vouch for the above, having lived in the...
-Sandall's Plum (A Scotch Gardener)
We cannot answer your inquiries better than by laying before you the following extract from the 'Gardener's Chronicle': - What are those beautiful black Plums which are now beginning to make their ap...
-Sandringham Sprouting Cabbage
We have just had the opportunity of testing, by cooking, the qualities of this new vegetable. It is a true hybrid, and was obtained from a cross between the Brussels Sprout and M'Ewen's dwarf Cabbage....
-Sanguinaria, Puccoon
This is a pretty genus comprising only one species. It is not uncommon in many gardens in the country, and should be more generally cultivated than even it is. It grows freely in almost any good garde...
-Saunders' Dark Wallflower
I am much disappointed with this reputed fine strain of Wallflowers. The flowers are not dark, but of a brownish orange hue, and not near so dense in colour as common strains of the Wallflower growing...
-Saxe-Gothaea Conspicua (Prince Albert's Yew)
This genus, which as yet is only represented by one species, was named in compliment to the late Prince Consort. It is a native of high mountain-ranges in Patagonia, from whence it was first sent to t...
-Saxifeaga Lowgipolia
I can quite confirm D. T.'s remarks on the above plant in your November issue, p. 508, as being the most beautiful and ornamental Saxifrage thai; we have at present. I have some plants of it on a rock...
-Saxifraga Peltata
One of the most extraordinary and distinct of its family. It produces large lobed leaves 8 inches across, attached near the centre to strong stalks 18 inches or 2 feet long, and bearing striking resem...
-Saxifragas
Saxifragas, in the mossy and silvery-leaved sections, present a rather numerous list to select from. The effect of both in winter is beautiful, especially in gardens where gravel and stone-work abound...
-Schizostylis Coccinea
This is a most useful plant when properly managed. It makes a fine show all the autumn months. Being of a bright scarlet colour, it mixes well among the Chrysanthemums; and when the spikes are cut, th...
-School-Life
Who can forget the time (I am speaking to the advanced in age) of his ancient school-life purgatory? Methinks I now see the mottled desks, rich (to the boys' eye) in carvings. Monograms, ornamental de...
-School-Life. Continued
I am rather inclined to think, however, that it was from the habit of reading much - of reading to people - and of writing out important or striking passages in a scrap-book, that I may fairly attribu...
-Sciadopitys Verticillata (The Umbrella Pine)
This genus, of which only one species is as yet known to botanists, is so named from the singular arrangement of its long leaves in regular whorls at the termination of the shoots, suggestive of the r...
-Scott's Orchardist, Or Catalogue Of Fruits. Second Edition
This is an immense descriptive catalogue of fruits cultivated by the author at Merriot Nurseries. It gives the synonyms and origin of each variety so far as known. The cultivation of each fruit is pra...
-Scottish Auboe-Ictjltural Society
The Sixteenth Annual General Meeting of this prosperous Society was held at the Craigie Hall, St Andrew Square, Edinburgh, on Wednesday, the 3d of November 1869, at 1 p.m., a large gathering of the me...
-Scottish Horticultural Association
The monthly meeting was held in the hall, 5 St Andrew Square, Edinburgh, on Tuesday evening the 3d ult. - Mr Dunn, president, in the chair. Mr L. Dow read a paper on the Kitchen-garden. After a few ...
-Scottish Horticultural Association. #2
The monthly meeting was held in the Hall, 5 St Andrew Square, Edinburgh, on Tuesday evening, the 7th ult.; Mr Dunn, President, occupied the chair. Mr John Sadler delivered a lecture on the Fungi. Th...
-Scottish Horticultural Association. #3
The monthly meeting was held on the evening of Tuesday the 4th ult., in the hall, 5 St Andrew Square, Edinburgh - Mr M. Dunn, president, occupied the chair. There was an unusually large attendance. A ...
-Scottish Horticultural Association. #4
The second annual meeting was held in the hall, 5 St Andrew Square, Edinburgh, on the evening of Tuesday the 4th ult., Mr M. Dunn, president, in the chair. After the disposal of a variety of routine b...
-Scottish Horticultural Association. #5
The first ordinary meeting of the second session was held in the Hall, 5 St Andrew Square, Edinburgh, on the evening of Tuesday the 1st ult. - Mr M. Dunn, president, in the chair. Ten new members havi...
-Scottish Horticultural Association. #6
The monthly meeting was held on the evening of Tuesday the 6th ult. - Mr M. Dunn presiding. Mr A. D. Makenzie read a paper on Economy of fuel in heating greenhouses with hot water, in which he revie...
-Scottish Horticultural Association. #7
The monthly meeting was held in the hall, 5 St Andrew Square, on the evening of Tuesday the 3d ult. - Mr Hugh Fraser, Vice-President, in the chair. After a variety of preliminary business, Mr William ...
-Scottish Horticultural Association. #8
The monthly meeting was held in the Hall, 5 St Andrew Square, Edinburgh, on Tuesday evening, the 1st ult., Mr Dunn, President, in the chair. Thirteen new members having been admitted, seven others wer...
-Scottish Horticultural Association. #9
The monthly meeting was held in the hall, 5 St Andrew Square, Edinburgh, on the evening of Tuesday, the 5th ult., Mr M. Dunn, President, in the chair. The gentlemen proposed as members at last meeting...
-Scottish Horticultural Association. #10
At the monthly meeting held in 5 St Andrew Square, Edinburgh, on the 5tb ult., Mr Dunn, president, occupied the chair. After the admission and Domination of new members, the secretary read a communica...
-Scottish Horticultural Association. #11
At the monthly meeting held in the Hall, St Andrew Square, Edinburgh, on Tuesday the 7th October, Mr Dunn, president, in the chair, there was a numerous attendance of members and others interested in ...
-Scottish Pansy Society
The twenty-fifth annual competition of the Scottish Pansy Society was held, in connection with the Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society's Show, in Edinburgh on Wednesday the 9th June, and, judging f...
-Scottish Pansy Society. #2
The twenty-sixth annual show and competition of this flourishing Society took place in one of the side-rooms of the Music Hall, Edinburgh, on Friday the 17th ult. As compared with former years, the sh...
-Scutellaria Mocciana
This is a really effective and useful accession to our list of free-flowering stove-plants, and one that should be in every collection where effective furnishing plants and cut flowers are much in dem...
-Seakale
This is about the most generally appreciated winter vegetable we possess, and forcing improves its quality. The plant thrives well on many parts of our sea-shores in pure sand, and this indicates that...
-Seakale Seedlings
I have no hesitation in saying that, under ordinary circumstances, there is no necessity whatever for growing Seakale two years before forcing; it is labour lost. Plants grown from chopped roots make ...
-Seasonable Notes Of Florist Flowers And Bedding Plants
Auriculas will again be on the move, and the first opportunity should be taken to go over the stock and surface-dress those requiring it. Young plants repotted in autumn we do not intend to surface-dr...
-Second Spring Show, April 12th And 13th
Prizes were offered on this occasion for greenhouse plants in flower, forced hardy shrubs, herbaceous plants in flower, Rhododendrons, Roses in pots, etc. As usual, the most valuable and effective col...
-Sedum
This is the most numerous genus in the hardy section of the tribe. There is a large number of the species in cultivation, but they are chiefly confined to botanic gardens, and only a few of the more c...
-Sedum Fabaria
This is one of the handsomest of the stone crops, and perfectly hardy, but very late in flowering - so late, in fact, as to be useless in cold late places, except it is assisted by a little artificial...
-Seed-Time
While this is being written, all the most important of seed orders for the garden will be in the hands of the seedsman, and busy hands are now employed late and early in wrapping up, labelling, packin...
-Seedling Heaths At Bothwell Castle
FOR many years - half a century at least - Both well Castle has been justly celebrated for a collection of well-managed Cape Heaths. For the last decade or two this beautiful genera of plants has gene...
-Seedling Pine-Apple
We recently had the pleasure of seeing eight or ten fruits of what we consider a wonderfully fine Pine-Apple at Lambton Castle gardens. It is certainly, as those of our readers who have seen it can re...
-Seedling Pine-Apples
I believe there are not many gardeners who have had much experience in raising and cultivating seedling Pine-apples. It is a subject seldom spoken of or commented upon in the horticultural press. It s...
-Seedling Tropaeolums (M. Porter)
Your seedling Tropaeolums, of the Lob-bianum section, are very pretty indeed, and show a marked advance, both in the depth of colour and size and form of the flowers, usually seen in this class. By al...
-Seeds To Be Sown In February, And How To Sow Them
Supposing the ground to be in the condition left by the winter's digging, it will require some preparation before it is fit for sowing seeds. The first caution I would give is not to tread or work it ...
-Selection Of Apples And Pears (B. J.,Frome)
The following nine varieties of dessert Apples, given in the order of their ripening, will be likely to meet your requirements: Summer Golden Pippin, Kerry Pippin, Cox's Orange Pippin, Adams's Pearmai...
-Selection Versus Collection
LAST month we advocated the growing of very limited selections instead of large collections of Apples, as being much more likely - as a general rule - to produce a greater abundance of fruit. The same...
-Sempervivum - Houseleek
This family is possessed of the strongest tenacity of life - the generic name implies that; and it is highly interesting on account of the rigidly geometric arrangement in rosettes that the leaves of ...
-Sempervivum Urbicum And S. Canariense
Although we have already and recently called attention to succulent plants, and to beds composed of them, as a most interesting and desirable feature to add to decorative gardening, we feel anxious st...
-Senecio Argenteus
From what we have already seen of this plant, we regard it as the finest silvery-foliaged plant for general usefulness outdoors that has ever been introduced. When it can be said of it that it is a ha...
-Setting Grapes
Till I had the pleasure of seeing Mr Simpson's article in the 'Gardener' of April on the Setting of Grapes and Peaches, I was under the firm conviction that keeping the vinery in a dry state during ...
-Setting Of Grapes And Peaches
Can any of your readers furnish a good reason for the necessity of keeping Vineries and Peach-houses, for instance, unusually dry while the fruit is setting; or explain how the damping of the house, o...
-Several Crops Of Melons On The Same Plant
All the Cucurbitaceae have the same habit and mode of growth; some climbing, however, but mostly trailing, gross-feeding, rapid growers, impatient of checks, or stopping in consequence, producing thei...
-Shelter
We have long had great faith in old herring-nets as shelter against winds, frosts, and animated plagues of the higher winged class. Against wasps and flies, to which we are now compelled to add hornet...
-Show Of Azaleas, Auriculas, Etc, April 19th
With the exception of Messrs Lane & Son, Great Berkhamstead, the collections of Azaleas staged for the Society's prizes were of an inferior description. In the open class for 9, in the nurserymen's cl...
-Shrubberies
Shrubs and shrubberies have become institutions as settled as they can very well be under our regime of recurring cold winters, during which the shrubs are emasculated or shortened over, or entirely c...
-Shrubs
It may be observed that many shrubs which appeared little the worse of the severe winter, are now showing signs of distress. Laurustinus, common and Portugal Laurels, are the worst we have seen. Where...
-Sites And Aspects Of Gardens
CONSIDERING that the success of garden culture so very much depends on soil and position, the choice of a site on which to make a garden is of the very first importance. The quality and supply of frui...
-Skimmia
S. Japonica and S. oblata are very useful little berried plants, and neat small bushes can be grown in small pots, and do good service in forming edgings round baskets and vases of larger plants. They...
-Small Chrysanthemums For House Furnishing
Useful as the Chrysanthemum undoubtedly is when grown into large bush specimens for conservatory embellishment, or in the various other ways in which it is trained and cultivated, there is no form in ...
-Small Pots In Forcing
The winter and early spring is, at first sight, the period of the year when the forcing gardener is most active; there is, at least, great activity in the stock-hole, and much and anxious communion wi...
-Solanum Capsicastrum
Familiar as this old plant is to most gardeners, and considering its usefulness in the winter season, it is strange to notice what reluctance is shown in private places to its culture. Perhaps it is o...
-Soldanella
Soldanella comprises a most interesting group of the smallest and most beautiful of Alpine plants. It is nearly related to Cortusa and Primula, but is easily distinguished from either by the cup-shape...
-Some Notes. " Consider The Lilies."
ONE of the first things that occurs to a would-be Lily-grower is how and where to procure bulbs. If cost is no object, he has only to write out an order for large sound bulbs from any of the numerous ...
-Some Random Thoughts About Grape-Growing
The present age, especially the period of it we have reached, is strikingly characterised by a sifting of theories, principles, and practices. What have long been held as settled truths, are passing...
-Some Random Thoughts About Grape-Growing. Continued
What I want to show is, that the balance struck between the two systems is unwarrantable, unfair, and calculated to mislead. In every one of the instances where monster Vines are held up as patterns ...
-Some Remarks On The Potato In Health And Disease
It will be remembered by those gardeners who read the 'Horticultural Transactions ' of 1828, that the President astonished the ordinary plodders in the culture of this tuber by his superior culture of...
-Something About Japan Lilies
Having in February last received a large collection of Lilies from Japan - sent home by Lieut. Woodroffe of the Royal Navy, where he had been stationed three years - I desire to give some account of m...
-Something About The Chrysanthemum
No apology is necessary for a reference to the Chrysanthemum at this season of the year. It is par excellence the popular flower of the autumn and winter months out of doors, if happily unmolested by ...
-Something About The Chrysanthemum. #2
Taking up the record of varieties from page 33, I have to say, in reference to a great many of the Anemone-flowered kinds, that though they may not find acceptance with all lovers of the Chrysanthemum...
-Something About The Chrysanthemum. #3
At the end of last November I received a note from Mr J. James, gardener to W. F. Watson, Esq., Isle worth, near London, asking me to inspect a conservatory full of Chrysanthemums, the which, though r...
-Something About The Hyacinth As A Bedding Plant
Spring flower-gardening is not attempted here to any great extent, but still some of the most prominent flower-beds are filled with bulbs in the autumn, when their summer beauty has passed away. Fore...
-Something About The Pansy
The cultivation of the Pansy has occupied the attention of florists for a considerable number of years; and, comparing the varieties now cultivated with those found in our gardens twenty years ago, th...
-Something New In Celery-Culture
There is nothing new under the sun; but anything differing from the ordinary received ideas of things is styled new. And it is in this sense that I have ventured to say that it is possible that, eve...
-Sowing Broccoli And Other Seeds
The wall-borders are very commonly utilised for raising the principal portion of Broccoli, Cauliflowers, Brussels Sprouts and other greens, and this I consider a mistake, simply because the space is m...
-Sowing Early Peas
If not already done, it is advisable that a good sowing should be made early in February. Nothing, however, will be gained by sowing early, in spite of everything - quite the reverse, as much depen...
-Spanish Or Sweet Chestnut
This variety of Nut is not grown very extensively in Britain for its fruiting qualities. It is, however, pretty generally grown as an ornamental tree. It is very pretty and very graceful, especially w...
-Special Fruit Prizes
Messrs James Veitch & Sons offer the following liberal prizes to be competed for at the Royal Horticultural Society's Gardens, at Kensington, on the date of their grand Rose show, July 2, 1873. ...
-Special Prize And Pelargonium Show, South Kensington, May 22d
Although the leading features of the show were the Zonal Pelargoniums of various sections, and the Roses which are above reported on, there was a large and very interesting display of other plants, in...
-Special Prize And Pelargonium Show, South Kensington, May 22d. Continued
This firm took the first prize with Peter Grieve, a fine habited variety, raised by Mr Peter Grieve, The Gardens, Culford Hall, Bury St Edmunds, who has not only raised some of the best kinds now in c...
-Special Prizes For Vegetables
It is gratifying to notice that an increasing interest and importance are being attached to the superior culture of vegetables. And it is high time, for certainly our horticultural societies have give...
-Spigelia Marilandica - Perennial Wormgrass
This is a lovely plant, very rare in cultivation, and difficult to keep unless the circumstances are most favourable. It is a native of moist warm woods in N. America, ranging over a considerable exte...
-Spinach
When sowing our last piece of winter Spinach, we had not enough of the Prickly to sow what ground was required, as we are expected to have it every day in the year. The ground was finished with the Ro...
-Spirea Palmata
This fine red - flowering hardy herbaceous species can scarcely be too highly commended. It forms one of the many valuable introductions from Japan made by Mr Robert Fortune; and though it had been de...
-Sports And Sporting
I am going to write a few words (as few as possible) on a subject on which I am, in common with every one else, very ignorant, and that is on sports. Sports do occur, although at extremely rare inte...
-Spring Exhibition Of The Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society
This Exhibition took place as usual in the Music Hall, George Street, Edinburgh. On the recent occasion the experiment was made of keeping the show open two days - the 29th and 30th of March - but we ...
-Spring Gardening At Birmingham
Foremost of all the illustrations of spring gardening I have been privileged to look upon this season, stands that almost unrivalled garden in the grounds of the Holte Hotel, Lower Grounds, Aston, Bir...
-Spring Gardening At Birmingham. Continued
The straight lines running from back to front, forming the divisions of this border into oblong beds, are composed of dwarf Spruce Firs, kept clipped to a minimum height of 12 inches. The outline of t...
-Standard Plants In Doors And Out
Where a choice arrangement is specially desirable with plants of fine foliage or those which flower freely, we always prefer a goodly number of standards. Extensive shubberies which we planted some ye...
-Standard-Trained Mignonette
To have nice standard-trained Mignonette necessitates some attention and care on the part of the cultivator. This is especially the case in the earlier stages of its growth, when the danger lies in th...
-Statice Profusa
The Statice family is well worthy of more attention than is generally bestowed on it. Many of the varieties are extremely useful for greenhouse and conservatory decoration during the autumn months, wh...
-Statice Profusa. Notes On Decorative Greenhouse Plants
Among flowering greenhouse-plants this Statice must take rank among the foremost, both as an ornamental plant and for the profusion and enduring quality of its flowers, as they may be said to be almos...
-Statice Rattrayana?
How often do we meet with this splendid plant in a wretched state, where it neither does credit to the grower, nor gratifies the taste of any one accustomed to behold it in a thriving condition ! Piti...
-Stephanotis Floribunda
It is not my intention to give your correspondent golden rules respecting this most useful climber, but simply to state how it has been treated here, and with what success, leaving him to judge for hi...
-Stirling Horticultural Society's Show
The Show of this Society, which was held in the show-ground of, and in connection with, the Highland and Agricultural Society of Scotland's Show, on July 26, 27, 28, and 29, was, so far as exhibits ar...
-Stirling Horticultural Society's Show. Part 2
The following gentlemen officiated as judges, and, from their well-known character, it is hardly necessary to say with acceptance : For Cut-flowers - Messrs Lewin, Drumpellier; and J. Whitton, Coltnes...
