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The London Medical Dictionary Vol1 | by Bartholomew Parr



Including, under distinct heads, every branch of medicine, viz. anatomy, physiology, and pathology, the practice of physic and surgery, therapeutics, and materia medica; with whatever relates to medicine in natural philosophy, chemistry, and natural history

TitleThe London Medical Dictionary
AuthorBartholomew Parr
PublisherMitchell, Ames, And White William Brown
Year1819
Copyright1819, Mitchell, Ames, And White William Brown
AmazonLondon Medical Dictionary

By Bartholomew Parr, M.D

Fellow Of The Royal Societies Of London And Edinburgh, And Senior Physician Of The Devon And Exeter Hospital Creditur, ex medio quia res arcessit, habere Sudoris minimum; sed habet tanto Plus oneris, quanto veniz minus. Hor.

Lexican contexat, nam Cxtera quid moror, omnes Poenarum species, hic labor unus habet Scaliger Philadelphia:

To The Right Honourable Sir Joseph Banks, Bart Knight Of The Bath, President Of The Royal Society

Sir,

Your kind permission of addressing these volumes to you, as it affords me an opportunity of acknowledging the many obligations you have conferred. I received with the greatest satisfaction. A. work, nearly approaching in its object that department of science in which you are so eminent; which rests on the observation of Nature in all her varied forms as her securest foundation; - in fact, The Natural History Of The Body And Mind, Cannot. I trust, to you be unacceptable. Should it appear to be executed in a manner worthy the approbation of yourself and the public, my highest ambition will be gratified.

I have the honour to be, Sir,

Your very obliged and faithful

Humble servant,

Bartholomew Parr

Exeter, November, 1808.

-Preface
If a dictionary be sometimes the refuge of indolence, it is an useful resource in circumstances of emergency. It offers a collection of opinions, at one view, and within moderate limits, suggests hint...
-Preface. Part 2
There are numerous collections from authors, sometimes of reference only, but more often copies of detached passages, arranged, in many instances, alphabetically, which, though not properly dictionari...
-Preface. Part 3
A Dictionary of Medicine was, some time since, published by Dr. Motherby, and continued, in successive editions, by him and Dr. Wallis, When a new work of this kind was required by the public, it was ...
-Preface. Part 4
Improvements in anatomy have been less splendid. Indeed, whatever the minutest accuracy could ascertain, in the investigation of the structure of the human body, was apparently found in the works of W...
-Preface. Part 5
The advantages of such connected views must be obvious. In the scattered practical observations, opinions have differed as widely as the statures and complexions of the authors. Each can only be with ...
-Preface. Part 6
The practice of medicine has been detailed with unusual care. The plans of the most approved and scientific authors have been carefully considered, and, whatever science or empiricism has at different...
-Preface. Part 7
Prejudice, superstition, and fancy, have greatly extended the list of vegetable remedies: but in a work of this kind, though every absurdity has not a claim to considerable attention, yet the most rid...
-Preface. Part 8
To have retained so many useless synonyms may, perhaps, require an apology. In fact, they were found in the pages of the work last mentioned, and had been introduced before its glaring defects showed ...
-Aavora
A species of palm found in Africa, and the American Islands. The nucleus of the fruit resembles an almond; it is mild and nutritious, and is used by the natives as an astringent, particularly in cases...
-Abdomen
The Belly, from abdo, to hide; as its contents lie hid in it. The last syllable is only a termination; as from lego, legumen. It is also called Imus Venter. Alvus. Gaster. Katocalia. Faesius calls it ...
-Abductor
(From abducere, to draw from.) Those muscles are called abductors which draw backwards the moveable parts into which they are inserted; of which there are several in the human body, viz. 1. Abductor ...
-Abies
(Probably from a wild pear, the fruit of which the cones of the fir resemble.) Fir, called also Elate Theleia. The fir-tree is an evergreen, and coniferous, with numerous, narrow, stiff leaves, stan...
-Ablactatio
(From priv. and lacto, to suckle.) Ablactation, or Weaning a child from the breast. Also called Apogalactismus. When the mother wants health, or strength; is affected with any constitutional di...
-Abortus. Aborsus. Abortio
(from ab, defect, and orior, to arise.) Aboriri quasi intempestive oriri. Abortion- or miscarriage. The birth of a child before its due time; or, the destroying a child in the womb: termed also convul...
-Abortus. Aborsus. Abortio. Part 2
Lime-water has been supposed to be singularly useful both in curing a disposition to, and preventing threatened miscarriages, in those who have often miscarried before. If in these cases the water was...
-Abortus. Aborsus. Abortio. Part 3
If flooding happens during the first six months, bleed according to the state of the pulse, keep the patient still in bed; and though she is faint, cold, or low, give no warm cordials, for they increa...
-Abscessio Abscessus
An abscess; (from abscedo, to depart;) or from abs and cedo, to retire.) A cavity containing pus, or a collection of matter in a part. So called, because the parts which were joined are now separated;...
-Abscessio Abscessus. Part 2
Abscesses from their seat and their consequences are often highly dangerous; and it is of the greatest importance to prevent or discuss them. The abscess, for instance, in the psoas muscle, is general...
-Abscessio Abscessus. Part 3
1. Abscessus abdominis. An abscess of the Belly. See Inflammatio. Musc. Abdom. N 10. 2. Abscessus ani. An abscess of the Anus. A large quantity of fat fills'up the cavity on each side of the an...
-Abscessio Abscessus. Part 4
9. Abscessus colli. An abscess of the .Neck. This part is affected with tumours of every kind, but generally the scrofulous and encysted occupy it. Abscesses here are apt to become fistulous; but by a...
-Abscessio Abscessus. Part 5
16. Abscessus inguinis. An abscess in the Groin, is sometimes occasioned by injuries done to the parts below, as in the knees, legs, or toes; a pestilential fever may be the cause, in which an abscess...
-Abscessio Abscessus. Part 6
20. Abscessus lumborum. See Psoas, seu Lum-borum Abscessus. 21. Abscessus manuum. Abscesses on the Hands. For the most part they are strumous; when not, the common methods suffice for their removal. ...
-Abscessio Abscessus. Part 7
27. Abscessus ossium. An abscess of the Bones. Observations in practice prove, that not only in the cellular parts near the joints, but also in the middle cavities of the large bones, inflammations ha...
-Abscessio Abscessus. Part 8
32. Abscessus pedum. Abscesses in the Feet. Of all the sorts that affect these parts, the strumous, which are most common, are the worst, for in these instances the bones are usually affected; but abs...
-Abscessio Abscessus. Part 9
41. Abscessus spirituosus. See Aneuris-ma. 42. Abscessus splenis. An abscess of the Spleen. This viscus is rarely the seat of abscess; but when it is, and the suppuration is completed, for the most p...
-Absinthium
Wormwood. unpleasant, (from .neg. and plea. But authors vary much in the account of the etymology of this word. However, the English name is originally an Anglo-saxon one. It is one amongst...
-Absorbents
Absorbent medicines, (from ab-iorieo, to suck up). This was formerly an important class of medicines, at present it is reduced below its proper level; and it will be useful to appreciate the real valu...
-Absorptio
Absorption. See the different kinds under Absorbentia vasa. Thgugh we are convinced by the most undoubted evidence that fluids are absorbed, we have little knowledge of the power by which this is eff...
-Abstinentia
(From abstineo, to abstain). In a limited sense, this regulation implies moderation and temperance; and numerous are the instances in which the happiest effects have resulted from them. The abstinence...
-Acacia
(From to sharpen). The Egyptian Thorn, or Binding Bean-tree. Several species are enumerated by botanists; but the two sorts used in medicine are, 1. Acacia Vera; called, by Caspar Bauhine, acacia ...
-Accelerators Urinae
Accelerators or the urine, (from accelero, to hanten). Called also urine stimulatores. They hasten theejection of the urine and semen. The acceleratores urine arise fleshy from the sphincter ani, an...
-Acer
The Maple-tree, (from acer;) because of the sharpness of its juice. The great maple-tree, falsely called sycamore, is the pseudo platanus. Lin. Sp. Plant. 1495. It is also called platanus tragi. The...
-Acetabulum
is a large cavity in a bone, to receive the convex head of another, for the advantage of a circular motion. The large cavity in the os coxendix is thus named, which receives the head of the os femori...
-Acetosella
So called from the acidity of its leaves. The plants of this acid nature employed in medicine belong to the genus oxalis L. and are the O. Acetosella Sp. Pi. 620, O. Cornuculata623; O. Cernua Wildenow...
-Acetum
Vinegar. This is the second state in which the saccharine juices of vegetables appear in consequence of a spontaneous fermentation, in a heat of about 80 of Fahrenheit. In the first it becomes a ...
-Acetum Distillatum
SeuSp. Aceti. Distilled vinegar. Acetous acid. Distil wine vinegar with a gentle heat as long as the drops fall free from an empyreuma. The first pint that is drawn off is a weak vinous spirit, and ...
-Achlys
A dimness of sight, (from darkness or cloudiness). It also signifies a small scar or mark over the pupil, of a light blue colour. It is usually synonymous with caligo cornet, or blindness from opaci...
-Achor
qu. (from bran; so called from the branny scales thrown off). Lactumen: abas, acores, cerion; favus. The crusta lactea of authors, and in England the scald head. Trallian says, that it is a sore o...
-Acida
Acids, (from acesco, to sharpen). Acids form a species of salts, exciting upon the organ of taste the sensation called sour; which maybe regarded as synonymous with acid. Every substance is called aci...
-Aciditas
(From acesco, to sharpen,) acidity, also acor. Diseases from this cause are frequent. The seat of acidity in our bodies, as a disease, is principally the stomach and the small intestines. An acid acr...
-Acidulae
(From acidus, sour). Mineral waters that contain a brisk spirit, when unaccompa-nied with heat, are thus named: but if they are hot also, they are called thermit. In Paracelsus, Fontale acetosum is of...
-Aconitum
Also called Camarum, Canicida, Cy-nococtanum. Various derivations are given by etymologists; as, 1st, a whetstone or rock, because it grows on bare rocks. 2dly, a negative, and dust, because it grow...
-Acridae
(From acer, sharp). Acrid medicines. Acrids are substances of a penetrating pungency: applied to the skin, they inflame it; chewed, they promote a discharge of the saliva; and snuffed up the nose, th...
-Acrimonia
Acrimony, (from acer, sharp J. This term is applicable to any substances that produce particular sensations from the actions of that stimulus which they possess, and which we express by the different ...
-Actio
(From to act,) vel Functio; also Facultas The actions or functions of the body are divided into the vital, natural, and animal. The vital functions, or actions, are those which are absolutely necess...
-Adductor
A leader to, (from adducere, to move or bring towards). A name of several muscles. l. Adductor ad minimum digitum. It rises from the unciform process of the carpus towards the annular ligament, and i...
-Adeps
Fat, called also pinguedo, axungia, buty-rum, arvina, arabus, etc. Fat is a condensed oily juice, contained in that part of the cellular membrane called membrana adiposa. When superfluous, and found i...
-Adnata Agnata, Tunica
(From adnascor, to grow to). The outer coat of the eye; called also circu?ncalualis, circumossalis,albuginea, epipephycos. It is that which makes the white of the eye, called also exclopion, and is th...
-Aegoprosophon
(From, a goat, and a face). See Aegidion. Aegylops or Aegilops. A disease in,the inward corner of the eye, (so called from a goat, and an eye, or goat's-eye,) because goats are supposed to be su...
-Aelora
(From to lift up.,) to suspend on high. Gestatio, a species of exercise used by the ancients, and of which Aetius gives the following account: Gestation, while it exercises the body and limbs, stil...
-Aer
Anp, air, (from the Hebrew term aor, light,) called also gas ventosum. From a variety of experiments, atmospheric air is proved to consist of a mixture of about seventy-two parts of azotic gas, to twe...
-Aer. Part 2
In other respects the physical properties of the air seem to have little influence: the warmest and longest summers are often healthy: the coldest winters, with the exception of accidental inflammator...
-Aer. Part 3
The aerial pathology has not yet been successfully cultivated. Man can live and enjoy health from the heat of twenty-eight to one hundred and eight degrees of Fahrenheit. He can exist in a constant fo...
-Aer. Part 4
Nitrogen gas, or the mephitic air of former authors, is very extensively diffused. Its specific gravity is inconsiderable, for it is lighter than atmospheric air, in the proportion of 985 to 1000. Nit...
-Aeris Flos
(From as, copper,) flowers of copper; anthos, phrasium viride, etc. Copper reduced to small grains, by pouring cold water on it when in a state of fusion. The cold water is poured on the copper as it ...
-Aerugo Aeris
Called also viride aeris, cupri ru-higo, calcithos, Hispanicum viride, verdigrise. It is copper, corroded by a fermented vegetable acid into a bluish green substance. The copper is made into very thin...
-Aes
43 Aeta The chemical character for copper is . Its gravity is to silver as eight to ten; to gold, as eight to nineteen; and to water, as eight to one: more strictly, it is from 7.780 to 8.58...
-Aetas
(From a Chaldean term, etta, time, - age,) one life; an hundred years; also a certain stage of lige. An age in history, or as relating to the life of man, is not, however, so extensive. It has usual...
-Aether
In philosophy, is a subtile fluid, supposed by sir Issac Newton to fill all space, and to be the cause of gravitation and numerous other phenomena, inexplicable on other grounds. Sir Isaac, however, o...
-Aether. Vel Ether
Vel Ether, in chemistry, (from ardeo, splendeo, bright and splendid,) is called liquor athereus vitriolicus, nitrosus, muriaticus, according to the acid from which it is formed, combined with alcoho...
-Aethiops Antimonialis
Antimonial AEThi-ops. Dr. Cockburn, in his Treatise on the Gonorrhoea, directs us to melt equal parts of antimony and sea salt in a crucible, and separate the scoriae, then to rub equal parts of the r...
-Affinitas. Affinity
Affinity, (from affinis, connected). Attractio, chemical affinity, also called elective attraction, may be defined the superior attraction evinced by all bodies for some particular substance; an attra...
-Affinitas. Affinity. Part 2
1. Caloric. In Water Oxygen AEther Alcohol Ammonia Water Vol. Oils Glass Q. Silver Bases of all Gases 2. Oxygen. In Waters Basis of Muriatic and va rious other Acids. Carbon Phosphorus Sulp...
-Affinitas. Affinity. Part 3
16. Sulphureous Acid. In Water Barytes Strontia Lime Potash Soda Magnesia Ammonia Alumine Jargonia Metallic Oxides Water Alcohol 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. Nitrous, Nitric, Muriatic, Oxy-Muriatic...
-Affinitas. Affinity. Part 4
Sulphur 47. Oxide of Cobalt. In Water Oxalic Acid Muriatic A. Sulphuric A. Tartareous Nitric Sebacic Phosphoric Fluoric Lacteo-saccharine Succinic Citric Formic Lactic Acetous Arsenic Bo...
-Affinitas. Affinity. Part 5
Sulphur Phosphorus Caoutchouc 60. Volatile.Oil AEther Alcohol Fixed Oil Fixed Alkali Sulphur Phosphorus 61. Fixed.Oils Lime Barytes Potash Soda Magnesia Ammonia Oxide of Mercury Oilier O...
-Agallochum
An Arabian term. Agallu-gen - lignum Indicum - aloe aromatica. The aromatic aloe. The accounts given of this wood are so different from each other, as well as from the specimens of it that are met ...
-Agaricus
Agaric, supposed from Agaria, a town in Asia. Many species of fungi have this term, all of which arc acrid and poisonous. -------------muscarius, Lin. Sp. Pi. 1645. The reddish mushrooms, also called...
-Agaricus Piperatus
Lin. 1741. Pepper mushroom; also called pepper agaric. The stalk is about two inches high. The hat is convex when young: as it expands, it becomes nearly flat; its colour is a dirty while, with a mixt...
-Agheustia
(,non,and gusto). Deageustia, Fect, or Loss of taste, called also Apogeusia, Apogeusis. Dr. Cullen ranks this as a genus of disease, in the class locale*, and order dysesthesia. The causes are ...
-Agnus Castus
(From agnus, a lamb, and the Hebrew term kadash, chaste), It is called agnus, from the down on its surface, which resembles that upon a lamb's skin; and castus, because the chaste matrons at the feast...
-Agrimo Nia
(From a field, and alone). So named from being the chief of all wild herbs. Common agrimony, called also eupatorium Graecorum, vel verum, and hociamsanun. A. eupatoria Lin. Sp. Pi. 643. The leaves...
-Aix
La Chapelle, is a large imperial city, situated in the duchy of Juliers, on the confines of Flanders, seven leagues from Spa; it contains many springs of hot sulphureous waters, which supply a number ...
-Akmella
See Acmella. Al. The Arabian article which signifies the; it is applied to a word by way of eminence, as the Greek i is. The Easterns express the superlative by adding God thereto, as, the mountains ...
-Albugo Corallii
A name of the magistery of coral, which it hath obtained from its whiteness. Albugo oculorum. White speck on the eyes. The Greeks generally named it leucoma: the Latins and ancient authors, nubes, pt...
-Albumen Ovi
White of egg; called also al-bumor and albor ovi, ovi albus liquor, ovicandidum, al-bamentum, clareta, etc. The white of an egg is a pellucid viscous liquor, thinner towards each end, and thicker in ...
-Alcali
Or Alkali, (of al and kali, i. e. the essence or the. whole of kali, the plant from which it was originally prepared, though now derived from plants of every kind). Alkaline salt is called alafi, alaf...
-Alcali. Part 2
In estimating the strength of alkali it has been usual to add the muriatic acid, and for each dram saturated, so many one-sixteenths of pure alkali were allowed. Alkalis, when pure, from whatever plan...
-Alcali. Part 3
Liquor, olim spiritus, sal, et oleum cornu. Cervi. The liquor, salt, and oil of hartshorn. These preparations are brought to us by the practical chemists in a state sufficiently pure for common purp...
-Aqua Ammo Nie Pure
This spirit, prepared with quick-lime, is thought to be too pungent and acrid for internal use; but in the dilute state of administering this medicine, it is as safe as that prepared with an alkaline ...
-Alchemia Alchimia, Or Alchymia, Alkima
Alchemy. That branch of chemistry which relates to the transmutation of metals into gold; the forming a panacea, or universal remedy; an alkahest, or universal menstruum; an universal ferment; and man...
-Cereris
Vinum Hordeaceum, barley-wine Vinum regionum septentrionalium; sometimes bira. Ale produces colics, and is occasionally, when not well fermented, acescent; but does not produce calcareous diseases, a...
-Alembicus
Avicenna considers this as an Arabic term; but others suppose it half Arabic and half Greek, from the Arabic particle' al, and which is again derived from for to ascend. Seneca calls it in the La...
-Alembroth
A Chaldee word, importing the K.ey of Art; some explain it by sal mercurii, or sal philosophorum et artis: others say it is named elem-brot et sal fusionis, or sal fixionis. Alembroth desicca-tum is s...
-Alga
A weed growing upon the sea shore, and in cold situations; called also ulva,facus marinus, bryon thalassium, grass-wrack, wrake, sea-weed or Grass,. and sea-moss. There are three kinds distinguished ...
-Algedo
( pain). Suppressed gonorrhoea; when it has stopped, or been checked suddenly after it has appeared, and is attended with pain. When it thus stops, a pain is continued to the bladder by the urethra; ...
-Alimenta
Aliment; or food both solid and liquid: (from alo, to nourish). It is such matter as is convertible by the actions of the body into an alkalescent gluten, of which all our solids and fluids are formed...
-Alimenta. Part 2
We next arrive at the seeds, which are nutritious, from their amylaceous principle, viz. the cerealia. Of these we may mention rice, wheat, barley, oats, rye, Indian corn, millet, buck wheat, Guinea c...
-Alimenta. Part 3
The animal food which digests in the stomach with the least irritation, though not the most quickly, is the white meat of all animals, and the meat of the younger ones. White and young meats abound in...
-Alimenta. Part 4
The amphibia form a link between animal substances and fish. The turtle, the delight of the epicure, is an example of this class; but the species we shall afterwards mention at length. The conger eel,...
-Alimenta. Part 5
Of the pice, some of the macaws have been eaten; but the flesh is hard, dry, and indigestible: those, however, which feed on vegetable substances, must be excepted. The psittacus pertinax., for instan...
-Alimenta. Part 6
Of the first kind, then, the genus gadus affords the most prominent instance. It contains the cod, the ling, the whiting, the haddock, the sea burbot, the pollack, the rawlin pollack or coal fish, the...
-Alimenta. Part 7
There are two river fish which deserve a higher rank, the river burbot (gadus lota), and the eel. Of the former, the liver, like the trail of the surmullet, is a peculiar delicacy; and the latter is a...
-Alimenta. Part 8
The genus equus is of a similar nature. Policy forbids the horse to become an article of food; yet, among the Tartar hordes, the horse and the mule also are articles of diet; probably in their younger...
-Alimenta. Part 9
We add the following list of alimentary substances from Dr. Darwin's Zoonomia, in the order of their nutritious powers, beginning with the most nutritive, and proceeding to those less so: I. Cervus e...
-Alkekengi
(Alkakangi, Arab). Winter cherry; also called halicacabum, solanum vesicarium, vesicaria vulgaris. The species used in medicine is the physalis alke kengi Lin. Sp. Pi. 262. It grows wild in France, ...
-Allium
(Either from oleo, to smell, because it stinks, or from anew to avoid, as being unpleasant to most people). Common garlic. Called also, from its antiputrescent property, theriaca rusticorum. It is the...
-Alnus
('alno. Ital.). The alder tree. Betula alnus Lin. Sp. Pl 1394! Alnus rotundi, folia glutinosa viridis, C. B. The common alder tree, called amendanus. The black alder is the Rhamnus frangula Lin. Sp....
-Aloes Gummi
Gum aloes. This is the inspissated gum of the whole plant described above. It is reported that Alexander, landing on the island of Succotora, or Zocotria, at the mouth of the Red Sea, in one of his ex...
-Alopecia
Baldness, the falling off of the hair, (from a fox,) because the fox is subject to a distemper that resembles it. Athrix, Depilis, Pha-lacrotis; when particularly on the sinciput, Calvities, and Cal...
-Alphus
(from to change,) M. A. Severinus calls it Baras. This disorder is a species of that sort of white leprosy called vitiligo, and which is divided into the alphus, melas, and leuce, called also albar...
-Altera Ntia
(From altero, to change). Alteratives. Medicines of this kind claimed formerly a considerable share of the physician's attention, when acrimony was the most common reputed cause of diseases. This subj...
-Althaea
(From to heal,) called also bismalva, hibiscus, malvaviscus, bolus Judaica, anadendro-ma/ache, anadendron, aristaltheca; in English, marsh-mallow. It is the althea officinalis Lin. Sp. Pi. 966, and ...
-Alumen
(Alum, Arab.).,the Greeks called it Assos, azub, Aseb; and when extremely hard, as iron, Elanula. It is an earthy salt, consisting, in a great measure, of the vitriolic acid and a pure clay, changin...
-Alysmos Alyce
(From to be uneasy, anxious). Anxietas, anxiety. Hippocrates uses it to express that restless uneasiness that is attendant on acute diseases. Duretus distinguishes between the and the The first is ...
-Amanita
(From , priv. and madness). The eatable mushroom, not poisonous. Their tribe is therefore called Aminita, Fungi, and Tubera. The fungous productions called mushrooms, truffles, etc. Among th...
-Amara
(Marar, to grow bitter. Heb.) Bitters. Bitterness is a simple perception which cannot be defined, but must be referred to experience. What is the nature of the substances possessed of it, in a chemica...
-Amaurosis
(From obscure). It is a decay or loss of sight, when no fault is observed in the eye, except that the pupil is somewhat enlarged and motionless. This disorder is styled a gutta sercna; cataracta nigr...
-Amblyopia
(From dull, and the eye) Visus debilis. This is a debility of sight, absolute or relative, without any apparent opacity of the cornea o-interior part of the eye. See Amaurosis. Hippocrates means b...
-Ambra
See Succinum. Ambra Arabibus. From cineraceus, the colour of ashes. Ambra Cineracea. A mbra Gri' sea, (from gris, grey). Also named 8uccinum-griseum,succinum-cinereum, amba...
-Ambusta
(From amburo, to burn). Burns, or scalds; called also causis, ambustio, ambustura. Dr. Cullen places this case as a variety of the phlogosis erythema. A burn is from solid substances; a scald from an...
-Lotio Lithargyri Acetati Camphorati
Camphorated lotion of acetated litharge. Rx Sp. camphorati 3 ij. aq. lithargyri. acetati 3 i. gradatim commisceantur et paulatim adde aq. distillatae i. In topical inflammations, having a tend...
-Amentia
(From , privat. and mens, the mind ). Madness, idiotic insanity; also anoia, fatuitas, oblivio; foolishness, idiotism, etc. Some use amnesia as a synonime. Dr. Cullen defines it to be the weakne...
-Amethysta Pharmaca
(From , neg. and wine ). Medicines which either prevent or remove the inebriating effects of wine. Amianthus, (From , priv. and to pollute,) so called from its white or ...
-Ammi
(From an urinal; because it provokes urine. Sison ammi Lin. Sp. Pl. 363,) or Ammi Verum; called also ammi creticum, ammi par-vum foliis fniculi, ammi semine tenuissimo et odoratissimo,cuminum A...
-Ammonia Muriata
See Avmoniacus sal. Ammonia Praeparata, olim Sal Volatilis Salis ammontaci. Ammonia aqua, olim sps. salis ammoniaci. Ammonia aqua purae, olim sps. volatilis causticus. See Alcali volatile. There ar...
-Ammoniacum
Gum. Called also armoniacum, but improperly; hammoniaci lachryma, assac, azac: and in English, gum ammoniac. It is a concrete gummi-resinous juice, produced in the East Indies, and brought in masses ...
-Ammoniacus Sal
Ammonia Muri-ata; called also cyreniacus sal, ammoniac salt and armoniac, but improperly; likewise alem-zadar, alemzadad, adarige, aquila, alfol, alacab, alaza-let, alcob, alfatide, aliocab, alisteles...
-Amnion
Or Amnios, (from a lamb, or lamb's skin). Martinus thinks it hath its name in allusion to , a vessel, used for the reception of blood insacrifice. It is also called armatura,aguina membrana, and pel...
-Amomum
(From human, Arabic, a pigeon,) whose foot it was thought to resemble. Stone pars-let. Botanists enumerate three species, viz. the true, the bastard, and as a third sort, the tree nightshade is inclu...
-Amongabriel
Or Amogabriel. See Cinnabaris. A' Mor, love, (from hamah, Hebrew, to burn; or am, a mother; because love is the natural passion of mothers to their children). Though not itself a disease, it produces...
-Amphibius
Amphibious, (from and life). Animals are thus called that are capable of living as well by land, or in the air, as by water. Though it is not our design to treat of subjects which belong to natural...
-Amputatio
Amputation, (from amputo, to cut off ). It is the cutting off a. limb. Ectome, excisio, and extirpatio, are used in the same sense. Excisio may indeed be applied to the operation where one part is cut...
-Amputatio. Part 2
Calomel mixed with starch, and strewed on a pledget of lint, is perhaps the best application to the stump of an amputated limb. 9. A retractor. 10. A roller of five ells in length; the many-tailed b...
-Amputatio. Part 3
When the dressing is finished, the patient should be laid in bed, and an assistant should gently and constantly hold his hand on the stump during some hours, not only to guard against a haemorrhage, b...
-Amputatio. Part 4
See Bell's Surgery, vol. vi. p. 411. White's Surgery, 199. Amputation of the Hand. Heister thinks it best to amputate the hand with a knife only, at the joint of the wrist; but the usual method is t...
-Amuleta
(From a band, because it was tied round the person's neck; or from to defend). Amulets. Amulets and charms are so nearly allied, as to be con-, sidered in the same light. In each, superstition, the...
-Amygdalae
( almond,) almonds. The fruit of the amygdalus, almond tree. A com-munis and nana Lin. Sp. Pl. 677. Amygdalae amarae. Bitter almonds. Amygdalae dulces. Sweet almonds. The leaves and flowers of th...
-Amylum. Amyleon. Amylion
(From , neg. and a mill, because it is made of com without a mill, or without grinding). It is the faecula of wheat, and with us called starch; named also amidum. It is the purest farina of th...
-Anagallis
(From and milk, because it has the property of coagulating milk,) called also cor-choron, pimpernella, bibinella, and aritis. The anagallis of the Greeks is the macia of the Latins. The species use...
-Analeptica. Analeptics
Such remedies as exhilarate the spirits, and restore flesh and strength. See Cardica and Restaura' ntia. Dr. Cullen says, they are medicines suited to restore the force of the body when lost, and are...
-Analysis
(From to resolve). In chemistry it is the term used for decompounding any mixed body, and reducing it into its constituent parts. The chemists make use of two modes of analysis: 1. by fire; 2. by men...
-With Respect
To Venereal Commerce. In the locales, dysorexiae, of Cullen. This disease arises from a deficiency of semen, or a weakness of the muscular powers necessary to its effectual discharge. In some instanc...
-Anasarca
(From through, and flesh,) called also catasarca,episarcialiam, intercus. Pituitaalba, hyposarca, hyposarcidies, veternum hyderos, Galeni phlegmatia, phlegmatitia. A species of dropsy from a serous h...
-Anatomia
(from through,and to cut, or from to dissect). Anatomy is the art of dissecting the human body in order to demonstrate the shape, structure, connexion, and situation of the parts; this, though it ...
-Anchylosis
(From crooked). A stiff joint, a species of which is called orthocolon. It is a species of contractura in Cullen's Nosology. When the bones are immoveable, and the joint in a bent position, it is cal...
-Ancyloblepharon
(From bent, and an eye-lid). A disease of the eye which closes the eye-lids. Sometimes the eye-lids grow together, and also to the tunica albuginea of the eye, from carelessness when there is an ul...
-Ancyloglossum
(From crooked, and the tongue). A contraction of the ligaments of the tonge: tongue-tied. Vogel defines it to be an adhesion of the tongue to the adjacent parts, so as to hinder sucking, swallowing,...
-Androgyne. Androgyni
(From a man, and a woman). Effeminate men, and Hermaphrodites. See Gynanthropus. Andromachi Theriaca. This medicine of Andromachus hath above sixty ingredients in it. It is needless to repeat the u...
-Anesum
See Anisum. Anethoxyla, the woody root of dill. Anethum, Anet, (from after, and to run,) so called because its roots run out a great way. Dill, or anet. It is the anethum gra-veolcns Lin. Sp. Pi. T...
-Aneurisma
(From to dilate much,) called also hematocele arteriosum, abscessus spirituosus, emborysma. See Abscess. The aneurism is a tumour arising from the dilatation or rupture of the coats of an artery. A...
-Aneurisma. Part 2
The causes of aneurisms are various. A natural weakness in a part of an artery is the immediate cause of the true aneurism. The internal causes are, a fulness of the arteries concurring with some viol...
-Aneurisma. Part 3
The method of cure is the same in the true, the false, and the mixed aneurisms: the varicous needs but little, if any assistance: if it is enlarged by exercise and be-cotaes painful, indulge a little ...
-Angelica Sativa
Called also imperatoria sativa, pectoraria herba. It is the angelica archangelica Lin. Sp. Pi. 360. It is found by the sides of rivulets, on the mountains of Lapland, and is cultivated in gardens all ...
-Angina
(From to strangle,) also called cynanche, kynanche, lycanche. Quinsy; thus named, from an abbreviation of the French word squinancie. It is an inflammation in the parts of the throat subservient to...
-Angina. Part 2
It is not, we have said, difficult to distinguish the inflammatory sore throat, when we reflect that it consists in a difficulty of swallowing, with fever, and a florid redness of the fauces. Scirrhi,...
-Angina. Part 3
Sec Aretaeus, Coelius Aurelianus, Hildanus, Trallia-nus, Hoffman, Boerhaave, Le Dran's Operations, Wal-lis's Sydenham, and Fordyce's Elements, part. ii. Cul-len's First Lines, i. 279. edit. 4. Angina...
-Angina. Part 4
These are the appearances, and such the practice in the more violent attacks of the complaint; and we have never seen an instance of it, when taken early and treated in this manner, in a constitution ...
-Angina. Part 5
The disease consists in a membranous substance, lining not only the trachea above its divarication, but also its minutest branches, though the larger parts of the tube are first affected. It has been ...
-Angina. Part 6
Angina Pharyng.AEa. This species is particularly rare. It is described by Eller, De Cognoscendis et Cu-randis Morbis; and a case of it occurs in the third volume of the Medical Commentaries. The pain ...
-Angiologia. Angeilogia
(From vas, and sermo). Angiology. It treats of the glands, lacteals, lymphaeducts, nerves, arteries, veins, and other vessels; including their structure and distribution. An Golam. It belongs to a ...
-Anguilla
(From ev, and to involve, because it rolls itself in the mud). The eel. Eels that are met with in rivers, or other clear running waters, are the best; the liver and the gall are extremely acrid. Bo...
-Angusturae Cortex
Angustura bark. This bark, at first imported in the year 1788, was supposed to be the production of a tree on the coast of Africa; but it is now found to come from the Spanish main. Mr. Bruce pronounc...
-Anima Hepatis
The name of sal martis. Anima orticulorum. A term for hermodac-tylls, etc. Anime. The vesicles of herrings; are thus called because they are light and full of wind. They are supposed to be diuretic....
-Animal
Animal, (from anima, life). All bodies endowed with life, and with a power of spontaneous motion necessary to support life, are called animals. Animals are thus distinguished in general from vegetable...
-Animal. Continued
Animal moschiferum. The musk animal. See Moschus. Animal zibethicum. See Zibethum. Animal kingdom. It is not our object to ascertain with precision the limits of this kingdom of nature, or to mark th...
-Animale Dippelii
Oleum. Dippel's animal oil. This is a common animal oil highly rectified: the number of rectifications required is in proportion to the former state of the oil: seldom less than six are necessary. It...
-Anime
So called from its refreshing odour. The Portuguese corrupted.the word anima into anime. The gum anime is also called resina anime, and courbaril rezina, aminaea, animum. By Piso the tree from whence...
-Animus
(From wind or spirit). The mind. The body and the mind reciprocally affect each other; whatever invigorates the body, renders the faculties of the soul proportionably active and strong: what depress...
-Animus. Continued
The regulation of the mind is of great importance in a studious man. The hour of sleep should not approach, while the mind is irritated by study. A calm serenity should be allowed to steal on, by ligh...