-Stirling Horticultural Society's Show. Part 3
Vegetables A Box of Vegetables, ten varieties. - 1, J. Souza; 2. W. Boss, Gartur; 3, J. Thomson. Two Cauliflowers - 1, J. Thomson; 2, W. Boss; 3, G. Dingwall. Two Early Cabbages. - 1, J. Thomson; 2...
-Stoking And Ventilating
We venture to discuss this matter more with a desire to conform to the Editor's wish, as expressed in the June number of the 'Gardener,' than with any expectation of being able to supplement his very ...
-Stone Blocks For Orchids
I am not aware that the acknowledged authorities on this beautiful family of plants, who have favoured us with a revelation of the secrets of their art in the successful culture of the various species...
-Stone Fruits And Hard Soil
It has often occurred to me, while observing the fruit trees growing on the walls of houses in many of the villages throughout England, especially in the southern districts, that the firmness of the s...
-Stonecrops (Sedums)
Stonecrops (Sedums) offer numerous green and glaucous species which are attractive during the winter, as they also are in the summer months. Amongst the best in colour and habit are - S. album, which ...
-Storrs Hall
Stores, the charming Westmoreland seat of the Rev. Thomas Staniforth, is situated about two miles south-west of Bowness, on the margin of the beautiful Lake Windermere, and is by far the most princely...
-Stove
1. Polystichum mucronatum; 2. Pteris tremula. The other Ferns we cannot recognise, being young fronds, and very much shrunk up in the carriage. 3. Too small a morsel to make out what it is, especially...
-Stove Vincas
These old inhabitants of our stoves are neglected plants in many gardens, and in the majority entirely discarded. It is to be regretted that such good and useful plants are cast aside to make room for...
-Stove-Climbers. Stephanotis Floribunda
Amongst sweet-scented flowering-plants the Stephanotis still holds a prominent position, whether for the embellishment of ladies' hair or for bouquet-making; and as a plant for the exhibition-stage it...
-Stove-Plants For Exhibition. (Dipladenias)
These climbers are among the most effective of all stove-plants when liberally treated, and are equally valuable either for exhibition purposes or for home decoration. At the Bath show of the Royal Ho...
-Stove-Plants For Exhibition. (Stephanotis Floribunda.)
This plant is one of the most beautiful of all stove-climbers, and may be taken as the type of what a decorative plant should be. It possesses a good constitution, grows freely if liberally treated, h...
-Stoves
The plants in this structure should now be in vigorous growth; and proper attention to watering, free drainage to the pots or beds where plants are turned out naturally, cleanliness from insects or di...
-Stratagem Pea
This Pea has proved a complete failure with us this season. Perhaps the cold wet season may have something to do with its failure; still other varieties - such as Ne Plus Ultra, Telephone, etc. - have...
-Strathearn Horticultural Society
The annual exhibition of this Society took place in the Masons' Hall, Crieff, on the 7th of last month, and was considered the best the Society ever held. The fruit was remarkably fine, some of the bu...
-Strawberries
In the failure in the case of our Strawberries generally this year out of doors, there will always remain something as a cause that we have not yet fathomed. We may attribute it to the soil, and we ma...
-Strawberries. #2
By the time these notes are seen in the ' Gardener,' many Strawberry-growers will be thinking more of gathering their crops than cultivating their plants; but details of the latter should closely foll...
-Strawberries All The Year
There has been much written lately about the preparation of Strawberries for forcing, both in 'The Gardener' and in the horticultural papers - some recommending exposure to all weathers, and others mo...
-Strawberries In Autumn And Winter
Perhaps there is no time in the year more suitable than the present for saying a few words about Strawberries, when the minds of all engaged in forcing this indispensable fruit will be directed to the...
-Strawberries In Pots Forcing
A number of these, according to the demand and space, should be put into heat every fortnight. Keep them near the glass, and begin with a temperature of 45 to 50 at night, increasing it to 5...
-Strawberries In Pots Forcing. #2
Strawberries in bloom are very easily injured by a high temperature from fire-heat and by cold currents of air, and both conditions must be avoided. Keep the temperature about 55 at night till th...
-Strawberries In Pots Forcing. #3
Very early plants will come into bloom this month, and if much fire-heat is used, they will not set well. 50 in cold, and 55 in mild nights, ought not to be exceeded. Do not expose the bloss...
-Strawberries In Pots Forcing. #4
Put a quantity of these in heat, according to the stock of plants and room. We prefer, for very early forcing, plants that are in 5-inch pots. If a fermenting bed of leaves in a light pit, on which th...
-Strawberry Cultivation
Sir, - Regarding your note appended to my paper in last month's 'Gardener' upon the subject of Strawberry cultivation, I beg to say that what I wrote is exactly what I was led to believe, by a convers...
-Strawberry Forcing
In some instances fruit may be sufficiently early to be colouring by the end of the month, in which cases it is necessary to keep a dry warm atmosphere, with a circulation of air to secure good flavou...
-Strawberry Forcing. #2
A word about varieties in the first place. Up till six years ago we imagined Keen's Seedling could not be surpassed for forcing purposes. At that time our experience was confined principally to Midlot...
-Strawberry Forcing. #3
If all has gone on well, these will now be an interesting crop, and one that will be most acceptable at table, as a companion dish to late Grapes and early Pine-Apples. Attend carefully to what was s...
-Strawberry Forcing. #4
I have read with great interest the valuable contribution on this subject by Mr Simpson, p. 107; and on its perusal a few thoughts naturally struck me, which I send by way of a supplement. As far as ...
-Strawberry Forcing. #5
I have read the interesting articles on the above subject in your March and April numbers, by Messrs Simpson and Cramb. I do not lay claim to near the experience of either, but, as far as mine goes, i...
-Strawberry Forcing. #6
I should not again have recurred to this subject were it not owing to certain statements made by Mr Young, of the Gardens, Wentworth, in a private letter received some weeks ago. What Mr Young has sai...
-Strawberry Forcing. - Passiflora Quadrangularis
The opinion of a gardener of Mr Cramb's reputation and experience deserves attention. I quite agree with him concerning the danger of propagating from a barren stock; but in our case I do not think th...
-Streptacarpus Biflora
The Streptacarpus biflora is one of the prettiest and most useful plants we have. The flower, which resembles the Gloxinia, is much prettier, although not affording such a variety of colour. It is far...
-Subscriber
Give your soil a good dressing of cow-manure, and if possible add some fresh heavy loam and trench the ground, mixing the manure well with it. Thus worked, we know of no reason why your soil should no...
-Subscriber, Cambridge
If your Lily of the Valley has produced foliage and no bloom, the crowns must have been too weak and immature. Grow it on carefully this season, and if the crowns and leaves are very thick in the pots...
-Subtropical Bedding In Private Gardens
The advantages to be derived from an extension of the subtropical system of bedding in private gardens, must sooner or later force its way upon the minds of those who have much experience of flower-ga...
-Succession Pines Without Bottom-Heat
It is the most usual plan in the cultivation of the Pine-apple through all its stages of growth to have it subjected more or less to bottom-heat. The practice is so general that it would lead many to ...
-Succulents
Those who have been in the habit of visiting Battersea Park, South Kensington, Kew, and other places around London, including some of the large nursery establishments, during the last two years or so,...
-Suggestions For Young Gardeners
There seems to me to be one point in the successful management of gardens too much overlooked in gardening literature generally - that is, the important part which young men play in large or moderate-...
-Summer Savory
A native of the same countries as the other. It is also used for the same purposes. It is a hardy annual, and the two are only distinguished by the names of Summer and Winter Savory in reference to th...
-Summer Spinach For Packing Purposes
Sown in the open during the hot summer months, Spinach is certain to run to seed before it is of a serviceable size. In consequence of this, although there is no great demand for it, I still consider ...
-Summer Treatment
As soon as the plants have done flowering, plunge them in some suitable material in a sheltered position, where they have the advantage of the sun at least half the day, and secure perfect drainage by...
-Summing Up
We have again arrived at the last monthly number for the year, and in summing up impressions of our magazine for the eleven months that have gone, we feel satisfied it has been a successful year, as ...
-Supply Of-Fruit And Forest Trees
The following colonial advertisement will stand comparison with that of any of our home nurserymen. Parties desirous of obtaining Fruit and Forest Trees, etc, can arrange for a supply at very modera...
-Swainsonias
As greenhouse Climbers, these are beautiful and elegant plants, and very useful for cutting, and where there is a large demand for cut-flowers, they should be grown largely. They thrive best planted o...
-Sweet Or Knotted Marjoram
This is a native of Portugal, and an annual, or is at least treated as an annual in this country. The tops are used for flavouring various dishes like the others. Like those we have already treated up...
-Symphiandra
Symphiandra is a genus of Campanulaceae, consisting, so far as is at present known, of only one species. It is simply a peculiar Campanula, and was separated from that genus on the ground of the anthe...
-Syringing Peach Trees Whew In Bloom
In the March number of the 'Gardener' for this year, D. J. says Mr Simpson of Wortley is somewhat given to startling ideas - I presume because he recommends syringing Peach-trees when in bloom. Perh...
-T. C. P. Q
Echeveria metallica can be propagated by taking off tbe lateral growths and striking them in small pots in sand. They may be placed on the shelf of a dry stove, and sparingly supplied with water. By f...
-T. F
The best way to propagate Golden pyrethrum is from seed. It is much more disposed to bloom from cuttings, and does not make such fine foliage. This is a fine plant for decorative purposes, but it is m...
-T. P
Dendrobiums should be kept drier at the root, and exposed to more light and air after they have completed their growths; and if kept in a temperature of 60, and just sufficiently watered to keep ...
-T. P. F
The Duke of Buccleuch Grape does well on its own roots; but our own experience is that the Muscat of Alexandria is the stock for both it and the Golden Champion. It does not follow that because a Vine...
-Tabernaemomtana Coronaria Flore-Pleno
As a useful flowering-plant during winter, spring, and summer, this plant should be grown where only the most limited collection of plants can be accommodated. A well-grown plant will not fail to prod...
-Table Decoration
This is a subject we have never seen touched in the ' Gardener.' There must be few gardeners who are not called on sometimes to add this to their list of duties. It is one of those which most effectua...
-Table Decorations
In treating of the above subject, my object is not so much to treat on the arrangement of what are known as the Marchian stands, as used for the dinner and exhibition tables, but simply to state what ...
-Tarragon, Perennial
An aromatic herb: a native of Siberia. It is used for flavouring various dishes. As a cheese herb, with mustard and cress, it is in request every day in the year. It requires a good deal of attention ...
-Taxus (The Yew). Notes On Hardy Conifers
Though limited to only two or three species, and even these regarded by some botanists as specifically identical, this genus is remarkably rich in distinct and useful varieties - many of them possessi...
-Tea Roses On The Back Walls Of Vineries
The great demand that now exists for cut-flowers compels gardeners to make use of all odd corners and positions under glass that are likely to be of any use in producing flowers for cutting, especiall...
-Tea Roses, Etc
The time to prune these should be the same as the others, but few of them will bear or are beautified by hard cutting. Gloire de Dijon is one of the most rampant amongst them. It is not well suited fo...
-Tea-Roses
These need only to be mentioned as being eminently adapted for the decoration of the greenhouse. For pot-culture they are invaluable, and being comparatively easy of cultivation, claim a place in the ...
-Temperature At Cluny Castle Gardens, Aberdeenshire, From May 1 To May 31, 1873
Height above sea-level, 280 feet; distance from sea, 17 miles. 1 Max. Min. May 1, ...... 60 45 2, ........ 62 ...
-Temperature For Grape-Vines During The Flowering And Other Periods Of Active Growth
Notwithstanding what has already been written and said on this subject, by men who are celebrated for the quantity and quality of their Grapes, there still exists a doubt in the minds of some Grape-gr...
-Temperature Of Forcing-Houses
In the December number of the ' Gardener' I made a few remarks on this subject. They were principally put forward in the form of queries, and in a way (I thought) so as not to hurt the prejudices of a...
-Temperature Of Forcing-Houses. Continued
It is said that in clear weather during April and May, when the Vines are growing, it is not unusual for the mercury to range between 80 and 90 in the shade at noon, and fall nearly to the f...
-Temperature Of Forcing-Houses. #2
Passing over the little satire indulged in by your correspondent J. S. at my expense, I cannot however pass without notice his dark, and, to use his own words, unscrupulous insinuations as to my fa...
-Temperature Of Forcing-Houses. #3
I RETURN to the subject once again, and with these remarks I close the discussion with D. J., on my side at least. After reading his last paper through, I am struck with its meagreness, seeing it i...
-Temperature Of Forcing-Houses. #3. Continued
The subject of experiment was our Muscat vinery. This house is worked in connection with four other houses, is heated with hot-water pipes, and the heat can be turned off by a valve in the next divisi...
-Temperature Of Forcing-Houses. #4
May I be permitted a small space to support Mr Simpson's argument on the above subject. We have a vinery here planted with different kinds of Grapes, and one end is occupied by Muscat of Alexandria: b...
-Temperatures Of Forcing-Houses
Being one of the readers of your valuable magazine, I hasten to pick up the gauntlet as thrown down by your correspondent J. S., respecting low or extreme high temperatures in early forcing-houses. A...
-Temple Gardens
In accordance with established custom, the gates of these gardens are once more thrown open to the public, and are daily thronged with thousands of visitors. The display provided by Mr Broome in the I...
-Testimonial To Mr Methven, Nurseryman, Edinburgh
A number of Mr Methven's friends connected with horticulture and arboriculture in various parts of the country, took the opportunity of their being in Edinburgh, at the spring exhibition of the Royal ...
-Testing Thermometers
The London gardening weeklies, during the late severe winter, seldom issued a copy without containing some warning, complaint, or instruction in regard to Thermometers. The low readings recorded in so...
-Tetrathica Verticillata
The Tetrathica in habit of growth very much resembles the Cape Heath, and the treatment generally given to the Heath will be found to suit it pretty well. It is a native of New Holland, and was introd...
-The "Australian Pea," Alias "Grotto's Mossy Pea"
Some sixteen or seventeen years ago, a gentleman brought some Peas from Australia, which have since that time been cultivated in a few private gardens under the designation of the Australian Pea. Thre...
-The Acacia. Notes On Decorative Greenhouse Plants
The Acacia, in its varieties, ranks amongst the most handsome and graceful, as well as most useful, of our flowering greenhouse plants. The sprays of flowers are excellent for arranging in vases, and ...
-The Adaptation And Keep Of Gardens
Last month we made some remarks on the laying out of pleasure-grounds, referring more especially to those connected with the rapidly-increasing numbers of places of moderate dimensions. We then atte...
-The Almond. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits
In a treatise upon the cultivation of hardy fruits it is necessary that all the hardy fruits known and grown - it matters not to how small an extent - should have a place. In this position stands the ...
-The Amateur's Garden
[It has been suggested to us by more than one correspondent, that we should devote a portion of each number to the more immediate requirements of our nonprofessional readers who do not employ a garden...
-The Amateur's Garden. Artichokes: Jerusalem And Globe
These are seldom or never seen in amateur's gardens, but why we do not know, except it be that very few amateurs know anything about them - and yet they are vegetables of easy cultivation, especially ...
-The Amateur's Garden. Celery And Salads Generally
Celery - Preparing The Trenches To grow Celery to perfection, rich soil is essential. Indeed Celery grows best in decayed manure, a year old or so. It is generally grown in trenches or beds sunk belo...
-The Amateur's Garden. Celery And Salads Generally. Continued
Planting Out In planting out choose a dull, showery time, if possible; otherwise do it in the evening, and shade during the day until the plants have fairly started, always watering liberally'. Lift ...
-The Amateur's Garden. Leeks, Garlic, And Other Alliaceous Plants
Leeks should be well grown or not attempted at all, for nothing is more unsatisfactory than ill-grown Leeks, while well-grown ones are invaluable to the owner of a small garden who wishes to make the ...
-The Amateur's Garden. Peas And Beans
Peas for coming in the earliest out of doors are generally sown as soon in the year as the state of the soil will admit; but in late districts, or when the soil is heavy or wet, or both, it is of litt...
-The Amateur's Garden. Potatoes
The Potatoe is decidedly the most important vegetable crop grown, and, unfortunately, the most precarious. A moderately heavy loam on a whinstone bottom is the best soil for growing Potatoes to perfec...
-The Amateur's Garden. Root Crops
Carrots These are perhaps of more value than Parsnips to the owners of small gardens, and they are more generally used. We recommend pretty much the same treatment as described for Parsnips, but the ...
-The Amateur's Garden. Salads
Lettuces Lettuces are in demand wherever they can be obtained. Their cultivation is very simple, but the way in which small growers treat them generally is not productive of fine crisp Lettuces. We r...
-The Amateur's Garden. Seeds And Seed-Sowing
It is scarcely time yet (February) for getting in the general ruck of garden seeds, though in dry warm soil many kinds may be sown, at least by the end of the month, with great propriety. Now is the t...
-The Amateur's Garden. The Cabbage Family
Next to the Potato in universal estimation stands the Cabbage, and there is good reason why this should be so. Good varieties properly grown furnish delicate, wholesome, nutritious dishes every day in...
-The Amateurs Garden
Believing that a few of the simplest directions in regard to the cultivation of small gardens will prove of use to a large and increasing number of your readers, knowing that very many of them inhabit...
-The Antirrhinum. Florist Flowers
Perhaps there are those who still question the propriety of honouring the snapdragon so much as to admit it into the order of that high-caste group designated Florist Flowers. We are perfectly well ...
-The Aphlexis. Notes On Decorative Greenhouse Plants
The Apblexis may with truth be called one of our neglected greenhouse plants, and yet as an ornamental, and more especially as an exhibition plant, it has few equals. The flowers are among what are ...
-The Apple. Fruit-Culture
The Apple is undoubtedly the most useful of fruits, hardy or otherwise, and is appreciated by old and young, rich and poor, alike. Not very many years ago our supplies were home-grown; but, like beef ...
-The Apple. Fruit-Culture. Continued
Planting The end of October is the best time of the year for planting fruit-trees. Plant only where the soil is dry. Orchard - trees on good deep soil should stand 25 feet apart after they have fully...
-The Apple. Fruit-Culture. #2
Medium Trees : Management Of The Tops Having disposed of the root-management of Apple-trees on Crab and Paradise stocks, we will now turn to the tops. As we have already indicated, we consider that t...
-The Apple. Fruit-Culture. #2. Pyramids
Many Apple-trees would naturally assume a pyramidal shape if let alone; others require a little pains in order to induce them to take on that habit. The first thing necessary in order to succeed in th...
-The Apple. Fruit-Culture. #3
Medium Trees On Medium Walls For walls which are only 8 or 10 feet high, we think what we have already called medium trees are most suitable. Trees on free stocks, especially where the soil is good a...
-The Apple. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits
The stocks to be used for grafting the Apple upon ought to be strong, vigorous, and healthy. They should be at least 1 1/2 inch or 2 inches in circumference, and those which are intended to be worked ...
-The Apple. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. #2
After the first season's growth is over there will be one, two, or three shoots upon every young Apple which has been grafted, according to the strength of the stock and the energy of the graft. It wi...
-The Apple. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. #3
I now come to speak of the diseases to which the Apple is subject in Britain; and first of all I would refer to canker. This is the greatest enemy, and perhaps the worst to master, of all the ills aga...
-The Apple. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. #4
There is a parasitic Lichen which often proves very injurious to fruit-trees in old orchards. It is generally of a lightish-grey colour, and when fully established upon the tree, gives it rather a gra...
-The Apple. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. #5
Another great enemy to the cultivation of the Apple is the Anthonymus pomorum, commonly known as the Apple weevil. This small insect, which is from one and a half to two lines in length, has often bee...
-The Apricot
Owing to the great diversity of climate and soils in this country, it is beyond my power to give advice applicable to gardens generally, as there are some species and varieties of fruits which thrive ...
-The Apricot. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits
The cultivation of this much-prized fruit does not receive the general attention that its value demands. This may in most cases be accounted for by the amount of trouble that is necessary, not only at...
-The Apricot. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. #2
The young Apricot tree, after it has attained the age of three, four, or five years, should be in a good condition for planting in a permanent position. No young tree should be so planted unless it is...
-The Apricot. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. #3
About the middle or towards the end of January, the young Apricot-tree, which has been fixed to stakes since the period of planting in autumn, may now have them removed, and, after having received the...
-The Apricot. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. #4
The Apricot, as has already been hinted, starts into activity at the earliest approach of spring, and, as a consequence of this, produces its bloom at a time when we often suffer much from sharp frost...
-The Archimedean Lawn-Mower
By way of indicating what from a trial we have found to be highly serviceable, and therefore worthy of commendation, we here present an illustration of this very useful garden requisite. For small vil...
-The Art Of Colouring Grapes
It is pitiable to see Grapes which are fine in every other way - large and regular in berry, beautiful in form, and large in size of bunch - yet lacking that all-important point of excellence, good c...
-The Art Of Skeletonising Leaves
This subject having excited a little interest amongst some horticulturists recently, I took the liberty of appealing to a lady friend who has been very successful as a skeletoniser of foliage, request...
-The Asparagus Competition
This will be held in the horticultural department of the Bath and West of England Society's Show at Tunbridge Wells, commencing on Monday, June 6th. Notice from those desiring to compete should be giv...
-The Aucuba
Another grand berried plant for winter decoration, - for many of these, besides their fine clusters of bright berries, have foliage almost equal to Crotons in richness of colouring. When grown in 6-in...
-The Auricula. Florist Flowers
Enough to fill volumes has been written concerning the cultivation of this flower, and it is not to our credit that it holds such a subordinate place in our esteem; nor are the present generation in a...
-The Auricula. Florist Flowers. #2
We shall suppose it is now November and the offsets look well, while they are comfortably staged in the winter quarters, everything having been done promotive of their general welfare as regards clean...
-The Autobiography Of A Gardener; Or, Lessons For The Young Professional
I am afraid I have undertaken a work which my limited abilities will leave but imperfectly executed. The natural question, then, will arise in the mind of the reader, Why attempt a voluntary performa...
-The Autobiography Of A Gardener; Or, Lessons For The Young Professional. Apprentice-Life
I am quite sensible of the risk I am running in attempting to depict what may be termed a one-sided view of former gardening-life - apprenticeship. But let me here say that I do not for a moment doubt...
-The Azalea. Decorative Greenhouse-Plants
The rage or fashion for fine-foliage plants, chiefly denizens of the plant-stove, which has existed for a number of years, has been the means of causing a great many of our finest greenhouse-plants, a...
-The Balsam. Notes On Decorative Greenhouse Plants
Among plants raised annually from seed, for greenhouse or conservatory decoration, the Balsam takes a prominent place as being one of the showiest grown for that purpose. True, it is not a plant very ...
-The Bedding-Out System
In the 'Gardener' for February, under the above heading, occurs the following passage from the pen of J. H., B.: - Any species or varieties, however beautiful their flowers may be, if they require...
-The Beneficial Results Of Trenching
It is well- known, or at least should be, to all gardeners, that trenching is to the soil one of the most beneficial of gardening operations. The past summer will long be remembered as one of the hot...
-The Best Potatoes
Three or four years ago, when we tried over five dozen kinds of Potatoes, we felt rather sure of getting at least one dozen really good kinds out of them; but experience proves that we have been expec...
-The Blandfordia
The Blandfordia constitutes another genus of greenhouse plants which have gone out of fashion and become neglected, and yet there is hardly any more showy plant in cultivation, or one that will better...
-The Boronia. Notes On Decorative Greenhouse Plants
The Boronias are a genus of plants some of which should be in every collection. They are very free - flowering and sweet - scented, and besides being useful for cutting and general house and conservat...
-The Brayton Vine Sport
Reference has more than once been made in ' The Gardener' to a Trebbiano Vine at Brayton Hall, Cumberland, which has for several years borne some bunches of grapes, the berries of which have been of e...
-The Calceolaria. Notes On Decorative Greenhouse Plants
No one can but admire a stage or shelf filled with the herbaceous Calceolaria when in bloom, and to see a whole house filled with them is a sight not easily forgotten. Even when a few are mixed among ...
-The Caledonian Horticultural Society's Show
This event, which causes so much interest to many gardeners, was this year conspicuous for the even quality of the Grapes shown. None of the bunches were of a large size, but the general excellence of...
-The Caledonian Horticultural Society's Show. Part 2
For eight bunches of Grapes, Mr M'Indoe was the only exhibitor; the sorts were Black Hamburg and Barbarossa, fine and good Gros Colmar, and Duke of Buccleuch. For four bunches, Mr Kirk, who made a sen...
-The Caledonian Horticultural Society's Show. Part 3
Class II. - Gardeners And Amateurs. Plants Table of Plants, 20 feet by 5 feet. - 1, A. Paul, Gilmore Place; 2, R. M. Reid, Edinburgh. Six Stove or Greenhouse Plants, in flower. - 1, J. Paterson, Mil...
-The Camellia. Notes On Decorative Greenhouse Plants
From the fact of its flowering at the time when flowers are generally scarcest, and the demand for them greatest, the Camellia, both for cut flowers and house decoration, fills a gap in a way that few...
-The Cape Heath. Notes On Decorative Greenhouse-Plants
Equal in importance to the Azalea, as a decorative plant, we must reckon the Cape Heath; and perhaps first in importance as regards details of culture. Indeed, to produce a healthy well-flowered speci...
-The Carnation
There is an apparent revival in the love for this old-fashioned florist-flower; and as the requirements of the plant are by many who wish to cultivate it only very imperfectly understood, a note on it...
-The Carnation (Dianthus Caryophyllus). Florist Flowers
The early history of this flower is shrouded in mystery, there being really no authentic record extant whereby we may be enlightened as to when, or by whom, the improved species was first introduced i...
-The Carnation (Dianthus Caryophyllus). Florist Flowers. Continued
General Culture Out Of Doors That the Carnation may grow luxuriantly it must have an aspect sheltered from cold winds, free exposure to sunlight, a rich and perfectly-drained bed, that has been previ...
-The Cherry. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits
Next in point of importance to those fruits already considered is the Cherry. Different authors have given different classifications, divisions, and subdivisions. To my mind the two best are those of ...
-The Cherry. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. #2
[Continued from page 73). The pruning and training of the Cherry are works of comparative ease - in fact, after a proper start has been made, there is less trouble with the Cherry than any other of t...
-The Cherry. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. #3
We have seen that the soil best suited to the Cherry is a good friable loam, moderately rich, neither too heavy nor too light. The Morello and Bigarreau will, however, do well in, and in fact prefer, ...
-The Chilwell Strain Of Pelargoniums
Mr J. R. Pearson of the Chilwell Nurseries, Nottingham, has made his name famous through his indefatigable and most successful efforts in producing so many new and improved varieties of Bedding Pelarg...
-The Chinese Azalea
The almost perfection of symmetry, and great brilliancy and purity of colour, to which the Chinese Azalea has been advanced, by patient breeding and high culture both in this country and on the Contin...
-The Chinese Azalea. Continued
As soon as the graft begins to grow freely, it should be stopped, and it will soon break into fresh growth with two or three shoots, which, as they make a few joints of growth, should be stopped in th...
-The Chinese Azalea. General Treatment
Although the details of what is considered the best way of propagating the Azalea were given in a former paper, the more general course in private establishments of working into a stock is to purchase...
-The Chinese Primula
The many varieties of the above make them interesting, especially when a good collection of the double sorts are grown along with the single ones. The Fern-leaved varieties, when in good health, are h...
-The Chinese Primula. #2
Perhaps amongst autumn, winter, and spring flowering plants there is none that can surpass the Primula for general usefulness, and nothing better exists for the amateur's greenhouse or as a window-pla...
-The Chinese Primula. Notes On Decorative Greenhouse Plants
Among the many useful decorative greenhouse plants, the Chinese Primula holds a prominent place; and it is indispensable among the dwarf section of flowering plants, not only on account of the time of...
-The Chorozema. Notes On Decorative Greenhouse Plants
The above genus of plants are natives of New Holland. The name is from two Greek words (choros, a dance, and zeraa, a drink), and was suggested to the discoverer by the fact that he found it growing n...
-The Chrysanthemum. Notes On Decorative Greenhouse Plants
What a blank there would be during the dull winter months in our greenhouses and conservatories, had we not this brilliant and most useful flower to fall back upon during this period of the year! Not ...
-The Cineraria. Notes On Decorative Greenhouse Plants
As a decorative plant either for house or greenhouse, or for cutting from, few plants can surpass the Cineraria. The variety and colours of the best strains of it are very beautiful, and as the time a...
-The Clianthus (Parrot's-Beak, Or Glory-Pea Of Australia)
The Clianthus is one of the most showy and most suitable plants for training up the rafter or for covering the back wall of the conservatory - especially if planted out in a suitably prepared border. ...
-The Coldness Of This Season And Next Year's Fruit - Crops
ACCORDING to the verdict of the Scottish Meteorological Society, the mean temperature of the first six months of this year has been lower by 5 than any corresponding period of any year since 1763...
-The Common Bind-Weed
I have been much struck with the wonderful wealth of flower this weed has manifested in several parts of the country during the prevalence of the drought. Very pretty, indeed, it has looked, and still...
-The Construction Of Rock-Gardens
In our last number we called the attention of our readers to Mr Robinson's interesting book on Alpine Flowers. We are now enabled to present an illustration taken from that work, bearing on the constr...
-The Culford Vine Sport
I was under the impression that the above sport had vanished. I observe, however, in 'The Gardener' for January of the present year, that it has appeared in the past season at Brayton Hall, and gath...
-The Culford Vine Spout
As many of our readers will remember, a West St Peter's Vine at Culford had a graft of Alicante put on to it, the branches of the latter variety being again furnished with grafts or inarches of, among...
-The Cultivation Of Clematis
Without doubt the varieties of Clematis have risen of late years to a very high degree of excellence, and we know of no other plants that can be used for such a variety of purposes, and none is more w...
-The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits
Having thus far detailed our experience upon the Pear, and having given what directions and instructions concerning its cultivation we deemed to be the best, it is now our intention to direct the read...
-The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. Concluding Chapter
Having regularly addressed the readers of the 'Gardener' from month to month upon the cultivation of hardy fruits for the last three years, I now lift my pen for the last time upon the subject, and wo...
-The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. Concluding Chapter. Continued
Another thing of great importance to know and understand is, in what position the workman ought to place himself at the work. Let us start with a tree which is in position against the wall, and only r...
-The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. Introduction
To whatever department of the economy of nature we turn our attention, having for our object the study of the various means by which we may obtain a desired end, there are difficulties to be overcome,...
-The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. Introduction. Part 2
This operation finished, the operator has years of anxiety before him ere the fruits of his labours will prove themselves good or bad. Notwithstanding, he will watch every stage from the present time ...
-The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. Introduction. Part 3
Although it has been said that this stock is short-lived if used for the Pear, yet nevertheless it is not so much so as most people are led to believe, if care and skill are exercised in the managemen...
-The Cultivation Of The Soil
In new gardens the soil is very often of a poor description, and in order to grow the finest vegetables to the greatest perfection,' it is imperative that means be taken to put it into good condition....
-The Culture Of Gold And Bronze And Variegated Zonal (Tricolor) Pelargoniums
As the winter approaches, bright colours seem to become more bright, and certainly more attractive and valuable, as leaden skies and dull days prevail. With the decline of flowers comes the necessity ...
-The Culture Of Hardy And Half-Hardy Orchids
It has often occurred to me that these plants should be more generally cultivated than is at present the case, more especially as many of them are, when well grown, scarcely less beautiful than the mo...
-The Culture Of Pitcher-Plants. (Cephalotus, Darlington Ia, Sarracenia.)
We have here a very interesting group of dwarf Pitcher-plants, most of the species being natives of temperate habitats, and consequently all the more valuable from the fact that they are easily cultiv...
-The Culture Of Pitcher-Plants. (Nepenthes)
THERE are few plants which interest ordinary observers more than these, when well grown; and like Orchids among flowering plants, they, when bearing well-developed pitchers, give a superior tone to th...
-The Culture Of Pitcher-Plants. (Nepenthes). #2
An erroneous idea seems to have sained ground with horticulturists generally - viz., that Nepenthes are very difficult plants to cultivate satisfactorily; hence we find gardeners as a rule set their f...
-The Culture Of Poinsettia Pulcherrima
As in page 43 of the present volume of the 'Gardener' you were led to speak in terms of high approval of the Poinsettias exhibited at the Liverpool Chrysanthemum Show in November last, it may perhaps ...
-The Culture Of The Rose In Pots
The Rose is always beautiful, at whatever season of the year it can be had in bloom, but especially so in the early spring months, when in the open air can only be found such things as the modest Acon...
-The Cyclamen
It has been to me a matter of astonishment that this by far the most beautiful of winter flowering-plants should not be more generally cultivated. I have grown it successfully for some years with less...
-The Cyclamen. #2
There is nothing better adapted for conservatory decoration, from the present time till late in spring, than the Cyclamen. Some years ago it was a badly-used plant, placed in out-of-the-way places, wh...
-The Cyclamen. Notes On Decorative Greenhouse Plants
What a treasure we have in the Cyclamen as a spring-flowering plant! The handsome form of its flowers, the variety of its colours, the beauty of its foliage, and its free flowering, as well as the end...
-The Dahlia. Florist Flowers
Amongst florist flowers none maintains a more eminent standing in public regard than the Dahlia. Looking at it in every enjoyable aspect, it is certainly worthy of the high esteem in which it is held....
-The Dahlia. Florist Flowers. Continued
General Management The Dahlia delights in rich and abundant feeding, coupled with a bed of deep rather light soil, properly drained. Rotten old turf is the best of soils for the Dahlia, adding, of co...
-The Destruction Of Ants
In the last month's issue of the 'Gardener' a correspondent wished to know the most effectual means of destroying ants. Though I will not say that what I am going to recommend is the most effectual me...
-The Drainage Of Pots, Etc
Probably, of all other professions, that of the gardener has most to do with necessary evils, which are ever the cause of anxiety and trouble to him, from the time he gets up in the morning till he la...
-The Drought
The following extract from 'Land and Water' will give our northern readers, who appear to have been blessed with an abundance of rain, some idea of the effect of the drought down south. Up to this t...
-The Dundee Horticultural Society
The Autumn Show of this Society took place in the Baxter Park on the second of last month. This Society is famous for the patronage it extends to Ferns, and the result on the recent occasion was a sp...
-The Education Of Gardeners
As you invite correspondence on this vexed question, allow me to offer a few remarks on the paper of A. W. in the 'Gardener' for March. Although I do not profess to attempt the solution of this ques...
-The Education Of Gardeners. #2
As one of the rising generation, I feel that it is my clear duty to write and thank Mr David Thomson for making known his views on so important a subject as that of education for those who devote thei...
-The Education Of Gardeners. #3
Sir, - A vast amount of misunderstanding prevails respecting the object which the Society of Arts has in view in getting up examinations on horticulture; and with your permission I shall endeavour to ...
-The Education Of Gardeners. #4
Let us see what One in despair puts forth to show that education is of little benefit to a gardener. 1. He served his apprenticeship at a nobleman's place, where there were twenty men employed. 2...
-The Education Of Gardeners. #5
THIS is a subject that has come prominently before the readers of the ' Gardener' since its first publication in 1867. The course of examinations instituted by the Royal Horticultural Society and the ...
-The Education Of Gardeners. #6
Allow me to correct what seems to be a glaring error into which Down South appears to have fallen in his statement of the case of One in Despair. The latter did not give any intelligent reader r...
-The Education Of Gardeners. #7
During 1869, much was said in the pages of the 'Gardener' about the education of young gardeners. Those specially interested are much indebted to Mr David Thomson, The Squire's Gardener, and other c...
-The Education Question
We have read with sympathetic interest the clever and suggestive papers discussing this subject in these pages for some months back, and we are anxious to see the Editor's final remarks on the subject...
-The Electric Light As Applied To Horticulture At Sherwood, Pembury Road, Tunbridge Wells
SUCH of your readers as may have seen the observations made by me in your number for July 1880, and felt any further interest in the question, will probably be expecting to hear whether any progress h...
-The Eriostemon. Notes On Decorative Greenhouse Plants
The Eriostemons are all natives of New Holland, and are among the finest and best of our hard-wooded greenhouse plants. They are mostly compact-growing evergreen shrubs, and are very free-flowering. T...
-The Failure Of The Peach Crop Of 1869
The almost universal failure of the Peach crop this season is not by any means easily accounted for; it may be said to be unprecedented. I am aware that there have been seasons, in particular district...
-The Fates Of Fruit-Trees
The leading gardeners of this country have never given the orchard-house system of growing fruit-trees more than a very lukewarm advocacy, perhaps partly because it does not fill the fruit-room, and p...
-The Fern World
By Francis George Heath. Sampson Low & Co., London. We have already noticed this interesting and instructive volume. The work is well calculated to accomplish the end the author has in view - namely,...