-Anisum. Anesum. Anicetum. Anise
It is the pimpinella anisum Lin. Sp. Pi. 379. Anisum herbariorum. Common anise. The common anise is a native of Egypt, Crete, and Syria: cultivated in the southern parts of Europe, and grows in our g...
-Anodyna
(From , neg. and pain). Anodynes are medicines which ease pain and procure sleep. They are usually divided into three sorts, viz. 1. Paregorica. mitigo, called also anetica. Paregorics, or s...
-Anorexia
Anorexy, (from , neg. and appetite): also apositia, asitia. A want of appetite, without loathing of food. The Greeks call such as take no food, or have no appetite, anorecti and asiti; but tho...
-Anthelmia
(From against and a worm,) the annual worm-grass of Jamaica. Spi-gelia anthelmia Lin. Sp. Pi. 213. The perennial worm-grass of Maryland is the Indian pink. It is the Spigelia Marylandica* though for...
-Anthelmintica
(From against, and a worm). Vermifuges and antiscolica arc words of the same import. These are medicines which either destroy or expel worms situated in any part of the prima viae. They were forme...
-Anthelmintica. Continued
The choice of these medicines, as adapted to parti-cular constitutions, furnishes little subject of rem In general the more active drastics should be avoid the weaker habits; and we have suspected tha...
-Anthora. Antithora
(From against, and monk's-hood,) so called because it is said to counteract the effects of the thora. Antherea, aconi-tum sa/utiferum, wholesome and yellow helmet flower, wholesome wolf's bane, monk'...
-Antimo Nialis Pulvis. The Antimonial Powder
Take of antimony coarsely powdered, hartshorn shavings, of each two pounds; mix and put them into a broad red-hot iron pot, stirring constantly till the mass acquires a grey colour. Powder the matter ...
-Antimonium
Antimony. Called also stibium, alcimad, alcotol, stimmi, platyoppthalmon, larbason, satanus devorans, lupus philosophorum, aurum lepo-rosum, ens primum solare, alamad, madail, duenech, afrob, alcofolo...
-Antimonium. Part 2
The labours of the alchemist have tortured antimony in various ways, as it was one of the metals by which he hoped to gain his imaginary riches. The pharmaceutist has not been less diligent at a later...
-Antimonium. Part 3
The violent action of the glass of antimony is supposed to be mitigated by combining it with wax in the vitrum antimonii ceratum. This form, first recommended in the Edinburgh Medical Essays as a reme...
-Antimonium. Part 4
By the action of nitre on antimony we obtain the crocus antimonii. This is a sulphurated oxide also, and obtained by deflagrating equal parts of nitre and antimony; to which, as we have said, the Lond...
-Antimonium. Part 5
Like all the preparations of antimony, emetic tartar is active in proportion to its solubility; and the scale of solubility extends from three times its weight in boiling water, and fifteen at 60...
-Antimonium. Part 6
The calx, or cinis antimonii, is called by Grinding terra sancta rulundi. When not greatly calcined, it is grey, and, as Boerhaave tells us, violently emetic. When more calcined, it is, as usual, iner...
-Antimonium. Part 7
We shall add a list of other preparations in which antimony has been employed, and to which it has given a name; but they contain only a small portion, if any, of the metal, and certainly owe no part ...
-Antiseptica
Antiseptics, (from against, and septics or putrifiers). What resists or corrects putrefaction. Complete putrefaction cannot be an object of practice, because it cannot take place in any considerable ...
-Antispasmodica
From against, and a convulsion). This class of medicines must be ranked among the more irregular and anomalous groups, as the individuals are adapted to a set of symptoms arising from a variety of ...
-Anus
Called also archos, cuius, hedra, podex cyr-seon, cyssaros; and in Hippocrates, cathedra; some name it perin. It is the lowest part of the intestinum rectum, commonly called the fundament. The extremi...
-Aorta
( air, and to hold). The term aorta was used by the ancients, who supposed that only air was contained in it. The name of the great artery proceeding from the left ventricle of the heart, of which a...
-Apepsia
(From , neg. and to digest; also dyspepsia). Indigestion. That genus of disease which Dr. Cullen names dyspepsia, he arranges in the class neuroses,and order adynamics. The symptoms are, a want...
-Aphonia
(From the same). See Catalepsis. It is also a name for the palsy of the tongue; one of the species of partial palsy. See Paralysis; called by some anaudia, see Anaudos, though Galen distinguishes them...
-Aphthae
(From to inflame). Called also, by Celsus, ulcera serpentia oris, spreading ulcers in the mouth; and in England pustula oris, the thrush; named likewise alcola, lactucimina; vesiculae gingiva-rum; a...
-Apium
It has different derivations: (from apex, the toft, because it has a large head; from apis, a bee, because they use it; or from or mild ). Smallage. Apium graveo/ens Lin. Sp. Pi. 379. The fresh r...
-Apium Hoktense
Called also petroselinum vulg. apium selinum, common or garden parsley. Apium petroselinum or apium hortense Lin. Sp. Pi. 379. It is too well known to need description. The roots are diuretic, and are...
-Aponeurosis
(of from, and a nerve). The word from whence comes the term nerve, used in its more extensive sense, means tendons and ligaments. Hippocrates, and other Greek writers, apply it in this way. The mod...
-Apoplexia
(From to strike or knock down, or smite suddenly). The apoplexy. It is called sideratio,attonitus, stupor palperia, palpezia, gutta; when it is slight it is called parapoplexia. Dr. Cullen ranks thi...
-Apoplexia. Continued
The danger seems to be chiefly proportioned to the difficulty of respiration; - if it be tolerably easy, and the patient can swallow, there are hopes; but if respiration be very difficult, or intermit...
-Aqua
Water; called also alma. This word is variously derived; some say it is quasi a qua vivimus, because by it we exist, others quasi aqua from the smoothness of its surface; some, from for sound, from ...
-Aquae
Medicinales, vel Mixerales. Medicinal, or Mineral waters. Waters which contain minerals in solution are distinguished by the name mineral waters; but as there is no water found in nature, even among ...
-Aquae. Part 2
The vegetable alkali is rarely found in mineral waters; yet as it has been discovered in some granites we may expect to meet with it. The solitary instances in which it has yet occurred, scarcely howe...
-Aquae. Part 3
To the sense of smelling, good water is free from odour. When saturated with the aerial acid, it exhales a suffocating, subtile vapour. Hepatic waters resemble in smell a stale egg, or the scourings o...
-Aquae. Part 4
If aerial acid be the means of the solution of the earth, it will separate in boiling; but more certainly by acetite of lead. The metal is precipitated, and the earth suspended by the acetous acid. As...
-Aquae. Part 5
This disquisition we have been led into from the first class of waters; and we may now add, that chemistry may probably detect ingredients not yet suspected in some of these, as azotic gas appears to ...
-Aquae. Part 6
The sulphureous waters are very powerful and active remedies; as the sulphur, in the attenuated form which it assumes in its combination with inflammable air, is conveyed to the smallest vessels. Thes...
-Aquae. Part 7
The administration of these remedies requires but little particular attention; the doses of the saline waters must be regulated by their effects. They should be drunk till they produce a slight evacua...
-Aquae. Part 8
The hydrogenated and hydrocarbonated waters contain, respectively, half their bulk of air. Of these little use seems to have been made, and the trials hitherto have spoken little in their favour. As ...
-Aquae. Simple Distilled Waters
Stillatitlae simplices. The simple distilled waters, now called only aquae; the word simples is omitted. Distilled waters are only water impregnated with the essential oil of the subjects distilled w...
-Aquae. Spirituous Distilled Waters
Stillatitiae spirituosae. Spirituous distilled waters, now called only spiritus, viz. spiritus pu/egii, etc. All the virtues of distilled waters are owing to the essential oil they take up. Spirit of...
-Aquosus Humor Oculi
The watery humour of the eye is a limpid water that fills all the space between the cornea of the eye, and the anterior part of the crystalline humour. This space is divided into the anterior and post...
-Aquula
A small quantity of limpid water. The term is applied to the pellucid water which distends the capsule of the crystalline lens, and the lens itself; and to a disorder of the eye lids. P, AEgineta, in ...
-Aranea
(From , to knit together,) called also arachne araneus, the catcher, the wolf, and Spider. Spiders are absurdly said to abound with volatile salt, in consequence of which they are sometimes useful i...
-Arbor
A tree; defined to be a plant of the largest growth, whose trunk is perennial and single, divided into many large branches, which are again subdivided into small twigs, on which the leaves, flowers, a...
-Archeus
(From the principal, chief, or first mover). The supposed primum mobile of Helmont, which, in his opinion, superintended the animal economy, and preserved it. It resembles Plato's anima mundi. Hippoc...
-Arden's Febris
The ardent fever, (from ardeo, to burn). It is also called febris deurens, cau-sodes, and cholerica; a burning, or highly ardent fever: by the Greeks called causus, (from uro, to burn,) because it wa...
-Areca
Ray takes the bahei coyotli to be this nut. Also called faufel, avellana Indiana versicolor. Caun-ga, The Indian, and the Malabar nut. It is the fruit of a species of palm tree which is met with in t...
-Argentum
(From white,) also called argyrus, cames, Diana, brumazer, luna, silver. Hauy, vol. iii. p. 383. The more obvious properties of silver are well known. Its specific gravity is 10.4743, nor can it be ...
-Argentum. Part 2
It is totally volatile in the fire by heat not much greater than that of boiling water, and by a far less heat it is calcined into a red powder. The fumes raised by fire are scarcely visible; and yet,...
-Argentum. Part 3
A pure oxide of mercury with a larger proportion of oxygen occurs in the hydrargyrum calcinatum of the London and Dublin Dispensatories. The process is slow and tedious; but the preparation, if carefu...
-Argentum. Part 4
Hermstaedt recommends a process of preparing calomel from the sulphat of mercury, to which nearly the original quantity of mercury is to be united by trituration. The muriat of soda is then added, the...
-Argentum. Part 5
Of the syrups Plenck's mercurial syrup is well known. Bellet asserts that his syrup contains no mineral acid. Girtanner, however, and Swediaur, have ascertained that the mercury has been dissolved in ...
-Argentum. Part 6
The calces of mercury next claim our attention. Dr. Priestley informed us, that mercury triturated with water might be changed into a black powder; but the fact was published by Homberg in the Memoirs...
-Argentum. Part 7
The sal sedativus mercurialis is another modern preparation; not, we suspect, of superior value, since its authors wish to confine it to external use. The nitrated mercury is precipitated by a solutio...
-Argentum. Part 8
We have had frequent occasion to remark, that all the metals possess a tonic power. We shall find that in this class of medicines there are many which seem to act chiefly by lessening irritability: th...
-Argentum. Part 9
It is improper in weak exhausted patients, and in erysipelatous ulcers, cancers, and some similar complaints. Among its bad effects may be mentioned, excessive debility and irritability, decayed teeth...
-Aristolochia
(From optimus, and purgamenta post partum in utero relicta). Birth-wort. It is so called, because esteemed for promoting the lochia in child-bed women. Also called adra riza. There are several s...
-Arnica Montana
(From a lamb,) so called from the likeness of its leaves to the coat of a lamb. German leopard's bane; called also do-ronicum, alisma, doronicum plantaginis folio, caltha al-fiina, acyrus; panacea la...
-Arohot
See Argentum vivum. Aroma, (from intensely, and to smell). Any thing fragrant or odorous; sometimes it is taken for myrrh. The aroma of plants is probably an essential oil, highly volatile, and with...
-Aromatica
(From an odour). Aromatics, or spicy drugs, are of a warm pungent taste, with more or less of a fragrant smell; some are purely aromatic, as cinnamon, nutmegs, etc.; others have a sweetness mixed wit...
-Arsenicum Album
(From the Arabic term, arsanek; or from for masculus fortis, because of its strong and deadly powers,) called crystal-linum, risagallum, aquala, arfar, aquila, zarnick, ar-taneck, white arsenic, and...
-Arsenicum Album. Continued
Our yellow and red arsenics are artificial, being no other than the white, mixed with different proportions of sulphur. The white is the strongest, the yellow weaker, and the red weakest. See Auripigm...
-Artemisia
(From A diana, because it was used in the secret disorders of women, over which she presided;) called also, mater herbarum, absinthium al-pinum, berens secum, parthenicum, cingulum sancti Jo-hannis, ...
-Arteria
An artery, (from air, and to keep,) because the ancients supposed that only air was contained in the arterial system; but by the word artery, Hippocrates meant what is now known by the name of aspe...
-Arteriotomia
(From an artery, and to cut). It is the opening of an artery for the discharge of blood. Galen, Antyllus, Oribasius, P. AEgineta, and several others, highly extol this practice in invererate headac...
-Arthritis
The gout, (from a joint, because it is commonly confined to the joint). Dr. Cullen, in his Nosology, gives it the name of podagra, (from pes, the foot,) because he considers the foot as the seat o...
-Arthritis. Part 2
That gout is caused by a morbid matter of some kind is a consequence apparently so clear and obvious, that it is not surprising to find it made the basis of every theory. Indeed, nothing but the stron...
-Arthritis. Part 3
Another disease has occasioned us some little trouble, viz. a gutta rosea; an erysipelas affecting the joints, sometimes attended with pain. The distinction, though not easy, is on the whole sufficien...
-Arthritis. Part 4
We have not mentioned some of the less common and less useful remedies. Bleeding has been recommended in strong and inflammatory habits; but it is, we believe, always injurious, even in misplaced gout...
-Arthritis. Part 5
Atonic gout is a disease peculiarly obstinate and distressing: it is the prelude of misplaced gout, and appears often in the interval between the repulsion of the active inflammation in the feet, and ...
-Arthropyosis
(From articulus, and pus). This word is variously used. Dr. Aitkin, in his Elements of Surgery, calls inflammation of a joint phlegmone articuli. By this name, in another part of the same work, he ...
-Arubus Arvina
Butter. See Adeps. Arum. It is derived from the Arabic term jaron. a dart, which it exactly represents. Called also arum maculatum, aron, jarus,isaros, pes vituli, barba aronis, serpentaria min. draco...
-Arytaenoi Del Muscul Minor
Vel Obliquus, vel transversalis. They are situated on the back part of the arytaenoid cartilage. They are very small muscles which run upon the surface of the greater arytaenoid muscles: they arise fr...
-Asafoetida, Vel Assafoetida, Andsjudan
The stikking healer. Also called hingisch, laser, laser-pitium, silphium, king, cyrenaicua succus, hindisch, devil's dung. It is the fetid concrete juice of a plant which grows in Persia, and other pa...
-Asaron Asarum
(From , non. and to adorn J. So called because it was not admitted into the ancient coronal wreath: called also nardus rustica, nardus montana, wild nard, and common assara-bacca. The species ...
-Ascites
(From uter, a mater bottle). So called from the protuberance of the belly resembling that of a bottle. It is the dropsy of the belly; termed also hydrocele peritonei. When water is accumulated in the...
-Ascites. Part 2
When the unmarried libertine disguises her fault under the pretence of dropsy, we cannot expect to gain any information from enquiry into the state of the menses; for she can invent circumstances, as ...
-Ascites. Part 3
If, however, we would diminish exhalation, we should employ cordials and tonics to support the action of the extreme vessels which convey the blood back to the heart. In this way we may suppose mercur...
-Ascites. Part 4
One observation arises on an examination of the effects of purgatives, viz. that the more active ones, which excite languor and nausea, are the most useful; apparently the relaxation thus produced, as...
-Ascites. Part 5
A S C- 199 A S C violent to be repeated; and, in a less degree, the abstaining from drink would probably be useless. In fact, the prohibition is of a modern date: it was not the practice of the ancien...
-Asclepias
(From Asclepius, its inventor; called also hirundinaria, contrayerva Germanorum, vincetoxicum). Tame Poison, Silken Cicily, and White Swallow wort. A. vincetoscicum Lin. Sp. Pi. 314. It resembles the...
-Aselli
Also called millepedes, polypedes, cutio, eyamus; multipedae; cubaris; centipedes: slaters, Hog Lice Church Bugs, Sow Bugs, and Wood Lice. These are insects, according to Linnaeus, of the class apter...
-Ashes
A term generally applied to the residue of combustion; generally limited to vegetable ashes, though sometimes applied to mineral calces. Vegetable ashes differ according to the degree of heat to which...
-Aspalathus
(From , priv. and to draw out, because its thorns are not easily drawn out when they have entered,) called also Rhodium lignum, dipsa-con, lignum roses odora, lign. thuris, erysisceptrum, Rhodi...
-Asper
A small river fish found in the Rhone. Perca asper Lin. It is so named from the roughness of its scales and jaws. It is good food, and very nutritious. The oil of asper is commonly enquired for as a ...
-Asphyxia
(From , neg. and a pulse, from , to leap, or beat, like an artery). It is so named, because the pulse is not perceptible to the touch; but the characteristic signs of this disease are, the sym...
-Assumina
The name of a shrub which at once destroys the vena medinensis, and saves the trouble of drawing it out. It is found and used on the coast of Guinea. See Phil. Transacts 2. A Stalls, or Astacus Martn...
-Asthma
(From or spiro, or rather anhelo, to breathe short). This is an impeded and very laborious respiration, joined with inexpressible anxiety and straitness of the precordia, preventing a free circulati...
-Asthma. Part 2
The humoral asthma is a disorder of the mucous glands of the lungs, in consequence of which they are relaxed, and the discharge of mucus, being unnaturally copious, obstructs the freedom of respiratio...
-Asthma. Part 3
When this disorder is recent, and produced by a decided occasional cause, there may be hopes of a lasting recovery; otherwise it is rarely, if ever, cured. An eruption of the menses, or of the haemorr...
-Asthma. Part 4
The cure of asthma must differ according to its nature, and the periods in which the remedies are employed. The only disease properly distinguished by this appellation is the convulsive asthma; but th...
-Asthma. Part 5
Vomits frequently repeated have been found of considerable utility, and their advantages have been variously explained. Those who consider the source of the disease to be in the stomach, think the fre...
-Asthma. Part 6
Blisters arc in this complaint singularly useful, and there is no doubt of the propriety of applying them very near the back. They must often be repeated, and as soon as one has begun to discharge, an...
-Astra Galus
(From a cockal or die. So called because it is shaped like the die used in ancient games). Ankle bone. Also called the sling bone; ballistae os; aristrios; talus; quatrio; tetroros; cavicula; cavill...
-Astringe
Ntia, Astricto Ria. Astringents, (from astringo, to bind). Adstringentia; called also anastaltica; constringentia. The solid parts of the human machine, from various causes, are often so relaxed that...
-Astronomia
Astronomy, (from a star, and law). It is the science which teaches the knowledge of the heavenly bodies, showing their magnitudes, distances, order, and motion. Hippocrates says, that one ignorant of...
-Atomus
(From , neg. and to cut or divide). An atom. It is a particle of matter exceedingly-small; indeed the elementary particles of which bodies consist. Asclepiades taught that atoms were the pri-mo...
-Atra Bilis
Ater succus; bilis alra; black bile. According to the ancients it arises, 1st, From the grosser parts of the blood, and this they called the melancholy humour. 2dly, From yellow bile being highly conc...
-Atriplex
The Greek term is Atraphaxis, from whence some say the word is derived; q. v. Orach, or orache; also called atriplex alba or rubra horten-sis, arrache, atraphraxis, chrysolachanon; white, red, or gard...
-Atrophia
(From , and to nourish). Contabescentia; inutritio; marasmus; ariditas corporis; an atrophy. It is a wasting, with loss of strength; but without hectic fever. Dr. Cullen remarks, that an atroph...
-Attenuantia
(From attenuo, to make thin). Attenuating medicines act, it is supposed, by diminishing the consistence of the blood, or secreted fluids, and almost exclusively of the fluids. Those which operate by i...
-Auditorius Meatus
(From the same). The passage that conveys the air to the auditory nerve. It leads from the lower anterior part of the concha to the tympanum, and is partly bony, partly cartilaginous; all within the t...
-Auditus
(From audio, to hear). The sense of hearing, also called aco'e. By this sense we perceive the elastic tremors of the air; and to facilitate the function, the organ of hearing is made up of hard bones,...
-Aurantia
(Ab aureo colore, from its golden colour). Enascentia, and Immatura. See Aurantia curassaventia. Aurantia hispalensis, called also mala aurantia fructu acido, major arantia malus, aurangia, mala aure...
-Auricula
(horn auris, the ear). The external part of the ear; which is divided into the upper part called pinna, and the lower soft part called lobus, or lobulus. The pinna is divided into several eminences an...
-Auripigmentum
(From aurum,gold, and pig-inentum, paint,) also called arsenicum croceum, arseni-cumjlaxnim, adarnech, albimec althanaca, ethel; orpin, orpiment, and auripigment. Galen called it arseni-cum, and Scrap...
-Auris
(From aura, air, as being the medium of hearing). The ear. The ear is usually divided into the external and the internal. By the external is meant all that lies without the external orifice of the mea...
-Aurum
(From aor, resplendence, a Hebrew term). Gold; called also sol, and rex metallorum, deheb, cor. The filings are named catma; the chemists call it sol, because they thought it to be under the influence...
-Avellan
E Ind1cae Ge.'nusoblongum. An inferior species of nutmegs. A Yena, (from aveo,to covet, because cattle are very fond of them). .4. sativa Lin. Sp. Pi. 118. Oats. The two kinds, the black and white, h...
-Axillaria Arteria
The subclavian ar-pert having left the thorax immediately above the first rib, in the interstice between the portions of the scalenus muscle, there receives the name axillary, because it passes under ...
-Azotum Azoticus
Gas, (from , non, and vita). Azote, azotic gas. This is the noxious part of the atmospheric air; see Aer. Formerly called phlogisticated air; and atmospheric mephitis. It has been called azote...
-Azygos
Vel Azigos, (from , neg. and a pair; without a fellow). The musculus azygos of Morgagni rises tendinous from the junction of the ossa palati, and runs down the palatum molle to the middle of t...
-Balaustia. Balaustium
(From various, and to dry; so called from the variety of its colours and becoming soon dry: or from , to germinate). Called also malus punica sylvestris; granatus sylvestris, punica granatum, the do...
-Balneum
(From to cast away, and grief). This word properly signifies the hot bath only; and under this head we shall consider only the general and partial warm baths, referring for cold bathing to the artic...
-Balneum. Part 2
If, then, the heat of the baths.was raised to so great a degree, some previous preparation was necessary. It is thought expedient at Bath, by previous evacuations to prevent the bad effects of a high ...
-Balneum. Part 3
At 102 the pulse was soon raised from 68 to 100, and, in ten minutes, the sweat on the face was copious, -the vessels turgid, the skin not corrugated, and the heat of the body raised fr...
-Balneum. Part 4
Of the exanthemata, the only disease in which bathing has been employed, is the small pox. In Upper Hungary, Fischer has described it as the domestic remedy for this disease; and, in an epidemic small...
-Balneum. Part 5
Alter the bathing, sweating between flannels is generally enjoined; but if we wish to employ it as a stimulus, a copious perspiration should not be too freely indulged. The contracted vessels should b...
-Balsamica
(From balsam). Balsamics, or those medicines by which wounds are healed. The term includes medicines of very different qualities, as emollients, detergents, restoratives, etc. But all medicines of th...
-Balsamum
(From the Hebrew terms baal sa-mum, the prince of oils,) called also balsamum genuinum. antiquorum, bulsamelaeon, Egypitiacum balsamum; bals. Gi/eadense, Asiaticum, Judaicum, e Meccha et Alpini; oleum...
-Banica
See Pastinaca silvestris. Banilia, Banilas. See Vanilla. Banksia. B. Abyssinica Bruce. The flowers are chiefly employed for ascarides in Abyssinia. A handful is infused in two quarts of beer. It is no...
-Bardana
Burdock. Arctium, betonica Bri-tannica. By Myrepsus called ilaphis. It grows on highway sides, and is sufficiently known by the burs which stick to the clothes. Bardana major, called also lappa major...
-Baro Metrum
Barometer, (of weight, and measure ). An instrument to determine the weight of the air, or observe the changes of weather; it is commonly called a weather glass, and frequently the Torricellian tube,...
-Barytes
(From heavy,) called, from its weight, also terra ponderosa, ponderous earth. This is not found very abundantly, or in large continued masses, but chiefly in the vicinity of mines. or veins of metal...
-Basilicum Ungutentum Flavum
Un glentum resinae flavae. Ointment of yellow re -Sin, consists of a pint of olive oil, yellow wax, yellow resin, of each a pound. To the wax and resin melted over a gentle fire the oil is added, and ...
-Basilicus Pulvis
(From royal, a king). The royal powder. This term has been applied to various purging powders, which contain cream of tartar as one of the ingredients. The term was afterwards changed to pulvis laxa...
-Bathing
Cold and sea. By the cold bath is meant that application of cold water which produces a sense of coldness called a shock, and which is followed by the increased action of the extreme vessels styled a...
-Bathing. Part 2
In scarlatina Dr. Currie has lately shown the advantages of cold ablutions, and the necessity of continuing them steadily to obviate the violent heat which attends the paroxysms of this complaint; and...
-Bathing. Part 3
When poisons or infectious miasmata have been communicated to the animal body, we often find that they lie dormant, till some exciting and generally debilitating cause gives them activity. This render...
-Bathoniae
Aquae. Called also solis aguae, badi-qua aqua. Bath waters. Dr. Cheyne accounts for the heat of this water by the following experiment. If filings of iron and the powder of sulphur, made into a paste...
-Battatas
(Indian). Called also battata Virgi-niana, solatium tuberosum esculentum, kippa kelengu, papas vel pappus Americanus, and convolvulus Indicus. The common or Virginian potatoe. They were first brought...
-Bdellium
(From the Arabic term bedallah,) called also madelion bolchon, balchus, and by the Arabians mokel, is a gummy resinous juice, produced by a tree in the East Indies, of which we have no satisfactory ac...
-Bellis
(A bello colore, from its fair colour). The daisy. Bellis minor; called also consolida minima, sym-pythum minimum, bellis sylvestris minor, bruisewort, and common daisy. Bellis perennis Lin. Sp. Pi. ...
-Ben
(From be/in, Arabic,) also called balanus myrep-sica, glans unguentaria, nux ben, nux unguentaria moris, Coatlis. The oily acorn, oily nut, or ben nut, probably from the guillandina moringa Lin. Sp. P...
-Benzotnum
(From the Arabic term benzoah,) called also assa dulcis, assa odorata, liquor syrenaicus, or, cyreniacus balzoinum, Gum benjamin. It is a concrete resinous juice, obtained from a middle sized tree, wi...
-Berbaris. Berberis. Barberry
(From the Arabic term berberi, wild). Called also oxyacantha Galeni, spina acida, crespinus, crispinus; piperidge or piperage bush, and barberry. The berbtris vulgaris Lin. Sp. Pi. 471. Nat. order tri...
-Bergamote
Or Bergamot, (French). It is a species of citron, produced at first casually by an Italian's grafting a citron on the stock of a bergamot pear tree, whence the fruit produced by the union participate...
-Beriberi. Beriberia
In the East Indies, the terms mean, in a medical sense, a species of palsy, in which, according to Bontius, patients seem to imitate sheep in lifting their legs when they walk. This palsy consists in ...
-Beta
So called from the river Baetis in Spain, where it grows naturally; or from the Greek letter , beta, which when turgid with seed it is said to resemble. Beet. It grows on some of the sea coasts ...
-Betula
(From batuo, to beat, because rods are made of its twigs). The birch tree. The betula alba Lin. Sp. Pi. 1393. Nat. order amentaceae. If this tree is wounded in the spring pretty deeply into its trunk...
-Bezoar
So called because it is found in the stomach of the sort of goat named bezoar. This is originally a Persian word, viz. badzcher, or lazcher, or phahazar, which signifies an antidote. Avenzoar is the f...
-Biceps Musculus
(From bis, and caput ). A double headed muscle. Biceps humeri, called also biceps internus humeri: Dr. Hunter calls it bice/is flexor. It rises by two heads; one of them, which is a slender tendon, f...
-Biliosa Febris
(From bilis, bile). The bilious fever; called also the marsh, remittent, autumnal remitting, and camp fever. Febris flava, febris maligna Barbadensis, icterodes. When a fever is accompanied with bili...
-Biliosa Febris. Part 2
The violence and fatality of this disease have directed very powerfully the attention of physicians to its nature, and particularly of those who have been engaged in the conduct of such epidemics. As ...
-Biliosa Febris. Part 3
To fulfil the other indications may appear an easy task; the stomach and bowels are to be emptied, the bark and wine given, and the whole is at an end. Such is the easy track of the theorist. In pract...
-Bilis
In Ainsworth it is derived from scil. succus, juice; and also fel, bile, or gall; and we know no better etymology. It is a bitter viscid juice, secreted from the blood in the liver, and collected i...
-Bilis. Continued
Its saponaceous nature was said to assist the union of the oil and water in the formation of chyle; but this idea is effectually destroyed by the experiment of Dr. G. Fordyce. who tied the ductus chol...
-Bismu Thum
(From bismut, German). Bismuth; also called wismuthum, marcasita, Galaena inanis, plum-bum cinereum Argricolae, blende Germanis, marcasite of silver, and tin glass. It seems not to have been known to...
-Bistorta
Bistort: quasi bis torta; twice twisted, or wreathed. So called from the contortion of its roots. Called also the greater bistort, or snakeweed; colubrina, beadiramon. It is the poligonum bis-torta Li...
-Bitumen
(from pitch; or from a pine, because it flows from the pine tree,) called also asphaltos,pissasphaltus, asphaltum, bitumen Judaicum, carabe funerum, gummi funerum, mumia, car vise ok Sodon, fossile...
-Blenorrhagia And Blenorrcha
(From mucus, and fluo). A newly formed genus of disease, to supersede the probably too general use of catarrhus. It is intended to include the mucous discharges, but it should have been confined to...
-Dislocation
Or Displacing Of Either, Or Both Eve lids, by elongation, retraction, turning inwards or outwards, with different symptoms in different species. But the true blepharoptosy, or preternatural descent of...
-Blindness
This very comprehensive term includes a variety of very different diseases; and we must here consider not only imperfect or depraved vision, but the causes of the total loss of sight. Imperfect vision...
-Blisters
The operation of this most useful remedy has occasioned numerous disquisitions and eager controversies. It is fortunate that the calm attentive practitioner has steadily pursued his path, and contribu...
-Blisters. Continued
In our enumeration of the diseases benefited by blisters, we shall be guided by their effects, and shall consider them as altering the determination of the fluids from parts overloaded; influencing th...
-Blood
This is the fluid contained in the arteries and veins of the human body, and is generally red; but in some smaller vessels which will not admit the red particles, a fluid apparently similar in every o...
-Blood. Part 2
The coagulum does not soon lose its form or colour; but in a warm temperature is quickly deprived of both. If removed from the serum and placed in a water bath, its consistence is increased, and serum...
-Blood. Part 3
As the immediate causes of the coagulation of the blood were so obscure, Mr. John Hunter supposed it to possess life, and styled it, with Harvey, the 'primum vivens et ultimum moriens.' Since his era,...
-Blood. Part 4
A putrid state of the blood is frequently spoken of by pathologists, and may be very reasonably expected in the most putrid fevers. MM. Parmentier and De-yeux examined repeatedly that drawn from patie...
-Boerhaavian System
In a Work of this kind, it would have been desirable to have given a short account of the lives, and an abstract of the opinions, of the most eminent physicians. It was for a long time a favourite obj...
-Boicintngua. Boicininingua
The battle snake, and Dominicum serpentum. Crotalus horri-dus Lin. It is said, that this serpent cannot approach a piece of a root which in Virginia is known by the name of Seneca, Rattle Snake Root; ...
-Boletus
(From a mass). Spunk. A genus of the fungi. It is an horizontal fungus; and porous underneath. The boletus igniarius is commonly called agaric of the oak. Boletus cervi. See Amanita. Boletus pini l...
-Bolus
(From a mass, from the Hebrew term balah, to agglutinate). A dole or bolus. Boluses differ not from electuaries, only they are made of a firmer consistence, in single doses, and therefore more prope...
-Bombax
Cotton. Called also xylon, gossi-pium, colonium, moulelavou. Bombax pentandrum Lin. Sp. Pi. 959. There are three sorts of cotton trees: one creeps on the earth like a vine, the second is thick like a ...
-Bone
Its Latin term, os, is supposed to be derived from the Hebrew word ozam, strength. The bones of animals constitute their firm, solid support; and their varied articulations give the animal that flexib...
-Bone. Continued
Bones, if they have arteries, must have accompanying veins, and they have also absorbents; for a diseased bony part is absorbed as well as other parts of the body: and the cavities of the round bones ...
-Borassus
The tender medullary substance which grows at the top of the great palm tree. Bo Rax, (from the Arabic term borac). Called also chrysocolla, capistrum auri, ancinar, boraxtrion, anucar, atincar, tinc...
-Botany
(From the Greek word a plant). In its strict meaning it is the science of plants; but in such a very extensive view it cannot be treated of in this place. Botany is divided into the classification a...
-Botany. Part 2
Morison, in a second edition of the Hortus Regius Blesensis, gave, in 1669, the rudiments of a method founded on the fruit; but the remembrance of this proposal has been obliterated by the splendour o...
-Botany. Part 3
The opinion that the genera of the same natural orders possessed similar medical powers, is by no means new. It was suggested in the Philosophical Transactions by Mr. Petiver, and is enforced by Hoffm...
-Botany. Part 4
1. Monocotyledones. Ord. I-x inclusive. ii. Dicotyledones & Polycotyledones. Ord. XII-LIV inclusive. Acotyledones. Ord. LV - LVII. Of the Xlth order some have single, others double cotyledons; ...
-Botany. Part 5
The eleventh order, the sarmentaceae, called from their having weak branches, in Latin sarmenta, is not strictly natural; and, in a medical view, contains plants of somewhat dissimilar powers. The sar...
-Botany. Part 6
The campanaceae is a very important order. The genus convolvulus furnishes five active purgatives, if we except the jalap, now suspected to be the root of a very different plant. The ipecacuanha also ...
-Botany. Part 7
From the sepiariae we only employ the jasmine and the olive; and, from their virtues, if any, those of the other genera will be sufficiently obvious. The syringa is of this order. The 45th order, the...
-Botany. Part 8
As we have said, that, in proportion to the more correct formation of natural orders, medical botany might be further improved, the later attempts in this line would appear to merit some investigation...
-Botany. Part 9
In these fifteen classes, one hundred natural orders are arranged; containing one thousand seven hundred and fifty-four genera. The characters of the genera are simple, and at the same time complete. ...
-Botany. Part 10
We had designed to add a table of the medicinal plants as arranged in the Linnaean system; but it would fill some pages without any adequate advantage; as it would only be more clearly seen what disco...
-Botrys
The following are generally considered as species of botrys. Botrts. The oak of Cappadocia or of Jerusalem; also called artemisia, ambrosia, chenopodium, and atri-plex odora, or suaveolenus. It is th...
-Bougie
In the French language, means a wax candle. The term is applied to a body of a similar shape, introduced into the urethra for removing obstructions. It is likewise known by the terms catheter, candela...
-Boulimus
A voracious appetite; (from a particle which, in composition, augments the sense, and hunger). Boulimos, or bulimus, for which word Avicenna uses bolismus, signifies an ox's appetite, though this d...
-Bovina Affectio
The distemper of black cattle. A disease among black cattle, caused by a worm lodged between the skin and the flesh. The Arabians call it aegritudo bovina. but it is little known in Europe; is not men...
-Brachialis Arteria
The brachial artery. It is the continuation of the axillary artery, which, as soon as it has passed behind the tendon of the pectoralis major, receives the name of brachial. It runs down on the inside...
-Brasium
(From to boil). Barley, or common malt. Called also byne; by Tacitus,frumen-tum corruptum. From it, beer, ale, and porter, which go under the general term, malt liquors, are made (see Alla); but an i...
-Brassica
(From or to devour.) Cabbage; called also crambe, brassica oleracea Lin. Sp. Pi. 932. All the species are supposed to be only varieties of the smaller kind, which grow spontaneously on our sea coas...
-Bread
This 'staff of life' is now essential to our existence; yet, while we enjoy it, we are naturally led to consider the substitutes once employed, when it was not known. Man, we have said, is not wholly ...
-Bregma
(From to moisten ). In infants these bones are not only tender, but very moist; and sometimes so in adults. They are also called sinciput, parietaria,and medium testae. They are two bones on the uppe...
-Brine
The fluid which is separated from meat that has been salted, containing a solution of the salt, Oo with albuminous and other animal fluids. It is used, externally, as a stimulant in palsies, and oede...
-Bronchiales Arteriae
They sometimes go from the fore side of the superior descending aorta, at others from the first intercostal, or from the arteriae oesophageae. Occasionally they arise separately from each side to reac...
-Bronchocele
(From the wind pipe, and tumour). Also called bocium, botium. It hath various names in different writings; the Swiss call it gotre; some have called it hernia gutturis, gutter, tumi-dum, et trachelop...
-Brunonian System
We have already explained our reasons for adopting the plan of giving distinct views of the most prevailing medical systems in different articles (see Boerhaavian system), and shall pursue the present...
-Brunonian System. Part 2
Again: Dr. Brown speaks of indirect and direct debility, of the two states of exhausted and accumulated irritability. The gaol fever is allowed to be an instance of the former, and the person, seclude...
-Brunonian System. Part 3
In the second class we see the asthenic cough, by which Dr. Brown means consumption; and apoplexy. In each case we must use active stimulants. In the latter we have said they must soon be employed, bu...
-Bryonia
(From to abound). So called from its abundance. It is a name for the white jalap; also Briony. Bryonia alba. White briony; called also vitis alba, vel sylvestris; agrostis, ampelos, archeostris; ech...
-Bubo
Abubo, (from the groin). Vogel names it bubon when in the groin; it is also named cambuca, cambuca membrata, codoccle; by some it is called fugile, and adin. It is a tumid gland which is inflamed, or...
-Bubonocele
(From the groin, and a tumour). It is also called hernia inguina/is, or rupture of the groin, when the intestines are forced through the ring of the external oblique muscle of the belly. When throug...
-Bubonocele. Part 2
In infants the reduction is generally easy, and as they acquire strength they are less subject to a relapse. In the vigour of life the return is generally more difficult, and the neglect or bad manage...
-Bubonocele. Part 3
Hernias in women are treated as in men, but in them the disease is less common, as the aperture is much smaller, not requiring the passage of a body so large as the testicle, but only the round ligame...
-Buccinator Musculus
Constrictor muscu-lus. The trumpeter's muscle, (from a trumpet). It is thus named because of its use in forcing the breath to sound the trumpet. It has two distinct beginnings on each side, one tendi...
-Buto
(From an ox, and death). So called because it is death to any cattle which eat them. The toad; also called rubeta, rana rubeta. The toad is of the frog kind, and of the number of those animals which ...
-Bunias
Vel Bounias, (from a hill, because it delights in rugged places,) called also actine, napus. Navew. It is a plant of the turnip kind, with oblong roots, growing slender from the top to the extremity....
-Buphthalmum
(From an ox, and oculus, an eye; from its resemblance to an ox's eye). Ox eye, or ox eyed, named boanthemon. In Myrepsus it is called crespulum. Buphthalmum cotulae Folio,also cotula flore luteo ra...
-Bursae Mucosae
(From bursa, a purse). Called also bursts tendinibus subjects, and sacculi mucosi. It is said that Bellini first observed these bags, but Douglas first described them. Their office is to facilitate t...
-Buxtoniensis
A Qua. Buxton water. See Aquae sulphureae. Buxton is in the Peak of Derbyshire. The waters there are the second in degree of heat among those of this island. The water of St. Anne's well is so pure, t...
-Cacao
(Indian); called also cacoa, amygdalus si-milus Guatimalensis, cacava,cacari, quahoitl, caravata, chocolata,avellana Mexicana, cacavera, cacavata cacao America; the pear bearing wholesome almond tree,...
-Cachexia
(From ill or bad, and a habit ) A bad.habit of body. The bad habit which constitutes cachexy consists of a want of vigour of the solid parts, and appears in universal languor, with every mark of de...
-Cadmia
(From the Hebrew term kadam,) also chlimia, catimia. Dioscorides meant by it the recrement which arises from brass whilst melting. Galen applied it to the recrement of brass, and a stone found in some...
-Caecum Intestinum
The blind got; so called from its being perforated at one end only; called also monomachon; and by Paracelsus monocolon. What we now call the appendicula caeci, Rufus Ephesius calls the cecum. But mod...
-Caesarea Sectio
The Caesarian section or operation; also called hysterotomia, and hysterctoma-tocia. It is the operation whereby the foetus is extracted from the uterus through the teguments of the belly. It is calle...
-Cajan
Or Cayan. Phaseolus erectus incanus siliquis torosis, thora parou, pisum arborescens; cytizus cajan Lin. Sp. Pi. 1041. A shrubby plant, with pods containing four reddish peas. A decoction of the leave...
-Calamy
And Calaminaris Stone. It is a metallic mineral, of a whitish or yellowish colour, and, in a state of purity, transparent, variously mixed; it is heavy and hard; of a middle nature betwixt stone and ...
-Calamintha
(From good mint). Calamint. Melissa calamintha Lin. Sp. Pi. 827. A perennial plant, that flowers in July and August. Calamintha anglica. Field calamint; called also calamintha pulegii odore, nepet...
-Calamus
(From the Arabic term kalam, or kele-mus). The stalk of any plant. See Caudex. Calamus aromaticus. Sweet scented flag; also called diringa, jacerantatinga, acorus verus, typha aromatica, clava rugosa...
-Calcinatio
(From calx, to burn to a calx or friable powder). Also, concrematio, deflagratio, com-bdstio, combustura, ambustio., The calcination of a body is, properly speaking, its exposure to the action of the ...
-Calcitrapa
Common star thistle; star knapweed; cardials stellatus, jacea ramosissima, stellata, rupina, centaurea calcitrapa Lin. Sp. Pi. 1297. It grows near highways, on commons, and flowers in June. The leave...
-Calculus
(From calx, a lime stone). The gravel and stone. The Greeks call this disorder lithia-sis and adamitum; the Latins name it calculus; and in English we understand by gravel, small stones that pass from...
-Calculus. Part 2
The urat of ammonia was first discovered by Fourcroy: it differs little in appearance from the acid, except that its laminae arc less sensibly streaked. It sometimes forms the whole of a calculus. It ...
-Calculus. Part 3
The gelatine accompanies almost every ingredient. It is the connecting medium of the other bodies mentioned; and is discovered by the fetid odour they exhale in the fire by forming carbon frothing in ...
-Calculus. Part 4
The calculous diathesis is so imperfectly known, and calculus of the bladder so rare a disease, that little has been attempted to prevent it. As stone, however, when once extracted, will sometimes rec...
-Calculus. Part 5
As soap was with reason supposed to add considerably to the virtues of the lime, it led to the use of the caustic alkali, softened by a more pleasing mucilage, veal broth. Since that time it has been ...
-Calculus. Part 6
Of all the purging medicines the oleum ricini is to be preferred in calculous disorders; whether a stone, orother cause of inflammation, produces gravelly symptoms. To relax the passage for the calcul...
-Calculus. Part 7
If a stone is obstructed in its passage through the urethra after bleeding, an emollient clyster and an anodyne draught will be proper; common emulsion should be drank freely, and if the patient is pl...
-Calculus. Part 8
The calculi of the prostate gland also consist, according to Dr. Woolaston, of phosphorated lime. Calculi of the salivary glands, calculous incrustations on the teeth, ossifications in the larger ves...
-Calendula
So called - quod singulis calendis, i. e. mensibus florescat - because it flowers every month. Garden marigold, called also caltha, calendula sativa. chrysanthemum, sponsa solis, single marigold. C. s...
-Calentura
(From caleo, to make hot). It is a violent ardent fever, in which a delirium comes on both early and suddenly. It happens to those who sail into very hot countries. Dr. Oliver gives the history of a c...
-Calidum Innatum
An expression borrowed from the Stoical philosophy to express the natural heat of animals, which, as connected with life, has been also called the lamp of life. By the ancient philosophers in genera...
-Calidum Innatum. Part 2
We must anticipate a little the doctrines of an approaching article (Caloric), by explaining some terms essentially necessary to the proper comprehension of Dr. Crawford's system. If we suppose at thi...
-Calidum Innatum. Part 3
The opinion of MM. Lavoisier and Seguin is more simple, but by no means meets so satisfactorily the phenomena, as the theory of Dr. Crawford. They consider respiration as a kind of combustion, in whic...
-Caligo
(From caligo, to be dark). A growing darkness of the eye, or dimness of the sight, from a manifest cause; as in cases of the cataract, etc. Dr. Cullen places this genus of disease in the class locales...
-Callus
From calx, the heel, or calco, to tread; because it used to be applied to the thick skin at the bottom of the heel, hardened by pressure; but it is a cutaneous or osseous hardness, either natural or p...
-Caloricum
(From calor, heat). Caloric. Lavoisier, in giving his reasons for the adoption of this term, says, All bodies are either solid, liquid, or in a state of aeriform vupour, according to the proportion w...
-Caloricum. Continued
Bodies of different colours convey heat also differently. The difference between white and black is well known; and the more intense colours, as red, orange, etc. convey it more readily than the blue ...
-Calx
This word is applied to whatever is subjected to calcination, or change from burning. It chiefly refers to metals after having sustained the action of fire; and to calcareous earths, which are burnt t...
-Campechense Lignum
Brought from the bay of Campeachy in America. Logwood; also called Acacia Zeylanica, lignum Campescanum, sappan lignum, tsiam pangam, lignum Campechianum, Indi-cum montanum lignum, lignum tinctile Cam...
-Camphora
(From the Arabic term caphura). Camphor; called also cqf, cafar, ligatura veneris, caphora; capur, alkosor, altefor; camphor. It is a solid concrete, chiefly obtained from the woody part of some trees...
-Camphora. Part 2
As camphor then seems to repress inordinate or irregular actions in the sanguiferous and nervous systems, while without any very striking or perceptible stimulus it determines to the skin, we may expe...
-Camphora. Part 3
When joined to other medicines, it adds to their efficacy, or corrects the inconveniences they might otherwise produce. Thus, in fevers, as we have said, it greatly assists the action of opium: it pro...
-Canalis
(From canna, a reed). A canal. It is also a round hollow instrument for embracing and holding a broken limb. Hippocrates speaks of its use, and Scultetus represents different sorts in his Armamentariu...
-Cancer
The crab, ( from rough, because of the roughness and sharpness of its claws. Cancer in Latin corresponds with the or the of the Greeks, and to the crab in the English). Cancer marinus, (from mare, ...
-Cancer. Part 2
Celibacy, as well as the cessation of the menses, conduces to the production of cancers in women, and consequently antiquated maids are the more subject to them: next are those mothers who have not su...
-Cancer. Part 3
Such arguments will scarcely establish the general nature of the disease; but others, drawn from its history, may be more decisive. It is not uncommon to rind a cancerous sore heal by the efforts of n...
-Cancer. Part 4
We must not, however, rest so strongly on the system just stated, to neglect the sentiments of other authors. It is certainly, as we have said, the more general and the more fashionable opinion that c...
-Cancer. Part 5
Of the causes of cancers we can say little. In the stomach, the dram drinker has been supposed more liable to the disease; and in general what induces a depraved state of the fluids, as irregularity i...
-Cancer. Part 6
It may be asked, also, to what period of the complaint the internal use of arsenic should be confined? We suspect it is not proper in this early stage: at a later period it certainly acts as a tonic, ...
-Cancer. Part 7
When ulceration has begun and is spreading; when the tumour is fixed to the ribs; the glands leading to the axilla swelled; art can no longer promise relief. To ease the pain and lessen the foetor of ...
-Cancer. Part 8
Mr. Le Febure recommends, in case of cancerous ulcers in the womb, that injections should be frequently thrown up of a decoction of carrots and hemlock, having four grains of opium, and as much arseni...
-Cancrum Oris
(From cancer, a spreading ulcer). Canker of the mouth; called also aphthea ser-jientes, librisulcium, gangrena oris, by Le Dran cheilo-cace. It is a deep, foul, irregular, fetid ulcer, with ragged edg...
-Candela
A Candle, (from candeo, to shine). Exhalations from candles are salutary or hurtful, according to the materials of which they are formed. Old tallow often sends off bad fumes; wax, though white, creat...
-Canella
(From the same). See Cinnamo-mum. Canella alba, (from the same; because these barks have a reed like appearance, from being rolled up in that form). Called also canella cubana; Mala-barica; winterana...
-Canini Dentes
Called also dentes cynodontes. The teeth betwixt the incisores and the grinders, of which there is one in each side, both in the upper and lower jaw. See Dens. Mr. John Hunter, in his Natural History...
-Cannabis
Hemp, or seed bearing hemp; cannabis saliva Lin. Sp. Pi. 1452. It is a tall annual herb with digitated leaves, cultivated in the fields on account of the mechanic uses of its tough rind. Some of the p...
-Cantharides
(From a beetle, to whose tribe it belongs). French flies, Muscae His-fianics, Spanish flies, cantharis major Meloe vesicato-rius, alatus viridissimus nitens, antennis nigris. Lin. Another kind is ca...
-Cantharides. Continued
In his chemical examination he found the same ingredients as M. Thouvenel; but he examined them separately, and in this the merits of his labour consist. The extractive matter reddened the tincture o...
-Caoutchouc
(French). Indian rubber, or elastic gu m. Called also Cayenne resin, and cautchuc. It is prepared from the juice of a tree in Cayenne or other parts of South America. The Mexicans call it olin, or oll...
-Capeli
Na, from capeline,a woman's ha dage; French). Or capitalis reflexa, capeline de la tete, deligatio, species 8. A reflex bandage. It is a double headed roller, about twenty-four feet long, and the bre...
-Caper
And Capra, (from carpo, to crop; because they are apt to crop the fruit and twigs from even-plant and tree which they can come at). The he and she goat; or capra domestica. Dr. Cullen, in his class o...
-Capillus
(Quasi capitis pi/us, the hair of the head,) also crinis. The hair. Capillus, though strictly the hair of the head, is used also for hair in general. The hairs are hollow, and furnished with vessels; ...
-Capivi Balsamum
(Indian.) Balsam ca-pivi, called also copaiba, capivus, album balsamum. The tree which affords it is called arbor balsamifera Brasiliensis, copaiba Brasiliensibus,and baccifera arbor Brasiliensis, fru...
-Capparis
(From the Arabic term cabar). Cap-fiaris spinosa Lin. Sp. Pi. 720. The caper bush. It is a low prickly bush, grows wild in Italy, Spain, and the southern parts of France. Those of Provence are the bes...
-Capsula Communis Glissonii, Venae Portae
It is a production of the peritoneum, including the vena porta and biliary duct in the liver. It is also called vagina portae. Glisson first described it particularly. Capsula cordis. See Pericardium...
-Capsularia Ligamenta
(From the same). Capsular ligaments, also called mucilaginosa liga-rer, as they contain many glands to separate the synovia. Every articulating bone is furnished with a capsular ligament, composed of ...
-Caput
(From the Hebrew term kabah, an helmet). The head. The parts in the lower cavities are the seat of the vital, and in the upper, of the animal powers; the latter is the seat from whence all sensation i...
-Caranna
(Spanish.) Also called caragna; bre-lisis. It is a concrete resinous juice brought from New Spain, and other parts of America, in little masses, rolled up in the leaves of flags, outwardly of a dark b...
-Carbo
(From the Hebrew term charak, to burn, or charbah, burnt). But charcoal is generally understood by this word when fossilis is not joined with it. It is also a name of the curbunculus. Carbo fossilis,...
-Carbon
Or Carbone. This substance has not yet been procured in a separate state; the idea of it is an abstract, not a sensible one: yet it is not, like phlogiston, an imaginary principle, for though on the w...
-Carbu Nculus
A Carbuncle, (from carbo, a burning coal). It is called carbo, rubinus verus; code-sel/a, erythema gangraenosum, granatristum, anthrax, pruna, and Avicenna names it Persicus ignis, particularly that s...
-Cardamines
(From the heart, because it comforts and strengthens the heart). Also called cardamantica, nasturtium aquaticum, culi flos, iberis, herba veteribus ignota, sophia; meadow cresses, ladies smock, and c...
-Cardamomum
(From and because it participates of the nature of both). The common or lesser cardamoms, called also elettari, rardam. minus. The lesser cardamom seeds are the produce of the amomum cardamomum Lin....
-Cardiaca Herba
Motherwort. It is also called agripalma gallis, marrubium, and cardiaca criepa Ruellii; leonurus cardiaca Lin. Sp. Pi. 817. It is called cardiaca because it is supposed to relieve-in fainting and dis...
-Cardialgia
The heartburn, or rather a pain and uneasiness at the upper orifice of the stomach; (from the left orifice of the stomach, and to be pained). Called also ardor ventriculi, and properly so, when atte...
-Carduus
(From to abrade; so named from its roughness, which abrades and tears whatever it meets with). The thistle. The general characters of which are as follow: the leaves are set alternately on the branch...
-Caries
(From to abrade, or from karah, to dig in, a Chaldee word); according to Mr. Sharp, it is a partial mortification of the bone, which separates from the sound part sooner or later. Dr. Cullen places t...
-Caries. Continued
In considering a caries of the bones, we should remember, that the bones have their vessels and circulating fluids, and the same general texture which the soft parts have; so that solidity, and a stro...
-Carmes
Eau de. Carmelite water, called also magisterial water of Baume'. It hath its name from being invented by the Carmelites at Paris. Take of fresh baum, six ounces; fresh lemon peel, the yellow part, t...
-Carminantia
Or Carminativa. Carminatives. In general, by these words are meant such medicines as are used to expel wind from the alimentary canal. The ancients had much of mystery in their practice, and celebrate...
-Caros
See Carum. Caros, carus, or carus, synonymous with sopor, (from the head, which is chiefly affected). It is a slight degree of apoplexy, in which some broken incoherent answers are obtained from t...
-Carotideae Arterae
The carotid arteries; from the head, or sleep; since, when the current of blood is diminished through these vessels, stupor follows. From the fore part of the curvature of the aorta, just before the...
-Carpus
a Greek primitive, a wrist, called by the ancients brachiale. It consists of eight bones; viz. the os scaphoides, lunare, cuneiforme, forme, forme, trapezium, trapezoides magnum, and uneiforme. The ...
-Carthamus
(From the Arabic term kartham). Bastard saffron. Called also cnicus; crocus Sara-cenicus; carthamum officinarum; carduus sativus, saffron flower; carthamus tinctorius Lin. Sp. Pi. 1162. Nat. order cyn...
-Cartilago
(Quasi cartilago, from carnis, the genitive of caro, flesh). A substance between muscular flesh and bone. A cartilage or gristle, called also chondros. Dr. Hunter defines it to be a smooth, solid, dia...
-Carui And Carum
Also called carvi, cuminum pratense, caros; carawaies. It is the carum carvi Lin. Sp. Pi. 378. Nat. order umbelliflerae. It is a native of the northern climes; cultivated in gardens with us; but by c...
-Caru Ncula
A caruncle. This word is a diminutive from caro, flesh. A caruncle is a small piece of flesh, or an excrescence that hath the appearance of flesh. Thus there are the carunculae lachry-males in the cor...
-Caryophylla
Ta: also herba Benedicta,cary-oph. vulgaris, garyophilla, janamunda, avens, herb bennet. It is called caryophyllata, from caryophillus, because its smell resembles that of clove July flowers. Geum urb...
-Caryophylli Aromatici
(From a nut, a leaf, and odour). The aroma-. tic cloves; called also garyophyllus, hinka, and clous. It is the unripe fruit, or rather the cups of the unopened flowers, of a tree which grows in the...
-Caryophillus Ruber
From a nut, and a leaf; so called because it smells like the leaves of the Indian nut or clove tree). Hence, it is a name applied to many plants of the pink and July flower kind. Gillyflower; also ca...
-Cas Gangythreb
See Verbena. Casamum. See Arthanita. Cascarllla. Cascarilla. The Spaniards apply this word to the Peruvian bark, as we apply the word bark to distinguish the same material. It is a diminutive of casca...
-Cassada
(Indian). Called also cacavi, cassave, pain de Madagascar, ricinos minor, maniot, yucca, ma-niiba, aipi, aipima coxera, aipipoca, janipha, jatropha manihot Lin. Sp. Pi. 1429. Nat. order tithymeloides ...
-Cassia
See Casia, and also Senna Alexandria. Cassia alata, Lin. Sp. Pi. 541. The leaves of this plant are bitter, nauseous in their taste, and supposed to be cathartic. The decoction is recommended in herpe...
-Cassina Cassine
Also called alaternoides Africana lauri serratae folio, Apalachine gallis, herba cassiana, alaternus. Ilex cassine Lin. Sp. Pi. 181. Nat. order dumosae. It grows in Carolina; the leaves resemble those...
-Castanea
Chestnuts, (from Castana, a city in Thessaly from whence they were brought). Called also lopima, mota, glans Jovis Theophrasti, Jupiter's acorn, and Sardinian acorn. Fagus Castanea Lin. Sp. Pi. 1416. ...
-Castor
(Quasi from the belly, because of the largeness of his belly; or from castrando, because he is said to bite off his testicles, as the supposed object of his hunters). The Beaver, also called fiber,...
-Catalepsis
Catalepsy, (from to seize, or interrupt). It is also called catoche, cato-chus congelatio; and by Hippocrates, aphonia; by An-tigencs, anaudia; by Coelius Aurelianus, apprehensio, oppressio; also ap...
-Catapasma Catapastum
(From to sprinkle upon). The ancient Greek physicians meant by this term any dry powder, to be sprinkled on the body; called also conspersio, epipas-ton, pasma, sympasmata, aspersio, aspergines; ...
-Cataplasma
A poultice, (from illino, to spread like a plaster,) also malagma, epipasma, epiplasma. Cataplasms take their name sometimes from the part to which they are applied, or effects they produce, so are ...
-Cataputia
Spurge, (from or the Italian term cacapuzza, to have an ill flavour). Under this name are ranked the Cataputia major; called also palma Christi, alkerva, ficus infernalis, pentadactylon, granadilla ...
-Avellana Cathartica
Or Purgatrix. The Purging nut. Jatropha multifida Lin. Sp. Pi. 1429. The tree is a native of America and the West Indies; and grows to a considerable size. Its fruit is oval shaped, containing roundis...
-Cataracta
A cataract, (from to mingle together, or put out of order; because the sense of vision is confounded if not destroyed). Dr. Cullen places it as a species of caligo, and names it ca-ligo (lentis) ob m...
-Cataracta. Continued
After the operation, treat it as an ophthalmy; and a collyrium, of one part rectified spirit of wine, and ten parts of lukewarm water, will be as proper an application as any. Mr. Daviel has the ho...
-Catarrhalis Febris Amphemeri
Na, (from catarrhus, because this fever is accompanied with, or proceeds from, a catarrh). The catarrhal fever, or continual quotidian of the ancients. It begins in the evening, with a shivering and a...
-Catarrhus
A defluxion, (from and to flow down). Called also bronchos, catarrheuma, fluxio, rheuma, capiplenium. It is an inflammation of, or an increased and morbid secretion from, the mucous membrane of the ...
-Catarrhus. Part 2
In the less inflammatory kind the secretion of the mucus comes on first, or at least the previous fever is not very easily distinguished. The running from the nose is not watery, but viscid; though th...
-Catarrhus. Part 3
The middle aged, the strong and robust, are in general soonest affected, and suffer most severely: children and old persons are less violently attacked; yet in the latter it is most often fatal: a hum...
-Cathartica
(From to purge). This word is generally used as expressive of purging medicines; but it implies emetics in ancient authors also. In this place, however, we must adopt the common language, and speak ...
-Cathartica. Part 2
As laxatives, we employ the sena (cassia sena); ipecacuanha (callicocca ipecacuanha) in decoction; the polypody root and myrobolans (polypodium vulgaris et emblica); the damask rose leaves (rosa damas...
-Cathartica. Part 3
In describing the effects and the use of cathartics, instead of explaining them in the way of some therapeutical authors, a capite ad calcem, we shall first speak of their more immediate effects; and,...
-Cathartica. Part 4
In diseases of the head, from the effects of cathartics just mentioned, we may expect the greatest advantages; and we find from experience, that they chiefly relieve every accumulation on the cerebrum...
-Catharticus
Sal, (from to purge). Called also amarus sal, magnesia vitriolata, Ebshamen-sis, and Epsomensis sal. Purging salt, Epsom salt, and English salt. This salt was first obtained from the mineral water a...
-Catheterismus
(From catheterus). The introduction of the catheter into the bladder; an appellation given by P. AEgineta to this operation, which is required in the following cases. 1. When a stone lies internall...
-Cauda
AEtius, in his Tetrab. 4. serm. 4. ch. 103. says, that in some women a fleshy substance arises from the os uteri, and fills the vagina. Sometimes it protu-berates without the lips of the pudenda, like...
-Causa
(Latin.) A cause. Causation, among metaphysicians and logicians, is a subject of peculiar difficulty and of some danger; since, in pursuing the reasoning without due attention, some of the best men ha...
-Causticum Americanum
See Cevadilla. Causticum commune fortu's. Ph. Lond. The common stronger caustic of the London college, called now calx cum kali, is made by adding five pounds four ounces of quick lime, to water of ...
-Cauterium
(From to burn). A cautery, either actual or potential. See Escharotica. Cauterium Potentiate Ph. Edinb. The potential cautery of the Edinburgh Dispensary. Take of Russian potash and quick lime, of ...
-Cava Vena
The principal vein, which receives the refluent blood, and conveys it to the heart, is thus named, from its size. The vena cava is generally described as being two; viz. the ascending and the descend...
-Cedria
(From the cedar tree). It is called the pitch and the resin of the great cedar tree, and it is the crude tears of the cedar. It has been supposed different from the cedrium, or oil of cedar, which is...
-Cedrus
(From Kedron, a valley where it grew in great abundance,) cedrus conifera foliis laricis, cedrus Libani, cedrus magna, larix orientalis. The pinus cedrus Lin. Sp. Pi. 1420. The great cedar of Libanus....
-Cellulosa Membrana
The cellular membrane. It is called tela cellulosa, panniculus adi-posus; membrana adiposa, pinguedinosa,et reticularis; in French, tissue cellulaire, tissue muqueux,and Iorgane cellulaire. This membr...
-Centaurium
(From a centaur). This herb is called centaury, because it was feigned that Chiron, the centaur, cured with it Hercules' foot, which had been wounded with a poisoned arrow. It is also culled Chironia...
-Cepa
(From a wool card; from the likeness of its root; or capitis magnitudine, from the size of its head). The onion. Allium cepa Lin. cromyon, et agrumina. Nat. order liliaceae. The common onion is a p...
-Cephalalgia Cephalagia
(From the head, and pain). The headach. It is also named cephalae, cephaloponia, and homonopagia. It is sometimes used to signify a dull pain of the head, of a short duration; but most frequently i...
-Cephalalgia Cephalagia. Part 2
We shall mention haemicrania as an idiopathic pain of the head, though by some authors it is referred to intermittents; by others to rheumatism. We mean to treat of it, however, more particularly unde...
-Cephalalgia Cephalagia. Part 3
An obstruction connected with the bowels has been a very general cause of this complaint, we mean the suppression of the haemorrhoidal discharge. In the whole circle of practical medicine, we know no ...
-Cephalalgia Cephalagia. Part 4
A branch from the fifth pair of nerves is spread on the membrane that lines the nostrils, and another branch from the same passes through the foramen su-percih, and spreads on the teguments of the for...
-Cephalica
Cephalics, (from the head, also capitalia,) remedies against disorders of the head. Dr. Cullen says, however frequently employed, such a general meaning is sufficient to show the absolute improprie...
-Cera
(From the Arabic kira, or the Chaldean kera). Wax. It is a concrete collected from vegetables by bees, and extracted from their combs after the honey is separated from them. It is wholly a vegetable p...
-Album Et Citrinum
Oleum cerae; oil of wax; called also cerelaeum, from cera, and oleum, from being thinner than cerate, which is, in fact, the butter of wax, prepared by filling the upper part of the retort with fine...
-Ceratum
From cera, wax). Cerate; called also Cerelaeum (which see), ceroma, ceronium, cero-tum, ceratomalagma. Cerates chiefly differ from plasters in consistence, being a softer kind of plaster, or harder ki...
-Cerealia
(From ceres, corn). All sorts of corn of which bread is made. The Greeks use the word demetrias in the same sense. Not to enlarge too far the article of bread, we referred to this part of our work a s...
-Cerealia. Part 2
Numberless experiments prove, that the nerves are necessary to life; and that when the brain, or medulla spinalis, is much injured, life is at an end, or at least health: yet no part of the brain bei...
-Cerealia. Part 3
Near the origin of each pair of nerves we are informed that a brown substance is observable; and in the cerebellum, confessedly the most important part of the contents of the skull, it penetrates so d...
-Cerealia. Part 4
As an appendage to the system of the brain, or rather as a detached nervous apparatus of considerable importance, we shall shortly describe the course and formation of the great sympathetic or interco...
-Cerealia. Part 5
As eight pair of nerves, according to Gall, are derived from the spinal marrow, they are styled entering nerves;but there are some minute nervous filaments, returning from the brain, which he calls ...
-Cerealia. Part 6
After having detailed every important circumstance relative to this very peculiar organ, we have not found a single property to assist us in explaining its functions. If we examine its changes from di...
-Cerealia. Part 7
The great intellectual principle which pervades every intellectual function, the association of ideas, is also carried on in the brain; and it is this principle which seems to require that the recepta...
-Cerealia. Part 8
The arteries in the plexus choroides, which are peculiarly minute and tortuous, probably have an important office, which we cannot even conjecture. The veins are large which arise from them, and some ...
-Cerebri Affectio Spasmodico
Ec-Statica. See Apoplexia. Cerebri compressio, and concussio. Compres sion of the brain: (from con, and premo, to .press together; and con, and quatio, to shake together ). This often happens from e...
-Cerumen Auris
(From cera, wax). The wax in the ears. The Latins.call it cerea, aurium sordes, and marmorata aurium, cypstle, cypselis,fugile. It in-viscates, and retains insects, and prevents their hurting the memb...
-Cervicales
Belonging to the neck, (from cervix, the neck,) the nerves which pass through the vertebrae of the neck. The first cervical nerve throws out a considerable branch to the occiput; supporting, in some ...
-Cervicales Abterae
The arteries of the Neck The cervical artery rises from the subclavian on its upper side, and is presently afterwards divided into two, which sometimes come out separately, and at others by a small c...
-Cervicaria
(From cervix, the neck, so named because it was supposed to be efficacious in disorders of the neck and throat). Bell flower, or campanula. The flower consists of one petal or flower leaf, shaped lik...
-Cervix
Usually confined to the back part of the. neck; hence derived by some from curvus, crooked; but, by others, quasi cerebri via, as the road leading to the brain; also collum, the neck. This is applied ...
-Cervus
From cornu; so called because of the exuberance of its horns). The stag, hart, or male of the red deer. The flesh of these animals, until they are three years old, is excellent. The bone of the stag'...
-Cetus
See Cete. The whale. There many kinds of this fish; but the two principal are the Greenland whale: also called balaena vulgaris, balaena major, musculus; according to Pliny, mysticetus: the Greenland...
-Chaerefolium Chaerophyllum
(From to rejoce, and folium, a leaf, so called from the abundance of its leaves). Called also cerefo-lium, gingidium; common chervil. It is the scandix cerefolium Lin. Sp. Pi. 368. It is an umbellif...
-Chalazae
And Chalazia, (from hail atones; grandma lupae). This name is given to a white knotty string at each end of an egg, formed of a plexus of the fibres of the membranes, by which the yolk and the white...
-Chamaedrys
(From and the oak). Germander. Chamaedrys minor repens; vulgaris. Also called quercula calamandrina, trissago; chamae-drops P. AEginetae and Oribasii. Small germander, and English treacle. It is th...
-Chamaelinum
(From and fax). See Linum catharticum. Chamaelinum vulgare. See Knawel. Chamaemelum, (from and an apple; because it grows on the ground, and has the smell of an apple). Camomile. Galen calls it eu...
-Common Wild Corn Or Dog's Camomile
It is the matricaria chamomilla Lin. Sp. Pi. 1256. It is upright,annual, and grows wild in corn fields. In France, and other countries on the continent, its flowers are used indiscriminately with the ...
-Chamaepitys Chamaepitys
Mas, (from and the pine tree.) Arthetica vel arthretica, ajuga, abiga; iva arthritica. Dioscorides says, that it was called holocyron in Pontus, Ionia in Athens, and sideritis in Euboea. Common grou...
-Chancre
A canker, (French); called also ca-roli. The ancients called such ulcers on these parts caries pudendorum. The small irritable pustules which have obtained this appellation do not appear at any certa...
-Chelidonia
(From the swallow, because swallows are said to open the eyes of their young by it; or because it blossoms about the time in which these birds appear.) The greater and lesser celandines. See Chelidon...