-The Fig. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits
It may be doubted by some whether I am justified in calling the Fig a hardy fruit, seeing that it cannot with safety be allowed to stand over the winter in our northern latitudes without protection of...
-The Fig. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. #2
There are few, if any, of our fruit-trees about which cultivators are so much divided regarding their pruning and training as the Fig. In looking over the pages of several of our best horticultural wr...
-The Filbert
The Filbert, which is just the common Hazel-Nut of the woods in a cultivated state, is not in very general cultivation throughout Britain, although it has been indigenous therein for a very long perio...
-The Floral Fete In The Baxter Park, Dundee
Saturday being the cheap and last day, the attendance was enormous. Besides the members and their friends who passed free, there were 850 passed the pay-gates at 6d. each betwixt ten and three. From t...
-The Flower-Garden
Owing to the exceptionally late and cold season, many gardeners will be unwilling to fill the flower-beds under their charge as early this year as usual. As a matter of fact, most of the subjects plan...
-The Flower-Garden. #2
With August returns the season for propagating the stock of bedding-plants for next year's requirements, but this season it will be a simple impossibility to obtain cuttings from Geraniums so early wi...
-The Flower-Garden. #3
The past season has been from beginning to end unsatisfactory in every sense, those flowers which have thriven under the continued attentions of Jupiter Pluvius having been very few indeed. Of these, ...
-The Flower-Garden. #4
The end of this month should see all hardy bedders into their places. It is better for the plants to have them established early; and it is easier to manage than to leave all plants, irrespective of h...
-The Flower-Garden. #5
Old-fashioned flower-gardens will again be either filled, or all but filled, with their summer or autumn occupants. Plants such as Geraniums, Lobelias, Ageratums, make the most satisfactory progress h...
-The Flower-Garden. - A Review, With Suggestions
In those gardens where the old-fashioned style of bedding alone is carried out, the season just past will have been a rather disappointing one. In our own case we planted out extra-strong flowering pl...
-The Food Journal For October
The continuation of the papers on Tea in this number furnishes some interesting and even startling information as to the adulteration of this favourite article of food. Tea is both adulterated by th...
-The Fruit-Garden. No. I
What are called the small fruits are of greater value to persons with very small gardens than are such fruits as Apples and Pears; and with such, a good supply for dessert, for cooking, and for preser...
-The Fruit-Garden. No. II. The Grape Vine
If there is to be an inside border, you will require to build up pillars from the bottom on which to rest your flue - for we advise you to build a flue so that you may apply a little fire-heat when ne...
-The Fruit-Garden. No. III. - The Grape Vine
If all goes well, these shoots will soon push out, and after a short time will grow rapidly, and should reach the top of your house by midsummer, when their tops should be broken or pinched off. Side ...
-The Fruit-Garden. No. IV. - The Grape Vine
Seeing that you have a good aspect, it would not be advisable to start your Vines into growth too early. March is a good time. Do not run up a great heat all of a sudden whenever you see the buds push...
-The Fuchsia For, Bedding Purposes
The Fuchsia is seldom used for this purpose, and I cannot think why, as it is a handsome plant, and one easily grown. For bedding in masses, or along with Calceolarias or similar plants, spring-struck...
-The Fuchsia. Notes On Decorative Greenhouse Plants
The Fuchsia, like the Pelargonium, may be called everybody's flower. Cottagers of every degree who have any love for flowers always endeavour to have a Fuchsia or two. We have seen them in cottagers' ...
-The Furnishing Of Borders Of Mixed Hardy Flowers
Though the 'Gardener' has kept to the front in giving practical information on hardy flowers, and the different ways they may be employed with the best effect, yet there are always readers who desire ...
-The Future Of The Royal Horticultural Society
There now seems every probability of the Kensington Garden being doomed; and this is a subject rather for congratulation than complaint, since it has been a stumbling-block to the Society since its fi...
-The Garden Oracle
Edited by Shirley Hibbert, F.H.S. Published at the 'Gardener's Magazine' Office, 11 Ave Maria Lane. This Annual is as interesting and useful as ever. It contains numerous tables calculated to be of s...
-The Gardener's Primer
The object of the following remarks is to endeavour to give to the young gardener some insight into the nature of the subject in pursuit of which he has cast his lot, and is not intended in any way to...
-The Gardener's Primer, No. II
All plants may be said to have had a natural habitat originally determined for them at the different geological epochs of time at which vegetation in some form or other may be supposed to have commenc...
-The Gardener's Primer. No. III
A practical acquaintance with the roots of different trees and shrubs will soon teach the gardener how to discriminate their distinctive characteristics of growth and smell, so as readily to distingui...
-The Gardener's Primer. No. V
This power of decomposing carbon dioxide (carbonic acid), and of decomposing ammonia into hydrogen and nitrogen, and water into hydrogen and oxygen, and of recombining, solidifying, and utilising thes...
-The Gardener's Primer. No. VI
So amenable are leaf-buds on stems to scientific treatment, that buds apparently dormant may be started, and set in motion, and become branches, by the simple plan, in the month of February, of cuttin...
-The Gardener's Primer. No. VI. Continued
These ovules are regarded as buds formed in the axils of carpellary leaves, and are the seeds, sometimes called seed-buds. The structure of the style (not always present), and the divisions of the ova...
-The Gardener's Primer. No. VII
Many opportunities will occur to the young gardener (his life will be made up of opportunites) of studying the characteristics of Fruit-trees, especially Apple and Pear trees, in different stages of g...
-The Gardener's Primer. No. VII. Continued
There is another kind of trenching often practised, called bastard-trenching, which is digging one spit deep and taking out the loose crumbs (as the loose mould at the bottom of the trench is called),...
-The Gardener's Year-Book
By Robert Hogg, LL.D., F.L.S., etc. 'Journal of Horticulture' Office, 171 Fleet Street. Another well-known and much-appreciated Annual, containing a great many useful tables, an almanac, a comprehens...
-The Gardener. January 1869. To Our Readers
ON making our appearance before you on this the first day of a new year, we wish you the usual compliments of the season. At the same time, we feel that you are entitled to more than this at our hands...
-The Gardener. January 1870. To Our Readers
THE nature of the new arrangements which have been made in regard to the editorial management of the 'Gardener' was shadowed forth in the November issue. With the present number commences that joint o...
-The Gardener. January 1871. The Gardener
There is reason to suspect that they who are appointed to, and undertake a share in, the direction and guidance of the public mind, do not estimate their position aright if they do not feel that the...
-The Gardener. January 1873. Phylloxera Vastatrix
HORTICULTURISTS have within the last few years had a most formidable addition to the host of foes with which they have to grapple in the successful cultivation of the Grape-Vine. And it is scarcely po...
-The Gardener. January 1873. Phylloxera Vastatrix. Continued
As time went on, galls were discovered on the under sides of the leaves at the affected end of the vinery, and this soon revealed the foe that had been carrying on its work of destruction in ambush at...
-The Gardener. January 1879. Our Supply Of Apples And Pears
IT is the opinion of some, that the production of Apples and Pears in the United Kingdom has ceased to be a matter of much importance, now that the Americans can pour these fruits into our markets and...
-The Gardener. January 1881. Orchid-Culture
THE culture of Orchids is every day becoming more and more popular, and in many cases, we may add, more and more successful. Yet there is still remaining in numerous instances ample room for further i...
-The Gardeners Primer. No. IV
It is in the mode of arrangement of the vascular tissue that the difference between the stems of monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants depends, and which has given rise to the use of the words e...
-The Gardeners' Benevolent Institution
The Managing Committee of this excellent Institution have resolved to make an effort to raise the pensioners' allowances from 16 and 12 to 20 and 16 per annum to male and female pensioners respect...
-The Gardeners' Year-Book And Almanack For 1879
By Dr Robert Hogg, LL.D., 171 Fleet Street, London. This welcome little annual is, as usual, replete with useful information. In addition to a very excellent practical calendar of garden operations f...
-The Gayest Of American Wild-Flowers
I am going to write an account of the members of the American Flora which are famous for beauty and fit for British gardens. At the present time, when herbaceous and alpine plants are fast becoming fa...
-The Gayest Of American Wild-Flowers. No. II
It is important to note the readiness with which many plants in a state of nature adapt themselves to altered circumstances, and on the other hand there are not a few kinds which perish when subjected...
-The Getting Up Of Zonal Pelargoniums For Exhibition
Years ago, when one saw in a schedule of prizes a class for three, or four, or six Scarlet Geraniums, the intending exhibitor had no difficulty in understanding what was required, for at that time t...
-The Getting Up Of Zonal Pelargoniums For Exhibition. Continued
When the plants are thus potted, and especially potted low down, an open situation in the garden is selected that is convenient for watering. A good hard and level bottom should be secured, or, if sof...
-The Gladiolus
The Gladiolus is now fully established as one of our most prized autumnal flowers. Its colours, many-hued and glorious, its stately spike of bloom, and the simplicity of its culture, combine to make i...
-The Gladiolus. Continued
A plant thus affected may flower, but after that it should be thrown away without compunction. No one understands the cause of this fell disease, and it is the more mysterious, seeing that from the sa...
-The Gladiolus. #2
As a warm lover of this beautiful autumnal flower, and as one of those who have written something about it, I should like to say a few words on the paper by Mr Morris in your last number, inasmuch as ...
-The Gladiolus. #3
Hybrids of Gandavensis must be classed amongst the very foremost of autumn flowers, and we ought not to forget that we are indebted for nearly all of those beautiful varieties to our neighbours across...
-The Glasgow And West Of Scotland Horticultural Society
This Society held its autumn exhibition in the City Hall on September 6 th, and it was one of the best shows ever held in the West of Scotland. Both plants, cut flowers, and fruit were numerous and fi...
-The Globe Artichoke
This vegetable, though seldom or never met with in the gardens of cottagers, is one that is very much esteemed at the tables of the wealthy. It is supposed to be a native of the countries which surrou...
-The Goat Moth Caterpillar
Just six months since I obtained a caterpillar form of this fine moth (Cossus liquiperda). It was of great size, being 4 inches in length, and as large round as the small finger of a moderate-sized ha...
-The Gooseberry. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits
The Gooseberry is perhaps the most popular of all our hardy fruits. It is in every sense of the word the poor man's fruit, as it finds a place in every garden, no matter how small. The poor man rejoic...
-The Gooseberry. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. Continued
The cutting will have made from three to five shoots, according to circumstances, the first year; these at pruning-time ought to be cut back pretty near home, when during the following year they will ...
-The Grape Vine
With two exceptions the Grape Vine (Vitis vinifera) is the earliest fruit-bearing plant of which there is any record. From earliest ages it has occupied a prominent and very important position amongst...
-The Grape Vine. Continued
The Grape Vine #1 It is only in the most favoured spots of these islands that Grapes of any kind can be grown, of even tolerable excellence, out of doors. Glass houses and artificial temperatures are...
-The Grape Vine. Fruit-Culture
In this paper we propose to point out a few of the errors into which amateur Grape-growers especially are prone to fall, though these errors are by no means confined to them. Prominent amongst these i...
-The Grape Vine. Vinery For Late Grapes
Having shown that a lean-to vinery facing due south is the best form for early forcing, under this head I have no hesitation in saying that for the same reasons that I have recommended the lean-to for...
-The Grape-Vine Controversy
Mr Simpson has raised a controversy in regard to low night-temperature in the cultivation of the Grape-Vine, which it is desirable should be discussed in all its bearings, in order to discover whether...
-The Grape-Vine Controversy. Low Temperatures For Setting Muscat Grapes
It is well the author of the leader in last month's 'Gardener' has laid so lucidly before the readers of this journal the true bearings of low night and high day temperature on the setting of Grap...
-The Grape-Vine Discussion
As a gardener who has worked Grapes on the low night-temperature system, you will perhaps allow me to say something on the subject, as opened up by Mr Simpson in last month's 'Gardener,' I have before...
-The Grapes At Ernespie, Near, Castle Douglas
Many of your readers will remember that Mr Kirk, gardener, Ernes-pie, carried away first honours for the best eight varieties of Grapes at the September show of the Royal Caledonian Society's meeting ...
-The Great Vine At Harewood
I saw this fine old veteran about the end of November, and as some particulars about it may be interesting to your readers, I may say a few words about it. The Vine is a Muscat of Alexandria, though I...
-The Hale Farm Nurseries, Tottenham
Having a deep interest in herbaceous and Alpine plants, we embraced the opportunity afforded by a short midsummer visit to London of gratifying a long-cherished desire to spend a few hours in Mr Thoma...
-The Hamburg International Horticultural Exhibition
For this event great preparations were made. 16,000 was spent in laying out splendid grounds and making suitable erections for the occasion. Committees were appointed in every nation in Europe, and e...
-The Hardy Primrose
The Primrose requires the same cultural routine as that advised for the Polyanthus, and there are many choice varieties worthy of careful cultivation, their habits being both dissimilar and characteri...
-The Heating Of Horticultural Structures. Stoking
There are few subjects of importance to gardeners that are not discussed in the pages of the 'Gardener' by thoroughly practical men, and it cannot be said that the heating of our horticultural structu...
-The Heliotrope
This is another indispensable plant for cutting from in winter, and we prefer Standards, for, when fairly established, they require no tying: on stems 30 inches high, and with heads 4 feet through, th...
-The Herb Border
Is not generally neglected in a well-conducted establishment, but in many places it is not dignified with a remarkable share of attention, for what reason I cannot tell; for the want of some particula...
-The Herbaceous Calceolaria
This valuable greenhouse plant is one of those things which, though of easy cultivation, is nevertheless often to be seen in anything but first-rate condition. Its roots delight in a cool and moist co...
-The Herbaceous Plant Controversy
For some time our contemporary, the 'Garden,' has been endeavouring to make it appear that we are opposing its pet branch of gardening - the culture of herbaceous plants; and, as our readers are aware...
-The Herbaceous Plant Controversy. Part 2
We have now to congratulate our contemporary on its apparent promise to leave off personalities and straighten itself up from violent attitudes in dealing with its critics, for only a few months ...
-The Herbaceous Plant Controversy. Part 3
In the 'Gardener' of November last we applied remarks to the same effect: Whatever is worth doing is worth doing well; and it may be taken for granted that no one with any sense of good culture and o...
-The Herbaceous Plant Controversy. Part 4
We have no greater desire, in order to show how thoroughly unfair is our critic's way of misquoting us, and how low is the line of conduct adopted by him, than that those who possess our ' Handy Book ...
-The Herefordshire Pomona
Edited by Robert Hogg, LL.D., F.L.S. London: David Bogue, 3 St Martin's Place; Hereford: Jakeman & Carner. The second part of this magnificent work more than maintains its high-class art in the splen...
-The Herefordshire Pomona, Part IV
London : David Bogue, 3 St Mark's Place, Trafalgar Square. Hereford: Lakeman & Carver, High Town. This Part of this magnificent work follows up and completes the practical treatise on the Orchard and...
-The Hollyhock
Any one who has a stock of Hollyhocks should now propagate as many as he can. If the old stock plants had been lifted in the early part of winter, potted and placed where a little growth has been made...
-The Hollyhock. Florist Flowers
The Hollyhock - a native of China - was introduced into European gardens three hundred years ago. In our short recollection, with few exceptions, the flowers produced from seed were nothing superior t...
-The Hyacinth (Hyacinthus Orientalis). Florist Flowers
The Hyacinth is a native of the Levant, an old and valued inmate of British gardens, and was cultivated in the time of Gerrard at the end of the sixteenth century. Gerrard mentions the single and doub...
-The Hyacinth (Hyacinthus Orientalis). Florist Flowers. Continued
The following varieties are to be preferred for early forcing to numerous others that force indifferently: Homerus, single pink; La Preciosa, single white; Grand Vainqueur, single rose pink; Regulus, ...
-The Hydrangea As A Decorative Plant
The common Hydrangea hortensis is perfectly hardy in the south of England, the Isle of Man, and other parts of the British dominions; but it is as a pot-plant that we would here allude to its excellen...
-The Importance Of Deep Drainage
In a letter last month, you discussed the subject of the situation of a garden; a few words on the great importance of thorough drainage may not be amiss as a sequel. Having selected your site for a g...
-The Importance Of Mulching
Never before so much as during last summer was I convinced of the beneficial results of mulching. A number of strong plants of Cauliflowers were turned out in April, and, as many will remember, a time...
-The Importance of Root-Inspection
Our fickle climate, great rainfall, and late severity of winters, all tend to make our subject one of pressing importance. More especially do we need to look to the roots of fruit-trees cultivated und...
-The Jerusalem Artichoke
This is, to the uninitiated, a most uncouth and uninviting-looking vegetable; but it is wonderful how palatable and tempting-like a good kitchen artist can make it before he passes it up-stairs. Seein...
-The Kitchen-Garden. No. I
It may possibly appear to some a work of supererogation to write a systematic series of articles on kitclien-gardening at this advanced period in the history of horticulture. And while confessing that...
-The Kitchen-Garden. No. II. Asparagus
For making a permanent plantation of Asparagus, the deepest, and, generally speaking, the lightest, soil in the garden should be chosen. A deep sandy loam is the best. Thorough drainage is a matter of...
-The Kitchen-Garden. No. II. Asparagus. Continued
The planting should never be performed when the ground is wet; and it is much better to wait for a dry time, even if the plants should shoot a few inches, than to work the ground as has been described...
-The Kitchen-Garden. No. IV. Cauliflower
The celebrated Dr Johnson used to say that of all the flowers in the garden the Cauliflower was the best. Perhaps among the many strong prejudices which had a place in the rugged but powerful mind of ...
-The Kitchen-Garden. No. IV. Cauliflower. Part 2
If more have been wintered in the hand-glasses than can be left to come to maturity, they should be removed by the middle of March. If the handglasses are of the largest sizes, one plant in each corne...
-The Kitchen-Garden. No. IV. Cauliflower. Part 3
Four-inch pots are large enough for the strongest plants, while the smallest may have a size less. The soil should be rich, such as old Melon-bed loam and well-rotted leaf-mould in equal proportions, ...
-The Kitchen-Garden. No. IX. Parsley
Parsley is of such ancient culture in this country that, so far as I am aware, the period of its introduction cannot be correctly assigned. It is said to be a native of Sardinia, and to have been intr...
-The Kitchen-Garden. No. V. Lettuce
To be able to supply well-blanched and crisp sweet Lettuce nearly every week in the year, requires a considerable amount of forethought and attention, and is a result very much valued and relished by ...
-The Kitchen-Garden. No. VI. Onions
THE Onion is referred to as a popular vegetable at a very early-period of the world's history; and it is perhaps a vegetable that is more universally cultivated than any other that is embraced in gard...