-Cheltenham Water
This arises from a spring near Cheltenham in Gloucestershire; and is one of the most celebrated purging waters in England. When taken from the fountain, it is clear and colourless, but somewhat brisk;...
-Chemia
Vel Chimia, (from the Arabic term chamiah, from chamah, to burn). Chemistry. Among the Greeks it was called and ; the last of which hath been generally followed by the later writers on this subject,...
-Chemia. Part 2
The folly, the madness, and the wickedness of the alchymists, for their conduct at different times merited each title, continued without any considerable change. They worked in secret; and collected f...
-Chemia. Part 3
The French chemists, not content with this splendid improvement, of which, indeed, they could not claim the honour, though they have made numerous additions, scarcely less valuable, perhaps, than the ...
-Chemia. Part 4
Under the article Air, in the First Part, we have mentioned the general properties of the different kinds of this invisible fluid, as well as of the medical properties of each species. We must now spe...
-Chemia. Part 5
Salts are either acid or alkaline. The acid salts, or acids, are mineral, vegetable, and animal; though various acids are not exclusively confined to the class in which they are arranged. The mineral...
-Chemia. Part 6
It is in the form of nitre that this acid is offered to our notice; in the language of modern chemistry, nitrat of potash. As it occurs from the hand of nature, it is far from pure. A large proportion...
-Chemia. Part 7
Muriat of potash has been styled the febrifuge salt of Sylvius, and, from one process by which it was prepared, the regenerated marine salt. Its crystals are cubic, but not regular; its taste pungent ...
-Chemia. Part 8
The acetous acid, as offered to us by the spontaneous changes, in consequence of fermentation, contains a large proportion of mucilage. This is separated by distillation, or more certainly by freezing...
-Chemia. Part 9
Tartarised ammonia seems not to have been examined: it certainly has not been employed as a medicine. Its crystals are tetraedral pyramids, with obliquely truncated summits. Borax is a natural produc...
-Chemia. Part 10
The camphoric acid has not been used in medicine, and the properties of its neutral salts are little known. Its crystals resemble the muriat of ammonia, and are, with difficulty, soluble in water. It ...
-Chemia. Part 11
Strontia resembles barytes in every circumstance, except that the salts it forms with acids have somewhat different properties; and it will probably be found that potash and soda, barytes and strontia...
-Chemia. Part 12
Of charcoal and pitcoal (see Carbo) we have spoken at sufficient length, as they are not substances very often employed in medicine. Respecting amber, usually arranged under the inflammables, we have ...
-Chemia. Part 13
The Animal substances which have been the objects of the chemist are, the blood, the gastric and pancreatic juices, the milk, the sebacic acid, the bile, the urine; the prussic, zoonic, formic, and bo...
-Chermes
(From the Arabic term charmah, or karam). Also called coccum scarlatinum, chermesinum tinctorium and bapticum,alkermes, coccibadicum, grana kermes, coccum insectorimn, quisquilia, scarlet grain, and K...
-China Orientalis
So called from the country from whence it was brought. China radix, sankioa, quaquara, smilax aspera Chinensis, or China root. It is the smilax china, Lin. Sp. Pi. 1459. It is an oblong, thick jointe...
-Chiru Rgia
(From a hand, and work, manual operation). Surgery, or that part of medicine which consists of manual operations. It was our intention to have comprised under the article of medicine a general histo...
-Chiru Rgia. Part 2
Celsus mentions the operation of lithotomy, but this is not the first time of the subject occurring. We delayed, however, noticing it till we could bring the whole together. It appears from Hippocrate...
-Chiru Rgia. Part 3
Ambrose Parey claims a greater share of attention. His works may he even at this time read with considerable profit, as he treats of every branch of the science with considerable judgment and precisio...
-Chiru Rgia. Part 4
In the seventeenth century the names crowd on us in such a multitude, that even the enumeration is almost impracticable. Among anatomists and surgeons, for we can now scarcely distinguish them, we fin...
-Chiru Rgia. Part 5
The profession of a surgeon is of the highest importance to society, and it requires a greater combination of talents than any other within the circle of scientific attainments. The object is certainl...
-Chlorosis
(From chloros, green). The green sickness, called also febris alba, the virgin's disease, amatoria febris, and icterus albus. Though Hippocrates does not seem to have known these names of this disord...
-Cholera Morbus
Coelius Aurelianus says, the name is derived from bile, and luo. It is called also diarrhoea cholerica, felliflua passio, and by some of the ancients, ho/era. Hippocrates divides this disorder into...
-Chorda
(from to roll up like a cord). Properly a musical chord, metaphorically a tendon. Poets often express by it the intestines. Paracelsus, in his work De Origine et Curatione Morbi Gallici, calls the pe...
-Chorde
See Chorda. It is a painful involuntary erection of the penis, happening at all times, but more commonly when the patient is warm in bed: under which circumstance, the penis is not only hard and painf...
-Chorea Sancti Viti
(A caetus saltantium ). St Vitus' dance. Also called viti saltus; by Paracelsus, lascivus. Horstius observes, that some women, who were disordered in mind, once every year paid a visit to the chapel ...
-Chorion
Membrana externa, qua foetus invol-vitur, (from receptaculum). Vide H. Steph.thes Sometimes called camisia fatus, shirt of the foetus. A name of the external membrane of the foetus. In women, as in...
-Choroides
(From chorion, and like ness). It is an epithet of several membranes, which, on account of the multitude of their blood vessels, resem-ble the chorion. It is the tunica retiformis oculi, a name of on...
-Chronicus
Or Chronius, (from time). Chronical. Diseases which continue long, and are without any, or at least a considerable degree of, fever. On the contrary, those which proceed rapidly, and terminate soon...
-Chrystals
And Chrystallography. This subject can scarcely be considered as a medical one, since, perhaps, the deposition of bony matter, more certainly calculous concretions, are the only instances of crystalli...
-Chylostagma Diaphoreticum Min
Dereri, (from juice, and to distil); called also theriacalis bezoardica aqua. It is a fluid dis-tilled from the theriaca Andromachi,or from Mithridate. Chylus, (from juice, ) called, in Paracels...
-Chymosis
(From to gape). It is when, from inflammation, the white of the eyes swells above the black circle, so that there appears a gaping aperture. Galen, de Euphoristis, calls it a red and carnous inflamm...
-Cichoreum Cichorium
( because it creeps about and scatters itself' in the fields). Sylvestre, and sativum. Wild and garden succory. The wild is the cichorium intybus Lin. Sp. Pi. 1142. It is a plant with oblong, dar...
-Cicu
Ta, (quasi caecuta, blind, because it is said to destroy the sight of those who use it.) Hemlock; called by some camarum; by others abiotos; and, according to Erotian, cambeion is an old Sicilian word...
-Ciliares
(From cilia, the eye lids,) vel Meibo'-mii Glandulae; from Meibomius, the discoverer. On the inner edge of each eye lid, in the tarsus, is a row of small holes, which are the excretory ducts of what a...
-Cimolia Alba
Terra: called also creta ful-lonica, terra and argilla Candida, creta cimolia. Tobacco Pipe Clay. It takes the name cimolia from the island Cimolus, in the Cretan sea, now called Argentiere, where it...
-Cinara
(From to move,quia movet urinam). Some write it cynara, and derive it from canis, a dog; because the plant is sharp, like dog's teeth. The artichoke. Also called alcocalum, articocalus, arti-xchoc...
-Cinnabaris
Cinnabar. Also called cinnabar nativum, minium purum, minium Graecorum, (magnes epilepsiae, from its supposed usefulness in epilepsies,) alzemqfor, ammion, azamar. Vitruvius calls it anthrax. Mineralo...
-Cinnamomum
(From the Arabic term kina-men). Also called cinnamum, canella, canella Zeylani-ca, cassia cinnamomea, cassiafistula, canella cuurdo, ku-rudu; cinnamon. The best sort of which the Arabians distinguish...
-Circulatio
(From circulo, to compass about, moving as it were in a circle). Circulation. For what is understood by it in chemistry, see Circulato-rium and Digestio. In anatomy it is the circulation of any fluid...
-Circulatio. Continued
The clamour that this publication excited was inconceivable. It was either not true, or the ancients had already taught the same. Riolan, a more respectable antagonist than the common herd, was alone ...
-Circulus
(Dim. of circus, a circle). A circle. Besides its proper signification, it is applied to different parts of the body; as, by Hippocrates, to the balls of the cheeks, the orbs of the eyes, or the cavit...
-Cirsocele
(From a varix, and a tumour ). It is also called varicocele, circocele, ramex va-rico&us, and hernia varicosa. This is an irregular, elastic tumour of the spermatic arteries and veins. Any large tum...
-Citreum
(From citrus). Called also citron,malus medica, malus citria. The citron tree. Citrus medico Lin. Sp. Pi. 1100. It was first brought from Assyria and Media into Greece, and thence into the southern p...
-Claretum
Claret, or clairet, a diminutive of clair, bright, transparent. By this name is generally understood an infusion of aromatic powders in wine, which is afterwards edulcorated with sugar and honey. This...
-Classificatio
And Classis, (from classes facere, and ultimately from to divide). Classification may perhaps scarcely at first appear to be a subject which belongs to the present work; but as we wish not to conceal...
-Clavellati Cineres
(From clavus,a wedge; so called from the little wedges or billets into which the wood was cut to make them). Also called alumen ca-tinum, soda, sal alkali fixum, cineres Russici, kali, po-tassa, gastr...
-Clavus
(From claudo, to shut). A nail or button. An instrument in surgery mentioned by Amatus Lusitanus, to be introduced into the ulcerated palate, for the better articulation of the voice. Sometimes this w...
-Climactericus Annus
(From to proceed gradually, as upon a ladder. The climacteric year. Every seventh year is usually styled a climacteric; but others reckon only those years that are produced by multiplying seven by o...
-Climate
The term is employed by geographers, who divide the globe into parallel bands or zones of a determined breadth. By physicians it implies different regions cither of more steady or more temperate warmt...
-Clitoris
(From to inclose, or hide, because in its natural state it is closed in the vagina,) called also 3 M ae strum Veneris, columella, dulcedo Veneris, epideris, hy-podermis, myrton. It is a part of the ...
-Clyssus
Clissus vel clistus, (from to wash). Among the ancient chemists, this word imported an extract prepared of various substances mixed together. Among the moderns, it signifies a mixture, containing th...
-Coagulantia
(From coagulo, to incrassate or curdle). In general such bodies as coagulate fluids; but in medicine it signifies more particularly such remedies or poisons as coagulate the blood and juices flowing f...
-Coagulatio
(from the same). Coagulation is when a fluid, or some part of it, is rendered more or less solid. This is variously effected, and from the different methods, as well as means, the appellations vary. ...
-Coagulum
(From the same). Curdled concretions, formed by the mixture of two liquors, are thus 3 M 2 called; such, tor instance, as the curd for cheese, separated from the serous part of milk, by means of renne...
-Cobaltum
Kobalt, (Germ.) called also cadmia metallic*. Cobalt. It is a ponderous hard metallic substance, found in some parts of Asia, now chiefly dug up in Saxony, but also met with in England. The best way o...
-Coccinilla
(A dim. of coccus, a berry,) also called coccinella,ficus Indiae grana, scarabaeolus haemis-fihericu.s, cochinelifera cochinella, coccus Americanus, cochinelle, coccus Indicus tinctorius. Cochineal. C...
-Coccus De Maldivia
See Palma coccifera. Coccus polonicus, Coccus radicis tinctorius, is found of different sizes, from a poppy seed; to a pepper corn, and in greater or less numbers adhering to the roots of the polygon...
-Coccygaeus
Musc, (so called from coccyx, where it is inserted). It arises from the spine of the ischium, and is inserted into the side of the os coccygis; this muscle and its fellow form a sling to bring that bo...
-Coccygis
Os, (from a cuckoo, whose bill it is said to represent). Also called cauda, coccyx, os-sis sacri acumen. It is situated at the extremity of the os sacrum, and is in some measure an appendix of it; it...
-Cochlea Cochlias
(From to turn round). Called also antrum buccinosum. The first mention made of this part of the ear is by Plutarch, who says, that Empedocles, a scholar of Pythagoras, was acquainted with it and its ...
-Cochleae
(From to wind, or wreathe). Snails. The snail is an animal lodged in a short thick turbinated shell, whose aperture is closed in the winter with a kind of cement. The land snails are called opercu...
-Cochlearia
(From cochleare, a spoon; because its leaves are like the bowl of a spoon). Scurvy grass, a low plant, with thick juicy leaves, somewhat hollowed, so as to resemble a spoon: those from the root standi...
-Coctio
(From coquo, to boil). Boiling; and metaphorically preparing. Also decoctio and apozema. The effect of boiling differs greatly from that of infusion. In the heat of boiling water the essential oils of...
-Coeliaca Arteria
(From venter, the belly). The coeliac artery arises anteriorly from the aorta descendens, as soon as it has passed through the diaphragm; its trunk is short, but it sends oft* from the right side two...
-Coeli
Flos, CcelifoLium,(from caelum, heavenly, flos, or folium, a leaf; so called because it was supposed to be a fallen star). In some places it is known by the name of star fall. Purgamentum stel-larum; ...
-Coffea
(From kofuah, mixing together). Called also jasminum Arabicum,choava, coffee tree or bush. It is the coffea Arabica Lin. Sp. Pi. 245: natural order rubiaceae, called also bon. When fit to drink it is ...
-Colchicum
(From Colchis, a city in Asia, where this plant abounds). Called also count, cotchicum commune; Anglicum, purpureum, et album. Cotchicum autumnale Lin. Sp. Pi. 485. Nat. Old. liliaceae of Murray. Mead...
-Cold
Cold is an agent peculiarly powerful in producing diseases, and removing them; indeed almost the fabled spear, which heals the wounds that it has inflicted. Though we have styled cold an agent, it is ...
-Cold. Part 2
The principal disorders attributed to cold are owing to its irregular application to the body overheated, or to a partial stream of cold air on one particular organ. From hence arise catarrhs, with al...
-Cold. Part 3
In external phlegmone, and all inflammations of the joints, cold is a more doubtful remedy. It has never, we believe, been employed in rheumatism; and in gout we still think it must be injurious. In s...
-Colica
(From colon, the name of one of the intestines). The colic; sometimes calledrachial-gia; but this term is more particularly confined to the colica pictonum, the second species. The appellation of c...
-Colica. Part 2
The colic should be distinguished from a fit of the gravel; stones passing through the ureters; rheumatic pains in the muscles of the belly; a beginning dysentery; the blind piles; from a stone passin...
-Colica. Part 3
Dr. Warren and Dr. Biss relate their success in attempting the cure of the colica pictonum, as it is denominated by one, and the dry belly ach by the other, by means of a salivation with mercury; and ...
-Collyrium
(From glue, fluo,) as they were usually glutinous, or designed to dilute the glutinous discharges. Suppositories, tents, and other things, have been styled collyria from their form; but as they were...
-Colocynthis
(From the colon, and moveo, from its active purging powers). Bitter apple. Also called alhandala, colocynthidis medulla, coloquintida. Bitter or wild gourd. It is the dried pulpy part of a species ...
-Colon
(From hollow). It is the first and most considerable of the large intestines, called also enteron. From the coecum it reaches in the form of an arch above the umbilical region, and extends to the low...
-Colpocele
(From sinus, and hernia). A hernia of the urinary bladder protruding into the vagina. Hence called cystocele vaginalis, or clytro-cele. A patient had been for many years liable to violent hysteric a...
-Columbrinum
(From coluber, the snake; co-lubrinum lignum, radix colubrina, nux vomica minor moluccana, vel altera modira caniram, solanum abo-rescens Indicum, snake weed tree. It is the wood of one species of th...
-Columbo, Columba, Columbe. Raijs De Mosambique
In the Portuguese language, raijs de Mosambique. It is produced in Asia, from whence it was trans-3 O 2 planted to Columbo, a town in the island of Ceylon, and from whence all the East Indies are sup...
-Combination
Of Medicines. In the rage of reformation, it is not uncommon to step beyond the proper limits; and, in almost every science, it is necessary, in different eras, to review dispassionately the conduct o...
-Comminutio
(From comminuo, to break in pieces). Comminution. Contritio. It is the reduction of any solid body into finer particles, and is of two kinds, viz. contusion, or pulverisation, and leviga-tion, or trit...
-Complexus
(From complecto,to comprise). Called also trigeminus. This muscle runs obliquely, rising from the transverse processes of the six inferior cervical vertebrae: and sixth, seventh, or eighth superior do...
-Conceptio
(From concipio, to conceive). Conception may be perhaps defined the first animation of the ovum, at the moment when it escapes from the ovarium, passing through the Fallopian tube to the uterus. The d...
-Concha
(From from its gaping). A shell. Some confine this word to the shell, while others intend by it the animal with its shell. Sea shell fish, when boiled, are wholesome food, though supposed to be alk...
-Concoctio
(From concoquo, to digest). Concoction. It is generally understood to be such a change upon the morbid matter, by the power of nature, generally with assistance of art, as renders it fit for separatio...
-Concussio
(From concutio, to shake together). \ concussion. A jolt or shock in consequence of blows or falls. Concussion of the brain. An affection of the brain, produced by a violent shock, without a wound or...
-Condimentum
(From condio, to preserve). Artyma, conditura. A condiment or preserve. It signifies whatever procures sweetness and a grateful taste to any substance. But, in a more restrained sense, that is called ...
-Condimentum. Part 2
Vinegar we now speak of as a condiment, occasionally used. When in a perfect state, it is scarcely ever, in a moderate quantity, injurious. Even the most acid stomachs, and pregnant women most injured...
-Condimentum. Part 3
Spirits, either alone or with water, are occasionally taken with similar design; but these are in every form, except occasionally as medicines, injurious. Brandy is chiefly preferred; but it is scarce...
-Condyloma
(From a joint or tubercle). A tumour; so called from its resemblance to a con-dyle, a joint bent, or a tubercle. It is a hard eminence, which arises in the folds of the anus, or a hardening or a swe...
-Conessi
(Indian). Called also the codaga pala, conessi seca, cadaguspali. It is the bark of a small tree, called arbor Malabarica lactescens; jasmini flore odoro, siliquis oblongis, growing in Ceylon and Mala...
-Confectio
(From the same). A confection; called also aligulus. In general it is any thing prepared with sugar, and the same with conditum. The latter is usually dry; the confectio a soft electuary. The dry conf...
-Congelatus And Cogelatio
(From con-gelo, to freeze). Frozen or frost bitten. Persons thus affected by the cold are compared to cataleptic patients, but still there is much difference between the diseases. When a man is benum...
-Conjunctiva Tunica
(From the same). The conjunctiva is erroneously confounded with the adnata; they are two distinct coats, and both but partial coverings of the fore part of the eye, though the conjunctiva is reflected...
-Conserva
(From conservo, to keep). A coxserve. Conserves consist of recent vegetable matters and sugar, beat together into one uniform mass. On account of the large quantity of sugar contained in conserves, i...
-Consistentia
(From consisto, to abide). The state or acme of a disease. When applied to the fluids, excrements, or excretions, it imports their consistence. Consoides. See Amianthus. Consolida, (from its supposed ...
-Conspicilum
(From conspicio, to behold). Spectacles. Spectacles are either convex, concave, or plain. The first are adapted to old persons; the next to those who see only with distinctness at a small distance; a...
-Constipatio
(From constipo, to crowd together). Obstipatio, adstrictio. Costiveness. Dr. Cullen gives this disorder the name oiobstipatio. A person is said to be costive, not only when the contents of the intesti...
-Consuetudo
(From consuesco, to be accustomed to.) Custom. Custom and habit are two terms often used synonymously, and indeed the former is often confounded with the latter. By custom is meant a frequent repetiti...
-Contagio
(From contingo, to meet or touch each other; vel infectio, from inficio, to infect). Contagion, or infection. It has been lately attempted to distinguish these two words, though not with a happy disc...
-Contractura
(From contralto, to draw together). Contraction; called by Dr. Aitkin, beribe-ria. An immobility of any of the joints from a preternatural contraction of some of their muscles, or from a derangement o...
-Contrayerva
(From contra and yerva, a herb, Spanish). A herb good against poisons. Drakena, Cyperus, longus odorus Peruanus, dorstenia, bezoardi-ca radix. Counter poison. It is the dorstenia con-trayerva Lin. Sp....
-Contusa
(From contundo, to bruise). Contusio, collisio, phlosma. Contused wounds, contusions, or bruises. When any part is bruised, the small blood -vessels are broken, and the blood they contained, effused i...
-Convolvulus
Or Volvulus, (from convolvo, to roll together). (See Iliaca passio.) It is also the name of a genus which affords the Jalapa, Mecoachana, Turbith, and Scammony; q. v. The whole genus usually abounds w...
-Convulsio
A convulsion-, or involuntary contraction of the muscles, (from convello, to pu/l together). Called also hieranosos, distensio nervorum. Dr. Cullen places this genus of disease in the class neuroses,...
-Convulsio. Continued
Sometimes convulsions attack suddenly, without any warning; at others their approach is indicated by certain symptoms, such as coldness of the feet, or a sense of creeping, rising like a blast of cold...
-Cookery
(See Aliment, page 72.) Though in this article we have, perhaps, introduced all the more essential remarks, yet we must still add what fancy, fashion, or refinement, has suggested. It is not generally...
-Coopertio
(From cooperio, to cover over ). Covering, clothing, or a small cloak, by which the body is defended from the air, the same as amictus, from co-operire, tegere, to cover, in which sense it is sever...
-Copos
(From to be -weary). Fatigue, weariness. We are so constituted by nature, that all our exertions must be succeeded by a suitable and proportionate relaxation. We are not calculated for a constant ac...
-Cor
In chemistry signifies gold; sometimes an intense fire. In botany, it is the heart of vegetables, or their pith. See Meditullium and Corculum. Co'r, (from contr. hebrew, koaeb, the middle,) called a...
-Corallina
(A dim. of corallium, coral,) mus-cus marinus, corallina anglica, corallina alba, sea coralline, and white wormseed. It is a marine production, common on rocks and shells in shallow water. It resembl...
-Corallium
(From a daughter, and of the sea.) Coral. It is also called lithodendron, or thee stone; almarago, mergen, almargen, gorgonias. Corallium album ramosum, Madrerpora vulgaris, corallium, officinarum o...
-Corallodendron
(From coral,and a tree; resembling in hardness and colour a piece of coral). The leaves for the most part consist of three lobes; the flowers arc papilionaceous, and succeeded by knobbed bivalve pod...
-Coriandrum
Coriander. (Derived, perhaps, from cimex, a bug, because the green herb and seed stink intolerably); also called cassibor and corianon. The coriandrum sativum Lin. Sp. Pi. 367. The plant is an umbel...
-Cornea
(From cornu, as it resembles horn). A coat of the eye, which is also called sclerotica cera-ioides. It is the first proper coat of the eye, strong, thick, and tendinous; its anterior part is distingui...
-Cornu Arietis
The appearance of the section of the pes hippocampi, a portion of the brain. Cornu cervi, (from the Chaldee term karnah,) in chemistry, is the beak of an alembic; but it generally means the horn of t...
-Corona
(From the Hebrew term koren). A crown. In botany it is a series of small beards, or rays, in discoid flowers. Corona seminis is the appendage to the top of many seeds, enabling them to disperse, serv...
-Coronariae Arterae Et Venae
(From the same). The coronary arteries and veins. Those of the heart are also called cardiacs. The first branches which the aorta sends off are the coronary arteries of the heart; and they appear betw...
-Corpora Albicantia
(From corpus,a body). See Cerebrum. Corpora cavernosa penis, called also nervea spongiosa. The two bodies, thus named, rise by two distinct crura from the lower part of the ossa pubis; after which th...
-Corpus Callo Sum
Called also Callus. If the falx is cut away from the crista galli, turned backwards, and the two lateral parts of the cerebrum gently separated, we see a longitudinal portion of a white convex body, n...
-Corroborantia
(From corroboro, to strength-en,) all such medicines as are suited to strengthen the body, and therefore to restore the strength which has been lost. Dr. Cullen thinks, as a general term, it is improp...
-Corrodentia
(From corrodo, to eat away). Corrosiveorcorrodingmedicines,also called cathaeretica. They are divided into, 1st, The mild, such as burnt alum, the ashes of green wood, calomel, calx hydrargyri alba, a...
-Cortex
(From corium, the skin, and tego, to cover; as covering the inner rind of the tree). The bark or outward rind of vegetables. It is the name of many drugs consisting of the barks of trees or roots, viz...
-Cortex. Part 2
The sensible qualities of the bark show it to be a warm tonic and astringent; excelled in its warmth by many aromatics, and in its astringency by the oak bark and the tormentil: as a stimulant, its ef...
-Cortex. Part 3
In the real phlegmasiae the bark is seldom admissible. Erythema and the erythemalatous inflammations must be excepted, and these ought to be separated from the others. Gangrenous sore throat, for inst...
-Cortex. Part 4
The bark is generally injurious in fevers of the inflammatory kind and in topical inflammations; yet, in some cases of abscess, where the suppuration proceeds slowly, or the discharge is thin and glai...
-Cortex. Part 5
Extract of Peruvian bark with resin. - Take of Peruvian bark, coarsely powdered, one pound; rectified spirits of wine, four pints; digest for four days, and then pour off the tincture; boil the residu...
-Costae
(From custodiendo; because they surround and keep in the lungs). The ribs. The costs, in anatomy, are generally twelve on each side, sometimes eleven, at others thirteen: their extremities next the ve...
-Cotyledon
(From cavity). The lateral bibulous, perishable lobe, or placenta of the seed, destined only to nourish the heart. The greater part of seeds have two lobes; some have more; some only one, and others ...
-Crampus
Cramp, (from krimpen, to contract; Germ.) It is a sudden and violently painful rigidity or spasm of a muscle. This complaint is often very troublesome, but not usually dangerous; though instances have...
-Craniology
We have introduced this subject in the article Cerebrum, and have there laid the foundation of the present inquiry, by considering the brain as the material organ of an immaterial principle; as the in...
-Crassula
(From crassus, thick; so named from the thickness of its leaves). Called also faba crassa, faba inversa, sedum telephium, fabaria, anacampseros maxima, cotyledum alterum, scrofularia media vel tertia,...
-Creta
(From Crete, the place whence it was first brought). Chalk. The only kind now used in medicine is the white chalk, which is found in most parts of the world. It is a pure white mineral calcareous eart...
-Cricelasia
The driving a hoop as high as the breast of the person who used it was formerly commended for rendering the limbs pliable, and strengthening the nerves. It was an ancient gymnastic exercise. Crico-ary...
-Crinones
(From crinis, hair,) called also comedones, cridones. The mention of dracunculi,observes Ambrose Pare, calls to my memory another kind of abscess, altogether as rare. This our Frenchmen name crinon...
-Crisis
(From to judge). The termination or change of a disease either by recovery or death. Hippocrates first established the doctrine of crisis and critical days, which were, the 3d, 5th, 7th, 9th, 1 1th,...
-Crocus
(From krokin, Chaldean) Saffron: because of its golden colour, the chemists call it aroma philosophorum, by contraction aroph; others have called it sanguis Herculis, aurum vegetabile, anima pul-monum...
-Crucibulum
(From crucio, to torment). Also called tigillum, catinus fusorius,albot,alkczoal, or crucible. It is an earthen vessel, made for enduring the greatest degree of heat, generally wider above than below...
-Cruralis Nervus
(From cms, a leg). The nerve which passes from the loin into the thigh is thus called. The second lumbar nerve joins the third, and that again communicating with the fourth, they produce this crural n...
-Crustacea
(From crusta, a -shell, and ) are animals which have the external parts firm and hard, but contain afleshy soft substance within. The firm part consists of a semicalcareous crust, forming one ver...
-Crystalli
(From cold, and to contract; for crystals were considered as water contracted by cold). See Crystallinae. Crystalli tartari. See Tartarum. Crystallina. The crystalline humour of the eye, (from col...
-Crystallisatio
(From crystal). Crystallization. The parts of all bodies which take the solid state are disposed to arrange themselves in such a manner, as to produce some regular geometrical figure in the solid. T...
-Cubebae
(From the Arabic term cubabah). Cu-bebs; called also piper caudatum; by Actuarius, com-fieba; and by Myrepsus, compiper. Piper cubeba Lin. Sup. 90. Wildenow, vol. i. p. 159. The cubeb tree is also the...
-Cubitalisner Vus
(From cubitus, elbow). See Cervicales. Cheselden describes the cubical nerves as being two in each arm: the upper passing over the upper exuberance of the os humeri, runs on to the thumb and the three...
-Cuculla Cucullaris
Musculus, (from cucullus, a hood,) called also trapezius, arises by a strong round tendon, from the lower part of the protuberance in the middle of the os occipitis behind; and by a thin membranous te...
-Cucumis
(Quasi curvimeres, from their curvature, according to Varro). The Cucumber. The cucumber hath a flower consisting of one leaf, which is bell-shaped, expanded toward the top, and cut into many segments...
-Cucupha
A hood; called also cucullus, birethus, and pileus. An odoriferous cap for the head. It is made like what is called the skull cap, for children, of either silk or linen; double, containing between its...
-Cucurbita
(A curvitate; from its shape). Cucurbita lagenaria Lin. Sp. Pl 1434. The gourd. It is a large fruit growing on a plant: its seed is one of the four cold seeds mentioned in the article Cucumis. It is a...
-Cucurbitula
(A dim. of cucurbita; so called from its shape). A cupping glass; an instrument of great antiquity, being mentioned by Hippocrates, and formerly made of horn or metal. Different names have been given ...
-Cullentan System
The Cullenian system forms an era in the history of medicine, which, from various causes, may perhaps escape the notice of future inquirers; for the physicians on the continent had scarcely escaped fr...
-Cullentan System. Continued
It is singular, however, that it did not occur to those who animadverted on or opposed the Cullenian system, that it was by no means wholly new or fanciful. The connection of the state of the extreme ...
-Cuminum
Cumin. (From to bring forth; because it is said to be efficacious in curing sterility.) It is also called cyminum and faeniculum orientate. It is the cuminum cyminum Lin. Sp. Pi. 365. This plant res...
-Cuprum
(Quasi as Cyprium; so called from the island of Cyprus, from whence it was brought). See AEs. In this article we chiefly enlarged on the chemical properties of copper, reserving our account of its med...
-Curcuma
(From the Arabic term carkim). Turmeric. Crocus Indicus, terra marita, cyperi genus ex India, cannacorus radice croceo,manjella,kua, kaha; by the Indians, borri-borri; by the Portuguese, saffran de te...
-Cutanei Morbi
If cutaneous diseases have been imperfectly, and with too little discrimination, described or considered by the practical physician, they have claimed a large share of the attention of nosologists, in...
-Cutanei Morbi. Continued
The genera of the order macula are, ephelis (freckles); naevus (marks supposed to be the effects of the mother's longing); and spilus (a mole). The genera of the Squamae are, the lepra (the true lepr...
-Cutaneus
See Sphincter ani. There is also a nerve so called. See Cervicales. Cutaneus internus servus. It rises from the union of the seventh cervical, and first dorsal pairs, runs over the other brachial ner...
-Cutis
(From to cover with a hide, or from cutan, a covering; Chaldean). The skin. It is called by Herodotus, anthrope. It is a strong, thick, universal covering of the external parts of the body, immediate...
-Cyathus
a cup, (from to pour out). It was a common measure among the Greeks and Romans, both of the liquid and dry kind; equal to an ounce, or the twelfth part of a pint. The sextans was two ounces; the qua...
-Cydonia
(From Cydon, a town in Crete, where they grew). The quince tree; also called cotonea, and malus cydonia. It is the pyrus cydonia Lin. Sp. Pi. 687. The wild quince tree. The quince tree is low, a nati...
-Cynoglossum
(From a dog, and a tongue; from its resemblance). Hound's tongue. Cynoglossum majus vulgare canina lingua. Greater hound's tongue. Cynoglossum officinale Lin. Sp. Pi. 192. It is a biennial plant; ...
-Cynosbatos
(From and a thorn). The berry of the dog Rose. Canirubus, cynocytis, rosa sy/vestris vulgaris, and inodora. It is the rosa canina Lin. Sp. Pi. 6:31. The wild briar, or hip tree. It is one of the la...
-Cyperus
(From a little round vessel, which its root is said to resemble). A plant with vitreous leaves, and triangular stalks, bearing tufts of flowers on their top, followed by a triangular seed. Cyperus ...
-Daucus
( from its relieving the colic, and dispersing flatulencies). The carrot, called also carota, supposed to be derived from cara. Daucus alsaticus. See Oreoselinum pratense. Daucus annuus minor. See ...
-Death
When we contemplate the wonderful structure of the human frame, the varied form in which it is supplied with what is necessary to its perfection the resources accumulated to obviate accidental wants, ...
-Dec
Dua, (from the Latin, de,from, and cado, to fall). Falling, fading once in the year; whatever falls away, as leaves of trees. In botany, deciduous plants are such as cast their leaves in winter. From ...
-Deferentia
Va Sa, (from defero, to convey). Immediately beneath the tunica albuginea are lodged the testicles, the tubuli of which run on to form the epididymis. They then become larger, unite, and form the vasa...
-Deglutitio
(From deglutio, to swallow). The act of swallowing. In swallowing, the morsel is collected on the upper surface of the tongue, is squeezed against the bony palate, and then carries the palatum molle b...
-Deligatio
(From de and ligo, to tie). A bandage. The design of bandages is chiefly to secure the dressings, or to confine the motion of parts which might be painful or injurious. In ulcers, they support the dr...
-Delirium
(From deliro, to rave, or talk idly). It Is termed also alienatio mentis, paranoiae paraphrenesis, dementia, sometimes emolio. When the ideas excited in the mind do not correspond to the external obje...
-Demulcentia Medicamenta
(From de-mulceo, to soften). Demulcent medicines sheath the acrimony of the humours, and render them mild. Dr. Cullen says, they are such as are suited to correct acrids, or to obviate the irritations...
-Dens
(Quasi edens, from edo, to eat, or from ). A tooth. The teeth are usually sixteen in each jaw; they are divided into the body above the gum, and the root, or fang, which is within the socket of the...
-Dentifricium
(From dentes fricare, to rub the teeth). Dentifrice; called also odontotrimma. Medicines for cleaning the teeth. Many preparations are employed for this purpose, chiefly consisting of scuttlelish bone...
-Dentitio
(From dentio, to breed teeth). Also called odontiasis, odontophya. Dentition, or breeding of teeth. Sauvages, in his system of Nosology, makes this a species of odontalgia. Cullen makes dentitio synon...
-Deobstruents
This is a class of medicines formed without any precise or definite object. Obstruction was a cause of convenient application, from its vague indefinite meaning; and, while Ientor and viscidity were t...
-Depressio
(From deprimo, to press down). A depression. In surgery this word generally signifies a sinking of some part of the skull, which happens from an external violence, by which the bone is fractured, or p...
-Depressor
Also deprimens, (from deprivo, to pull, or draw down). In anatomy, a name applied to several muscles, because they depress the parts to which they are fastened. Depressor anguli oris. A name given by...
-Depuratio
(From depuro, to purify). Depuration, clarificatio, despumatio,vel rectificatio. It is the freeing of any fluid from all heterogeneous feculence, and rendering it more transparent. This operation is o...
-Derivatio
(From derivo, to draw from; and from de, and rivus, a river). Derivation. In medicine, when a humour cannot conveniently be evacuated at the part affected, and is attracted from thence, to be discharg...
-Diabetes
(From to pass of, or through). Diarrhea urinosa; dipsas; diuresis; hydro/is ad matu-lam; profiuvium urine. An excessive discharge of crude urine, exceeding the quantity drunk. Boerhaave, in his Ins...
-Diaeta
(From to nourish). Dieta, also Diaterica. Diet. When strict and regular, the Greeks named it cathestecos. Though diet is often confined to what we eat and drink, yet Galen and most other medical wri...
-Diaeta. Continued
The diet, adapted to different climates, will not detain us long. Under a tropical sun, the perspiration is considerable, and the fluids alkalescent. The supply should therefore be of the mildest kind...
-Diagnosis
(From to discern, or distinguish,) also dignotio. It generally means distinction, and is generally confined to diseases; therefore, diagnostics mean the signs of diseases by which they may be known a...
-Diaphoretica
(From the same). Diaphoretics. Medicines which promote perspiration. Diaphoretics differ from sudorifics: the former only increase the insensible perspiration; the latter excite a sensible discharge t...
-Diaphoretica. Part 2
It was formerly the custom to accumulate all these stimuli for particular purposes, thinking that the greater the heat, the more copious would be the discharge. Physicians, in this plan, were frequent...
-Diaphoretica. Part 3
As different theories have dictated, we have been sometimes alarmed with apprehensions of producing morbid viscidity and lentorof the fluids by sweating; at others, taught to promote this evacuation t...
-Diaphragma
The diaphragm,(from to make a partition, or inclosure, of and to close,) because it divides the cavity of the thorax from that of the abdomen. Midriff; also called diazoma, disseptum, hypozoma,septu...
-Diaphragmaticae Arterae
Belonging to or connected with, the diaphragm. The diaphragmatic arteries; also called phrenic. Their origin has been already explained. The diaphragmatic arteries generally appear on the under side o...
-Diarrhoea
(From through, and to flow). Alvi Fluxus, hypexodos; perturbatio alvi; a too frequent discharge of the contents of the intestines. Dr. Cullen places this genus of disease in the class neuroses, and o...
-Diarrhoea. Continued
In cases of diarrhoea following suppressed perspiration, we considered the discharge as merely vicarious. It is, however, sometimes inflammatory; and it was necessary to separate the consideration in ...
-Diarthrosis
(From per, and a joint). A moveable articulation; abarticutatio, and dearti-tulatio. Different authors vary in their division; but Dr. Hunter supposes it to consist of three species: 1st, The enarth...
-Dictamnus Albus
(From Dictamnus, a city in Greece, on whose mountains it grew,) fraxinella, white or bastard dittany. It is a plant with leaves resembling those of the ash tree, but much smaller, and more juicy. On t...
-Digestio
(From digero, to dissolve). Digestion-. In surgery it is the disposing an ulcer or wound to suppuration, by the application of proper remedies. In pharmacy it is the subjecting of bodies, included in...
-Digestio. Part 2
Those who contend that digestion is a simple solution, have sought, with some anxiety, for a solvent of a peculiar power; and they have at last, apparently, discovered it in what they style the gastri...
-Digestio. Part 3
The food then in the stomach is in part dissolved by the saliva and fluids of the organ; broken down by fermentation, and, by the latter process, in part ani-malised. In this state it is carried into ...
-Digestio. Part 4
The digestibility of different substances we considered under the article Aliment, and we there spoke from observation, assuming, as the criterion, the exacerbation of hectic paroxysms, which always o...
-Digita Lis
(From digitus, a finger). Aralda, digitalis purpurea Lin. Sp. Pi. 758. It is a hairy plant, with serrated leaves; a thick angular stalk, on which are numerous purple tubulous flowers, resembling the f...
-Digitus
(From digero, to direct, as the natural instrument of pointing or directing). A finger. In the hands they have particular names. The first, which is opposite to, and thicker than the rest, is called ...
-Diplo Pia
(From duplus, and visus). A depravity of sight, by which the same objects appear double. The symptom is almost always of short dura-tion, and we bear it freely. So long as the object is not within ...
-Dispensatorium
(From dispendo, to distribute, or set in order). Dispensatory. A work treating of the composition of remedies; called also antidotari-um. A dispensatory contains a select number of formulae, establish...
-Dissectio
(From through, and seco,to cut). Dissection. The cutting up a body,with a view amining the structure of the parts. See Anatomia. It is scarcely an object of a work of this kind to teach the minutiae...
-Distillatio
(From distillo, to drop gradually). Distillation; alsacta, catastagmos. Sometimes it signifies the same as defluxio, or catarrhus; so Shak-speare speaks of distilling rheum. In pharmacy it is the s...
-Distortio
(From distorqueo, to wrest aside). It is applied to the eyes, when a person seems to turn them from the object he would look at, and is then called squinting. (See Strabismus.) It also signifies h...
-Distortio. Part 2
An adult, in a case where no violence hath been committed or received, usually complains first of weakness in his back bone, accompanied with a heavy dull pain, and great lassitude: this is soon follo...
-Distortio. Part 3
The restoration of the spine to its natural figure depends much on the early administration of the help proposed: though the distemper may be so far cured, as the patient may recover the use of his li...
-Diuretica
Diuretics, (from by, and urine). Medicines which are suited to promote the secretion and provoke the discharge of urine, either by increasing the quantity of water in the mass of blood, or by introd...
-Diureticus Sal
Diuretic salt; acetated kali, sal Sennerti, tartarus regeneratus, and arcanum tartari; terra foliata tartari; essentiale sal. It is a fixed vegetable alkaline salt, saturated with the acetous acid, an...
-Dolor
Pain; algema. Boerhaave, and most ether authors on this subject, assign a stretching of the nerves as the only immediate cause of pain: but this is a partial view of the subject, since compression, ir...
-Dracunculi
(From a serpent). Guinea worms; called also capillares vermiculi, tape worm, and solitary worm. The Arabians call it Me-dinensis, vel medena vena. They styled it vena, because they doubted it being a...
-Ductus
(From duco, to lead). A duct or canal; a word frequently applied to parts of the body through which particular fluids are conveyed. Ductus arteriosus. It is found only in the foetus, and very young c...
-Duodexum
(From duodeni, twelve). This intestine is thus named from a supposition that its length does not exceed the breadth of twelve fingers; and if measured with the ends of the fingers, the idea is suffici...
-Dura Mater
(From durus, hard, and mater, mother). It is so called from its hardness, compared with that of the pia mater, and from its being the source of all the other membranes; omenta eilamides, cuticu-laris ...
-Dysenteria
(From difficult, and the intestines). Intestines with difficulty moved, though sometimes called diarrhaea carnosa and dissolutus morbus, often the blood flux, because blood occasionally appears in th...
-Dysenteria. Part 2
The principal distinctions of dysentery into inflammatory, putrid, and malignant, are without foundation, as will be obvious from the following short description. It is evident that these are inflamma...
-Dysenteria. Part 3
The cure of dysentery, as described by the earlier authors, is confused and contradictory. As an increased evacuation it has been treated by astringents; as a spasm, by opiates; and as an haemorrhage,...
-Dysenteria. Part 4
Goettlieb Richter, in his Medical and Surgical Observations, observes, that the dysentery is a rheumatic or catarrhous affection of the larger intestines; and that the proper remedies for the disease ...
-Dysodes
(From bad, and to smell). An ill smell, fetid. Foesius thinks that in Hippocrates it means a.fetid disorder of the small intestines. It is also the name of a malagma for the pleurisy, and of an acopo...
-Dysopia
(From difficulter, and Difficult sight; parorasis. Dr. Cullen places this genus of disease in the class locales, and order dysesthesiae, which he defines, depraved vision, so that objects cannot b...
-Dyspermatismus
(From difficulter, and semino,) agenesia. Dr. Cullen places this genus of disease in the class locales, and order epischeses, which he defines a slow or impeded emission in coition of the semen viri...
-Dyspnoea
Difficult breathing, (from difficulty, and to breathe). Dyspnoon. This is a genus of the class neuroses, and order spasmi. Dr. Cullen defines it to be a constant difficulty of breathing, without a se...
-Dysuria
Dysury, (from painful, and urine). A difficulty of voiding the urine; stillicidium, ardor urinae, culbicio, obstruction, heat, difficulty of voiding urine, and strangury. A total suppression is cal...
-Ebrietas
(From the same). Drunkenness. Spirituous liquors animate, and for a time our natural vigour is more active; but this effect is fleeting. If they are often repeated, or too freely used, their excess of...
-Eccymosis. Ecchymoma
(From , to pour out, or from without, and juice,) exsuccatio. Sometimes Crustula and Sugillatio are applied in this sense; which see. It is an effusion of humours from their respective vessels under ...
-Ectropium
(From the same,) an inversion or everson of the eye lids, so that their interior red skin becomes prominent, and the eyes exposed. When this misfortune happens in the superior eye lid, in consequence ...
-Elaeosaccharum
(From oil, and sugar). A mixture of essential oil with sugar. The oil requires at least eight or ten times its quantity of sugar, which should be well rubbed with the mixture, and kept closely f...
-Electarium
Vel Electuarium,(from eli-go, to choose, or rather lackata, from laack, Heb. to lick up,or the Greek word to tick). An electuary. Anon electuary is of the same consistence and materials as a bolus; ...
-Elective Attraction
(From eligo,to choose, or select). This term has been usually applied to chemical affinities; but as we have employed it in physiological discussions, we shall state the foundation on which we rest. ...
-Electric
Tas; electricity, (from amber). The quality which amber possesses of attracting light bodies when rubbed, has expanded into consequences the most extensive, and results the most important: it has bec...
-Elelisphacos
(From to distort, and sage,) the name of a species of sage, from the appearance of its leaves and branches curling spirally: its virtues are the same with those of sage. See Salvia. Elementum. Elem...
-Elemi
Called also icicafiba, icicia, and gum elemi, is a dry resinous substance, brought from the East Indies and AEthiopia; but an inferior sort is the produce of an olive tree in the Spanish West Indies; ...
-Elephantiasis
Lazari morbus vel malum; Phaeniceus morbus, is generally ranked as a species of leprosy (see Lepra Arabum); but is distinguished from the leprosy by being seated in the flesh, while the leprosy only a...
-Elevator Aurpculae
This muscle arises from the external termination of the frontal muscle, it being formed of different fleshy fibres covering the temporal muscle; and being thin and membranous, is carried over it; then...
-Elichrysum
Helyohryson, (from the sun, and gold; from their shining yellow appearance). Goldylockx. It is a small, shrubby, downy plant, clothed with long very narrow leaves, producing on the tops of the bran...
-Embryu Lcia
(From a faetus, and to draw). A hook for the extraction of a child when labour is difficult. In the present practice of midwifery, as circumstances vary, the foetus is drawn from the uterus by the ...
-Emetica
Emetics, (from to vomit,) anocathartica, and -uomitoria; medicines which excite vomiting. The use of these medicines is so extensive, and their effects often so important, that they will justify our...
-Emetica. Part 2
Other causes of vomiting are more obscure in their action. Association of ideas is a mental operation; yet a very frequent and certain cause of vomiting is, the recollection of objects connected with ...
-Emetica. Part 3
In continued fevers emetics are highly useful, but their effects are not equally striking. The debilitating power of every febrile attack affects the stomach, and produces those irregularities of the ...
-Emetica. Part 4
In the adynamiae, emetics are of very extensive utility. They are of doubtful efficacy in syncope,when the disease arises from a topical affection of the heart and larger arteries, or when owing to de...
-Emissarium
(From emitto, to send forth). An emissary. In medicine it is any outlet, whether natural or morbid, from which any thing is discharged. Emmenagoga, Emmenagogues, (from the menstrual discharges, and ...
-Emollientia
(From emollio, to soften). Emollients, malacticos. Medicines which lessen the force of cohesion in our simple solids, and therefore soften and diminish the hardness and rigidity of the parts to which ...
-Emphysema
(From to inflate,) inflatio; and sometimes leucophlegmatia; is any flatulent tumour: but it means generally a soft tumour arising from air being admitted into the cellular membrane. In Hippocrates i...
-Empirica Secta
(From and experientia). The empiric sect. It was begun by Sera-pion of Alexandria, or by Heracleon, about 278 years before the birth of Christ. The empyrical physicians conducted themselves wholly by...
-Emplastrum
(From the same). Plaster. Plasters are compositions for external use: they are not always applied for any medical virtue; but chiefly used to retain other dressings, or to keep the parts to which they...
-Emplastrum. Continued
Its use is generally known; but the following is an easy substitute: Dissolve a pound and a quarter of fine isinglass in five pints of water; and before it cools spread it on silk in the manner above ...
-Empyema
(From within, and pus, or matter). The ancients called all internal suppurations empyema, (see ecpyema); but at present this name is confined to a collection of purulent matter, lying loose in the c...
-Encanthis
(From in, and an angle of the eye,) an encysted tumour on its inner angle. At the first a tubercle appears on the carunculalachrymalis, or on the cuticle adjacent; afterwards this tumour extends ove...
-Encauma
(From and burn). The scoriae of silver, as well as the mark left by a burn, and a pustule produced by the same cause. It is also the appellation of a superficial ulceration on the eye. Those ulcerat...
-Enema
A clyster, (from to inject,) enclysma, catlaysma, and lotio. Any liquid medicine injected into the anus. Clysters are usually injected by means of a bladder and pipe, called elusma, fistula, ou/isco...
-Enula
(A corruption of Helenium; so called from Helene, the island where they grow,) aroma germanicum, enula campana, aster, omnium maximus; scabwort, and elecampane. Inula Helenium Lin. Sp. Pl 1236. It is...
-Ephemera
(From and a day). A fever of one day's continuance only; diaria febris. The heat of the body is moderate, such as attends an excess of wine, or a violent passion. The pulse is somewhat full and quick...
-Ephidrosis
(From to break out into a sweat,) hydropedesis, desudatio and mador. Dr. Cullen places this disease in the class locales, and order apoce-noses; and defines it a preternatural evacuation of sweat, on...
-Epidemius
(From upon, and the people). Epichorios;pandemius,popularis, regionalis morbus. An epithet of diseases which at certain times are popular, and frequently attack; then for a time disap-year, and agai...
-Epidemius. Continued
4. In 1625, a hard frosty winter, summer wet and hot; 1626 and 1627 excessively hot summers; 1630 and 1631, a great drought; the other years wet until 1634. In 1625 the plague killed thirty-five thou...
-Epilepsia
(From to seize, invade, or oppress). The epilepsy; Abas, morbus caducus, in-terlunius, magnus, and attonitus morbus, analepsia; by Paracelsus, catalentia; by the Portuguese, cobrello; by Hippocrates,...
-Epilepsia. Continued
From the variety of causes, and the nature of some of these, it is difficult to state the indications and method of cure. We may, with the generality of authors, propose, 1. To prevent an impending pa...
-Epinyctis
(From and night). A pustule which arises in the night resembling a furunculus; according to Sauvages, these are pustules of a blackish-red colour, crowding together, three or four lines in diameter, ...
-Epiphora
(From to carry with a force ) In a medical sense, it is a violent determination, generally inflammatory, of the fluids to any part of the body; but more particularly the flow of tears from the eyes,...
-Epulis
(From upon, and the gums). Vogel describes it, a tubercle on the gums without inflammation.- Of these there are two species; one without pain, the other troublesome, and often degenerating into a...
-Errhina
(From the nose). Sternutatoria. Er-rhines, called nasal, caput purgia, which last is a barbarous term, implying those remedies which purge the head. These are either errhines, or masticatories: the f...
-Eryngium
(From to eructate; because it causes eructations). Eryngo. Eringus, eryngium maritimum, inguinalis, aetherea herba, aster atticus, hyophthalmos, crocodilion,iringus, and sea holly, eryn-gium campestr...
-Erysimum
(From to draw; from its power of drawing blisters). Iris, camelina, chant aeplion, verbena faemina, eruca siliqua cauli oppressa. Hedge mustard. Erysimum officinale Lin. Sp. Pi. 922. It is a hairy p...
-Erysimum. Continued
Sydenham reckons the Essera (which see) among species of erysipelas. Erysipelas should be distinguished from the plague, and from inflammations of different kinds that appear on the skin. When erysi...
-Escharotica
(From to bring on crusts by burning, ultimately from uro). Escharotics, called also erodentia, caustica, cauteria. Substances which dissolve the solid matter of the human body, or attract its moistu...
-Essentialis
(From esse, to be). Essential. It is an epithet for salts procured from vegetable juices, by crystallization. For the process, see Ace-tosa. When the viscous juices of vegetables are used in this proc...
-Essera
(From the Arabic sorah). The chronic nettle rash. It is called essere, sora, and sara, by the Arabians; by Sydenham, a bastard or scorbutic erysipelas, with or without ulcerations; the nettle spring, ...
-Esula
Vel Ezula. Spurge. There are many species of plants which bear this name, some of which rank under the article Tithymalus. Esula Indica, tithymalus orientalis arborescens, 'triquetrus, spinosus, and ...
-Ethmoides
Os, (from a sieve, and a form). Cribriforme, cribrosum, and coliforme os; fora-minulentum; spongiosum os. This bone is placed between the two orbits of the eyes, where a notch is left for its inserti...
-Euphorbia
So named by Juba, in honour of Euphorbus his physician; schadida-cal/i, tithymalus. aizoides fruticosus, etc. The euphorbium plant. burn, thorny plant, spurge. Euphorbia officinarum Lin. Sp. Pi. 647....
-Euphragia. Euphrasia
(From joyful; because it exhilarates the spirits,) ocularia, eye bright; euphrasia officinalis Lin. Sp. Pi. 841. It is a herb with small, oval, serrated leaves, set in pairs without pedicles: the flo...
-Exanthema
(From to springforth like a flower). Rash. Effloratio, efflorescentia, and epan-thesma. Red patches on the skin, variously figured, in general confluent, or diffused irregularly over the body, leavin...
-Exfoliatio
(From exfolio, to cast the leaf). Desquamatio. Exfoliation. The process by which the dead part of the bone separates from the sound. One principal cause of an exfoliation of a bone is an interruption ...
-Exostosis
(From out of, and a bone). Hyperostosis, a tumour on a bone. Mr. Pott calls it an enlargement of the bone. Its hardness equals, or rather exceeds, that of the bone from which it proceeds. Mons. Peti...
-Expectorantia
(From expectoro, to discharge from the breast). Expectorants, bechita, and bechica. Medicines suited to promote the excretion or rejection of mucus from the bronchial glands. Some expectorants operate...
-Extensor
(From extendo, to stretch out). An extender. This name is given to several muscles. Extensor Carpi radialis. This muscle takes Its origin from the rising line of the os humeri, that runs towards the ...
-Extenuatio
(From extenuo, to diminish ). Leanness. This may arise in two ways: one from the increased evacuation of the nutritious particles; the other from cacochymia, or a depravation of the fluids. Prosper Al...
-Extractio
(From extraho, to draw from). Extraction. The liquors which dissolve bodies in then-pure state, separate them from impurities, or rather extraneous bodies with which they are mixed. Extraction is perf...
-Extravasatio
(From extra, and vasa, out of the vessels). Extravasation; applied to any part of the fluids of the body out of their proper vessels: thus an ecchymosis. sugillation, or aneurism, may be called extrav...
-Faba
Quasi faga, (from to eat, it being originally the food of man). The bean, cyamus,phaseo-lus. This plant hath a long unicapsular pod, full of kidney shaped seeds; the stalks firm; the leaves in pairs,...
-Fagara Major
(From fagus, the beech, which it resembles). Cayutana Luzonis, cubebis. Fagara plerota Lin. Sp. Pi. 172. It is a plant found in the Philippine islands. The berries are aromatic, and, according to Avi...
-Fames
(From to eat; because it is the stimulus to eat;. Hunger; that peculiar sensation of the stomach which excites a desire for food, according to Willis, arising from acid effluvia, and vapours, affect...
-Fascia
Ligatio, ligatura, alligatura. A bandage, fillet, roller, or ligature. Of bandages, in general, we have spoken in the article Deligatio; and it now only remains to consider the different forms of band...
-Fauces
(The plural of faux, the top of the throat,) isthmion, amphibranchia. The top of the throat; the space about the openings into the larynx and pharynx, which can be seen when the mouth is open and the ...
-Febrifugus Pulvis. Febrifuge Powder
The Germans give this name to the stypticus pulvis Helvetia In England a mixture of oculi cancrorum and emetic tartar, in proportions of half a drachm and two grains, hath obtained the same appellatio...
-Febris
(From febreo, pro ferveo, to be hot). Since the complaints of mankind have attracted the attention of practitioners, the cause of fevers has been a problem that they have in vain attempted to solve; a...
-Febris. Part 2
These are the phenomena of fevers in their acute, regular, and distinct form. In intermittents they appear regularly, nearly as described; and the most perfect undisguised form of fever is the tertian...
-Febris. Part 3
While the system of Boerhaave prevailed in the south of Germany, different views arose in the north. The patient and industrious Hoffman thought he saw in fevers a change in the state of motion, and a...
-Febris. Part 4
Obstruction to the circulation increases its activity; for the vessels are excited by distention, and, when the extent of the circuit is curtailed, those behind act with greater energy. Thus tying up ...
-Febris. Part 5
There are various peculiar and distinct contagions, which excite fevers of a particular form, attended with cutaneous affections. The jail and hospital fever maybe considered as the consequence of a p...
-Febris. Part 6
This is a faithful picture of the general progress of continued fever, either fatal from its violence, from neglect, or from improper treatment. In more favourable circumstances, or with proper manage...
-Febris. Part 7
Our prognostic must then be taken from the degree of debility. This is obvious often to the sight: and the young practitioner should exercise his acuteness by careful and attentive observation at the ...
-Febris. Part 8
The state of the urine has also afforded numerous prognostics, and the discrimination of its clouds, its sediment, etc. have been peculiarly minute. The greater number of these appearances may be disr...
-Febris. Part 9
Our chief indications in fever are to lessen the fa to restore, as far as we can, the balance of the circulation; and to support the strength. 1. To lessen the heat.-we have considered the heat as th...
-Febris. Part 10
When we spoke of Cathartics, we explained at some length their advantages in relieving congestions of the viscera and the head. In this way they are well adapted for the relief of fever; and that arti...
-Febris. Part 11
Nauseating doses of antimonials operate powerfully and safely as diaphoretics. Dr. Fordyce supposes this effect to be owing to the medicine, and not to the action on the stomach. For this reason, perh...
-Febris. Part 12
It may appear singular, that among the means of lessening heat, or removing topical congestion, we have omitted bleeding in all its forms. The consideration was postponed to introduce it in this place...
-Febris. Part 13
We mean not, however, in every instance to discourage the use of tonics; but merely to allege that they are not alone adapted for the cure of fever, and often injurious before the infarction of the vi...
-Febris. Part 14
Strangury, though often the effects of blisters, sometimes occurs in fevers without their application, and arises from a spasmodic irritation of the neck of the bladder. In this case opium, particular...
-Femoralis Arteria
(From/emur, the thigh). The femoral artery is the external iliac after it has passed from under Poupart's ligament, and is continued along the thigh into the popliteal. Besides ossification and wounds...
-Femoris
Os, (from the same). Thigh bone; anche os. In the thigh there is only one bone; it is the largest and strongest of those which are cylindrical. On its outside, near the neck, is a large tuberosity, th...
-Fermentatio
(From fermento, to ferment). Fermentation, ecbrasmus, brasmoa, is an intestine motion excited, with the assistance of proper heat and fluidity, between the integrant and constituent parts of farinaceo...
-Ferrum
(From fero, to wound); iron; chalybs, Mars, aquarius, biladen, hadid. Its chemical character is Iron is a bluish white metal, very hard, admitting of a brilliant polish, styptic to the taste, and e...
-Ferrum. Part 2
Iron filings, with an equal quantity of nitre, thrown into a crucible red hot, are changed to the yellow oxide of iron, called Zwelfer's saffron of Mars : sublimed with muriat of ammonia, it becomes t...
-Ferrum. Part 3
The next ore is the magnet, the amorphous oxidu-lated iron of Hauy, iv. 13. It would be endless to transcribe the idle stories recorded of the efficacy of this form of iron. When held in the hand it i...
-Ferrum. Part 4
Solutions of iron in vegetable acids are much more mild, and less ungrateful, both to the palate and mach, than those made with the mineral acids. The dose is from a tea spoonful, to a table spoonful...
-Ferrum. Part 5
Sal martis. Salt of steel. Chalybis sal, now called ferrum vitriolatum. Vitriolated iron.-take filings of iron, vitriolic acid, by weight, of each eight ounces; distilled water, three pints; mix them ...
-Fibra
(From fiber, extreme). A fibre. Haller observes, that the least discoverable fibres are of two kinds. The first are lineal; the second are conjoined with a breadth frequently larger than their length;...
-Fibula
(Quasi figilula, from figo, to fasten). A buckle, clasp, or button'. It is the name also of an ancient mode of bringing the lips of wounds together. Hippocrates sometimes uses the word for the part of...
-Ficus
Vel Ficatio, (from to produce; or phig, Hebrew). The name of a tubercle about the anus or pudenda. See Condyloma. Ficus 1'ndica. See Banana and Musa. Ficus Indicae grana. See Cocinilla. Ficus infe...
-Filix
See Filices, its plural. Pteris. Fern-. Blancnon Oribasii. Fern is divided into the male and female; the male hath no branches, but only one main rib; the female is branched. Filix aculeata. See Lon...
-Fissura
(From the same). A fissure or crack. The mouth, or other natural apertures into the body, are called fissures; but morbid fissures are cracks in the skull, or in a long bone when the fracture is longi...
-Fistula
(Quasi fusula, from fundo, to pour out). So the Latins called a catheter. See Catheterus; and also a clyster pipe. See Enema. Fistula. A Pipe. In surgery it is a kind of ulcer which resembles a pipe;...
-Fistula. Part 2
Fistula. in a'no. No part of the body is more subject to abscesses than that immediately surrounding the lower part of the rectum: it is much exposed to pressure and other external injuries, which imp...
-Fistula. Part 3
The disease is sometimes so violent and obstinate, that the parts in the vicinity, and sometimes the rectum itself, are separated from the organs around. Various methods of peculiar severity have been...
-Flammula
Formerly a skein of silk with which setons were made. The name also of several species of ranunculus, of the atragene and clematis. Flammula jovis, (from its burning acrimony). Surrecta alba. The upr...
-Flavus Cortex
Yellow bark. This bark, very lately introduced into practice, is supposed to be a species of cinchona, growing in the interior mountainous parts of America, described by Murray under the title of cort...
-Flexor
(From flecto, to bend). A name applied to several muscles, from their office of bending the parts to which they belong. Flexor brevis minimi digiti manus, rises from the unciform process of the carpu...
-Flores
(See Flos.) Flowers. In chemistry, they are the most subtile parts of bodies, separated from the more gross, by sublimation in a dry form, and found under the respective names of the materials used, a...
-Flos
(From quia emicat ut famma; or from flando, quia spiral odorem: some authors derive it from green). A flower is that part of a plant in which the parts of generation of either sex reside. In some fl...
-Fluid
A. The fluids of the body have been classed according to their form, or their qualities. In the former view, they may be arranged under the heads of gaseous, watery, oily, glairy, or mucous. The gaseo...
-Fluor Albus
The white flux, the whites, eluvies, cachexia uterina, leucorrhta, leucorrhois, etc. is a flow of matter from the vagina, of different colours and consistencies, but generally of a pale or whitish col...
-Foeniculum
A diminutive of faenum, hay ; because when dried, it is preserved ; or quasi faenum ocu-lorum, the hay or herb good for the sight. Fennel. Wine impregnated with it is called marathrites. Foeniculum v...
-Foenum Camelorum
See Juncus odora Tus. Foenum Gr.ecum, (from faenum, hay, and Graecus. Greece; because it grew there in the meadows, like hay). Fenugreek; buceras, because the fruit is corniculated; and aegoceras, be...
-Foetabulum
(From faetco, to become putrid. foul ulcer ; and an abscess with a cyst. Severinus. Foetida Tinctura. See Asafcetida. Foetus, (from feo, to bring forth). See Voss. Etymol.) Epicyema, and epigonion. Th...
-Foetabulum. Part 2
Of the membranes we need not again speak, but merely to remark that the ovum is contained in the double decidua, as the head in a doubled night cap, and that each is probably an inspissated exudation ...
-Foetabulum. Part 3
The changes from the foetal state take place from the moment the child breathes; but the cause of its breathing has puzzled the ablest physiologists. The necessity of taking breath has been attributed...
-Folium
(From a leaf). A leaf; called folium, to distinguish it from the leaf of a flower, which is called petalum. See Petala. A leaf is termed: 1. Folium abruptum pinnatum, abruptly pinnate, when they hav...
-Fontanella
In anatomy, is the membranous part found in new born infants at the meeting of the coronal and sagittal sutures, and which at last ossifies. It is called fons pullans. Fontanella, (a diminitive of fo...
-Formica Miliaris
See Herpes. Formica minor, (quia ferat micas; because of its diligence in collecting small particles of provisions together). Parvula (nam exemplo est) magni formica laboris. Ore trahit quodcunque ...
-Formula
Adiminutive of form, and applied to the, form of a medicine. The distinctions were formerly numerous and minute; the appellations varied from trifling accidental circumstances. We need not follow the ...
-Fornix
See Achicolum. Fornix, (from the Arabic term forn,) is part of the corpus callosum in the brain, and called from a distant resemblance that it hath to the arches of vaults. Seecerebrum and Lyra. Fort...
-Fractura
(From frango, to break). Catagma; classis; clasma; agme. A fracture. Dr. Cullen places this genus of disease in the class locales, and order dialyses; and defines it part of a bone having its cohesion...
-Fractura. Part 2
Fracture of the carpus. - These bones are small, and rarely broken; and when fractured, they cannot be properly replaced, nor will they consolidate. The ligament and tendons are also generally so much...
-Fractura. Part 3
Fracture of the cubit. - The cubit hath two bones, viz. the radius and ulna. Fractures in these are discovered by the sight, touch, and ear: by the touch and sight, if the hand of the affected cubit b...
-Fractura. Part 4
It sometimes happens that when the case is an oblique fracture, the sharp end of the bone is so entangled in the adjacent muscles as to prevent a reunion; but if an incision is made upon them, and the...
-Fractura. Part 5
Fracture of the scafiula. - If the acromion be broken, it is easily reduced with the fingers, if the os humeri is raised a little upwards; but it is with such difficulty retained, that the arm can sel...
-Frfctio
(From frico, to rub). Rubbing. Friction of the body, if duly continued and repeated, promotes absorption and perspiration, quickens the circulation, particularly through the finer capillaries. It cont...
-Frontis
Os. The bone of the forehead; coro-nale os, inverecundum, motopon . The external surface of this bone is smooth at its upper convex part, but below several cavities and processes are observed. At each...
-Fulminatio
FulminatioN, (from fulmino, to lighten or thunder). In chemistry it means generally explosion, when it is the same with detonation. But in the depuration of the more perfect metals, when infused with ...
-Fumigatio
(From fumus, smoke). Fumigation. By the subtile fumes inspired, or sometimes swallowed, much benefit or injury may be produced. The latter is evident from the palsies produced among workers in lead an...
-The Plan Of A New Classification Of The Functions Of Life
Class I.-functions that serve for the preservation of the individual.- (Individual life.) Order I. Functions which assimilate the aliment by which the body is nourished. (Assimilating, inter...
-Digestion Nutrition Circulation
Respiration, Secretions, Ossification, Generation, Irritability, and sensibility. Every body in which one or several of these functions are observed must be regarded as an ' organized or living body. ...
-Fungus
( sponge; from their spongy contexture). , Toadstool, besacher; is the lowest, and a very imperfect vegetable genus, having neither visible seeds, flowers, leaf, nor the structure of a plant. Most of ...
-Fun
Gus salicis, boletus suaveolens Lin. Sp. Pl. 1646. It has at first an acid taste, and is then bitter. It has been employed in hectics, but is now disused. Fungus Haematodes. This singular complaint w...
-Funis
Vel Funiculus Umbilicalis, (from its resemblance to a rope). The xavel-string. It is of very different lengths, commonly about half a yard; usually fixed near the middle of the placenta, but occasiona...
-Furor Uterinus
(From furo, to be mad, and uterus the womb,) acrai, brachuna, astromunia, aras-con, arsatum. Dr. Cullen calls it nymphomania; and places it in the class locales, and order dysorexia. He defines it an ...
-Furunculus
(From furo, to rage; from the violence of the heat and inflammation previous to suppuration,) called dothein; and by Paracelsus, chiadus, chioli; a boil, is a phlegmonous tumour which commonly termina...
-Galbanum
Gum, (from the Hebrew chalbanah,) albetad, chalbane, gesor, is the concrete, gummy resinous juice of an evergreen plant, with leaves like those of anise, growing in Syria, the East Indies, and Ethiopi...
-Gallae
(From Gallus, a river in Bythinia,) nuces gallae, gallae maxima orbiculattae, gallae spinosae, ceses, galls; the productions of the quercus cerris Lin. Sp. Pl. 1415. They are hard round excrescences;...
-Galvanism
(From Galvani, one of its earliest cultivators). Though the phenomena which Galvanism offers are by no means wholly new, yet the discovery of their nature and source, as well as their application, are...
-Galvanism. Continued
Galvanism seems chiefly to affect the nervous system, including the muscular fibres, and, indeed, in some degree, fibres of every kind, producing even some apparent contraction in the fibrin of the bl...
-Gambogia
(From the province Cambogia, where it is produced in the largest quantities). From its supposed virtues, it is called gummi ad podagram, gummi gutta; and by corruption gotta, gutta gamba, gamon, gcrma...