-The Kitchen-Garden. No. VI. Onions. Continued
The more room within a certain limit, of course, the larger the bulbs produced, and vice versa. The two systems by which the seed is put in the ground - the drills, and broadcast in beds - have each ...
-The Kitchen-Garden. No. VII. The Parsnip
The Parsnip is a native of Britain, and is most frequently to be found in its wild state growing in loamy soils by the waysides in England. In its wild state the roots are generally small, forked, tou...
-The Kitchen-Garden. No. VIII. Potato Culture
Had any one foretold that a small tuber occupying an insignificant space - and scarcely, if at all, used for human food - in the newly-discovered regions of South America, should become in the compara...
-The Kitchen-Garden. No. VIII. Potato Culture. Continued
To succeed the crops in pots and frames, a quantity should be started either singly in small pots or in boxes, and planted out in some warm sheltered spot about the middle of April. They may be 3 to 4...
-The Kitchen-Garden. No. X. Seakale
Seakale is one of our own native plants. It is to be found in many parts of England, Scotland, and the Isles, growing in sandy places close to the sea. It is about 100 years since it first made its ap...
-The Kitchen-Garden. No. XI. Spinach
To supply Spinach in first-rate condition all the year round is not always an easy matter, especially in dry hot localities and in poor sandy soils. At the same time it is a vegetable which is almost ...
-The Lambton Bunch Of Grapes
We have much pleasure in being able to give an illustration of the very remarkable bunch of Black Hamburg Grapes which Mr Hunter, gardener to the Earl of Durham at Lambton Castle, exhibited at the Man...
-The Large Flowering Or Show Pelargoniums
A look through the collections of Show Pelargoniums when in bloom in the month of June gave the following as a selection of twenty-four fine varieties of great usefulness, whether for the decoration o...
-The Large Vine At Speddock, Dumfriesshire
At Speddock, near Dumfries, there is a very remarkable specimen of the Black Hamburg Vine. It is distinguished for its size, but not more so than for the splendid Grapes it bears annually. As far as w...
-The Late Severe Winter And A Few Of Its Lessons
THE past winter, and some of the lessons it has been calculated to teach horticulturists, will long be remembered. In some districts, and probably in the south-west of Scotland in particular, there is...
-The Late Winter
There seems some incongruity in writing on such a subject at this time, but when we see 5 of frost registered on a morning in June, as we have this morning (10th), it is rather apt to set us pond...
-The Laurestinus
This is a very useful plant when there is a great quantity of cut flowers required; and to have it in flower at Christmas, and standing in the conservatory among other things, it has a good effect. It...
-The Luton Hoo Cucumber
Amongst the many new varieties recently introduced, I undoubtedly consider the Luton Hoo to be the nearest approach to perfection; far surpassing either Marquis of Lome, Blue Gown, or any of the other...
-The Manchester Exhibition Of The Royal Horticultural Society
On the 19th of July, Manchester was the great centre towards which horticulturists tended from all parts of the United Kingdorn - for Scotland, Ireland, and Wales had its representatives there. This a...
-The Manchester International Exhibition
International Exhibition of Fruits, Vegetables, and Flowers, in connection with the Manchester Botanical Society, September 3d, 4th, 5th, and 6th. - We have before us the schedule of prizes which are ...
-The Manchester International Fruit Show
This meeting was looked forward to with high expectations. It has come and gone, and Horticulturists have every reason to be satisfied with the result. The Council of the Manchester Botanical Society ...
-The Manchester International Horticultural Exhibition. August 24-27
It was generally anticipated that a grand display of plants, fruits, and vegetables would be brought together in response to the liberal schedule of prizes offered by the council of the Manchester Roy...
-The Manchester International Horticultural Exhibition. August 24-27. Part 2
The second prizes in the two latter classes were well won by Mr J. Morton, Chorlton-cum-Hardy. Six competed for the prize offered for the best seedling Grape; a promising white variety, said to be the...
-The Manchester International Horticultural Exhibition. August 24-27. Part 3
Mr Wildsmith had good Schoolmaster Potatoes, Improved Reading Onions, Exhibition Sprouts, and Snowball Turnips. About the same number competed for Messrs Dicksons' & Robinson's prizes, the best collec...
-The Medlar
The Medlar is another of those fruits not very generally cultivated, and not very popular, except with those who have acquired a taste for it. It is of a peculiar habit of growth - very twisting and s...
-The Mulberry
A Subscriber in last month's ' Gardener' wishes for information as to propagating the Mulberry; and why cuttings, which were taken from a fruit-bearing tree, and struck thirty or forty years ago, do...
-The Mulberry. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits
Although there are several varieties of this excellent yet much-neglected fruit, the only one, so far as we are aware, which is in general cultivation in Britain, is the Morus nigra or black Mulberry....
-The Muscat Hamburgh Grape. A Remonstrance
If the natural sweetness of my disposition did not restrain my vindictive feelings, I should certainly enter an action against you for defamation of character, for in page 96 of the 'Gardener' you hav...
-The New Bamboo Shading
The New Plant and Bulb Company, of Lion Walk, Colchester, have sent us the accompanying illustration and description of a new shading for hothouses which they have brought out. We think very highly of...
-The Newark Gooseberry-Show
This exhibition was held at the Robin Hood Inn, Newark, on the 1st of August, and judging from the weight of some of the fruits staged on this occasion, they must have been very fine. Our readers not ...
-The One Hard-House (By Thomas Rivers). Sixteenth Edition
Edited and arranged by T. Francis Rivers. Longmans & Co. When a work has reached its sixteenth edition, it seems almost superfluous to notice it. It is well known that the author of this work, the la...
-The One-Shift System In Potting Pines
Is it necessary to pot Pine suckers into small pots when taken from the old plants, shifting them on as required until the size is gained in which it is intended to fruit them? One thing in favour of ...
-The Orchard-House At Chiswick
This house is just now an object of considerable interest to fruit-cultivators, and its condition demands that a notice of it should be given in this form. It stands like an oasis amid the dismantled ...
-The Parsnip
To obtain good Parsnips the seed requires to be sown as soon in the year as the soil is in good working order. We generally manage to get ours in some time in February, and never later than the middle...
-The Peach And Nectarine
These two fruits are classed together. They not only belong to the same genus (Amygdalus), but the same species (persica) includes them both. The Nectarine differs from the Peach in being somewhat les...
-The Peach And Nectarine. Continued
Drainage, Depth, And Width Of Border When the Peach-house occupies a site where the soil and subsoil are uncongenial, such as poor sand, an irony gravel, or a cold stiff clay, the whole should be re...
-The Peach And Nectarine. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits
For various reasons I intend to treat of these together. Although we are apt to speak of them as if they were two distincts fruits, it is nevertheless a fact that they are both the product of one pare...
-The Peach And Nectarine. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. #2
I will take it for granted the cultivator has succeeded in his operation of either budding or grafting. If so, the young tree should make a good healthy shoot several feet long during the first season...
-The Peach And Nectarine. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. #3
The reader will no doubt have observed that in all cases early autumn has been the season recommended for planting the various fruit-trees I have brought under his notice. In the case of the Peach and...
-The Peach And Nectarine. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. #4
The disbudding of the trees next demands attention. Our practice is not to do the whole operation at once, but to go over the tree at least twice or thrice, at regular intervals of a week or so. The f...
-The Peach And Nectarine. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. #4. Continued
After the dozen are placed in position, the box is filled up with the grass and screwed down, and will travel a thousand miles without the slightest injury, provided the fruit has been gently handled ...
-The Pear. Fruit-Culture
Almost everything that we have said in regard to the preparing of the soil, planting, lifting, root-pruning, shoot-pruning, pinching, and training of Apple-trees applies to Pear-trees, so we need not ...
-The Pear. Fruit-Culture. Continued
As Pear-trees grow larger than Apple-trees, it is right to allow them more room to develop. Large trees on walls and in orchards should be allowed 4 or 5 feet more than Apple-trees, medium-sized ones ...
-The Pear. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits
We now come to treat of the art of grafting, which in passing we may remind the reader is of very great antiquity. Although we cannot definitely say to whom the honour of first introducing it belongs,...
-The Pear. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. Part 2
Where clay can at all be got we would not recommend wax, as clay keeps the scion in a more natural condition than it is possible to obtain from wax, which only serves the purpose of excluding the ai...
-The Pear. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. Part 3
By performing the operation in this way, we are of opinion that the graft is firmer and more secure from accident, while there is a greater surface to form a union, so that when once a union is formed...
-The Pear. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. #2
Horizontal training is perhaps the simplest mode of all, and is the one which we have seen to be in most general use for the Pear about all old places. A considerable number of old Apples may still be...
-The Pear. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. #2. Part 2
It is almost superfluous for us to enter upon the various modes and modifications adopted for the Pear in the open garden or orchard. Every cultivator has a mode of his own, which he is sure to consid...
-The Pear. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. #2. Part 3
We need not here make any reference to the priming and training of espalier Pears, as the course to be pursued with them is exactly the same as for wall-trees. We may state, however, that the Quince i...
-The Pear. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. #3
(Concluded from page 113). The only disease to which the Pear is liable in this country, so far as I have ever seen or been able to ascertain, is canker: there may be others of which I am not aware, ...
-The Pear. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. #3. Part 2
Spirits of tar have been recommended, is well as several other things - such as train and linseed oil - but to paint a tree all over with any of these would be to adopt a cure as injurious as the dise...
-The Pear. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. #3. Part 3
The most effectual cure is to syringe the trees affected with a strong decoction of tobacco-water, and the best time to apply it is towards midnight, when they are sure to be upon the upper surface of...
-The Pentstemon
I do not think the Pentstemon is quite so popular as are some other flowers of the florist class, - at least, in looking round gardens, it is not so conspicuous as it well might be. The fact that this...
-The Pentstemon. Florist Flowers
This valuable border-plant is fast rising in the estimation of the generality of horticulturists, which is not to be wondered at, considering its great usefulness as a border ornament alone. Great as ...
-The Phoenix Park
By the demise of the late lamented Mr Wilkie, the responsible post of head bailiff of the Park recently fell to the disposal of the authorities. It affords us no small pleasure to-day to be able to in...
-The Phlox
There was a time, and that not very long ago, when the Phlox was scarcely recognised as a florists' flower, but now it holds a deservedly high place in the list. Besides great beauty, it has other des...
-The Phlox. #2
Amongst hardy plants suitable for the adornment of the flower-garden in autumn the Phlox holds a high position; and yet, notwithstanding its hardiness and striking beauty as a border-plant, and also, ...
-The Phlox. #3
The merits of this family are so well known, as represented by the many varieties of the late-flowering and the early-flowering sections now in cultivation, that it is quite unnecessary to do more tha...
-The Phlox. Florist Flowers
There are several distinguishing features presented in the various types of the genus Lychnidea (Phlox), which has determined them as species: for example, Paniculata, from its panicled inflorescence,...
-The Phylloxera Vastatrix In The Vineyards Of France
A Paris correspondent informs us that the insect is spreading in all the wine-growing countries; no remedy discovered. It seems as if the prediction of Mr David Thomson, editor of 'The Gardener,' wa...
-The Pimelea
The above genus contains some of the most beautiful of our flowering greenhouse plants. They are generally easily grown, and are very free bloomers, as well as being very sweet-scented. They are admir...
-The Planting Season
Before this appears in- print the planting season will not have gone. The planting season is really much longer than is generally accepted, for, with care and judgment, it may be done at any time, exc...
-The Plum Grown As A Pyramid
I have read on page 8 of the last number of the 'Gardener' an article on The Cultivation of Hardy Fruits, by Mr M'Millan, in which he particularly treats of the Plum. In that article the following p...
-The Plum. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits
We now beg to call the attention of the reader to the cultivation of the Plum, which may be classed as the third in point of importance among the larger-growing hardy fruits. No well-regulated, in fac...
-The Plum. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. Continued
When scions are taken off for grafting purposes, more knowledge and discrimination are necessary for the selecting of Plums than perhaps any other variety of fruit. Much of the gum and canker which we...
-The Plum. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. #2
At the end of the first season's growth - no matter whether the tree has been grafted or budded - the cultivator must determine what mode of training he intends to adopt. The fan is by far the best me...
-The Plum. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. #2. Continued
This operation may be performed regularly every two or three years, until the tree has arrived at full size and bearing, and even afterwards an occasional root-pruning will be found of much benefit. I...
-The Plum. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. #3
The Plum being one of the hardiest of fruits, many of its varieties are admirably suited for cultivation in the open ground. If a tall-standard form of growth be intended, the stronger-growing varieti...
-The Polyanthus (Primula Vulgaris, Variety Polyanthus). Florist Flowers
The Polyanthus, though not clothed in the dazzling vestment of the Hyacinth or the Tulip, is nevertheless worthy of a quiet-sounding note of praise. Has it not been the inseparable associate of both f...
-The Polygala
This genus of plants comprises a great many varieties, embracing as it does hardy annuals, hardy herbaceous plants, and greenhouse evergreen plants. The latter, to which alone the following notes refe...
-The Pot-Culture Of Intermediate Stocks
Too much cannot be said in praise of this most useful section of the Stock family. Grown ever so carelessly, they yield a good supply of flowers; but when grown in pots and carefully tended, they prod...
-The Potato Disease
We desire to introduce this subject as surreptitiously as possible. It is one which is supposed to have the same effect upon an editor as a red rag has upon a bull. It is a well known fact that last y...
-The Propagation Of Lapageria
This beautiful greenhouse climber is somewhat difficult to increase by cuttings; it is, consequently, yet dear, even though it has been twenty years or more in cultivation. Nor is it very free in prod...
-The Proposed Abandonment Of Chiswick Gardens
THAT many of our readers are interested in this matter, is clear from the number of communications we have received relating thereto; and the tone of these communications is to deprecate the giving up...
-The Pruning Of Fruit-Trees
Fruit-trees, when well trained, either on walls or as standards, are quite a feature in any garden. They are at all times pleasing, when pruned, in flower, and in fruit. The taste for hardy-fruit cult...
-The Quince Stock
More things than Pears are worked upon the Quince stock in these days. Precociousness is a feature which is not confined either to gardening or the vegetable kingdom. Rapidity of action is the charact...
-The Quince Stock. #2
It is with much pleasure that I lift up my pen to make answer to Mr Simpson's article on the above subject (see May number of the ' Gardener,' page 230). I am glad that he has procured for me this opp...
-The Quince. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits
This is a fruit which is not very extensively cultivated in Britain. Our horticultural experience extends to several of the best places in the kingdom, and yet, strange to say, in only one of these pl...
-The Renovation Of An Old Garden
Some few months ago Mr Iggulden alluded to the kitchen-garden here under my charge, at the same time suggesting that I should describe the system adopted in bringing the soil into a tolerably satisf...
-The Rhododendron
This is another class of plants which come in for a good share of attention from those who have a large demand on them in keeping the conservatory gay. I will only give the names of a few we have foun...
-The Ripening Of Winter-Flowering Plants
The rainfall of the past summer, and the thick clouds in which the sun has been enveloped for the greater part of the season, have left gardeners with a legacy on their hands to make up by artificial ...
-The Rose
Is a plant which can scarcely be had in large enough quantities at any time. They are universally admired in their natural season of blooming, and when forced into bloom throughout all the early sprin...
-The Rose Forcing
Of all forced flowers in use for the spring decoration of the conservatory there is perhaps none more desirable than the Rose; nothing gives so great satisfaction when a good and successful result is ...
-The Rose In Pots
The following remarks on the cultivation of the Rose in pots may not be considered entirely out of place at the present time, the object in view being to direct attention to the capabilities of the Ro...
-The Rose-House
IT is questionable if any glass structure in a garden can command such general admiration as a Rose-house, or if there is one where so much beauty and fragrance are to be found. Where choice flowers a...
-The Rose-House And Pot-Roses
Many are apt to overlook and neglect both Roses in pots and those that are planted permanently in the Rose-house during the season when they can be gathered in abundance outside. I have seen Roses in ...
-The Rose. Chapter IX. - Selection
DESCENDING now from roseate heights, and ere we reach the perfumed plains below, we must halt to gaze upon our PILLAR ROSES, some rising singly here and there, like the proud standards of victorious t...
-The Rose. Chapter IX. - Selection. Part 2
As with a Vine, only put a strong cane into a rich border, use the knife courageously, and be sure of Grapes. As single specimens of Pillar Poses, the following may be tried with confidence: - Anna ...
-The Rose. Chapter IX. - Selection. Part 3
Madame Clemence Joigneaux Were I asked to point out a Rose-tree which I considered a specimen of healthful habit and good constitution, I know of none which I should prefer before M. C. J., with its ...
-The Rose. Chapter IX. - Selection. Part 4
Arches and arcades are graceful, because natural, forms, quas Natura sua sponte suggenit, as we read in our Oxford Logic, in which to grow varieties of the Rose having long, lissom, drooping branches....
-The Rose. Chapter VI. - Manures
I opened noiselessly the other morning, that I might enjoy a father's gladness, the door of a room in which my little boy, six off, was at his play. He was evidently entertaining an illustrious vis...
-The Rose. Chapter VI. - Manures. Part 2
Each man assures his neighbour that the process of desiccation is quite easy, and the art of deodorising almost nice; but nobody goes in. The reader, I have no doubt, has with me had large experien...
-The Rose. Chapter VI. - Manures. Part 3
But I have since found, that as my Roses are, for the most part, on the Brier (of which I am the faithful admirer, despite recent condemnations from my learned brothers, of which I shall speak more fu...
-The Rose. Chapter VI. - Manures. Part 4
Mr Cant says: - In planting Roses, a hole should be made about 18 inches deep, and large enough to contain half a wheelbarrowful of compost; two-thirds of this should be strong turfy loam, and one-th...
-The Rose. Chapter VII. - Arrangement
EVERY gardener must be an infidel - I am, and I glory in the fact - on the subject of infidelity. The proofs and the precepts of natural and revealed religion are brought so frequently and impressivel...
-The Rose. Chapter VII. - Arrangement. Continued
But what do I see, as the mist clears 1 A garden which, like a thousand others, has obeyed the command of imperious Fashion, - Away with your borders, your mounds, and your clumps ! Away with walks an...
-The Rose. Chapter VIII. - Selection
T A K E a hot schoolboy into a fruiterer's shop, where the cheeks of the Peach and the Quarrenden Pippin are glowing like his own, where the bloom still lingers upon Grape and Plum, and where the Goo...