-Ganglion
A primitive in the Greek. In anatomy, it imports a knot in which nerves from different sources are intimately mixed. Where two nerves join together, there is generally a ganglion, or plexus; as may be...
-Gargarisma
Or Gargarismus, (from and that from the throat,) anagargariston, diaclysma, collutorium oris. A gargle. It is used for washing the mouth and throat when inflammations or ulcerations are present. A s...
-Gastrica
(From the stomach). See Gastrodynia. Gastrica arteria dextra, vel Gastrica major, proceeds from the hepatica arteria; passes behind the pylorus, and, beyond it, sends out the duodenalis or intesti...
-Gastrorathia
(From the belly, and a suture). Gastroraphy. This word strictly signifies the sewing up any wound of the belly; yet in common acceptation it implies that an intestine is wounded as well as the belly...
-Gelatina
(From gelo, to congeal). Gelatine is an ingredient in the vegetable as well as the animal kingdom; though the former is more properly styled gum or mucilage. It is transparent, soluble slowly in cold ...
-Geneion
(From the same). Sec Axthereon. Generatio, (from genero, to beget). Generation. This peculiarly curious and interesting subject has employed the ingenuity and sagacity of physiologists of every age, t...
-Geneion. Continued
From the first exertion of philosophical investigation. it is reasonable to suppose that the source and means of our existence must have employed the reflections of those who were capable of penetrati...
-Genio Glossi
(From the chin, and the tongue). Mesoglossi. These muscles arise from the chin, above the genio hyoides, and enter the middle of the tongue to bring it forwards. Winslow thinks that they push the t...
-Genista
(From genu, a knee; from the inflection and angularity of its twigs). Cytisogenista, cytisus sco-fiarius vulgaris. Common broom; spartium scopuri-um Lin. Sp. Pl. 996. It is a shrubby plant, with numer...
-Gensing
(Chinese). Ginseng, aralia humilis, nisi,sisarummontanum Cor sense,aureliana Canadensis Iroquaeis, plantula Marilandica, panax quinquefolium Lin.sp. Pl. 1512. Ginseng is the root of a small plant gro...
-Gentiana
Gentian, greater yellow gentian, felwort, or the European chincona gentiana lutea Lin. Sp. Pl. 320. The stalk is unbranchcd and jointed; the leaves oblong, acuminated, ribbed, and set in pairs at the ...
-Genu
(From because by this articulation the body is bent towards the earth). The knee; also the patella, knee pan. The knee is the articulation of the thigh and leg bone; as a gin-glymus it admits of only...
-Smooth
Geoffraea, Or Bastard Cabbage Thee. Geoffroya inermis, foliolis lanceolatis, of Swartz; of Ayton in the Hortus Kewensis; and of Wildenow, ' Sp. Pl. vol. iii. p. 1130. See Wright, Philosophical Transa...
-Geranium
(From a crane, because its pistil is long, like the bill of a crane). A bandage used from the days of Hippocrates, now called spica simplex. In botany, it is the name for batrachium, crow's foot, or ...
-Gesta Tio
(From gero, to carry). See AEora. Gestatio. Gestation, or pregnancy, cuophoria. It is the progress of the foetus from the time of conception to that of parturition. See Foetus. The time of a woman's...
-Gingivae
(From gigno, to beget; because the teeth are generated in them). The gums; ula, the plural of ulon. Pollux distinguishes the flesh on the outside of the teeth from that on the inside, or the part betw...
-Glandula
(From its resembling a nut). Aden. A gland; a distinct soft body, usually of a reddish colour, which separates a peculiar fluid from the general mass, either injurious to the system, or for some usefu...
-Glauberi Sal
So called from its discoverer or inventor. Glauber's salt, sal mirabilis, admirabilis, sal catharticum Glauberi, natron vitriolatum. The Dau-phiny salt is a natural production of this kind, obtained f...
-Glycyrrhiza
(From sweet, and a root). Liquiritia; dulcis radix; and adifison; glycyrr-hiza glabra Lin. Sp. Pl 1046. Smooth legumined, or common Liquorice, is a plant with oval leaves, set in pairs along a middl...
-Gonorrhce
A, (from teed, and to flow,) an involuntary efflux of seminal juice: but this is not the proper appellation of the disease to which it is applied, and the term now commonly used is blennorhagia, from...
-Gonorrhce. Part 2
A discharge of mucus, if not connected with a venereal taint, even when accompanied with inflammation, is not infectious; and the common gleet, when inflammation is secondarily excited, by high living...
-Gonorrhce. Part 3
Another method of extinguishing the disease has been attempted, viz. by exhibiting a large dose of the corrosive sublimate internally. It produces a very violent commotion in the system, in which ever...
-Gonorrhce. Part 4
Gonorrhoe'a bala' ni. See Gonorrhoea spuria. Gonorrhoe'a benigna. Sec Gonorrhoe'a pura. Gonorrhoe'a chordata, when accompanied by a chordee. Gonorrhoe'a libidinosa. Gonorrhoea laxorum. Gonorrhoe'a...
-Graduatio
The solemn academical process, by which a degree of doctor of medicine is obtained; a process eluded by some venal universities, and perhaps not always conducted with sufficient strictness. It is elud...
-Gramen
(Quasi gradimeri, from gradior, to creep along, from the extension of its roots). Grass. Grasses are one of the seven natural families, into which all vegetables are distributed by Linnaeus. They are...
-Granata Mala
(From granum, a grain; because full of small seeds). Granatum; mala punica; malum granatum; malicorium; pomegranate: punica granatum Lin. Sp. Pl. 676; is a prickly tree or shrub, with long narrow leav...
-Gratiola
(see Gratia Dei). Digitalis minima; centaurioides; water hyssop, and hedge hyssop, gratiola officinalis Lin. Sp. Pl. 24. It is a low plant, with finely serrated leaves, set in pairs on the stalks with...
-Gravedo
(From gravis, heavy). A Cold. Gravedo imports a load in the head, or the running from the nose, experienced in catarrhus or coryza. Celsus translates by the word gravedo; and Coelius Aurelianus by th...
-Grief
One of the depressing passions; it stops perspiration, renders every muscular action languid; and thus checks the intestinal and biliary discharges, renders the skin sallow, and, by lowering the activ...
-Grotto Del Cani
A grotto near Naples, in which dogs are suffocated. The deleterious vapour is carbonic acid air, which rises only about eighteen inches. A man, therefore, is not affected; but a dog forcibly-held in, ...
-Ground Nuts
Arachishy/iogaaLin.Sp.Pi. 1040, is a leguminous plant, originally from Africa, but now-cultivated in all the European establishments. Its calyx is divided into two parts, the upper of which is semi-tr...
-Guaiacum
(Indian). Guaiacon, hagioxylon, lignum benedictum, vita lignum, palus and palma sancta, euonymo adfinis occidentalis, ibirace, etc. The darker kind the Americans call hiacan, or huiacan; the yellowish...
-Gummi
(Tsama/i, pronounced ghamah; Hebrew,) gum, gisisim, is a concrete vegetable juice, of no particular smell or taste, viscous and tenacious when moistened with, and wholly soluble in, water; insoluble i...
-Gu Stus
(From to taste). The taste. Upon the tongue, towards the apex and sides under the skin, are obtuse papillae of various figures; prominent in the tongue of a living person, when applied to the object...
-Gutta
(From to pour out). A drop; alunsel. Drops are an uncertain form of administering medicines; and, where great exactness is necessary, they should not be prescribed. The shape of the bottle, or of it...
-Gymnastica
Gymnastics; exercises of the body which were proposed for the restoration and preservation of health, and for the cure of diseases. They were of Greek origin; and are so called from the word naked; ...
-Haematocele
(From blood, and a tumour). A species of false hernia in the scrotum, consisting of a collection of blood in the tunica vaginalis. It resembles, in appearance, an hydrocele, and the method of cure is...
-Haemoptysis
(From blood, and to spit). A spitting of blood; haeoptoe. By this term, however, is meant a bleeding from the trachea or the lungs; for blood from the nose and the stomach is often apparently spit. W...
-Haemoptysis. Continued
H AE M 726 H AE M however, more frequent from the second cause. Tumours, styled tubercles, as we have said, frequently contract the cavity of the chest, and occasion the most dangerous haemoptysis; as...
-Haemorrhagia
(From blood, and to flow). Haematochysi, and sanguifluxus. Haemorrhages, though frequent diseases, are not among the most dangerous complaints to which the human body is subject, and are of importanc...
-Haemorrhagia. Part 2
The causes which particularly favour the occurrence of haemorrhage are: 1. External heat, which is said to rarefy the blood: but the blood is by no means an expansile fluid; and the swelling of the ve...
-Haemorrhagia. Part 3
H AE M 729 H AE M to which we should add, avoiding the irritations of light, heat, noise, and agitation of either mind or body. It must be remembered, that, when we spoke of cold as a means of produci...
-Haemorrhoidal
Ls, (from haemorrhois, the piles). Haemorrhoidal fever. It is of short duration, and considered as symptomatic. Vogel defines it an ephemera, attended with pain of the spine, piles, or at least painfu...
-Haemorrhoides
(From blood, and to flow). The hemorrhoids, or piles. A discharge of blood from the haemorrhoidal veins, called the open or bleeding piles: when instead of this haemorrhage there are large tumours, ...
-Haemorrhoides. Continued
The vital fluid is contained in corresponding vessels, styled arteries and veins; but the former only are active powers. In the veins the blood is propelled by the adventitious aid of other muscular o...
-Harrowgate Water
A salt, purging, sulphureous water; the strongest in Great Britain, of the heat of 92, but it does not lose its sulphureous smell even in a boiling heat. It is perfectly clear; and in taste and s...
-Hectica
Vel Ethica, (from habit,) the symptomatic fever; irregular intermittent fever; fever of suppuration; and slow fever. Hippocrates describes this fever under the name of phthisis: But Celsus is the fir...
-Hectica. Continued
The hectic fever should be distinguished from the intermittent, the common inflammation, and the slow or nervous fevers. The intermittent is more regular in its form, and in its attacks; and the slow ...
-Hedera
(From haereo, to stick; from its attachment to trees and old walls). Ivy. Hedera arbohea. Common or tree ivy; corym-bus; hedera helix Lin. Sp. Pl 292; is an evergreen plant, climbing and spreading on...
-The Hedge
J Gill Go-by-the Ground J glecoma hederacea Lin. Sp. Pl. 807; is a low, hairy, creeping plant, with square stalks; roundish or kidney-shaped leaves, set in pairs at the joints; the flowers are bluish ...
-Heliotropium
(From and to turn to). Turnsole, or Heliotrope. The flowers are funnel shaped; their brims cut into ten unequal segments; collected into a long reflexed spike, resembling a scorpion's tail; each flow...
-Helleborus
Or Elleborus, because it kills if eaten,) nicon; the name of several rosaceous flowered plants, and of female sanicle. See Imperatoria nigra. Helleborus fcetidus. Helleboraster; helleboras-trum;...
-Hepatalgia
(From the liver, and pain). When pain affects the liver, as well as spleen, it is not often easy to distinguish them from bilious colic during the life of the patient: some practitioners think it un...
-Hepatica
(From the same). Belonging to the liver, is applied to medicines serviceable to the diseases of that organ; and to a pain in the region of this organ. Hepatica vulgaris, fontana, terestris, stellata,...
-Hepatitis Inflammatio
Hepatis,(from the liver.) Ax inflammation of the liver. An inflammation may be in different parts of the liver, as in its membranes or substance; in its concave or the convex side. Inflammation in t...
-Herba
(From the Arabic term erbah, from raba/i, to germinate). Herbs, or plants whose stalks die to the ground every year.' Those whose roots continue one year are called annual; if two years, biennial; and...
-Hermodactylus
(From Hermus, a river upon whose banks it grows, and dactylus, a date, which it resembles). Hermodactyl; colchicum illyri-cum of Forskell and Gronovius; alsurengium; asaba; Hermes dactyletus; cphemero...
-Hernia
(From a branch, because it protrudes forward). A tumour, ecrexis ramex, and a rupture, as occasioning a tumour. In consequence of some sudden effort, a portion of the contents of some cavity is forc...
-Hernia. Part 2
In general there is a pain and uneasiness in the tumour; and, when it has been long down, the pain is often extremely violent, felt not only in the tumour itself, but over the whole abdomen. If the di...
-Hernia. Part 3
When a rupture happens, and is unattended with any signs of stricture, or other violent symptoms, a bandage or a truss will be the most eligible means of relief. The modes of operation when the knife ...
-Hernia. Part 4
Whatever be the cause, bleeding, according to the strength of the patient, is necessary; and an active purgative must follow. Goulard's saturnine water should be applied cold by means of rags folded s...
-Herpes
VelErpes,(from to spread or creep, from their quickly spreading). Tetter. Dr. Cullen places this disease in the class locales, and order dialyses; and defines it, phlyctenae, or a great number of sma...
-Hieracium
(From hierax, a hawk). Hieracu-lum, Hawkweed. See Accipitrina. Hieracium longius radioatum. Long rooted hawkweed. Hypocheris radicata Lin. Sp. Pl. 1140. The stalks of each species are full of branche...
-Higuero
The calabash tree; crescentia cujete Lin. Sp. Pl. 872; is a large tree common in America, and the American islands; but one species was known to Linnaeus, of which he has noticed three varieties; but ...
-Hippocastanum
Or Hippocantanum, (from equus, and a chesnut; from its size). The horse chesnut tree, castanea equina, pavina,esculushifi/iocastanum Lin. Sp. Pl. 488; natural order trihilatae. This tree frequently...
-Hirudo
(quasiAaiirdo,from haurio, to drawout). The Leech; sanguisuga, exos; first noticed by Themi-son. Those whose backs are striped, and bellies spotted, which are taken from clear running waters ov...
-Holquahuitl
See Cortex Peruvianus. Holywell Water. A simple cold water, remarkable for its purity, similar to Malvern. Homa. An anasarcous swelling. Homo. Man. In a work, the object of which is to detail every th...
-Holquahuitl. Part 2
The more distant the animal is from man, the more deep are the indentations of the viscera to yield to the more rapid movements. The heart is situated almost transversely in the human diaphragm, but i...
-Holquahuitl. Part 3
Caffre and Negro, the Hottentot and Papou respectively. The Europeans are, in this arrangement, styled Celts: he should rather have called them a Gothic race. The Hungarians, the Asiatic Russians, and...
-Holquahuitl. Part 4
We must not, however, look for perfection in the overgrown beings which occasionally 'astonish us by their magnitude. Beyond a given proportion, bulk and height are sources of weakness; for a greater ...
-Holquahuitl. Part 5
Extreme humidity, with cold and a stagnant atmosphere, produces swellings of the lymphatic glands, goitres, and cretinism. The Cretins are an insensible race, with little pretensions to the character ...
-Holquahuitl. Part 6
The want of any essential organ in generation wholly changes the peculiar sexual form. This we know, by frequent experience among animals, and it occurs in the human race. We had lately a record of th...
-Holquahuitl. Part 7
The commencement of spring and the end of autumn are supposed in Europe to be the most fatal seaons; but; Dr. Heberden has shown that in England a larger proportion of mankind die in the winter months...
-Hordeum
(Ab horrore arista, from the unpleasantness of the beard to the touch). Barlky. In the. shops barely occurs in two forms, viz. hordeum distichon Lin. Sp. Pl. 125; hordeum Ga/licum vel mundatum; and co...
-Horminum
(From to excite,) from its supposed qualities in provoking venery. Clary; gallitri-chum; sclarea; orvala; garden clary; the salvia hor-minum Lin. Sp. Pl. 34; is a whitish, green, slightly hairy, plan...
-Hydarthrus
(From the same). A white swelling. Dr. Cullen places this genus in the class locales, and order tumores, which he defines a tumour of the joints, chiefly of the knee; at first the swelling is slight, ...
-Hydatis
(From the same). See Aquula. Htdatis. A hydatid. (See Phlyctaenae.) Hy-datis, considered as a genus of disease, has been placed by Dr. Cullen among the local diseases in the class tumo-ret. It has bee...
-Hydatis. Continued
The hydatids of hogs are found in the substance of the fat and in the muscles. They are sometimes so numerous as to be almost contiguous. The disease, besides measles, is sometimes called lepra; and o...
-Hydrocele
(From water, and a tumour). This term is employed when water is contained in ruptures; but particularly is applied to a dropsy in the scrotum; hydrops testis, hernia aquosa, oscheocele,andoscheofihy...
-Hydrocele. Continued
Mr. Bell's method, by incision. -The patient being placed upon a table of a convenient height, and being properly secured by two assistants, with the scrotum lying nearly upon the edge of the table, ...
-Hydroce Phalus
(From water, and the head). Dropsy of the head. This disease has been divided into two species, external and internal. In the first, water is confined between the skull and the integuments. In the ...
-Hydroce Phalus. Continued
There is little doubt but that a diseased state of the brain exists previous to the accumulation of the water, and the great question is respecting the nature of this state. We have little reason to s...
-Hydrophobia
(From water, and to fear). A dread of water; aquae pavor, is a symptom of the disease caused by the bite of a mad animal; but not peculiar to this disease, nor always attendanton it. (See Dyscapatot...
-Hydrophobia. Part 2
On dissection, the brain, the medulla oblongata, and all the muscles, are said to be drier than usual: the membranes extenuated; the pericardium dry; the blood coagulates slowly, if at all; and putref...
-Hydrophobia. Part 3
When our attention has been paid to the wound, we must look to the other excretories for the evacuation of the poison: those most commonly preferred are the skin, the urinary organs, the salivary or i...
-Hydrops
(From water,) hyderos; a dropsy. In reality there is but one kind of this disease, for all the various dropsies differ only in their seat. As this circumstance suggests a variety of practice, we hav...
-Hydrops. Continued
Hydrops ad matulam. See Diabetes. Hydrops arti 'culi. See Hydrops genu. Hydrops cysticus. The encysted dropsy is a collection of water enclosed in a cyst, which is sometimes from a collection of hydat...
-Hygidion
Acollyrium described by P. AEgineta, lib. vii. c. 16; called ammonii collyrium. Hygidion hygeia, Hygidion Hygieia,(from sound). Health or soundness. The name of a plaster called panacea, and the pl...
-Hymen
a membrane; from Hymen, the god of marriage, as by it is usually understood the membrane which appears in the form of a crescent, situated at the entrance of the vagina, called also claustrum vir-gi...
-Hyoglossus
(From the hyoid bone, and the tongue). The nameof the muscle of the tongue. It rises from the basis, but chiefly from each cornu of the os hyoides, running laterally and forwards, to shorten the ton...
-Hyoides
Os, (from v, and because formed like the Greek letter upsilon,) yoides, hypsiloides, and upsiloides; bicorne, and lambdoides. It is situated in an horizontal position between the root of the tongue a...
-Hyopharynaegus
(From the hyoid bone, and the pharynx). The hyopharyngaei muscles, in general are those which on each side are inserted into the os hyoides; and they may be reckoned three pair, viz. the basio pharyg...
-Hyosciamus
(From a swine, and a bean; from hogs eating it as a medicine; or from the hairy and bristly appearance of the plant). Henbanes; hog's beans, and dens caballinus. The plants have hairy, oblong, deep...
-Hypericum
(From above, and image, or spiectre; because it is supposed to drive away evil spirits). St. John's wort perforata, fuga daemonum, androsaemum, Hypericum vulgare; hypericum perforatum Lin. Sp. Pl. 11...
-Hypochondria
(From under, and a cartilage). The hypochondria are those viscera on each side, which lie under the spurious ribs, extending to the ilia, and comprehending not only the muscles, but the internal par...
-Hypochondriasis Vapours Spleen
Hoffman, with great propriety, contends, that hypochondriasis is not the same disease as hysteria. He observes, that a strangulation of the fauces, a quick and difficult respiration, endangering suffo...
-Hypopleurosis
See Pleura. - Hypopyon, (from under, and pus). Pyosis, and abscessus oculi. The disease has been considered to arise from a collection of pus under the cornea; but this idea is, at least, imperfect,...
-Hypostaphyle
(From sub, and the uvula,) procidentia uvula; columella; craspedon; is an elongation of the uvula, from relaxation, inflammation, or ulceration, attended with uneasiness and difficulty in swallowing,...
-Hyssopus
(From the Hebrew word azab, a holy herb, or a herb appointed for cleansing holy places). Hyssop. Symphytum petraeum; hyssopus officinalis Lin. Sp. Pl. 796, is a low shrubby plant, with brittle branche...
-Hysteria Febricosa
A tertian fever, with spasms and convulsions. Hysteria, (from the womb, from which the disease was supposed to arise). Hysterics; an appellation of the midwives of Greece and Italy who practised me...
-Ichthyocolla
(From fish, and glue). Isinglass; colla piscium; alcanna; and huso; fish glue, is a solid glutinous substance, prepared in Muscovy from the sturgeon. The skins and fins are boiled in water; the deco...
-Ichthyosis
(From the scale of a fish, which it resembles). A harsh, dry, scaly, and almost horny texture of the skin, differing from leprosy by its not falling off in branny scales. Above and below the elbow an...
-Icterus
(From the golden thrush, from the complexion of the patient resembling in colour the plumage of that bird. Pliny ridiculously observes, that if the jaundiced person looks on this thrush, the bird die...
-Ictus
(From ico, to strike). A stroke or blow. It signifies also the pulsation of an artery, and the sting of a bee or any other insect. Ictus solaris. A stroke of the sun; insolatio; and by the French cou...
-Ignis
(From the Hebrew term aesh). Fire. Bacon, Boyle, Newton, and their followers, consider lire not as an element but as an adventitious property, resulting from the intestine motion of the smaller partic...
-Ileum Intestinum
(From to turn about; on account of its many convolutions,) eilion; ilion; one of the small intestines, immediately following the jejunum. Its convolutions surround those of the jejunum, on the two la...
-Iliaca Passio
(From Ma. the small guts). The iliac passion, ileus, convolvulus, contorsio, cileos, chordapsus,volvulus, tormentum; a disease of the small intestines, generally from spasm: Dr. Cullen considers it sy...
-Iliacae Arteriae
Belonging to the ilia. The iliac arteries are formed by the bifurcation of the aorta, at about the fourth vertebra of the loins. They descend nearly three fingers breadth from their origin; and when t...
-Imperatoria
(From impero, to command, because its leaves extend, and overwhelm the lesser plants which grow near it). Masterwort. Astrantia, magistrantia, ostritium, imperatoria major, astritium, struthium, smyrn...
-Impotentia
(From in, not, and potens, able). Impotence in men is the same in its effect as sterility in women, that is, an inability to propagate their species; but in the causes and the circumstances these stat...
-Incisorii Ductus
Two canals from the bottom of the internal nares, across the arch of the palate, which open behind the first and largest of the dentes incisorii; their lower orifices are in the foramen pala-rinum ant...
-Incitabilitas
(From incito,to stir up to action,) incitability. In a practical view it has appeared necessary to make a distinction between this term and irritability; because, though it is allowed that to those tw...
-Incubus
The night-make; (from incubo, to lie on; ephialtes, from to leap upon; epibole, from to press on; because the patient imagines that something leaps or presses upon him; and babuzicarius, from to spe...
-Indicum
(From the Arabic term Hindi, India). The indigo blue plant; also called indigo, anil, nil, isatis, and coronilla Indica, emerus Americanas, glastum Indicam, Ameri, coaachira Indorum, colutea Indica, h...
-Indusium
(From induo, to put on). A shirt or Shirt or Shift.clean linen promotes perspiration, and it may be renewed as often as the patient pleases, whether the isorder be of the acute or the chronical kind; ...
-Infans
(A non fando, from its inability to talk). An infant or child. Fred. Hoffman limits the period of infancy to the time when children begin to talk, and that of childhood to the age of puberty. During ...
-Inflamma Tio
(From in flammo,to burn,) phleg-mone; Phlogosis; inflammation. Phlegma, Hippocrates; oxyphlegmasia; a topical pain, with an injury of the functions of an internal organ, attended with inflammatory fev...
-Inflamma Tio. Part 2
The great subject of debate has been, whether obstruction really exists in inflammation. Dr. Wilson, from microscopical observations, is convinced that this is the case. We have said that the conclusi...
-Inflamma Tio. Part 3
When an inflammation either by the operations of nature or the influence of remedies yields, an action is first perceived in the vessel, the dark colour assumes a brighter hue, the tumour lessens, and...
-Inflamma Tio. Part 4
It may appear that, in this disquisition, we have omitted the inflammations of the mucous membranes. These, however, make no part of the present subject; for they arise very generally from a morbid po...
-Inflamma Tio. Part 5
Sedatives of every kind arc essentially necessary. A class of medicines, which we have styled iniirritants, which we shall soon notice, and which consists of those diluents and demulcents which sooth ...
-Inflamma Tio. Part 6
5 K 2 irritable. It is not, therefore, always proper in inflammations where the action of the vessels is inconsiderable; but, in watery solutions, a valuable remedy where the circulation is pushed on ...
-Inflamma Tio. Part 7
The causes are either those of fever in general, obstructions of any kind in the intestines, intususceptio, or wounds. The usual causes, however, are those of fever. The symptoms are, a shivering, wi...
-Inflamma Tio. Part 8
If then the usual laxatives, assisted by clysters, do not procure motions, and violent vomiting comes on, a grain of opium may be given in a single pill. If this is rejected, a tea spoonful of the tin...
-Inflamma Tio. Part 9
When the presence of this inflammation can be discovered, the method of cure will be the same as that of an inflamed liver or spleen. Bleeding is, however, scarcely admissible. Inflammation of the mu...
-Inflamma Tio. Part 10
When an abscess begins to form, it is known and treated as described in the article Abscessus peri-ostei. 17. Inflammation of the rectum is rarely so acute as that of the small intestines, nor so apt...
-Inflamma Tio. Part 11
If suppuration comes on, we are told to direct it to the perinaeum. We may do so, but our success will be inconsiderable. Abscesses in the uterus are rare, but they are very generally fatal. See Ferne...
-Inflamma Tio. Part 12
The treatment will vary according to the causes, etc. When from an acrid matter taken in by the mouth, it must be evacuated by a quick emetic; by large draughts of warni mild liquids; or by the proper...
-Inflamma Tio. Part 13
The horror and rigor of the attack are violent, but short in their duration, and are followed by a violent hot fit, in which all the symptoms indicating increased action of the arterial system are ver...
-Influenza
Influence. (Spanish.) See Catarrhus epidemicus. The same principle which induced Hippocrates to attribute epidemics to the re oeloe, gave this general epidemic catarrh the name of influenza. From ...
-Influenza. Part 2
Relying on this foundation, I endeavoured to relieve such as required my assistance by the following method: if the cough had not yet caused a fever, and other symptoms, which, as we said, usually ac...
-Influenza. Part 3
In the month of November of the above-mentioned year I attended the eldest son of sir Francis Wyndham in this fever. He complained of a pain in his side, and the other symptoms that attended those wh...
-Influenza. Part 4
The late influenza might very properly have been named the sweating sickness, as sweating was the natural and spontaneous solution of it, and rest, abstinence, and warm diluents, were, in most instan...
-Infusio
(From infundo, to pour in ). Infusion-. It signifies either the action of the fluid, or the medicine prepared by it. By infusion in water, the gummy, the extractive, and the saline parts of vegetable...
-Injectio
(From injicio, to throw into). An injection, called also eisbole. Fluids used for injection should be used lukewarm; and may be applied either by a syringe or clyster pipe. When used in gleets or gon...
-Injectio. Continued
Alcohol mixes both with water and oil, and consequently has been employed to fill the capillary vessels, but it coagulates the animal fluids it meets, and often blocks up the canal. It will not suspen...
-Inirritantia
This is a class of medicines not hitherto introduced into the systems of therapeutics, though described, we apprehend, by Dr. G. Pearson, in his course of the Materia Medica, under the appellation of ...
-Insecta
(From in, into, and seco, to cut). An insect. These animals are thus named from their being almost wholly divided in the middle. We deferred considering this class of animals in a physical or a medic...
-Insomnium
A dream. Quod in somno vi-detur. Dreaming is a subject of considerable importance, not only in a physiological view, but as often affording useful prognostics, particularly in fevers; and it has been ...
-Insomnium. Continued
The cause of dreams has excited various speculations. This waking sleep, or sleeping activity, appeared to Baxter so inconsistent, that he supposed immaterial spirits were amused, or engaged in sugges...
-Intercostalis
(From inter, between, and cos-tee, the ribs,) any part situated between the ribs; viz. Intercqstales arteriae, which arise in pairs from the aorta, and run on' the lower parts of each rib. They are e...
-Intermittens Febris
(From thesame). An intermittent fever, is a febrile disease consisting of distinct attacks, with perfect freedom from fever in the intervals. Different names are given to this fever according to the p...
-Intermittens Febris. Part 2
Quartans vary as much; but, indeed, in this country quartans are uncommon, except in the marshy countries on the east of this island. The quartana duplicata of Sauvages consists of two paroxysms every...
-Intermittens Febris. Part 3
To conduct the paroxysm so that its solution shall finally remove the disease, is often beyond our power. An emetic, given at the first approach of coldness, will often lessen both it and the next sta...
-Intermittens Febris. Part 4
The prejudices against the bark, on its first introduction, led to a variety of substitutes for it in these diseases; and all the bitters and astringents were occasionally employed, joined sometimes w...
-Intermittens Febris. Part 5
The intermitting nature of this complaint is known rom its occurring in the low, damp, marshy situations, from its regular recurrence, and from the remedies which relieve it. But among these we cannot...
-Interossea Arteria
(From inter, between, and osa, bones). The cubical artery, in its course between the heads of the radius and ulna near the interosseous ligament, gives off these arteries, the internal and external. ...
-Interossei Musculi
Found both in the hands and feet. There are three in the upper part oi the hand, and as many on the inferior. Their name describes their origin, and they are blended with the lum bricales, performing ...
-Intestina
(From intus, within ). The intestines, chorda, and pantices. From the pylorus to the anus is one continued canal, divided into the small and great intestines, covered by the mesentery and mesoco-jon; ...
-Involucra
(From involvo, to fold in; from com-ingnextafterthechild). Secundines.hystera, membrane?. They form an universal covering for the foetus, and the water in which it floats during pregnancy. They consi...
-Ipecacuanha
(Indian). Brasiliensis radix, herba paris Brasiliana, polycocos, poaio do matto, caa-ajtir; cpio; Indianaradix, periclymenum parvum, Ipeca cuan, or Brasilian root. Many of these names have been assign...
-Iris
(From to show). A rainbow. The forepart of the choroides of the eye, named from the variety of its colours. It lies floating and loose; is convex on the anterior, and concave on the posterior part; ...
-Iris Tuberosa, Vel Bulbosa
See Hermodactylus Folio Quadrangulo Iris foetida, spatula foetida, xyris, gladiolus fixti. dus, spruge wort, stinking gladdon, or gladwyn; iris foetidissima Lin. Sp. Pl. 57; a wild species of iris, d...
-Irritabilitas
(From irrito, to provoke). Irritability; the vis insita of Haller, vis vitalis of Gorter, oscillation of Boerhaave, tonic power of Stahl, and the inherent power of Cullen. It means that susceptibility...
-Irritatio
(Ab irritare). Irritation is a term to which different meanings have been affixed, and this has occasioned some confusion among pathologists. The most obvious idea of irritation is the action of a mec...
-Ischiadicus Morbus
(From the same,) also called ischias, sciatica, coxa dolores. Aretaeus ranks this disorder as a species of gout,which comes, he ob serves,on the hind part of the thigh, the ham, or the tibia; at ot...
-Ischium
Os, (because it lies near the loin). Coxendix cochone; the hip bone. The extent of this bone may be marked by a horizontal line drawn through near the middle of the acetabulum coxendicis; for the bo...
-Ischuria
(From to retain, and urine). An Ischury, A Stoppage or Suppression Of Urine. La Motte distinguishes between a retention and a suppression of urine. In the former, styled strangury, the patient hat...
-Ischuria. Continued
When a stone in the pelvis of the kidney is the cause, we can gain nothing by the stimulating diuretics, except impacting the obstruction more firmly. Our best chance, though a slight one, is by anody...
-Ixia
(From glue). Varix. A name of the carlina, or such of this tribe as yield a viscous juice. The ixia, or ixias, is represented as poisonous; but it is not clearly known to what plant these names belon...
-Jalapa
(From Chalapa, or Xalapa, a city in New Spain). Jalap. Gialappa, chalapa, xalapa, mecoca-fiana nigra, convolvulus Americanus, bryonia Peruviana. There is said to be a third species of jalap called mut...
-James
Dr. gave his name to a fever powder, since highly celebrated. With a disingenuity highly reprehensible he seems to have deviated from his original idea, and sold a medicine under the authority of a pa...
-Jecur
(From the Hebrew term jaker). The Liver; called also Aepar, the upper part erix. Immediately below the diaphragm, on the right side, is placed the liver, whose small lobe extends to the scro-biculus c...
-Jecur. Continued
The hepatic duct passes towards, and, descending obliquely, somewhat behind, the pancreas to the lower part of the duodenum. It is inserted, from behind, nearly five inches below the pylorus by a sinu...
-Joints
(See Articui.atio and Articulus.) We have resumed the consideration of this subject, to reduce into one view the diseases of the cavities of the joints: these are either effused fluids, or loose carti...
-Juglans
(Quasi Jovis giant, the nut of Jupiter). The walnut. The tree is sometimes called carya, the appellation of walnuts rendered black by boiling; and the rob diacaryon: nux regia, basilica, Persica, et E...
-Juncus Odoratus
Faenum vel stramen came-lorum, schaenanthus, holoschaenos, squinanthum, juncus aromaticus, pa/ea de mecha, gramen dactylon aromati-cum; sweet rush, or camel's hay; a dried grass brought from Turkey an...
-Kali
(Arabic,) salsola, salieornia, alga marina, salt wort, and snail seeded glass wort. Salsola kali Lin. Sp. Pl. 322, a plant with spreading, reddish, pretty thick branches; oblong, narrow, pointed, fles...
-Labia
See Processus. Labia, and labium, quo apprehendimus cibum). A lip. The lips, of which the red part is called prolabium; the sphincter, orbicularis labi-orum, are sufficiently known. When the cuticl...
-Lac
(From Ickak, to lick up, Arabic). Milk is the secreted fluid destined for the nourishment of the animals arranged by Linnaeus in the class of mammalia, comprehending also, from this circumstance, the ...
-Lac. Part 2
The thickest and richest creams are afforded by the sheep and goat; the milk of the mare, the ass, and the female, afford the thinnest. From female milk scarcely any separation takes place, even with ...
-Lac. Part 3
The butter of cows is usually yellow: if white, its quality is inferior. If the milk has been kept too cool, the butter is pale, with little flavour, and not unctuous or rich. To have butter in perfec...
-Lac. Part 4
The milk of the goat is very white, sweetish, and of an unctuous taste. Its specific gravity is 1036. It is affected by re-agents nearly as asses' milk. The cream is very thick, of a mild agreeable ta...
-Lac. Part 5
In the directions for a milk diet, equal absurdities prevailed. To prevent coagulation, we are sometimes advised to add aqua ammoniac or lime water (Motherby, fifth edition). We now know that these pr...
-Lacca
(From the Arabic lakah). Lac, or gum lac; ancosa; is a concrete brittle substance, of dark red colour, brought from the East Indies, incrusted on pieces of sticks, internally divided into cells. It is...
-Lactantium Tabes
The hectic of nurses, chiefly from debility. See Lactatio. It is characterized by every symptom of weakness in the animal and vital functions, to which evening exacerbations and morning sweats succeed...
-Lactatio
(From lacteo, to suckle). Suckling. The child should suck, if possible, during the first month; for the early milk is not only advantageous to the child, but the discharge prevents many inconveniences...
-Lactea Febris
(From lac, milk). The milk fever. It is a frequent custom to apply the child only to its mother's breast, when the milk flows freely, on the third or fourth day. A fever is thus, from the irritation o...
-Lactea Vasa
Galactophoriductus, (from milk, and to carry). The lacteal vessels. These vessels were not unknown to Erasistatus and Herophilus, and are distinctly mentioned by Galen. It was supposed, very early...
-Lactuca
(From the milky juice it produces on being wounded). Lettuce; marillium, eunuchion, is a plant with slender but firm stalks, which yield, as well as the leaves, a milky juice. The flower consists of a...
-Ladanum
(From ladon, Arabic,) labdanum, cistus, cistus ladanifera, ledon Cretense. The true ladaniferous shrub. Cistus ladaniferus Lin. Sp. Pl. 737, or rather c. Creticus Lin. Sp. Pl 738. The gum labdanum is ...
-Lapathum
(From to evacuate; because it purges gently). Dock. Lapathum acutum; rumex, oxylapathum, sharp pointed dock; rumex acutus Lin. Sp. Pl. 478. This species, denominated from its sharp pointed leaves, h...
-Lapis
A stone differs from an earth in consistence only; but there are some bodies, evidently stony, which contain no earth, as the diamond. The mineralogists who arranged fossils from their external form...
-Laureola Foemina
(A diminutive of laurus, laurel; which it resembles,) mezerion, chamaelaea, thy-melaa folio deciduo, mezereon. spurge olive, widow wail; Daphne mezereum Lin. Sp. Pl. 509; is a small tree, or bush, wit...
-Bay Cherry Laurel Cherry, Or Cherry Bay
Prunus lauro cerasus Lin. Sp. Pl. 778. The root of this tree or shrub is large, rough, and furnished with many fibres. The branches are woody, numerous, brown on the outside, and white within. The le...
-Laurus Alexandrina
(From laus, praise; as it was the rewardof victors). Hippoglossum epiglos-sum, daphne, diglossum, epiglottis, ruscus latifolius, bonefacia, coracobotane gazar, uvularia; ruscus hippo-glossumhin. Sp. P...
-Lavendula
(From lavando washing; because it was used in baths). Lavender, staechas. Lavendula latifolia, nardus Italica, spica mas, pseudonardus aspic, common broad leaved lavender, or spike lavender, lavendul...
-Lentiscus
(From lentisco, from the clamminess of its juice). Mastiche; the lentisk or mastich tree, pistachia lentiscus Lin. Sp. Pl. 1455, is an evergreen, with soft branches hanging downwards, and small stiff ...
-Lepidium
(From a scale; from its use in cleansing the skin from scales). Piperitis, raphanus sylvestris, iberis, Dionysius, poor man's pepper, pepper wort, dittander, lepidium latifolium Lin. Sp. Pl. 899, is...
-Lepra
(From a scale). The leprosy. See Alphcs. The leprosy is a chronical disease; in warm climates infectious, but not evidently so in cold countries; though its infectious nature was formerly suspected...
-Lepra. Continued
Though it is admitted that the lepra is most commonly a topical disease, yet, from the thickness of the scales, and from the chief seat being in the cutis vera, topical remedies alone scarcely affect ...
-Levator
(From levo, to lift up). The name is given to many muscles, whose office it is to elevate different parts into which they are inserted, viz. Levator palati mollis, rises from the basis of the skull, ...
-Levatores Ani
And Elevatores, rise with a broad base from the symphysis of the os pubis, the internal part of the ileum, the membrane of the obturator internus and coccygaeus, and the sharp process of the ischium, ...
-Levigatio
(From levis, light). The pharmaceutical operation, by which hard substances are reduced to an impalpable powder; but unless the instrument is very hard, as much of the stone as of the medicine may be ...
-Levisticum
(From levo,to assuage; from its relieving painful flatulencies). Ligusticum, angelica mon-tana perennis. Common lovage; ligusticum levisti-cunt Lin. Sp. Pl. 359; is a tall umbelliferous plant, with le...
-Lichex
(From lambo, quia lambendo terpant,) a cutaneous disease called lichen, from its resemblance to the spots scattered over the tuberculated lichen. It is a papulous eruption, sometimes rising into tum...
-Lichex. Continued
A vivid eruption of papulae, somewhat analogous to the prickly heat, appears in our own climate, on the arms, hands, face, and neck of labourers, and other persons who use violent exercise during the ...
-Lien
(From soft, or smooth). See Splen. Lien sinarum. See Faba .AEgyptia. Lienteria, (from smooth, and the gut). A I.ientery. Levitas Intestinorum, q. V. In Dr. Cullen's system it is the fifth species ...
-Ligamentum
(From ligo, to tie). Colligamen, copala, syndesmos, a ligament. The ligaments are tendinous, inelastic, glistening bodies. Every articulated bone is furnished with a capsular ligament, which is compos...
-Lignum
(From lego, to gather). Wood; because its branches are gathered into bundles for domestic use; a term applied to many medical substances; as, lignum aloes, lignum guaiacum, lignum Quassiae, etc. vide ...
-Lilium
(From smooth, graceful). The Lily. Lilium convallium minus. See Monophtllon. Lilium album. The common white lily, lilium candidum Lin. Sp. Pl. 433, is perennial, a native of Syria and Palestine, c...
-Limonum
(from from the green colour of its unripe fruit, or from the Hebrew term rimon). The lemon tree; citrus medica, malus medica and persica Lin. Sp. Pl. 1100, , is a native of Asia, but cultivated...
-Linagrostis
(From cotton, and, grass; from the softness of its texture). See Panicum. Linaria, (from the resemblance of its leaves to those of flax,) osiris urinaria, flax weed, or common toad flax, antirrhinum...
-Lingua
(From lingo, to lick). The tongue, glot-ta, plectrum. This term is also applied to some vegetable substances, from their similarity in shape to the tongue. In animal bodies it is composed of two parts...
-Linimentum
(From lino, to anoint). Lint-ment, hypaleipton,litus, perichrisis, is a thin ointment, and principally designed for an application where the tenderness of a part will not admit of a hard one. Sometime...
-Linum
(From soft, smooth; from its smooth texture). Flax. Linum usitatissimum Lin. Sp. Pl. 397, is properly called line, only while standing green in the field, without any inner bark: when the inner bark ...
-Lipothymia
Leipothymia, (from to leave, and the mind). Fainting. Deliguium animi, defectio, exanimatio, syncope, asphyxia; virium lapsus; in a greater degree, apopsychia, and echysis; syncope of Dr. Cullen, wh...
-Liquor Cyreniacus
See Benzoinum. Liquor AEthereus, See AEther. Liquor cereris. See Alla. Liquor metallicus. See Argentum vivum. Liquor salis. See Circulatum. Liquor veneris. See AErugo AEris. Liquor amnii, in mid...
-Lit
Hargyri composita aqua. See Lotio hydrargyri Acetati. Ceratum saponis is, strictly speaking, a preparation of litharge, and is made by boiling a pound of litharge with a gallon of vinegar over a slow...
-Lithontripticus
(From a stone, and to break). An appellation of medicines supposed to break or dissolve the stone in the bladder; cat-culifragus. Though the different stones generated in the human bladder may requi...
-Lithophyton
(From a stone, and a plani). A lithophyte, keratophyton coral; a species of plant of a horny substance, seeming to be of a middle nature betwixt wood and stone. Lithophyton nigrum. See Corallium n...
-Lithophyton. Part 2
The method of De Romanis, or with the greater apparatus, was suggested by the facility with which stones are extracted from the female bladder, in consequence of the greater size of the urethra, and i...
-Lithophyton. Part 3
The lateral operation is described by Mr. Sharp in the following words from Mr. Cheselden:the patient being laid on a table, with his hands and feet tied, and the staff passed, as in the old way, let...
-Lithophyton. Part 4
If the stone is broken, the larger pieces should be extracted by the forceps, and the smaller with a scoop, rwards warm water is to be injected, and the patient raised to an upright posture. We think,...
-Lobelia
An American plant named in honour of Lobel, found in woods and dry marshes. With the root of the lobelia syphilitica Lin. Sp. Pl. 1320, the American Indians cure the most virulent pox. Five or six of ...
-Discharge sOf The Uterus After Child Birth, Gynaecia
Gynaecia, the third species of Dr. Cullen's menorr-hagia, which he defines, a sanguinary menorrhagia in lying-in women. This discharge arises from the distended vessels, and proceeds till the removal ...
-Lorind Matricis
An epilepsy, or a convulsive disorder supposed to proceed from the uterus. Lotio,(from lavo, to wash). A lotion; an external fluid application. When used on the eyes, it receives the name of collyrium...
-Lues
(From luo, to dissolve, because it produces dissolution; or from the Hebrew term, laugh, to absorb,) the pestilence in men, and the murrain in beasts. Lues deifica. One of the ridiculous names for th...
-Lues. Part 2
The lues is at present received from infection only, and it usually shows its source by the tumour of the glands, interposed between it and the receptaculum chyli, as in the lymphatic glands of the gr...
-Lues. Part 3
These general appearances are often accompanied by still more distressing local ones. Though we have only mentioned the chancre as the first symptom, it is sometimes followed by painful ulcers, spread...
-Lues. Part 4
In whatever way mercury acts, it is admitted to be the only remedy which we can depend on in this climate. Various are the opinions respecting the preparation to be chosen, the forms of administration...
-Lues. Part 5
In each instance, we must proceed very cautiously with the medicine, to accustom the constitution to its irritation. The other preparations chiefly in use are Plenck's powder, the solution of the sub...
-Lumbares Nervi
(From the same). The lumbar nerves pass out from the spinal marrow through the vertebrae of the loins, and become larger from the first to the last. The first lumbar nerve throws a large branch backwa...
-Lumbrici
(A lubricitate, from their slipperiness). The lumbricus, which abounds in the intestines of young persons, resembles so nearly, in its general Appearance, the earth worm, that it has been considered ...
-Lupulus
dislike; from its bitterness,) humulus convolvulus perennis, humulus lupulus Lin. Sp. Pl. 1457. The hop. This plant hath hollow stalks, and broad serrated leaves, cut into three or five sharp pointed...
-Lutum
(From soluble). Lute. Caementum. Many chemical vessels require to be covered with coating, to preserve them from being broken or melted in the fire, or to close exactly their junctures. These coating...
-Luxatio Luxatura
(From luxo, to dislocate ) . Dislocatio; aberratio; eluxatio; emotio; elongatio; ecptoma; ecclysis; lygismos; delocatio; exarthrema; olis-thema; a luxation, or dislocation. A slight dislocation is ter...
-Luxatio Luxatura. Part 2
2. Capitis luxatio vel cranii. Luxation of the head. A separation of the bones of the cranium from the hydrocephalus is by some called a luxation of the head; but in general, is meant a luxation of th...
-Luxatio Luxatura. Part 3
10. Femoris ossis luxatio. Luxation of the thigh bone. A fracture of the neck of this bone is sometimes mistaken for a luxation. The head of the thigh bone may be luxated downwards, forwards, inwards,...
-Luxatio Luxatura. Part 4
Fresh luxations are most easily reduced; those of long continuance are restored with difficulty; but if the head of the humerus adheres to the adjacent parts, which after a long time usually happens, ...
-Luxatio Luxatura. Part 5
Mr. Bell observes, that in the reduction of these dislocations (viz. of the metacarpus and fingers), the bone should not be pulled down till it be somewhat raised or elevated from the contiguous bone;...
-Lycanthropia
(From a wolf, and a man), Lycanthropy; by the Arabians cutu-buth, from an animal which perpetually moves up and down on the surface of stagnant waters; by AEtius, cynanthro/iy, as well as lycanth...
-Lycopodium
(From a wolf, and a claw,) muscus clavatus, terrestris, squamosus, plicaria, cingularia, wolf's claw, club moss; lycopodium cla-valum Lin. Sp. Pl. 1564, is a fertile moss, destitute of pedicles and c...
-Lympha
Quasi nympha, (from water). Lymph is a pellucid, insipid, pure liquor in the human machine, and the purer parts of the serosity generally obtain this appellation. The gelatinous parts of this fluid...
-Lymphae Ductus
(From lympha, and duco, to carry). Vasa lymphatica. Lymphatic vessels. The lymphatics arise from, the cells of the membrana cellu-laris, the cavities of the intestines, of the urine and gall bladders,...
-Lymphae Ductus. Part 2
The lymphatics of the lower extremities having now reached the trunk of the body, and passed under Pou-part's ligament, appear upon the sides of the ossa pubis, near the pelvis. Some pass up with the ...
-Lymphae Ductus. Part 3
It is by the action of the absorbent system that many-noxious materials are introduced into the habit; as the matter of the small pox, the lues venerea, the miasmata of fevers: and it is also by their...
-Lymphae Ductus. Part 4
cording to Mr. White, in the first or inflammatory stage, antiphlogistics are necessary, in the degree which the patient's strength will permit. The bowels should be kept lax. the pains alleviated by ...
-Macis
cortex aromaticus, aromatic bark). Mace, the middle bark, of nutmegs, enveloping theii shell, of an oily nature, and of a lively red colour when fresh, growing paler from age. It is dried in the su...
-Magnes
The loadstone. Calamita, lapis Lydius, antiphyson, lapis Heraclius, from Heraclea, a town in Lydia. The term, however, is singular in many respects. Its origin is uncertain, but its application and in...
-Magnetismus
Magnetism, from its effects on the human body, can be scarcely an object of our attention; yet, as folly and fraud have brought it forward in a conspicuous view, it will be necessary to ascertain its ...
-Majorana
(Quo'd mense Maio floreat, because it flowers in May). Marjoram. Majorana cretica, vel Syriaca. See Marum Syriacum. Majorana majori folio, amaracus, sampsuchua. Sweet marjoram. By amaracus the ancie...
-Malum
A disease. (See Morbus.) In a strict sense it is applied to the unnatural protrusion of the apple of the eye, called procidentia oculi; consists in an enlargement or profusion of the eye ball, when th...
-Malva
(from to soften). The mallow, malva rotundifolia sylvestris Lin. Sp. Pl. 969; sufficiently known. Its leaves and flowers are slightly mucilaginous, have no remarkable smell, and are merely emollient....
-Malvern Water
Rises in Worcestershire, and it contains lime with a small proportion of magnesia, suspended chiefly by carbonic acid gas. A very small quantity of sea salt is occasionally found in it. The proportion...
-Mamei
The mammaea Americana Lin. Sp. Pl. 731, mammoe, momin, or toddy tree, is a fine tall tree, constantly of a beautiful green colour, somewhat resembling the walnut tree. Its trunk rises to the height of...
-Mammae
(From mamma, plural mamma). The breasts. In the breasts we distinguish the mammillae, or nipples, the areola, the brownish circle around the nipples, and the lactiferous vessels. The .breasts are co...
-Manganese
Magnesium, magnesia nigra, and siderea, manganese oxyde Hauy iv. 243, is of a black brown colour, with occasionally a little of the metallic splendour, of a specific gravity from 3.70 to 4.75. Some va...
-Mangostan
Garcinia mangostana Lin. Sp. Pl. 635. A tree which has been transplanted from the Molucca islands to Java, and at Batavia is admired as an ornament in gardens. It resembles the citron tree, has a stra...
-Mania
(From to rage,) delirium maniacum, paruphrosyne; phrenitis apyreta, heracleius, madness. (See also Melancholia.) This disease receives different appellations, according to its violence, its causes, a...
-Mania. Part 2
Insanity seldom attacks at once: its approaches are gradual; and, as suspicion and cunning are the most striking mental symptoms, these are often conspicuous in the earliest stages. In delineating the...
-Mania. Part 3
Though we may declaim,what a wonderful piece of work is man ! yet, when we view him in this state, where his boasted reason, instead of assisting, misleads him; when we see him exposed to elemental ...
-Mania. Part 4
The prognostic in this disease is usually unfavourable, except when it arises from repelled eruptions, imperfect gout, or the stoppage of the discharge of a fistula in ano. When it arises from a const...
-Mania. Part 5
The sedative antispasmodics are the foetids, musk, and camphor. The former are comparatively weak; musk is more powerful, but rarely genuine, and always expensive. Camphor is more active than either, ...
-Manna
(From the Syriac term mana, a gift; as it is supposed to be the food bestowed by God on the children of Israel). Manna Calabrina, ros Calabrinus, aeromeli, alusar, drosomeli; and when of a rosy colour...
-Marinum
Vel Marinus Sal, (from mare the tea). Sea salt; esebon; communis, culinarius, et ci-barius sal; common salt. The salt is not only extracted from the sea water by evaporation, but is also found in ext...
-Marrubium
(From the Hebrew terms mar rob, a bitter juice). Horehound; mauromarson; which rather means the black sort. It is also a name for the cardiaca, leonurus cardiaca Lin. Sp. Pl. 817, and some other plant...
-Marum
(From the Hebrew term mar, bitter,) sampsuchus, clinopodiummastichina Gallorum, thimbra Hispanica; Jaca Indica, mastich thyme, or common marum, thymus mastichina Lin. Sp. Pl. 827, is a low shrubby pla...
-Masturbatio
Manustrapatio, Onanismus, the sin of Onan, from a perverted passage in the Pentateuch. The discharge of semen from a preternatural stimulus; the vice, it is said, of the solitary monk, and, perhaps, o...
-Materia
(From mater, a mother). Matter; substance. In strictly logical disquisitions, material is in opposition to modal, the one signifying as a cause, a substance, the other a peculiar state; thus a sword i...
-Ambrosiacal Alliaceous Hircine
Stinking, and sickly. The three first are pleasant, the three last disagreeable, smells. This enumeration is not perhaps correct, nor the classes distinct; but the Linnaean language is employed by man...
-Ambrosiacal Alliaceous Hircine. Part 2
The tastes of plants conduct us more certainly to their medical properties; but the similarity of terms may contribute, without care, to confound them with the smells. Our chief guide in this path is ...
-Ambrosiacal Alliaceous Hircine. Part 3
The bitter taste is confined to the oily and resinous juices of vegetables, and to the inflammable oxides. It is communicated to all vegetable substances by what is styled by the French chemists their...
-Ambrosiacal Alliaceous Hircine. Part 4
Analysis, conducted with care, leads us, however, to form some conjecture of the nature of the vegetable. The expressed juices of the green and watery plants (the oleraceae) are slightly laxative and ...
-Ambrosiacal Alliaceous Hircine. Part 5
The earliest therapeutical authors were the natural historians; for to their descriptions of plants were usually added their medical virtues. The herbals, as they may be called, from the time of Theop...
-Ambrosiacal Alliaceous Hircine. Part 6
Many authors on this subject have followed a more arbitrary arrangement, though in part botanical. Thus, Simon Paulli has divided his plants as they flourish in either of the four seasons; Vogel, acco...
-Catalogue
I. Emetica. .Nauseosa. Scillae radix ! Antimonii praeparationes, refracta dosi. Digitalis purpurea, folia ! Nicotiana! Nux vomica ! Colchicum autumnale. . Evacuantia. Emetica Nauseosa, ...
-Catalogue. Part 2
Umbellatarum semina. Angelica, radix; Hedera terrestris; Hyssopus herba. Marrubium album. A grimonia ? Pulegium. Iris florentina. Enula campana. Siliquosae. Alliaceae ! Scilla ! Colchicum autumnale. ...
-Catalogue. Part 3
Tonica . Amara calida. Cincona. cortex, rubra & flava. Angustura. cortex. Swietenia. cortex. Eleutheria. cortex. Aurantium. cortex. Canella alba. Quassia amara. Picrania amara. lignum. Wright. ...
-Catalogue. Part 4
The division of sialagogues is sufficiently obvious. There is but one certain internal remedy of this kind. mercury. Yet, from the late experiments with the nitric acid in syphilis, there is some rea...
-Matlock Waters
Found at the place from whence they take their name in the county of Derby, where there are a great number of warm springs, which, according to Dr. Short, acquire their heat by passing through a bed o...
-Matricaria
Partheniwn, febrifuga, metrica-ria, from matrix. Common feverfew, featherfew, or febrifuge, matricaria parthenium Lin. Sp. Pl. 1255. This plant hath firm branched stalks and roughish leaves, each of ...
-Maxilla
(From to chew,) mandibula. The cheek or the jaw. See Buccae. Maxilla inferior, mela. The lower jaw is situated at the lower part of the face; divided into the chin, sides, and processes. The chin i...
-Maxillariae Arteriae
The maxillary-arteries. The external artery, also called the genial and angular artery, is a branch from the external carotid. It runs to the basis of the lower jaw, close to the attachment of the mas...
-Maxillaris Inferior Nervus
Ramus inferior, is the third branch of the fifth pair of nerves. It passes through the foramen ovale of the os sphenoides, where it gives off several branches to the muscles of the lower jaw, then thr...
-Meccha
Bals. See Balsamum. Mechoacana Alba, (from Mechoachan, a province in Mexico, whence it was brought). Rhabar-barum album, convolvulus Americanus, jalapa alba, bryonia alba Peruviana, mechoacan. It is t...
-Medicamentaria
({rommedica?nentum,medicine,) pharmacy, is the art of making and preparing medicines, sometimes of preparing poison. Pharmacy hath been distinguished into chemical and galenical. The first consists of...
-Medicamentum
(from medeor, to heal). A medicine has been styled any substance capable of changing the state of the solids and fluids of the human body, so as to prevent the increase of disease,or restore health. T...
-Medicina
(From medeor, to heal). Medicine. The history of the science which is the chief object of our work, must necessarily detain us for some time; yet, to avoid an article of an extremely disproportioned l...
-Medicina. Part 2
Of the Rhodian and Italian schools, established by the descendants or priests of AEsculapius, we have few-remains: of the existence of the latter .we find only some imperfect hints in Galen. The forme...
-Medicina. Part 3
The undisputed works of Hippocrates are said to be the first and third book of the Epidemics; two books of the Praenotiones (a different work from the Prae-notiones Coacae, published by Elzevir in 166...
-Medicina. Part 4
To engage, however, in any extensive enquiry respecting the physiological doctrines of the Coan sage would be idle, since much was fancy and more probably conjecture; but above all, on account of the ...
-Medicina. Part 5
A rule, less liable to be mistaken, was, that diseases from repletion must be cured by evacuation; and the contrary. Rest is equally the remedy for labour, and labour for indolence; and, in general, m...
-Medicina. Part 6
To check excess of motion, he seems to have very rarely used opium. In what he styles strangulations of the uterus, he advises the soporific meconium: the seems to be the papaver spumeum, the peplium...
-Medicina. Part 7
The school of Smyrna, in which Erasistratus taught, was undoubtedly famous; but there is reason to' doubt whether the medals which remain, supposed by Mead to have been struck in honour or commemorati...
-Medicina. Part 8
Greece was now become subservient to the superior genius of Rome, and we must there look for the progressive steps of medical improvement. Rome, formed by the rude tribes of ferocious banditti, wanted...
-Medicina. Part 9
6E share of their former liberty. As their language was fashionable, their manners pleasing, their demeanour obliging, perhaps approaching to servility (Juvenal), it is not surprising that they should...
-Medicina. Part 10
Thus was this famous revolution in medicine effected, not from superior judgment, more extensive observation, or experience, but from ignorance of what former practitioners had taught, and indolence, ...
-Medicina. Part 11
Celsus was another distinguished practitioner of the methodic sect, who brought, or greatly contributed to bring, physicians back to the patient study and observation recommended by Hippocrates. He se...
-Medicina. Part 12
therefore, means the separation of bodies previously united. Coelius Aurelianus uses the words recorporate and recorporatio. The chief works of Thessalus, quoted by Coelius Aurelianus, relate to di...
-Medicina. Part 13
An author of this era, and of the Methodic sect, whose works arc lost, was Soranus of Ephesus; and we have reason to regret it, because Galen, who loses no opportunity of criticizing the Methodics, sp...
-Medicina. Part 14
come out of the tombs exceeding fierce; and the tombs of the pagans were generally open to receive the oblations to the manes of the deceased. As we have pronounced the question to be a trifling one...
-Medicina. Part 15
Some Byzantine physicians, dimly seen through the obscurity of the darker ages, we may shortly mention. Nanus, who lived near the end of the tenth century, by the command of Constantine Porphyrogenetu...
-Medicina. Part 16
All these translations, and even Honaim's, were very imperfectly executed, though the latter, disgusted by the treatment of Mesue, had retired two years to the Grecian islands, where he had cultivated...
-Medicina. Part 17
Thus while medicine was declining in Greece it kept alive in Arabia; but it seems scarcely to have survived the thirteenth century in either. This was the period of its downfal. Europe and Asia were o...
-Medicina. Part 18
Another physician in the service of Robert was Joannes Sylvaticus, styled Pandectarius, from his Pandects, or Medical Vocabulary. He was a Mantuan by birth, and educated in the school of Salernum; but...
-Medicina. Part 19
This century was, however, distinguished by exertions more honourable for science. It was the era of the discovery of the circulation of the blood, a subject already noticed, and of the dissections of...
-Medicina. Part 20
While Boerhaave held the reins of empire, and ruled with a sway almost as absolute as that of Galen, two rivals arose who overturned his apparently well established dominion. Hoffman and Stahl were ri...
-Medicina. Part 21
Natural philosophy is highly necessary, independent of its connection with matter and motion. We are advancing rapidly into these branches, where, as in the human body, we see effects without being ab...
-Medicina. Part 22
It has been supposed, that extensive reading rather impedes by overloading the mind, than assists by giving information. Reading, however, with judgment and discrimination will produce no such effect....
-Medicina. Part 23
Had we room, we might enlarge a little on the policy of medicine. Hoffman has left us a dissertation entitled Medicus Politicus, though its object is different; but the art in this age is greatly impr...
-Medicina. Part 24
To pursue the history through the 18th century would be useless, and almost impracticable. We engaged in it chiefly from curiosity, and need only add, that the minor works on this subject are collecte...
-Medicina. Part 25
Returning sanity is another point of doubtful distinction; nor do we see that it is possible to lay down any rules, except the absence of the pathognomonics of the disease. Yet we have often witnessed...
-Medicina. Part 26
From what has been said under the article Impotentia, q. v., the physician will be sufficiently directed in his judgment; nor need wc enlarge with the disgusting indecency with which the old authors e...
-Medicina. Part 27
Accidental poisons are received in the food, or are hastily swallowed by mistake instead of a medicine, before the taste betrays their nature. The former are chiefly copper,arsenic,and lead; the latte...
-Medicina. Part 28
Violent death is apparently ascertained without difficulty; and when the cause proceeds so far as to destroy the organization of a part essential to life,little hesitation can be felt. Haemorrhages, a...
-Medicina. Part 29
When the dissection is determined on for the discovery of the cause of death, it should be attempted early, before putrefaction can have changed the appearance of the parts, and with as little motion ...
-Medicina. Part 30
Medical authors, kind to the fair sex, have been anxious to point out the fallacy of all these proofs; and we shall so far join with them in urging the practitioner not to hasten the decison. Certaint...
-Infanticide
We know not when we have found greater difficulty in speaking on any subject than on the present. The weight of arguments seem often to bear hard on those who are the objects of the greatest compassio...
-Infanticide. Part 2
The colour of the lungs, which is of a bright red previous to inspiration, their situation in the thorax, and the situation of the liver and stomach, as well as the shape of the diaphragm, will afford...
-Infanticide. Part 3
Injuries in the vital organs, and indeed all wounds of the larger vessels, must necessarily be fatal. The stoppage of respiration, from any cause, must also soon terminate in death. A question sometim...
-Infanticide. Part 4
Nuisances often claim the attention of courts of justice, and physicians are sometimes called on to decide. Their object is, however, to determine only what manufactures are injurious to health. A bri...
-Medulla
Quia in medio ossis. Marrow; ax-ungia de mumia. In anatomy it hath various significations. The white substance of the brain is called medulla, or the medullary part, to distinguish it from the brown o...
-Medulla Oblongata
Oblongata is a continuation of the medullary substance of the cerebrum and cerabellum, passing downwards, and a little backwards to the foramen magnum occipitale, where it assumes the name of medulla ...
-Mel Meli
(From honey). Honey; aercmili, acoitus. Aristaeus, a pupil of Chiron, is said to have first gathered this sweet vegetable juice, collected by the bee from the flowers of various plants, and ...
-Melancholia
(From black, and bile). Melancholy; delirium melancholicum, erotomania, panophobia, athymia. Dr. Cullen places it as a genus in the class neuroses, order vesaniae, and defines it, a partial insanity...
-Melilotus
(From honey, and the lotus,) lotus sylvestris, sertulacompana, trifolium cabal-linum, corona regia, common melilot, trifolium meli-lotus officinalis Lin. Sp. Pl. 1078, is a plant with smooth, oval, s...
-Melissa
(From because bees are fond of it,) apiastrum, erotion, mellifoliutn; citrago, citraria, and cedronella, from its colour; melissa officinalis Lin. Sp. Pl. 827, is a well known plant in our gardens: t...
-Membrana
(From membrana, parchment, which it resembles). A membrane; chiton. Winslow describes it to be a pliable texture of fibres, disposed or interwoven together in the same plane. Membranes differ in thick...
-Menoruhagia
(From the menses, and to break out). Excessive or extraordinary discharge of the menses, metrorrhaghia, haemorrhagia uterina. Dr. Cullen places this disease in the class pyrexiae, and order hemorrha...
-Menses
(From mensis,a month,) catamenia, menstrua, emmenia,gynaecia, periodical discharges of blood from the uterus, vagina, or both, from about the age of fourteen to about fifty. In warm climates they appe...
-Menses. Part 2
This view of the subject will explain equally the pathology and practice in all their varieties. When the changes, which successively take place in the determinations to the different parts, commence,...
-Menses. Part 3
The tonics most generally beneficial are the metallic. Of these the most useful, or rather the most used, are the iron and mercury. We have said, that perhaps, with the exception of lead, all the meta...
-Menses. Part 4
Suppressio mensium. When the habit is established, and the discharge continued monthly from this cause, it cannot be broken with impunity. The most frequent causes of suppression arc exposure to cold,...
-Menses. Part 5
The task is more difficult when the discharge is immoderate; for female prejudice demands our active interference to check it, but this is always injurious. Young practitioners are commonly alert to s...
-Mensura
The variety of measures employed by different nations renders medical directions often obscure, and occasionally fallacious. The word mensura is sometimes employed absolutely to denote a given bulk, a...
-Mentha
Mint; hedyosmos, from its sweet smell; is a perennial herb with square stalks, serrated leaves set in pairs, and spikes of monopetalous flowers, each cut into four sections, and followed by four seeds...
-Mercurialis
(From mercurius, quicksilver). Mercurial, or a preparation of mercury. But in obsolete authors, the atra bilis is also called the mercurial humour; and the diseases from this source have the same appe...
-Mercurius
Quick or living silver; from its great fluidity. See Argf.ntum vivum. Mercurius alcalisatus. Alcalisated mercury; hydrargyrus cum creta; Quicksilver with chalk; AEthiops albus. hydrargyri puri iij. ...
-Mercurius. Continued
It might be supposed, that when the nitrous acid ceases to effervesce with the mercury, it is saturated with it; but this is far from being the case: the acid, when the heat is increased, being still...
-Mesentericae Arteriae
(From mesente-rium, the mesentery). The upper mesenteric artery, called colica, seu mesenterica superior, rises somewhat below the coeliac. The aorta a little above its division gives off the inferior...
-Mesenterium
(From the middle, and intestine,) e/iichordis; mesaraeon; the mesentery, thus named from its being' in the middle of the intestines, is a duplicature of the peritonaeum, nearly of a circular figure ...
-Mesocolon
(From the middle, and the colon). When the mesentery has reached the extremity of the ilium, it contracts and becomes the mesocolon. One lamina, turned to the right side, is called the right ligamen...
-Metacarpion Metacarpus
(From after, and the wrist,) that part of the hand situated between the wrist and the fingers. The ancients called the carpus brachiale,and the metacarpus post brachial. It forms on the inside the p...
-Metalla
(From the Hebrew term metil, a hard substance). Metals, or metallic substances, are distinguished by their splendour, their opacity, their fusibility, specific gravity, conducting power, hardness, ela...
-Miasma
(From to pollute). Miasmata have lately claimed the attention of pathologists, as they are the causes of some of the most fatal fevers to which mankind are subject. In the more strict pathological in...
-Miliaria. Miliaris. Febris
(from the pustules resembling millet seed). The miliary fever, by the Germans Friesel, placed by Dr. Cullen in the class Pyrexia, and order Exanthemata; defined a synochus attended with restlessness...
-Millefolium
(From mille, a thousand, and folium, a leaf). Lentibularia; supercilium and Iumbus Veneris, myriophyllon, chiliophyllon, common yarrow; mill foil, Achillea millefolium Lin. Sp. Pl. 1267, is a plant wi...
-Mineralia
(From mina, a mine of metalts). Minerals. The mineral kingdom furnishes numerous and very valuable remedies, first introduced by the chemical physicians, and, for a long time disregarded by the Boerha...
-Moderni
(Quasi hodierni, of to-day). The aera of modern learning, according to the best chronologists, is that of the capture of Constantinople by the Turks, when the Greeks fled to Italy, carrying with them ...
-Mola
(a Hebrew term). A name for the patelle, knee pan, for the molares denies, or grinders; for the maxilla; and a false conception, or a shapeless mass in the uterus, without a placenta, called epicy-ema...