-The Rose. Chapter VIII. - Selection. Part 2
It is what cricketers call an all-rounder, good in every point for wall, arcade, pillar, standard, dwarf - en masse, or as a single tree. It is easy to cultivate, out of doors and in. It forces admi...
-The Rose. Chapter VIII. - Selection. Part 3
Solfaterre had not depth of colour; Solfaterre was faulty in shape; Cloth of Gold was not meant to be worn out of doors, and was quickly tarnished by rough weather; and even the Marechal's own mother,...
-The Rose. Chapter VIII. - Selection. Part 4. The Ayrshire and Evergreen Roses
The Ayrshire and Evergreen Roses - it should be, Evergreen if the weather permit - have many claims upon our grateful admiration. If we have an ugly, red-faced, staring wall, which seems to glory in i...
-The Rose. Chapter X.- Garden Roses
SOON after the publication of my last chapter, I received from a furio-comic amateur the following epistle: - Sir, - I wish to be informed what the Two in Whist you mean by leaving me on the 1st of A...
-The Rose. Chapter X.- Garden Roses. Part 2
We must grow, of course, the blushing, fresh, fragrant Provence. It was to many of us the Rose of our childhood, and its delicious perfume passes through the outer sense into our hearts, gladdening th...
-The Rose. Chapter X.- Garden Roses. Part 3
Only a twopenny Rose; but as I carried it in my coat, and gazed on it, and specially when, waking next morning, I saw it in my water-jug - saw it as I lay in my dingy bedroom, and heard the distant ro...
-The Rose. Chapter XI. - Garden Roses
I COMMENCED my selection of garden Roses - that is, of Roses which are beautiful upon the tree, but not the most suitable for exhibition - with the Provence and the Moss, because these were the Roses ...
-The Rose. Chapter XI. - Garden Roses. Part 2
These white Roses are no candidates (though candidate) at our severe competitive examinations; but they are delightful members of our Rose community, beautiful in themselves, and enhancing greatly the...
-The Rose. Chapter XI. - Garden Roses. Part 3
Before we skim their cream as garden Roses, let us remember with admiration the ancestral cow. For who shall despise those old China Roses, which have brightened more than any other flower our English...
-The Rose. Chapter XII. - Concerning Rose-Shows
WHEN that delightful young officer of her Majesty's Guards paid a guinea, no long time ago in London, to the great spiritualist, medium, or whatever the arch-humbug called himself, of the season, and ...
-The Rose. Chapter XII. - Concerning Rose-Shows. Part 2
They discovered that they had been for years grossly insulted by their neighbours (Aimee Vibert was almost sure that a young Potato had winked his eye at her), and the time for revenge was come. No, n...
-The Rose. Chapter XII. - Concerning Rose-Shows. Part 3
And I thought, as I went rushing down the Northern Line, what a joyous, genial day it had been. Personally unknown to my coadjutors, we had been from the moment our hands met as the friends of many ye...
-The Rose. Chapter XII. - Concerning Rose-Shows. Part 4
I feel no shame in confessing that when the hall was cleared, and I looked from the gallery upon the three long tables, and the platform beneath the great organ, glowing with the choicest Roses of the...
-The Rose. Chapter XIII. - Roses For Exhibition
AS he who can ride exchanges his pony for a cob, and his cob for a hunter, and, having achieved pads and brushes, where hounds are slow, fences are easy, and rivals few, longs for a gallop at racing s...
-The Rose. Chapter XIV. - How To Show It
WHEN I first exhibited Roses, the boxes selected for the Queen of Flowers were not what royal boxes ought to be. They were ordinary and heterogeneous; they were high and low, wide and narrow, painted ...
-The Rose. Chapter XIV. - How To Show It. Part 2
The young knight will not be armed cap-a-pie until he has supplied himself with a couple of helmets. If the weather is showery, or the sun scorches, just before a show, many Roses may be advantageousl...
-The Rose. Chapter XIV. - How To Show It. Part 3
Your own are magnificent, larger than those which bloom in Manchester chintz above your slumbering brow, 9 inches in diameter. You reach the show; you win every prize, laurels enough to make triumphal...
-The Rose. Chapter XIV. - How To Show It. Part 4
Nor let the exhibitor, amateur or professional, suppose that these matters are of no importance. It is true that priority is won by the superior merits of the Roses, carefully examined and compared; b...
-The Rose. Chapter XV. - At A Rose-Show
AS the young knight in the olden time, having reached ye place ordayned and appointed to trye ye bittermoste by stroke of battle, became naturally curious concerning his adversaries, and, after cari...
-The Rose. Chapter XV. - At A Rose-Show. Part 2
Alas for our poor feeble humanity! - two hours later Mr Irascible, finding no prize-card on his boxes, denounces Mr T. as an ignorant humbug, or knows for a fact that he is in vile collusion with the ...
-The Rose. Chapter XV. - At A Rose-Show. Part 3
Another failure of empirical knavery, another slip between the cup of silver and the lip of stratagem, occurs to my recollection. It was my good fortune to win a prize goblet annually given for Roses ...
-The Rose. Chapter XV. - At A Rose-Show. Part 4
Never tiring, when the competition is close, in his keen and patient scrutiny estimating every Rose by a fixed standard, setting down in his note-book, counting, comparing their respective marks of me...
-The Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society
The summer exhibition of this Society took place in the Music Hall, George Street, Edinburgh, on the 9th of last month. As a display of plants, it was a fair average one as compared with other years. ...
-The Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society. #2
The annual meeting of this Society was held in the Music Hall, George Street, Edinburgh, on the 2d of last month, when there was a large attendance of members. Mr Thomson, Dalkeith Park, in the chair....
-The Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society. #3
The summer exhibition of this Society was held in the Music Hall, George Street, Edinburgh, on the 12th of last month. Roses and fruit were the leading features on the occasion; pot plants were neithe...
-The Royal Gardens, Kew
The Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew are always interesting, no matter what particular season of the year we may select for a visit, but just now they are specially attractive, when every twig is set with...
-The Royal Gardens, Kew. Continued
In the Erica-house we notice Aponogeton distachyon flowering very freely in a large bell-glass. This is a very interesting hardy aquatic from the Cape of Good Hope, and deserves to be more extensively...
-The Royal Horticultural Society And Provincial Exhibitions
THE Royal Horticultural Society has held another provincial show - in many respects a good one ; but there has resulted what some predicted, and many more feared - a pecuniary loss to the Society of s...
-The Royal Horticultural Society And The Horticultural Press
ON the 28th of December last, a communication bearing that date, and signed by the Assistant-Secretary of the Royal Horticultural Society of London, was addressed to Mr Richard Dean, one of the Editor...
-The Royal Horticultural Society At Nottingham, June 27
Allow me to intimate through the medium of the ' Gardener' to those who purpose visiting this great Exhibition, that to insure the comfort of gardeners and exhibitors, I have made arrangements with th...
-The Royal Horticultural Society. Fruit And Floral Meeting, February 15th
This was a most successful meeting, both as regards the number and value of the plants exhibited and the attendance of visitors. These meetings of the Society are undoubtedly increasing in interest an...
-The Royal Horticultural Society. Fruit And Floral Meeting, March 1
The following prizes were offered by the Society, all in open classes. Class 1 6 Camellias in pots. Class 2 12 Camellias cut blooms. Mr W. Howard, gardener to J. Brand, Esq., Bedford Hill, Balham,...
-The Science And Practice Of Horticulture
It is very much to be regretted that the slightest jealousy or ill-feeling should spring up and exist in any quarter whatever, between those who may be termed the scientific representatives of horti...
-The Soil-Supply Of Garden's
WE recently commented on the water-supply of gardens, and now we propose to offer a few remarks on the very important question of the soil-supply of gardens. It need not be said that these twin elem...
-The Strawberry. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits
The Strawberry is one of the finest and most esteemed of all the products of the vegetable kingdom. The propagation of the Strawberry may be effected by one of three ways - viz., by seed, by runners,...
-The Strawberry. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. #2
The soil which is best suited for the Strawberry is a heavy loamy clay, in which all except the scarlet varieties will succeed best. For the scarlet class - that is to say, Grovend's Scarlet and suchl...
-The Summer Show of Aberdeen Royal Horticultural Society, July 23, 1869
The Summer Show of this Society was held in a magnificent marquee on the Links, yesterday. The Show was in every respect equal to those of former years (last year, being a special show, excepted), bo...
-The Summer Show of Aberdeen Royal Horticultural Society, July 23, 1869. Continued
Section II. - Cut Flowers Twenty-four Roses, named, dissimilar (open to nurserymen and other competitors) - Prize by John Keynes, nurseryman, Salisbury - 1. Geo. Wyness, Usan House, Montrose; 2. Wm. ...
-The Surface Cropping Of Vine-Borders
Having read with much interest the remarks of Mr Simpson on the cropping of fruit-tree borders, and wishing all sensational matter to be put on one side, I venture to ask this question, Can we, as pra...
-The Telephone In Horticulture
Messes Dicksons & Co., Nurserymen and Seedsmen, Edinburgh, have established telephonic communication between their seed warehouse in Waterloo Place and their Pilrig Park Nursery, Pilrig Street - a dis...
-The Theory of The Leaf
All plants are produced from seeds or buds - the one free, the other attached; the one spreading the plant geographically, the other increasing its individual size. Carefully examined, the seed, or st...
-The Thinning And Swelling Of Forced Peaches
It is impossible to over-estimate the value of forced Peaches as a dessert fruit; but what a difference there is in the appearance and quality of fruits grown under different systems of cultivation! ...
-The Tomato, With Cultural Directions For Maintaining A Continuous Supply
Including also Chapters for Amateurs and the Growers of Fruit for the Markets, an Estimate of Varieties, and a Complete List of useful Receipts. By William Iggulden, Gardener to the Eight Hon. the Ear...
-The Treatment Of Hardy Primulas For Indoor Decoration In Winter And Spring
Were it not for the practice of forcing spring and early-flowering plants, our plant-houses, parlours, and drawing-rooms would be un-cheered by many blossoms in the dull months of December, January, a...
-The Tulip (Tulipa Gesneriana). Florist Flowers
In structural completeness the Tulip may be considered a masterpiece of finished simplicity - a plant of imposing bearing, were it only green instead of being the most gaudy of Nature's painted cups, ...
-The Use Or Abuse Of Tubs And Boxes For Trees
The art of gardening is so often called in to make objects not only look their best, but often also to make them look what they are not, that it becomes a question how far such a course may be safely ...
-The Utility Of Science
The address of the President of the British Association, delivered at Liverpool, illustrates in a very remarkable manner the practical utilities of Science. One of the largest and profoundest question...
-The Varieties Of Calanthe Veitchii
We do not know how many varieties there are in cultivation of this fine and most useful winter-flowering Orchid; but there are, at least, two varieties, and one of them is very much superior to the ot...
-The Veitch Memorial
We understand that so spontaneous and general has been the desire that some lasting memorial of this eminent horticulturist should be formed, that a most influential committee has been convened to tak...
-The Veitch Memorial Prize
In reference to the Veitck Memorial Prizes, we are enabled to state that, with the consent of the Council of the Royal Horticultural Society, the Trustees will distribute the following prizes at the f...
-The Vine. Fruit-Culture
If the position where the border has to be formed is naturally wet, a set of drains, about 10 feet apart, should be cut across it, and led into another drain running parallel with the border at its ex...
-The Vine. Fruit-Culture. #2
A subject in connection with the formation of Vine-borders which is of no small consequence is the exclusion of wire-worm from them. If the soil is taken from pasture-land, or any land under grass, wi...
-The Vine. The Vinery. Fruit-Culture
There is perhaps no plant the culture of which occupies so much of the attention of horticultural writers as the Vine. The soil in which it grows, the air in which it breathes, the system of training ...
-The Vitality Of Seeds
It has been recently asserted that the reason why old Melon seeds produce more fruitful plants than young seeds produce, is because the starch the old seeds contain is gradually converted into albumen...
-The Water Supply Of Gardens
The supply of a sufficiency of wholesome water to our large towns has become one of the most important questions of the day. In many instances the supply of water is insufficient in quantity and def...
-The Weather
The following remarkably low temperatures occurred at the following places on March 14th:- Mr Forbes's Nursery, Hawick, .... 26 of frost. Jngleston Gardens, Ratho,..... ...
-The Weather In December 1878
The following are the lowest readings of the thermometer at- Rainfall, 1878. Inches. Chatsworth, Derbyshire - Dec. 24 and 25, 0.4 ...
-The Weather Near London
I AM no weather prophet; neither would I draw conclusions as to the coming winter from passing incidents: one fact I will mention, during a practice of forty years I never knew the ice-house filled so...
-The West Meadows, Edinburgh. A Public Garden For The Working Classes
Gardening may be well said to be the purest of all human pleasures, in the knowledge and pursuit of which the professional as well as the amateur botanist experiences a perpetual secret joy and happin...
-The Winter Greenhouse
In the successful management of plant-houses nothing is so necessary as courage - courage to avoid worthless varieties, courage to throw inferior plants away, and courage to give those which are retai...
-The Winter Terrace-Garden At Woodstock
On page 240 of the May No. of ' The Gardener' you state, The winter terrace-garden at Woodstock is the most unique thing of the sort in the three kingdoms. I (and doubtless many other amateur garden...
-Thermo - Plastic Putty
In a paper read before the Civil and Mechanical Engineers' Society by Mr R. M. Bancroft on the renewal of King's-Cross station roof, it was stated the glazing putty used in this roof was that known by...
-Thinning And Mulching Roses In Autumn
Perhaps there is no other branch of nursery business in Great Britain in which there is such a general interest taken as in propagating and cultivating the Rose. Thousands are grown annually, and thou...
-Thinning Onions Unnecessary
Some time ago I stated in ' The Gardener' that Mr Pettigrew of Cardiff Castle Gardens never thinned his Onions. On his recommendation the Onion crop here, in 1878, was treated in this way, with the mo...
-Thomson's Styptic
This is undoubtedly a most valuable preparation for stopping bleeding of the Grape Vine. About two years ago I had the misfortune to have an early Vinery frozen when in flower, and coming in to bear t...
-Thornhill
We are unable to say why your double white Camellia drops its buds as you describe. You say you water the border regularly, that the drainage seems good, and the plant healthy. These conditions, and t...
-Thoughts About Grape-Growing
We are so accustomed at this period to hear it stated that preconceived ideas of every kind are being sifted for the purpose of ascertaining the amount of truth and fallacy contained in them, that it ...
-Three New Orchids
Among the many new and rare plants exhibited for the first time at the meetings of the Royal Horticultural Society at South Kensington during the past year, were the following Orchids: Den-drobium sup...
-Thuja (The American Arborvitae). Notes On Hardy Conifers
This is a small but very interesting genus of evergreen shrubs and bushy trees, for the most part natives of North America, all of them very ornamental, thoroughly hardy, and of remarkably free growth...
-Thujopsis (The Broad-Leaved Arborvitaes). Notes On Hardy Conifers
This new, and as far as is yet known small, genus, is so named from the resemblance of the species of which it is composed, both in habit of growth and general appearance, to their near allies the Ame...
-Thyme
Three sorts are cultivated, common narrow-leaved, common broad-leaved, and Lemon Thyme. The two first are used for the same purposes - for seasoning stuffings principally - and it is therefore not nee...
-Thymus
Among the Thymes there are some very pretty plants for our purpose. One of the best, Thymus lanuginosus, forms a close, densly-spreading carpet of hoary purple foliage, clothed with fine hairs, which ...
-Thyrsacanthus Rutilans
This old but most useful flowering plant, with its long drooping spikes of scarlet flowers, which it produces in the dark days of winter, is worthy of more attention, and should be grown on a larger s...
-Tilia (The Lime-Tree). Ornamental Trees And Shrubs
The genus Tilia is composed of a limited number of umbrageous, deciduous trees, of stately growth, indigenous to the temperate and colder regions of Europe and North America. They are all very hardy, ...
-To Keep The Fruit Of The Strawberry Clean
It is quite impossible to keep the fruit of the Strawberry free from sand without placing something or other underneath it. Of all the different materials used I consider that bark is best. I have use...
-To Our Readers
THE Proprietors of 'The Gardener,' finding that Mr Thomson of Dalkeith could no longer devote the time and attention it required to the Editorial management of the Periodical, have entered into arrang...
-To Preserve French Beans
French Beans and Scarlet Runners, nicely trimmed for cooking, can be preserved for winter use by salting them, thus: - Make a brine of salt strong enough to float an egg. Fill a jar with the Beans, th...
-To Return To The Peas
Previous to sowing, our ground is well trodden, and then stirred with a dung-fork. Wide drills are drawn with a flat hoe, or thrown out with a spade, from 2 to 3 inches in depth, and running from nort...
-To The Editor Of The 'Gardener'
Sir, - In going through the gardens of John Blackwood, Esq., Strathtyrum, near St Andrews, I was very much struck with a figure in the flower-garden filled up with very simple materials - namely, Mang...
-Tobacco (St. E.)
The plants should be taken up as soon as they have done flowering, and hung up by the heels against a south wall, or any convenient place, and exposed to the sun and air. If the plants cannot be gathe...
-Todea Superba
It may not be generally known how easy of cultivation this beautiful Fern is, and how hardy of constitution it is, so that any one who has command of a small one-light cold frame may easily grow it. ...
-Tomato Culture
Tomatoes - or, as they are sometimes termed, Love Apples - should receive every encouragement in the way of aiding them to make strong plants during the early part of the month of May, so as to have t...
-Tomatoes
Sow the seeds thinly in 6-inch pots in light soil. Cover lightly, and when of sufficient size, prick out into small pots, and shift into 6-inch ones by the time the small ones are filled with roots. I...
-Tomatos
Although I wrote in the last June number of the 'Gardener' at some length on Open-air culture of Tomatos, I cannot consistently omit reference to the subject in this series of papers. That Tomatos a...
-Torreya (The Foetid Yew)
This small genus, named in honour of the late Professor John Torrey of New York, one of the authors of the 'North America Flora/ is closely allied to the Yews, and is composed of small evergreen trees...
-Tortworth. Dinner-Table Plants. Palms
For table decoration, few if any class of plants are so useful and effective as many of the Palms, when in a young state. Being entirely devoid of anything that approaches to what may be characterised...
-Trachelium
Trachelium is another genus of Campanulacese, which is very distinct in feature from any of the other genera. The only species, T. caeruleum, which has proved hardy in this country is a native of sout...
-Transplanting And Potting Camellias
This appears to be a task of difficulty to many, considered a hazardous undertaking, and in numerous cases as certain death to the plants. I have beard it remarked times almost without number, that th...
-Transplanting Old Fruit-Trees
By the time these remarks appear, transplanting operations will not be much more than commenced in many places; for though November is the most favourable month for moving most kinds of fruit-trees, i...
-Travelling Notes On Gardens In The Midland Counties
My object in taking this journey was to enable me to cast aside home cares for a few days, - to see something of what was being done in other parts of her Majesty's dominions, to visit old friends, an...
-Travelling Notes On Gardens In The Midland Counties. Continued
My next move was to the pleasure-ground: somewhat extensive, and containing at the extremity a large sheet of water, partly an artificial increase by an extension of the river Avon. This is rather a s...
-Travelling Notes On Gardens In The Midland Counties. #2
At the conclusion of my last communication I had reached St John's Nursery, Worcester, which ranks among the largest provincial establishments in the kingdom, extending to rather more than a hundred a...
-Travelling Notes On Gardens In The Midland Counties. #2. Continued
To these Mr Smith is making extensions: there was a house nearly finished, 360 feet long by 19 feet wide, divided into two divisions, the largest to be employed for the growth of Roses in pots, and th...
-Travelling Notes On Gardens In The Midland Counties. #3
Leaving the kitchen-garden we now pass on to the pleasure-ground, once somewhat limited, but recent additions have very much increased its extent. Unrestricted criticism would in this case be an unjus...
-Travelling Notes On Gardens In The Midland Counties. #4
Viewed as a whole, the scenery around Eastnor Castle possesses a greater variety of aspect than is usually to be met with in places of a similar character. Nature has done much here, and art has stepp...
-Travelling Notes On Gardens In The Midland Counties. #5
The Pinetum is reached by a gradual ascent from the kitchen-garden, and possibly a better situation could not have been selected. It is of considerable altitude, which varies the temperature, not, how...
-Treatment Of Established Trees
THE remarks in our last chapter apply wholly to trees in the open garden or orchard. Further on we will deal with wall-trees. In the meantime we will confine our attention to the treatment of the tree...
-Treatment Of Pelargoniums, Fuchsias, And Calceolarias For Exhibition
I have plants of Calceolarias, Pelargoniums, Geraniums, and Fuchsias, which I want to exhibit at a horticultural show the last week in August. The Pelargoniums and Fuchsias are in 8-inch pots, the Cal...
-Tree Carnations
Those cultivators who have to grow large quantities of choice flowers either for the market or home decoration, should at once see about getting up a good stock of these valuable plants. They may be h...
-Tree-Ferns
No one doubts that fine-foliaged plants have wonderfully progressed in public estimation during the past few years, and it may be fairly interpreted as a certain sign of the increase of good taste in ...
-Trees On Walls
We would make the same subdivision here as among trees which are to be grown in orchards, in quarters by themselves, or in rows in the kitchen-garden. For villa or cottage gardens, we think that mediu...
-Trenching
Trenching I find to be the greatest possible help to successful kitchen-gardening. Every bit of ground bare in winter we trench, not only turning over the soil a couple of spits in depth, but shovelli...
-Trichinum Manglesii
Though known to botanists fully twenty years before, it is only some eight or ten years ago since, if our memory serves us right, Mr Thompson of Ipswich was fortunate enough to raise plants of this lo...
-Tropaeolum Speciosum
I was glad to see that W. S., in the September number of the 'Gardener,' is also an admirer of this charming hardy herbaceous plant. Having grown it with success for the past ten years, and found it...
-Tropceolum Speciosum
Sir, - I have been interested in the articles on Tropceolum Speciosum by your correspondents W. S. and R. F. I have seen this pretty plant in all its beauty on the rock and wind-raked terraces refer...
-Tropoeolum Speciosum
In the interest of truth and caution, I cannot allow to pass unnoticed the statement by R. F. at page 134 of the 'Gardener' for March, to the effect that I had exaggerated the difficulty experienced...
-Trtentalis Europaea
This pretty little plant is a native of Britain and other countries of Europe, also of North America and Asia, always affecting the colder latitudes, or, if appearing in the warmer countries, it rises...
-Tuberoses For Winter Flowering
To say that the Tuberose is everybody's flower in winter would be exceeding the mark, although its cultivation is simple and the price of the bulbs exceedingly low. It is therefore surprising that the...
-Tuberous Begonias
Perhaps no class of decorative plants has been so much improved of late years, and the cultivation of them so much increased, as that forming the subject of these remarks. Tuberous Begonias are now be...
-Tuberous Begonias As Bedding-Plants
One of the many things that will make the summer of 1879 memorable in the experience of gardeners is the comparative, indeed total, failure of many tender plants that in ordinary seasons have done wel...
-Tulipa (The Tulip)
This furnishes some of the most splendid flowers of spring. The later-flowering varieties, which are derived from T. Gesneriana, are unsurpassed in the variety and brilliancy of their colours; and the...
-Tupa
Little generally is known of this magnificent family of Lobeliads in this country; T. Fueillei, Syn. Lobelia Tufa is the best known, and is to be met with about the Glasnevin and College Botanic Garde...
-Turnips
The earliest and most profitable crop of these will be obtained from an east border, the soil of which should be rich and firm. On the first favourable opportunity in March seed should be sown of the ...
-Tweed Vineyard
Booking at the Victoria Station, Manchester, for Galashiels, after doing the International, a six hours' ride brought us into the immediate vicinity of the valley of the Tweed, classic through the p...
-Tweed Vineyard. Continued
India-rubber hose are attached to each pipe, by means of which borders are watered, and vines syringed in any part of the house when such is necessary. Pine-growing is carried on extensively and to p...
-Two London Suburban Nurseries
One forenoon, early in September, we found ourselves in the London establishment of Messrs Downie, Laird, & Laing at Forest Hill, which, under the personal direction of Mr Laing, has gained as much pr...
-Tyro
It is desirable to have the command of bottom-heat from hot-water pipes in a chamber underneath Pines, but it is also desirable to do with as little heat as possible from such means. Where 3 feet deep...
-U.S
Coniferous plants may be successfully grafted at any time between the end of August and beginning of April. We prefer the end of August, or as soon as the young wood is ripened. The best mode is what ...
-Under-Gardeners
Your correspondent Mr Temple's remarks on this subject are kindly, temperate, and suggestive; and regarding the teaching of young gardeners, and the responsibilities of master-gardeners in their way, ...
-Under-Gardeners. #2
1 don't think your correspondent J. S.'s remarks on the above are any more than just. In the first place, he says when the master puts his young men in the way of acquiring a good practical knowle...
-Under-Gardeners' Difficulties
Sir, - Will you allow me space in your magazine, the 'Gardener,' to say a few words respecting the young man's difficulties 1 At page 276 I have read F. W. B.'s remarks, headed 'A Word to Young Garden...
-Unusually Low Temperature In March, Etc
On March 15 the temperature fell 25 below freezing at Drumlanrig Gardens, which is the most severe frost we have any recollection of having occurred in the middle of March. We will be much oblige...
-Urceolina Pendula
This is a most distinct and beautiful bulb, allied to Eucharis, but differing in a very marked degree from that universal favourite in the form and colour of the flowers. The foliage resembles that of...
-Using Stones In Potting
Have any of your readers ever used stones purposely in potting such things as Vines and Pines? It is the custom to pick these carefully out of the compost before using it; and I confess, myself, to a ...
-Vallota Purpurea. Notes On Decorative Greenhouse Plants
One of the choicest and most useful of our greenhouse flowering bulbs is the Vallota purpurea. This charming plant is a native of the Cape of Good Hope, and is worthy of a place in the most limited co...
-Variegated Wellingtonias (Mrs Browning)
We have seen two different types of variegation; the one being variegated with gold, the other with silver. The former was sent out by Mr R. Hartland of Cork, who has in his nursery a large plant, tho...
-Variegated Zonal Pelargonium Leaves (I. J)
The leaves of your seedling Pelargoniums are much inferior to what are now in cultivation, and we doubt if they are likely to improve, as, judging from the freshness of the colouring and the texture o...
-Varieties Of Figs
In order to keep up a constant succession of ripe Figs for a good many months of the year, as treated of in former papers, not very many varieties are necessary. Taking into consideration the fruitful...
-Vegetable Marrows
There are not many districts south of the Grampians where crops of these may not be secured, if the young plants are nursed a little after being planted. They may be sown in the same manner as Melons,...
-Vegetables For Exhibition (A Subscriber, Stirling Castle)
The best vegetables are of course the following: Potatoes, Peas, Cauliflowers, Artichokes, Scarlet Runner, and dwarf French Beans, Celery, Vegetable Marrows, Tomatoes, Leeks, Cabbage, Carrots, and Oni...
-Vegetables. Gardeners
Basket of Vegetables, ten varieties - 1. James Johnstone, Bellfield House, Cupar; 2. James Wilson, Beechwood; 3. Thomas Hardie, Springfield House, Cupar. Two Cauliflowers - 1. John M'Leod, Birkhill, ...
-Veronica Imperial Dwarf Blue
This makes a very useful plant for early autumn and winter work, being of such dwarf compact habit, when nice little bushes can be had in 4 and 5 inch pots. It is good for a front line on a conservato...
-Victoria Nectarine
Allow me to call attention to this new and, I fancy, but little known fruit - a seedling raised some years ago by Mr Rivers of the Saw-bridgeworth nursery. I have fruited it during the past and presen...
-Vinca
This is the only British representative of one of the most beautiful natural orders in the vegetable kingdom, Apocynaceae, which comprises many splendid and justly-favoured shrubs and climbers, well k...
-Vinca (The Periwinkle). Ornamental Trees And Shrubs
Of the shrubby species belonging to this interesting genus, only two are hardy enough for open-air cultivation in this country. These are evergreens with a trailing habit of growth, indigenous to a so...
-Vine Disease In The South Of France. Phylloxera Vastatrix (J. E. Planchon)
Female specimens and their eggs, a and a, antennse; b and b, horns or suckers; c, egg plainly visible in the body of the insect; d, the egg; f, winged form of the insect. All greatly magnified. The f...
-Vine Disease In The South Of France. Phylloxera Vastatrix (J. E. Planchon). Continued
The first takes place shortly after birth, the second after laying-time. Some uncertainty, however, hangs over the number of these changes, as the cast-off skins are often found mixed up with groups o...
-Vine Forcing
Give every attention to late Grapes still hanging, in the way of keeping a steady temperature of 45 and a dry atmosphere. Instead of opening ventilators on mild foggy days, keep them shut, and em...
-Vine Forcing. #2
Attend to Grapes still hanging as directed last month. Prune all Vines as soon as the fruit is cut from them, and dress all cuts made after this season with styptic to prevent any chance of their bein...
-Vine Forcing. #3
Early crops that have finished the stoning process, and that are required to ripen as early as possible, may be encouraged forward more freely with an advance of temperature to 70 in mild weather...
-Vine Forcing. #4
Where the earliest crop of Grapes is the produce of Vines in pots, they will in many cases be ripe this month; and as soon as ripe they require, of course, a change of treatment. They will - especiall...
-Vine Forcing. #5
In early houses where the Grapes are ripe, the atmosphere should be dry and cool. It is, however, possible, for the wellbeing of the Vines, to cany the drying process too far, especially when most of ...
-Vine Forcing. #6
All Grapes intended to hang through the winter should be perfectly ripe by the 1st of October, and where they are not so let them be assisted with lire heat, and a circulation of dry warm air. Look ov...
-Vine Forcing. #7
The past season was a very unfavourable one for late Grapes. They were ripened with little sunshine and too much moisture in outside borders, and are on that account destitute of fleshiness and sugar,...
-Vine Forcing. #8
Where one or two vineries have been started, another may be started about the middle or end of the month, according to circumstances. See former directions as to temperature, etc., connected with star...
-Vine Forcing. #9
Now is a good time to start Muscat and other late varieties requiring high temperature to ripen them to perfection, and fit them for keeping well through the winter. This especially applies to localit...
-Vine Forcing. #10
Keep the atmosphere in the early house, when the Grapes are quite ripe, dry and cool. If our previous directions regarding mulching and watering the border before they were quite ripe, have been carri...
-Vine Forcing. #11
Keep all Vines from which the fruit have been cut cool and airy, unless, indeed, it be in the case of any vigorously growing Vines, the wood of which may not be so far advanced in ripeness as is desir...
-Vine Forcing. #12
This is perhaps the most trying month of the year for Grapes that are still hanging. If they can be. successfully kept during the time the Vines are shedding their foliage, there is not much fear of t...
-Vine Forcing. #13
Give careful attention to all ripe Grapes still hanging on the Vines. They should be examined at least three times a-week, and all decaying berries removed. If the Vines are at all thickly set with le...
-Vine Forcing. #14
What has just been said about hard firing in the case of Pines is applicable to Vines that have been started a month or six weeks ago. Avoid high night-temperatures, and make the most of sun-heat by d...
-Vine Forcing. #15
If all late Grapes have not already been cut and used or bottled, the sooner they are bottled the better now, so as to get the Vines pruned and kept as cool as possible for a time. All wounds made in ...
-Vine Forcing. #16
It is to be feared that pot-Vines from which ripe Grapes were at one time expected by the 1st of May will be quite a fortnight or three weeks later, owing to the severity of the first three months of ...
-Vine Forcing. #17
In the forcing of Vines to produce fruit in May (and it is little use having them earlier in these times of long-keeping late sorts), avoid above everything, as the greatest evil, high night-temperatu...
-Vine Forcing. #18
Pot - Vines, as well as young Vines in borders, that have been subject to early forcing for the first time, very often break irregularly; and it is difficult to prevent their doing so, and at the same...
-Vine Forcing. #19
Crops in pots that have been required to ripen early, may be pushed forward freely as soon as the stoning process is complete. Advance the night temperature to 70 when the weather is mild; but if...
-Vine Forcing. #20
The winter and early part of spring having been so very cold, necessitating so much fire-heat, it is to be feared that the foliage of early Vines may not be so robust as is desirable, and no doubt red...
-Vine Forcing. #21
In early vineries, where the Grapes are ripening, ventilate freely, always leaving air on all night, so as never to have a stagnant atmosphere. Keep ripe Grapes cool and dry, but do not carry the dryi...
-Vine Forcing. #22
It is to be feared that many Vines in Scotland, owing to the very cold sunless summer, may not be so well ripened as they should be. Where such is the case they should be subjected to more or less lir...
-Vine-Borders
Until the publication of Mr Thomson's Treatise on the Vine, it was a common opinion that the richer the border, the more certain were the Vines to produce fine Grapes. I suspect the desire to excel in...
-Vine-Grafting
This subject has received considerable attention from cultivators of late. Various modes have been tried to improve the Vine by grafting, and the results, favourable and otherwise, have been reported ...
-Vine-Growing In The Open Air
As my friends and neighbours around me are now busily employed in shearing off the summer growth of Vines, it occurs to me that the present would be a fitting opportunity of saying a few words of gene...
-Vinerie Forcing
Keep ripe Grapes cool with a dry atmosphere. If our former directions regarding mulching and watering inside borders have been carried out, there is not much fear of the soil becoming dry and cracking...
-Vines And Vine-Borders
I have no doubt the readers of the 'Gardener,' like those of every other horticultural periodical, consider they have had quite enough of the subjects I have chosen for this and a few other papers of ...
-Vines And Vine-Borders. #2
In my paper of last month I called attention to a set of circumstances which I think unfavourable to the prolonged fruitfulness of the Vine, and I believe they are such as have come under the observat...
-Vines In Italy - Depth Of Soil
In the leader for July there is a hard nut to crack for some who yet boldly defend shallow Vine-borders. I have no doubt but this subject (as all that concerns the Vine generally does) will in due tim...
-Vines In Pits For Early Forcing
THE cultivation of Vines in pots for early forcing - now an established custom in gardens - was perhaps the best idea that ever suggested itself to modern cultivators of the Grape Vine. It has saved t...
-Vines In Pits For Early Forcing. Continued
This being done, they should be cut down to within two or three eyes of their base, and be kept on the dry side until they are required to be started, say at the beginning of February, when they shoul...
-Viola "Blue Perfection"
I have been greatly pleased to notice that the young plants of this very beautiful Viola which I have here growing in my garden, display a creeping habit, a quality that cannot fail to greatly enhance...
-Viola Calcarata - Spurred Violet
This is a low-growing species with many underground creeping stems, by which it extends itself and forms carpet-like masses of a lively green. The stems are angular, and clothed with acutely egg-shape...
-Viola Cornuta, Var. Perfection
An attempt has been made to identify this fine new Viola, recently awarded a First-Class Certificate at one of the meetings of the Royal Horticultural Society, with what was known as Beaton's Good Gr...
-Violaceae. Notes On Hardy Herbaceous Plants
If this natural order presented nothing except the Sweet Violet for our admiration, it would have a very strong claim on the consideration of all lovers of sweet and beautiful flowers. But there are m...
-Violaceae. Notes On Hardy Herbaceous Plants. Continued
These may be grown planted out in rich ground in the same way as the others till September, when they may be lifted and potted or planted in frames closely, and afterwards merely protected from severe...
-Violas, Pansies And Sweet Peas
These are one and all greatly benefited at this time by having all seed capsules and pods removed. Very few of the Violas bloom later than September. The only one which we have this year given a promi...
-Violets
The culture of the Violet is exceedingly simple. In April the side runners should be allowed to grow, and to encourage them to root freely they should have light rich soil sifted among them. In May a ...
-Violets For Winter Flowering
The importance of a supply of Violets in winter, and the universal esteem in which they are held for the pleasant odour they impart to rooms where flowers are admissable, as well as their general util...
-Visit To Japan. - Garden Cultube. To The Editor Of The 'Yorkshire Gazette.'
Tokio, Nov. 14, 1872. Sir, - According to promise, I will continue my description of Su-mae-Yah. On entering the gateway of one of the gardens you generally come on a pretty little winding path leadin...
-Visit To Japan. - Garden Culture. To The Editor Of The 'Yorkshire Gazette.'
Tokio, Nov. 1, 1872. Sir, - In one of my previous letters I gave a short notice on agriculture; and now, with the kind assistance of a horticultural friend, I send you a letter on garden culture and f...
-Vitis
Your Vines are attacked by the Vine mildew. Lose no time in painting your hot-water pipes with sulphur. Keep the atmosphere of the vinery dry, and increase the heat and ventilation. This should check ...
-W. A., Chester
You may burn the soil of your garden by getting any brushwood you can conveniently, and putting it together like a cone, with a vent at the top; then set fire to it, and pile your soil all round it. I...
-W. Bridges
You should not have the slightest difficulty in having your garden gay in August by adopting what is generally termed the bedding system, using the best of scarlet and pink, etc. Pelargoniums, Calceol...
-W. C
You have done well in letting more air and light at your walks. Sprinkle them with salt twice a-year. The salt will destroy the moss, and it can be brushed off with a hard broom. We fear we do not qui...
-W. E. B
The best trees for standing the sea-breeze, and otherwise best for your purpose, are Pinus austriaca and P. maritima. Sea Buckthorn is the best of all seaside plants, but not so appropriate for an ave...
-W. E. E
We suspect your Vine is Chasselas Musque, which is very subject to crack. Cut the shoots half through, a little below the bunch, whenever the first berry cracks, and protect the roots from heavy rains...
-W. H. C. B
There is much truth in your paper, but we do not think its publication would do any good; and seeing you merely give your initials, you should not criticise others because they conceal their names. T...
-W. M
We have noted the heading to the paragraph leader in our contemporary, but cannot act as you suggest. It is a shocking profanation and prostitution of one of the most solemn passages of Scripture. W....
-W. M. Syglisthorne
Our correspondent has our thanks for his good advice; at the same time, we think that in the Hints to Amateurs we meet many of the requirements of the class of gardeners he refers to, and in our pap...
-W. N., Dis
Thanks for your letter. What you say of the preparation is no doubt perfectly correct; but were we to insert it, it would be looked upon as an advertisement, and we cannot afford to advertise gratis. ...
-W. P
Buy the Vine at once, and grow it till the wood gets sufficiently mature to admit of its being inarched. We struck a Vine of the variety you name this time twelve months, and in July inarched it on th...
-W. S
The failure of the late Peach crop this year is all but universal, and is the result of the fine warm weather we had in February, which set the sap in motion early. This was succeeded by the severe co...
-W. T
What you suggest has often been talked of, but the Edinburgh Council seem perfectly apathetic about horticulture, hence the town has fallen sadly behind in gardening for the people. Inquiries having ...
-Wahlenbergia. Genus of Canipanulaceae
Wahlenbergia is a small genus of Canipanulaceae. Looked at from a practical point of view, it should never have been separated from Campanula, from which it differs in only one respect, and that not ...
-Walks And Footpaths
It might not be justifiable to make a distinction between a walk and a footpath as a feature of utility in the garden, still we think there is or ought to be some distinctive difference, in so far as ...
-War In Relation To Horticulture
The magnitude of the recent French reverses is vividly realised when a great centre of scientific intelligence, like the capital of France, is hemmed in by a powerful army. The Jardin des Plantes is n...
-Weather
The weather in Auckland has been unprecedentedly dry and hot. The fruit season is magnificent, and the root crops have not been bad, but the hay harvest is likely to suffer from the drought. In spite ...
-Weather In Germany - Hanover, July 16
Our weather has not been agreeable; either rainy or dreadfully warm. Thunderstorms have been very frequent, and severe in their consequences; in one village the damage done is 50,000 thalers. Fruit ha...
-Weather-Wise
We shall not be wrong in assuming that the minds of the gardening fraternity have for the last three weeks been more concentrated on the weather than on the war. Our atom of mind has and still can thi...
-Weeds On Walks (P. A.)
Weeds on walks are often the most troublesome. Wherever a loose shingly grav3l is used, or one that does not bind, hoeing and raking are permissible; but it is very undesirable in the case of walks, l...
-Weeks' Upright Tubular Boiler, With Patent Duplex Compensating Improvements
We are enabled to give an illustration of this boiler, and from an inspection of its mechanism, have reached the conclusion that it appears likely to answer well the end for which it has been designed...
-What Is The Best Way To Dispose Of Decomposable Garden Refuse?
There are few gardeners, perhaps, that will not candidly confess to a weakness in favour of ample supplies of manure and composts or soils; and equally few that willingly cry enough of either, even wh...
-What To Avoid
Avoid keeping the plants longer in heat and moisture than is necessary to complete the first set of growths, unless wood and not buds is the aim, but rather shift to a cool house and lessen the amount...
-When And How To Lift And Store Dahlia-Roots
A few words on these points may perhaps prove to be words in season to many of our readers just now. For the present year the glory of the Dahlia has departed, for November comes, with gloomy fogs be...
-Whip or Tongue Grafting
To perform the operation of whip or tongue grafting, first cut over the stock to the required height; then, with a sharp thin-bladed knife, cut a slice 3 inches long off the stock, as represented at a...
-White Kidney Section
International Kidney Extra good crop, very large tubers, and of fair average quality. Covent Garden Market Very good crop, tubers a nice size for table, and very good when cooked a first-rate potat...
-Winter Bedding
There are now so many plants which are quite hardy, used for effect in summer bedding, that it is worth while to consider how they may be so combined with the tender plants in summer that they may occ...
-Winter Bedding. Continued
In the interesting article on Winter Bedding in your last number, I observe Daphne cneorum is recommended for that purpose. Allow me to protest against such an abuse of this plant: it hates being...
-Winter Flowers
Conservatoeies should be brilliant now with flowering-plants, and at no season of the year - not even during the summer - do flowers present such a bright and cheerful appearance. When the days are sh...
-Winter Salads
In most gardens, large and small, there is abundance of salad material during the summer and autumn months, which is much valued by the owners; but the same cannot be said about quantity in all garden...
-Winter Savory
This is a hardy, low Evergreen shrub, a native of Italy and France. The aromatic leaves are used in soups, salads, and other things. It is also sometimes boiled along with beans, probably on account o...
-Winter Vegetables
All kinds of vegetables are very nice and highly valued when they become ready for use for the first time in spring and the early part of the season; but I do not think there is any time when a variet...
-Winter-Blooming Orchids
In the early part of January last we had an opportunity of inspecting a new Orchid-house that Mr William Bull, of the King's Road, Chelsea, S.W., has just erected for the growth of Orchids. This hous...
-Winter-Blooming Orchids. Continued
A somewhat rare and certainly beautiful species is L. albida, one specimen in particular being of fine development. The flowers are French white, marked with gold. One had larger flowers, which were t...
-Winter-Flowering Begonias
Another class of plants that should not be overlooked, as their cultivation is so easy. They do well on a shelf in a Pine-stove, or any place where they can have a temperature of from 60 to 70&de...
-Winter-Flowering Orchids. Coelogyne Cristata
This effective plant comes from the mountains of Nepal and Sylhet, where it flourishes at an altitude of several thousand feet. It is one of the best winter and early spring flowering species we have;...
-Winter-Flowering Orchids. Laelias
Orchid-blooms are welcome at all times of the year, but those seem to us most acceptable which expand during our dull wintry months. All flowers are beautiful; but there is an obvious superiority abou...
-Winter-Flowering Orchids. Laelias In Pots
Laelia Anceps Introduced from Mexico nearly forty years ago, this plant remains a distinguished favourite in nearly all collections. It grows freely in the Cattleya-house or in an ordinary plant-stov...
-Winter-Flowering Orchids. Laelias On Blocks
Laelia Acuminata This is an old-established favourite in our gardens, having been introduced thirty years ago from Mexico. It generally flowers during December or January, and lasts a fortnight or th...
-Winter-Flowering Orchids. Lycaste Skinnerii
Some Orchids can only be successfully cultivated where a high temperature is maintained; and in addition to this, they require much extra care and attention. Others, however, grow luxuriantly in a mod...
-Winter-Flowering Orchids. Odontoglossums
We have here a genus of plants from the highlands or mountain-ranges of the New World, and particularly noted for their adaptability to what is popularly termed cool treatment. Nearly all the specie...
-Winter-Flowering Plants
The time of year is again at hand when all winter-flowering plants will or should be placed in their winter quarters. The nights have turned cold rather earlier than usual in this locality, and plants...
-Wintering Brompton Stocks
There is always considerable uncertainty hanging over the fate of these stocks. Sometimes they will pass through a winter unscathed, and at another time will be destroyed wholesale. My experience of t...
-Wintering Verbenas (Verbena)
Your query has been submitted to Mr Henry Eckford, of Coleshill Gardens, the raiser of some of the finest Verbenas now in cultivation, and the following is his reply: - In reply to your correspondent...
-Wiring Walls For Training Fruit-Trees
It is surprising how pertinaciously the old system of training wall-trees with nails and shreds has been adhered to. In this respect, speaking generally, we are no further advanced than our great gran...
-Wortley. Table And Room Decoration
Perhaps of all plants for winter decoration, as far as colour is concerned, there is not one to be compared with the Poinsettia pulcherrima for effect; it is a stove weed for facility of management, e...
-Yellow Blooming Plants For The Flower-Garden
There are two of these that I use somewhat largely, and which I can highly recommend; the one is Tagetes signata pumila, the other the pigmy dwarf orange French Marigold. Both produce yellow flowers, ...
-Yellow Peaches
In Notes on New Varieties of Fruits which appeared in last month's 'Gardener,' Mr Shortt includes Dr Hogg and a Bee among yellow-fleshed Peaches, which is a mistake. I have grown both of these; the ...
-Young Amateur
You say you were much annoyed last summer with red-spider on your Vines. It was a grand season for red-spider, being so hot and dry. Peel all the loose bark off your Vines. Wash them with soap and wat...
-Young Fruit-Trees
I was much pleased with some remarks that have appeared of late in 'The Gardener ' on our supply and selection of fruit. For who would not like to see fruitful trees and a well filled fruit-room? Some...
-Young Gardeners
Allow me, through the 'Gardener,' to thank Mr Hinds for his able article on the Balsam. I quite concur with him that it is almost forgotten by a great many gardeners, and not known how to be grown by ...
-Young Gardeners And Overtime
Referring again to the overtime movement, and whilst all must admit that there is room for an emancipation bill on behalf of young gardeners, still a little allowance must be made for circumstances. A...
-Young Wall Trees
Where walls are a good height - say from 14 to 18 feet - instead of planting the trees at from 10 to 15 yards apart, I would recommend to get maiden trees, - that is, one growth from the bud or graft,...
-Zephyranthes Rosea
It seems scarcely possible to believe that this beautiful half-hardy bulb should have to be classed with the neglected plants, but so rarely is it now seen that the conclusion is inevitable. It cannot...
-Zonal Pelargonium, Guillon Mangilli
In the March number of the ' Gardener,' Reader refers approvingly to the above. Probably, had he seen it as grown by Mr Taylor at Longleat, he would not have dismissed the subject so briefly - comme...
-A "Subscriber" In The North - A Learner
A Subscriber In The North Telegraph Cucumber will suit you for winter. If you have two pipes for bottom-heat, you require no hot dung. Good loam and some dung, and, if at hand, a few bones about th...
-A Lover Of Ferns - A. C
A Lover Of Ferns You can get Davalia Mooriana from any nurseryman; at least any nurseryman can procure it for you. We make it a rule never to recommend tradesmen in these pages. A Lover Of Herbaceou...
-A. C. Cade - A.P
A. C. Cade In so mild a climate we do not consider chambering necessary. The depth of soil, if you do chamber, should be 2 1/2 feet. The more the rainfall, the greater necessity there is for draining...
-Abandonment Of Chiswick - American Blight (A Perplexed One)
Abandonment Of Chiswick The writer of the lines under this heading is informed that they are not admissible to our columns. Ageratum Imperial Dwarf This cannot be too highly recommended as a dwarf ...
-An Aberdonian - Aponogeton Distachyon
An Aberdonian Your greenhouse that you have converted into a vinery being circular, it will be expensive to heat it with hot-water pipes, and we don't think an Arnott's stove, as you propose, will an...
-Aquilegia Aurea - Armeria Setacea
Aquilegia Aurea This is a new introduction from the Rocky Mountains. It is closely related to A. Canadensis, and in habit of growth, foliage, and height resembles that species. The flowers are, howev...
-Astragalus Vaginatus - Bryantlius Erectus, Syn. Menziesia Erecta
Astragalus Vaginatus This is a beautiful dwarf Milk-Vetch, with a woody root-stock and short branches also woody. The leaves are long, minutely pinnate. The flowers are in large showy racemes and dee...
-Bulbocodium Vernum - Campanula Pulla
Bulbocodium Vernum A very beautiful plant in the mass, Crocus-like in the form of its flowers, and also in its habit of pushing up its flowers in advance of its leaves. The flowers are rosy-purple, a...
-Campanula Raineri - Constant Reader, Bute
Campanula Raineri One of the handsomest of the dwarf-growing species. The flowers are very large, nearly 2 inches across, erect, purplish or bluish-purple. Campanula Waldsteiniana A dwarf dense - g...
-Constant Subscriber - Cultivation Of The Cucumber (Alma)
Constant Subscriber The Silver Variegated Euonymus, the Chinese Honeysuckle, and Variegated Periwinkle, are all first-rate hardy edging plants, and bear the knife well. They can be easily propagated ...
-Cymro - Dianthus Hybridus Maria Pare
Cymro You should have sent us a frond of the Fern with spores on it. We think it is Asplenium Adiantum nigrum var. acutum. We cannot, without a flower sent with it, say what the other plant is. D. ...
-Double Glazing (W. N.) - E. St A
Double Glazing (W. N.) We have no experience of double glazing as applied to Pine-houses; but you might make an experiment by having another set of lights made to put over the others in winter and be...
-E. Welsh - Extras
E. Welsh The Celery you sent us last spring was of first-rate excellence; we shall be much obliged for a pinch of seed this spring. Education Of Gardeners We do not see our way to open our pages...
-F - Filix Femina
F We know of no reason why Amaryllis Ackermanii should not do at the back wall of your greenhouse. It is a strong grower and very brilliant in colour. Take also the following: Brilliant, Holfordii, J...
-Fine-Foliaged Plants - G. M
Fine-Foliaged Plants Araucaria excelsa, A. Cookii, Bambusa Fortunii variegata, Coprosma Baueriana variegata, Centaurea ragusina, C. argentea plumosa, C. gymnocarpa, Cineraria acanthafolia, Dracaena a...
-G. R - Helenium Hoopesii
G. R We cannot throw any light on the case of your Camellia if there ha3 not been any budding or grafting. Garden-Walks (Inquirer) Six barrow-loads of rough material and one of fresh lime would cov...
-Heliotrope Surprise - J. B
Heliotrope Surprise What Imperial Blue is among Ageratums this is among Heliotropes. A lively purplish blue. Grows about 9 inches high, and having a first-rate habit. In some localities, where for th...
-J. B. K - J. K
J. B. K Drain at least 3 feet deep, 8 yards apart. Trench the ground, turning up as far as the staple is good, forking over the subsoil, but leaving it in the bottom. We would not pare the turf off u...
-J. O - John Cameron
J. O In the absence of every particular of the circumstances under which your Grapes were grown we cannot give you a satisfactory answer. The Grapes, however, had evidently never ripened thoroughly, ...
-John Forbes - Lime
John Forbes Monochaetum ensiferum, a beautiful greenhouse plant. John Gordon Your specimens did not reach us till the 16th, and were very much dried up. 1, Cannot recognise; 2, Adiantum assimile; 3...
-Linum Campanulatum - Manor
Linum Campanulatum A handsome yellow-flowered species, about 15 inches high. Linum Flavum Another beautiful yellow-flowered species, perhaps the best of its colour, and a very compact grower. Linu...
-Mary - Mrs Richards
Mary There is a deep-blue Viola suitable for bedding purposes in the market about London. It will probably be advertised in our pages ere long. It would suit your purpose. You will find it referred t...
-Muscat Of Alexandria Grapes - Name Of Plant
Muscat Of Alexandria Grapes At the meeting of the Fruit Committee of the Royal Horticultural Society, held in November, Messrs H. Lane & Son, Berkhampstead, exhibited some splendid examples of Muscat...
-Name Of Plant (A Reader) - Notes On New, Rare, And Choice Hardy Herbaceous Plants
Name Of Plant (A Reader) The specimen sent was so thoroughly shrivelled that we could make nothing of it. There must have been some delay in posting the box. Name Of Plants (A Forester) The double-...
-Notts - Palms
Notts You will see that your suggestion is being carried out. We have made arrangements that embrace winter-flowering Orchids and other winter-ilowering stove-plants. Orchis Maculata, Var. Superba ...
-Pelargoniums - Potatoes, Sets, Whole Or Cut?
Pelargoniums All the tricolor and variegated sorts; none better than Man -glesii properly trained. Pentstemon Glaber A very pretty Pentstemon, very dwarf, only about 6 inches high, with pretty glau...
-Preceptor - R. Wynne, Haydon Bridge
Preceptor The following Annuals will suit you: - Clarkia elegans, C. pul-chelia grandiflora, Collinsia bicolor, Coreopsis tinctoria, C. Drummondii, Dianthus Heddewigii, Erysimum Peroffskianum, Hibisc...
-Reader - S. L
Reader We never found any difficulty in getting a good set on the laterals, and consider the sub-lateral system a mere waste of time. Your other question would take up our whole space, were we to at...
-S. M. L - Saxifraga Pyrenaica Var. Maxima
S. M. L You will find the information you ask for in our present issue, under the head of New and Select Florist Flowers. For the other matter you must apply to some horticultural engineer. We neve...
-Scilla (Squill) - Strawberry, Dr Hogg (A. E.)
Scilla (Squill) This is one of the loveliest of the genera of spring flowers. S. amoena, bifolia, campanulata, italica, nutans, and sibirica, are the principal of the spring-flowering sorts, and all ...
-T. A. Mitchel - T. R
T. A. Mitchel The Iris-blooms, etc, were all decayed before they reached us, not having been sent direct to us. We cannot, however, undertake to name mere varieties. T. B Gumming is frequently caus...
-T. S. K - The Greenhouse
T. S. K We cannot undertake to name Roses, especially when received in bad condition, as yours were. T. W. S Populus Candicans, the grey or common white Poplar. William's book on Ferns will probabl...
-The Holy Thorn Of Glastonbury - Tomato Sauce For Cold Meat
The Holy Thorn Of Glastonbury When at Yeovil in the second week in January, we saw this famed Thorn in leaf and bloom, in the garden of Hound-stone House, the residence of Mr Thomas Sampson. There we...
-Trillium Grandiflorum - Vine Border (G. S.)
Trillium Grandiflorum A very choice and beautiful plant, somewhat singular as well in structure and aspect. The flowers are pure white, and appear in ordinary seasons in the end of April, and last ti...
-Vine-Border (A Constant Reader) - W. C. N
Vine-Border (A Constant Reader) It will be advantageous to cover the Vine-border, so as to keep the roots dry. This can be done with tiffany or wooden shutters; the last named is the best thing, as t...
-W. E., Liverpool - Wm. Kater
W. E., Liverpool The thrip is a difficult insect to destroy. Fumigate your vines three nights in succession, and throw a little Cayenne pepper or a few capsicums amongst the tobacco when burning. On ...









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