-Molares
Dentes, (from mola, a mill, and dens, a tooth). Grinders, genulni; gom/ihioi; molae; mo-misci; the large broad teeth beyond the canini. The two first are smaller than the rest, terminating in two poi...
-Mollusca
(From mollis, soft). Natural history has, within these few years, greatly extended its boundaries by new discoveries. Philosophers wanted new worlds as a supply for their ambition, new territories for...
-Monstrum
And Monstrositas, (from monstro, to show). Monster, or a monstrous, i. e. a preternatural production. A monster is very judiciously defined by Dr. Hamilton, in his valuable and comprehensive Outlines...
-Morbilli
(A dim. of morbus, disease). The measles. Variola cholerica of Avicenna; blacciae of Rhazes; bothor; bovilla; fersae of the Arabians. Dr. Cullen places this disease under the title rubeola, in the cla...
-Morbilli. Continued
The treatment of measles has, we think, been mistaken and misrepresented. It has been considered as a peripneumonic disease, and the most liberal bleedings have been ordered: but the peripneumony only...
-Morbillosa
Belonging to the measles. Morbus, (from death). A disease; malum, nosos. ' A disease we have already defined to be that condition of the human body in which the actions of life and health are not p...
-Morbillosa. Part 2
A more certain cause of preternatural tenuity is acrimony. It may certainly be of various kinds, but we can only perceive with clearness the saline acrimony. Yet we have little doubt of this effect be...
-Morbillosa. Part 3
The scurvy is admitted to arise from salt provisions, but in these the milder animal fluids are separated and in part decomposed; the texture of the animal fibre is also destroyed, and in reality the ...
-Morbillosa. Part 4
An excess or defect in the quantity of the fluids is scarcely an object of this part of our work, yet to consider the doctrine of plethora in this place may facilitate some future enquiries. These sou...
-Morbillosa. Part 5
In all these cases the vital solid is often the chief and the principal cause. The want of elasticity arises from water being poured into the cellular membrane instead of the usual halitus; the flacci...
-Morbillosa. Part 6
Heat increases sensibility, and cold diminishes it. The sensibility is also less in torpid constitutions, in weak states where the circulation is not carried on to the extremities, from the applicatio...
-Morbillosa. Part 7
For some time the general health remains uninterrupted; but, when the disease advances so as to be acutely sensible to the touch, with an acute or throbbing pain, and a redness of the skin, hectic exa...
-Morbillosa. Part 8
A similar application of hot water has been attempted at a distance from Bath; but whether it arises from the heat employed being too low, or that the Bath waters derive, in part, their virtues from t...
-Morosis
(From foolish). Stupidity, idiotism. This may be styled a mental disease, sometimes owing to a more slow expansion of the mental faculties, which often, however, attain their powers suddenly, and in...
-Morphae
A, from forma externa). Morphew, scurf, a species of the leprosy seated in the skin. The brown itching morphew is named hepatizon. Morpiones. Crab lice, so called from their resembling crabs: pedicu...
-Morsus
(From the same). A bite, or pain resembling that from a bite of an insect. Morsus diaboli. See Tubae fallopianae, or Devil's bit, and Sucisa. Morsus gallinae. See Alsine. Morsus ranae. See Microleuc...
-Mortificatio
(From mors, death, and fio, to produce). A mortification. Sphacelus, ignis frigi-dus. Hippocrates uses sphacelus in different senses, sometimes confining it to a corruption of the bone, which, in the ...
-Mortificatio. Continued
In scorbutic habits, particularly in sailors after long voyages, in soldiers from an unhealthy encampment, or after a siege, and in prisoners after confinement, ulcers break out chiefly in the lower e...
-Moschus
(From the Arabic term mosch). Musk, amisa, is an odoriferous grumous substance, an inspissated secreted fluid of the moschua moschiferus of Linnaeus, and the Tibet musk of Pennant. This animal is of t...
-Mucilago
(From mucus). A mucilage; mu-cago, a viscid glutinous liquor, made by dissolving the gum, or the soluble part of gum arabic, quince seeds, & c. in water. Young plants particularly abound in mucilage,...
-Mucus
(From the Arabic muk,) myxa; myxara; myxas; the viscid fluid which covers the surfaces of all the membranes, exposed to any extraneous matter, as the skin, internal membrane of the mouth, nose, lungs,...
-Mum
A bitter infusion in beer, to which the ingredients are added, generally while the beer is fermenting, though it is sometimes made extemporaneously by adding a bitter tincture. It is a German liquor, ...
-Mumia
(From the Arabic mum, wax). Mummy signifies pissasphaltum, bitumen, or a brown fluid found in sepulchres, in which bodies embalmed have been preserved many years; sometimes a carcass dried by the sun ...
-Musculus
See Mytilus and Cetus. In ana-tomv from , to draw or contract. Lacertuli, q. v. Muscles consist of those bundles of fleshy fibres by which the motions of all animal bodies are performed, and each is...
-Musculus. Part 2
6 N 2 the zoonic acid, is chiefly discovered in the muscles; that their fluids are the most completely animalized of the whole system; that in animals who lead the most active lives, and in the organs...
-Musculus. Part 3
The action of muscles is never intermitted, and only diminished in the sleeping state. This action arises from a less degree of that power which moves the limbs, and is styled, by Haller, the vis insi...
-Musculus. Part 4
Before we proceed to a general enumeration of the muscles, we must premise, that the most fixed point is styled its origin, the more moveable its insertion. In the motion, however, of limbs, the pecul...
-Musculus. Part 5
Muscles of the Trunk. Those are principally the muscles which cover the breast; those which constitute the fore part and sides of the abdomen; and the great muscles that are spread over the back. The...
-Musculus. Part 6
The fingers are principally moved by two flexors and one extensor. The former muscles arise from the upper part of the fore arm near the bend, and running down towards the wrist, send off four round t...
-Muscus Clavatus
See Lycopodium. Muscus cumatilus. Lichen apthosus Lin. Sp. Pl. 1616, is supposed to be anthelmintic, and is given in infusion or decoction to destroy worms, or to remove aphthae. The dose of the powd...
-Myle
See Patella and Mola. M\Lo-Glossi, (from dens molares, and lingua). These muscles are small fleshy planes, situated transversely on each side, between the ramus of the lower jaw and the basis of...
-Myopia Myopiasis
(From to shut, and the eye). Short sight; dysopia dissitorum of Cullen; nuciositas, because the eyes are generally partly closed. This disease is owing to the excessive convexity of the crystalline...
-Myrobalani
(From an ointment, and a nut,) myrobalans, a dried fruit of the plum kind, brought from the East Indies, of which three kinds are brought fron Bengal, faba Bengalensis, Cambaia, and Malabarica. (Se...
-Myrrha
(From Hebrew, mar, bitter). Myrrh, stacte, ergasma, in the ancient designation, Z z. Dioscorides mentions a fatty species, gabirea. It is a gummy resinous concrete, brought immediately from Alexandria...
-Myrtus
The myrtle; myrrhine, because it smells like myrrh. Myrtus Brabantica and Avglica, called also rhus myrtifclia Belgica, myrica gate Lin. Sp. Pl. 1543, rhus sylveslris; acaron; frutex odoratus sefiten...
-Mytilus
The mussel, mytilus edulis Lin. Syst. Naturae, musculus. A sea shell fish of a luscious flavour, found on many parts of our coast, of a moderate size, larger between the tropics, and smaller in the ar...
-A - Abdominal Ring Abductio
A A. The letter a, with a line above it, thus, , is used in medical prescriptions for ana, of each; sometimes it is written thus, ; e. gr. Mel. sacchar. et man. vel &...
-Abducentes Nervi - Ablutio
Abducentes Nervi Part of the sixth pair; so called because they are lost on the abductores oculi. Abductio (FromaŁ and duco, to draw,) a species of fracture, when a bone near the joint is so divide...
-Abomasum - Abscissio
Abomasum (From ab, dim. and omasum, the stomach of a beast.) The name of the fourth stomach of a beast that chews the cud. The first is called venter, or rather ventriculus, the word used for it in A...
-Absconsio - Acajaiba
Absconsio (From abscondo, to hide). A sinus, or cavity of a bone, which receives and conceals the head of another bone. Absinthites (From absinthium, wormwood'). A wine impregnated with wormwood. T...
-Acajou - Acatalis
Acajou See Acajaiba. Acalephe A Settle, (from , negative, agreeable, and a touch), because the touch, as it hurts, is not agreeable. See Urtica. There is also a fish and sea-fowl thus name...
-Acataposis - Acer Virginianum
Acataposis (From ,non, and deglutio). See Deglutitio. Acatastatae (From , neg. and to deine). Fevers anomalous in their appearance, and irregular in their paroxyms. Acatharsia (From...
-Acerbitas - Achicolum
Acerbitas (From acer, sharp,) acerbity, sourness. Acerbus Sour, harsh; or a sourness with as-tringency; also bitter. Acerides (from , negative, and wax ). Plasters made without wax. Ace...
-Achillea - Acidum Arsenicum
Achillea The achilleas take their name from Achilles, because with this he is said to have cured Telephus. Linnaeus uses the word achillea as the generic term for yarrow, milfoil, or sneezewort. For ...
-Acies - Acne
Acies (From axn, a point). Steel. See Cha-lybs. Acinaformis (From a scymitar, and forma, shape,) applied to leaves, one of whose edges is sharp and convex, and the other straight and thick, like a...
-Acnestis - Acosmia
Acnestis (from negative, and to scratch). That part of the spine which reaches from betwixt the shoulder blades to the loins. This name seems only applicable to quadrupeds, because they cann...
-Acotyledon - Acrociiordon
Acotyledon Applied to seeds when they are without cotyledons. Acoustica Medicines against deafness (from to hear). But no internal medicines of this kind are known. Acrai See Satyriasis, and Fu...
-Acromion - Acrothymion
Acromion (From extreme, said the Acromium } shoulder). Sec Scapula, 2. Acromphalion (From extreme, or the tip, and navel). The tip of the navel, or the middle of the navel. Acron In general, ...
-Act Med - Aculon
Act Med An abbreviation of T-homae Bartho-lini Acta Medica et Philosophica Hafhiensia. Act Philos. And Transact. Philos The Philosophical Transactions. Act Reg. Sc The Histories and Memoirs of th...
-Acupunctura - Adamus
Acupunctura (From acus, a needle, and pungo, to prick,) acupuncture. Bleeding performed by making many small punctures with a silver needle on the part affected. This method is practised in Siam, Jap...
-Adami Pomum - Adepta Philosophia
Adami Pomum The convex part of the thyroid cartilage of the larynx. Adansonia From Adanson, the name of the person who first described the Aethiopian sour gourd. See Baobab. Adarce (From n...
-Adhatoda - Adipsia
Adhatoda The Malabar nut. Referred by Lin. to the genus justicia; not employed in modern practice, and seemingly useless. Adhesio (From ad, and haereo, to cleave to,) adhesion. In medicine, a term ...
-Adipson - Adscendens
Adipson (from , neg. and thirst). See Oxymel and Ptisana. Medicines were thus named that allayed thirst, if used for that purpose; and may be applied to such as do not provoke thirst. The ...
-Adstrictio - Aedosophia
Adstrictio (From ad, and stringo, to bind together,) Adstriction. It either expresses the styptic quality of medicines, or the retention of the natural evacuations, by the rigidity of the respective ...
-Aegeirinon - Aegyptia Antidotus
Aegeirinon a poplar). An ointment so called, because the fruit of the poplar, or its catkins. ' are an ingredient in it; not now employed. Aegeiros. See Populus. Aegias (From a goat). A white spe...
-Aegyptium Oleum - Aerologia
Aegyptium Oleum See Cataputia; also the name of a topic used by the ancients in uterine disorders. -------------------- album. See Crinomyron. --------------------croceum ung. Both these are descri...
-Aeromeli - Aesecavum
Aeromeli (From air, and honey), honey dew. See Mel and Manna. Aerophobi (From air, and to be afraid). According to Coelius Aurelianus, somephre-nitic patients are afraid of a lucid and others o...
-Aes Coronarium - Aetiologia
Aes Coronarium See Aes. Aes Ustum, burnt copper. -Thin plates of copper are laid stratum super stratum in a crucible, with sulphur and sea-salt; then they are placed over a hot charcoal fire, and the...
-Aetoiphlebes - Agenesia
Aetoiphlebes Eagle veins, (from an eagle, vena ). According to Ruffus Ephesius, the veins that pass through the temples to the head were thus called. Aetolion (From an eagle, so called because th...
-Ager Naturae - Aggregatus
Ager Naturae See Uterus. Ageratum (, non, and senectus,) because its flowers preserve their beauty a long time. It is also named balsamita minor; costus hortorum minor; Sweet Maudlin Maud...
-Agiahalid - Agoni Sticum
Agiahalid See Lycium. Agis See Femer. Agitation Exercise is sometimes useful, by agitating the whole system; and violent agitation is recommended by Bartholine in fits of tooth-ach and deafness. ...
-Agostus - Agriocardamum
Agostus From to bring or lead). That part of the arm from the elbow to the fingers. See also Palma. Agredula A species of frog. Agresta, verjuice, (from wild). The juice of unripe grapes, or the ...
-Agriocastanum - Ague Drops
Agriocastanum (From wild, and the chesnut). See Bulbooastanum. Agriocinara, (from wild, and artichoke). See Cinara sylvestris. Agriococcimela (From wild, a berry, and an apple-tree). See P...
-Ague Cake - Aizoon
Ague Cake A tumour in the region of the spleen which often follows agues, and was once said to be owing to the use of the bark. It is, however, now very rare; and much more so since the bark has been...
-Ajava - Alaqueca
Ajava (Indian). So the Portuguese call a seed which is brought from Malabar, and is celebrated in the East Indies as a remedy in the colic. When the gout affects the stomach, these seeds are very eff...
-Alare Externum - Albotat
Alare Externum (From alaris, winged, and externum, outward). See Pterygoides externus. Alaris Vena (From ala, the arm-pit). The inner of the three veins in the bend of the arm, because it comes imm...
-Albotim - Alkalina
Albotim Or Albotai. See Terebinthina. Albotis See Terminthus. Albuginea Vel Tendinosa Tunica. The inner proper coat of the testicle, named from its white and transparent colour. It is a strong, t...
-Alkalisatio - Alcohol
Alkalisatio Alcalisation. The impregnating any thing with alkaline salt. Alkalinus Sal Salis Marinae See Anatron Alcancali See Angelocalos. Alcanna (Indian word). See Ichthyocolla, Anchusa, and...
-Alcol - Alelaion
Alcol (Alcal, Arab.). See Acetum. Alcola (Alcala, filth, Heb.). Aphtha, which see. Paracelsus gives this appellation to the tartar or excrement of urine, whether it appears as sand, or mucilage. A...
-Alembaci - Alexiteria
Alembaci Burnt lead. Alembic See Argentum vivum. Aleophanginae Pilulae These are the pil. aromaticae of Messue. Joined with the hellebore they have been called pil. aleophang. capitales et stomac...
-Alfacta - Alia Squilla
Alfacta See Distillatio. Alfadidam The scoria of gold, iron, or copper; also burnt copper. See AEs ustum. Alfatida Burnt copper, or the scales flying off from copper. See AEs ustum. Alfatide Se...
-Alica - Alipasma
Alica (From alo, to nourish). A sort of food admired by the ancients; it is difficult to say whether it is a grain or preparation from some seed: many writers speak of it as a sort of wheat; but upon...
-Alipe - Alleluia
Alipe Remedies for wounds in the cheek to prevent inflammation. Galen. A 'Lipili, (from alarum pilos, evellentes.) Servants so called from their pulling off hairs from the arm-pits with tweezers, ...
-Alleger Ale Aigre - Almagra
Alleger Ale Aigre Vinegar made of ale. It is almost the only vinegar now employed in this country. Allence See Stannum. Alliar Aeris A term used in preparing the philosopher's stone, to signify p...
-Almanda Cathartica - Alphita
Almanda Cathartica Lin. Pi. Suppl. Murray's Syst. Vegetabilum,p. 209. A plant growing on the shores of Cayenne and Surinam, used by the inhabitants as a remedy for the colic; Supposed to be cathartic...
-Alphitidon - Aluminos
Alphitidon (From meal). It is when a bone was broken into small fragments like alphita, i. e. bran; also called caryedon; and catagma, when like a broken nut. Alphiton Greek. A hasty-pudding; in L...
-Alunsel - Amalgama
Alunsel A drop. See Gutta. Alus. - See Consolida. Alus Gallica. Alusar See Manna. Alvea Rium (From a/veare, a bee-hive). The bottom of the concha or hollow of the exter...
-Amalt - Ambalam
Amalt The abbreviation for amalthaeum. Amamelis (From and an apple). The amamelis of Hippocrates is supposed to be the same with the epimelis of Dioscorides, which is the small bastard medlar. Th...
-Ambar - Ambulo
Ambar See Ambra. Ambarum (Aeara, Arabic). Ambergrise. See Ambra cineracea. Ambarvallis Flos, (from the Latin word ambire). See Polygala. Am Be, (From a lip, edge, or border). ...
-Linimentum - Ammoniaci Emplastrum
Linimentum Oleosum - oily liniment. R. Olei oli-varum i. ss. aquae calcis iij. This is more particularly adapted to burns, especially where the skin is scorched, or destroyed, from its softening qua...
-Amo Amp Ammo Niae Aceta Tae Linimentum - Ampharisteros
Amo Amp Ammo Niae Aceta Tae Linimentum Ammonia. Ammonitrum (From sand, and tre). In our glass-houses called frit. See Fritta. Ammoni Lcolly Rium, (from sand). A collyrium which removes sand o...
-Amphemeri Nos Amphemerina - Amphimerina Hungarica
Amphemeri Nos Amphemerina It is the continued fever of Linnaeus and Vogel, (from . a Greek preposition, signifying a re-volution, and a day,) a quotidian intermittent. See Quotidiana febris. It i...
-Amphimetrion - Ampulla Scens
Amphimetrion (From about, and the womb). The parts about the womb. Amphiplex (From about, and toconnect). According to Rufus Ephesius it is the part situated betwixt the scrotum, anus, and inter...
-Amputatura - Ana
Amputatura (From amputo, to cut off). A wound from the entire separation of a part from the body. Amuctica (From to vellicate). Remedies that by vellicating and stimulating the bronchia; raise a c...
-Anabatica - Anacceliasmus
Anabatica (From the same,) applied to continual fever, when it increases in malignity. See Synochlus. Anabole (From to cast up). The discharging any thing by vomit. Anabrochismos (From sursum,...
-Ana - Analdes
Ana Colupa An Indian plant mentioned in the Hortus Malabaricus, whose genus is not determined. Its juice is said to be useful in epilepsies, and to cure the bite of the naja. Anacollema (From to a...
-Analentia - Anaphonesis
Analentia A species of epilepsy mentioned by Paracelsus. A corruption of the word analepsia. Analepsia Johannes Anglicus and Riverius give this name to the species of epilepsy which proceeds from a...
-Anaphora - Anarisitesis
Anaphora (From to bring up, or up. wards). Hippocrates uses it for thanks due to an obligation. Any discharge from the mouth. Anaphoricoi (From the same). Those who spit blood; or, according to A...
-Anarrh - Anatica Proportio
Anarrh Lnum, (from and' a nose). See Antirrhinum. Anarrhcea (From upward, and to flow) A flux of humours from below upwards. Anarthroi (From , neg. and a joint,) fatness so considerable...
-Anaton - Anchusa Alcanna
Anaton See Anatron. Anatresis (From and to perforate). Galen uses this word to express trepanning. Anatripsis (From and I wear). Fric. tion: sometimes called tripsis. Anatris See Argentum ...
-Anchyle - Ancylotomus
Anchyle See Anchylosis. A contraction of a joint; or the back part of the knee. Anchylomerisma In Sagar's Nosology it signifies a concretion or growing together of the soft parts. Anchynopes See ...
-Ancyrotdes - Androsace
Ancyrotdes A process of the scapula, so called from uncus, a beak or hook, and form. See Coracoides processus. Anda Probably the same with Andira, q. v. Andena Steel which melts in the fire, a...
-Androsaces - Anemonoides
Androsaces Summer navel-wort. A plant on the sea coasts of Syria. It is called an-drosace, (from man, and a cure.) Two drams of this herb, or of its seed, taken in wine, powerfully promote urine. ...
-Anencephalos - Anguis
Anencephalos (From a,neg. and the drain). Born without brains; metaphorically foolish. Aneos (From a, non, and clamo, to bawl out). Loss of voice and reason. Anepithymia (From a, non, and des...
-Anguium Senectae - Anima Mundi
Anguium Senectae The exuviae, or skins of serpents that are cast in spring; the slough or cast skin of a snake is as good. A decoction of it boiled in wine is said to cure deafness, pain in the ears,...
-Animalis Facultas - Anochei Lon
Animalis Facultas See Facultas and Actio. Animalis motus. Animal motion. This is the same with muscular motion, and is divided into two species sufficiently known, voluntary and involuntary. See Mu...
-Anocoelia - Anonis
Anocoelia See-Celia. Anochus (From to retain). A stoppage of the intestinal discharge. Anodmox (From , neg. and a smell). Without smell. It stands opposed to fetid. Anodus A word used...
-Anonymos - Antalium
Anonymos (From ., neg. and a name). Nameless. It was formerly a name of the cricoid cartilage; and many exotic trees and shrubs are ranked now under this name. Anonymos Americana. A sort of...
-Antalkalina - Antendeixis
Antalkalina (From against, and alkali). Such medicines as resist or destroy acids. Alterants and Anorexia. Bile is the most common alkaline acrimony found in the stomach. Antaphrodis Lacos, Antap...
-Anteneasmus - Anthophyllus
Anteneasmus (From against, and implacable,) Anteneasinum. The same with enthusiasmus. A particular kind of madness: in it the patient is furiously irritated, and endeavours to lay violent hands ...
-Anthos - Anthypnotica
Anthos (from upwards, and to run, because in its growth it runs upwards,) a flower. Hippocrates means by this word, flowers in general; and if Galen is right in his comment, includes the seeds wit...
-Anthypochondriaca - Anticipans
Anthypochondriaca (From against,and the hypochondria). Medicines against the disorders of the hypochondria. Anthypochondriacum Anthyst E'-Ricum, Sal. It is the residuum remaining after the distill...
-Anticnemion - Anti Icteric
Anticnemion (From over-against, and the calf of the leg). Hippocrates uses this word to express that part of the tibia which is bare of flesh. Anticolica (From against, and the colic). Remedies...
-Antilepsis - Antipatheia
Antilepsis (From to lay hold of). Hippocrates applies this term to,the method of securing bandages from slipping. Apprehensio and apprehenso-rium are used in the same sense. Antilobium (From aga...
-Antiperistasis - Antipraxia
Antiperistasis (From and to surround). A compressing on all side's as the air Presses. Antipharmicum (From against, and poison). An antidote, or Preservative against poison. See Alexipharmica. ...
-Antipyreticon Antipyreton - Antitypus
Antipyreticon Antipyreton (From against and a fever). A remedy against a fever; called also antipyreuticon. Antiquartanarium Or Antiqua'r-tium, (from against, and quartanum, a quartan fever). A ...
-Antivenerea - Antylion
Antivenerea (From , against, and venereus, venereal ). Medicines against the lues venerea. Antivenerealis Aqua preservativa. It is a solution of caustic alkali, or corrosive sublimate, in water, t...
-Anucar - Aparine
Anucar See Borax. An Us artificial. This artificial aperture is generally at the ring of the abdominal muscles, in consequence of a hernia. It has occasioned many discussions in the works of the la...
-Aparthrosis - Ape Rtus
Aparthrosis (From ab,and a joint). Sec Articui.atio. Apathes (From , neg. and an affection, or passion). Those who seem to be void of human passions, instanced in Diogenes the Cynic, and T...
-Apes - Aphrodes
Apes (Perhaps from apio, necto, to join together; because, connected together by the feet, they hang down from the entrance of the hive). Bees; called by the ancients Bugones, q. v. If they are drie...
-Aphrodisia Aphrodisiasmus - Aplytos
Aphrodisia Aphrodisiasmus (From Venus). Venereal commerce. Some express by this word the age of puberty, or the venereal age. Aphrodisiasticon Clidion (From froth). A troche; so called by Galen...
-Apncea - Apoclasma
Apncea (From , non. and spiro). A defect of respiration, such as happens in a cold, etc. Apobamma (From leniter intingo). See Embamma. Apobrasma (From per aestum exspuo; and ferve...
-Apocleisis - Apceum
Apocleisis An exclusion, (from aversari). But Hippocrates uses the word, from whence it is derived, to express a loathing of food. Apocope (of from, and to cut). See Abscissio. Apocrisis (Fro...
-Apogalactismus - Apophlegmatica Apophlegmati
Apogalactismus (From and to abound with milk ). See Ablactatio. Apogeusia Apogeusis (From and to taste.) See Agheustia. Apolepsis (From to be suppressed, retained, &c); also dialepsis inter...
-Apophrades - Aposceparnfsmus
Apophrades (From the singular unfortunate). Those days in which an acute distemper comes to a fatal crisis, or on which there is no crisis at all, when expected. Apophtharma (From and to corrupt...
-Aposchasis Aposchasmus - Apostematai
Aposchasis Aposchasmus (From and to scarify). See Scarificatio. Apositia Apositoi (of from, and food). A loathing of food. Those who are averse to food. See Anorexia. Apospasma (From I tear...
-Apostolorum - Apozymos
Apostolorum (From an apostle,) Ung. The apostles' ointment; because it is made with twelve ingredients, exclusive of the oil and vinegar; called also dodecapharmacum. Tereb. Venet. resinae flav...
-Apparatus - Apronia
Apparatus (From appareo, to appear, or be ready at hand). In surgery it is the collection and regular disposition o'f all the instruments necessary for the exercise of the art,orof any particular ope...
-Approximatio - Aquaeducus
Approximatio (From approximo, to approach ). A superstitious method of cure, by transplanting a disease into an animal or vegetable by immediate contact. In surgery it is applied to a fractured bone ...
-Aquala - Arac
Aquala See Arsenicum, and Sulphur. Aqualiculus Aqualicus (From aqualis, a water pot). That part of the belly from the navel to the pubes, being considered as a cistern and container of the excremen...
-Aracalan - Arbustiva
Aracalan See Amuleta. Araca Miri (Indian). A shrub growing in Brasil. It bears fruit in March and September, which tastes like a mixture of musk and strawberries; and when candied or made into a ma...
-Arbutus Papyracea - Architholus
Arbutus Papyracea Called also papyracea, fragaroides, ferentis, fragaria. The strawberry tree. The fruit of this tree, called unedo, comarus, and meemacylon, is slightly cooling and relaxing, aperien...
-Archos - Areola
Archos The anus. Also the intestinum rectum. Archoptoma (From anus, and to fall down). A bearing down of the rectum. Vogel. Arcion Arcium See Bardana. Arcos See AEs ustum. Arctata Pars So Sc...
-Aresta Bovis - Aricymon
Aresta Bovis See Anonis. Aretae Noides. See Arytaenoides. Areus The title of a pessary mentioned by P. AEgineta. Arfar See Arsenicum album. Argal See Tartarum. Argasyllis (From a serpent, ...
-Arida Medicamexta - Armoracia
Arida Medicamexta (From areo,to dry up). Dry medicines, such as powders.' Ariditascorporis (From aridus,dry). See Marasmus. Aridullam A substance used in the East Indies as a remedy in intermitte...
-Arnabo - Arrhostia
Arnabo See Zedoaria. Arnaldia (From a lamb, and for pain). It is so called because lambs are subject to it. A malignant slow disease of the chronical kind, attended with an alopecia; it was form...
-Arsaltos - Arthrodia
Arsaltos See Bitumen. Arsatum See Furor uterinus. Arsenias Arseniate Arsenical salt, formed by the union of the arsenical acid with certain Artaba An Egyptian measure containing about five of o...
-Arthrodynia - Artificialis Sal
Arthrodynia (From a joint, and pain). See Rheumatismus. Arthron (From to Jit together). A joint. See Articulus. Arthrosis (From articulo). See Articulatio. Artia According to some it is ...
-Artiypochros Color - Arytae
Artiypochros Color (From , and pale). A palish yellow colour which attends a disorder of the spleen, or chlorosis. Artizoa (From and life). Shortlived. Artocarpus The bread-fruit tree. A. in...
-Arytenoide E Cartilagines - Asarites
Arytenoide E Cartilagines See Aspera Arteria. Aryt AENoides, vel Aretaenoides, (from a funnel, and shape. Hence from the shape it takes the name. The arytaenoid, or ewer-like cartilage; called al...
-Asasi - Asepta
Asasi A tree which grows on the coast of Guinea, the infusion of whose leaves cures the tooth-ach. Phil. Transactions, N 232. Asbestinum Asbestos Or Asbestus. When the term is applied to the a...
-Ash - Asphaltitis
Ash See Fraxinus. Ash, mountain. See Sorbus. Ash, poisonous. See Rhus. Ash, bitter. See Quassia. Asiaticum Bals. The balm of Gilead. See Bai.samum. Asigi See AErugo AEris. . Asimion. An ingred...
-Asphaltos Asphaltum - Assimilo
Asphaltos Asphaltum (From a lake in Judea where it is produced) See Bitumen.asphodelus, (from ashes, from the ashes of the dead, because the herb was formerly sown upon the graves of the dead). Th...
-Assis Asserac - Asthenta
Assis Asserac The Aegyptian name for bang, which see, and also cannabis. Assistentes (From ad,and sisto, to stand near). A name for the prostate glands, because they lie near the bladder. See Paras...
-Astra Ntia - Athanasia
Astra Ntia Vulg. et niger, (from a star, so called from the star-like shape of its flowers). See Imperatoria. Astrape (From corusco). Lightning. Galen reckons it among the remote causes of an ep...
-Athanor Athonor - Atlas
Athanor Athonor (From an Arabic word, athan). Among the chemists it is a sort of digesting furnace, contrived to maintain its heat a long time, communicating with its chimney by a lateral canal, as t...
-Atmosphaera - Atreti
Atmosphaera (From vapour, and a circle). The atmosphere. See Aer. Atochia (From , priv. and pario). Preternatural labour. Atocium (From the same, so called because some-of the flowers be...
-Atrices - Attonitus Morbus Et Stupor
Atrices (From , non, and hair). Small tubercles near the anus, about which hairs will not grow; and which recede and return, especially at the first. Valesius de Taranta reckoned them among c...
-Attractio - Aura
Attractio (From attraho, to attract). See Repulsio and Affinitas. Attractivum (From the same). Attractive. Paracelsus pretends to have had an attractive medicine which would draw away the diseases ...
-Auratus Germanorum - Authemeron
Auratus Germanorum (From aurum, gold). It is an oleo-saccharum with the oil of cinnamon, called Aurum horizonta.'le. Aurea Alexandria An antidote invented by Alexander. Aureliana Canadensis Iroqua...
-Autophosphorus - Aversio
Autophosphorus From itself, and phosphorus: real phosphorus). See Phosphorus. Autopsia Autopsy (From himself, and to see). Occular Evidence. Autopyros From itself, and wheat). See Bread. ...
-Aves Cypriae - Azar
Aves Cypriae See Candela fumalis. Avicennia Tomentosa See Anacardium. Avigato Pear Laurus persea Lin. Sp. Pi. 529. A nutritious tropical fruit, supposed to be antidysente-ric. The sailors eat the...
-Azed - Baccar Baccharis
Azed An inferior kind of camphor among the Arabians. The finest was called alcansuri; the second abriagi. The first was the natural exudation from the tree; the second was a very pure kind carefully ...
-Bacchia - Balanda
Bacchia (From bacchus, mine, because it generally proceeds from hard drinking and intemperance). See Gutta rosacea. Bacchica (From Bacchus, because he was generally crowned with it). See Hedera ter...
-Balaninum - Balsamella
Balaninum Ol.(from an acorn). Oil of the Ben nut. Balanocastanum (From a nut,and a chesnut). See Bulbocastanum. Balanos (From to cast, because it sheds its fruit upon the ground; or from the ...
-Balsamioleum - Barbadoes Tar
Balsamioleum See Balsamum. Balsamifera And Arbor Indica, (from and fero, to bear). See Peruvianum balsamum. Balsamifera arbor Brasiliensis. See Capivi balsamum. Balsamina The balsam apple, (f...
-Barbarea - Baryphonia
Barbarea Herba sanctae Barbara, nasturtium hybernum,pseudobunias, eruca lutea latifolia, sisymbrium, carperitaria, winter cresses, garden rocket, rocket gentle, erysimum barbarea Lin. Sp. Pi. 922. Th...
-Barypicron - Basio
Barypicron (From dull, and bitter). See Absinthium vulgare. Basaal (Indian). The name of an Indian tree growing about Cochin. It flowers and bears fruit once every year, from the first year of its...
-Basis - Baxana
Basis (From i am fixed). The support of any thing upon which it stands. The broad part of the heart is called its basis, to distinguish it from the apex or point. In pharmacy by basis is meant tha...
-Bazcher - Behen Album Vulg
Bazcher A Persian word for antidote. See Bezoar. Bdella ( to suck,) Bdellerum. Horse leech. See also Varix. Bean Ignatius See Faba Sti. Ignatii. Bean Malacca. See Anacardium Orientale. Bear's...
-Beidelsar And Beidellopar - Belly
Beidelsar And Beidellopar A species of Asclepias, perhaps the a. gigantea Lin. Sp. Pi. 312, used in Africa as a remedy for fever and the bites of serpents. The caustic juice which issues from the roo...
-Beloere - Berula
Beloere (Indian). An Indian evergreen plant. The seeds purge moderately, but the leaves roughly. Raii Hist. Beloides Belonopdes (From a dart, and forma J. See Belemnoides. Belt A bandage applied...
-Berytion - Bezoardicum Joviale
Berytion From Berytus, its inventor. The name of a collyrium described by Galen as good against an ophthalmia; and of a pastil against the dysentery. Bes See Cyathus. Besacher See Fungus and Spon...
-Bezoardicus Pulvis - Bignonia Catalpa
Bezoardicus Pulvis See Bezoar orientals. Bezoarticum Bezoartic; such was the opinion of the ancients respecting the virtues of bezoar, that physicians held it as a medicine highly efficacious in a ...
-Biladen - Biothanati
Biladen SeeFerrum.' Biliaria Arteria (From bills, appertaining to bile). The biliary artery. When the hepatic artery hath advanced as far as the vesicula fellis it gives out the biliaria, which acc...
-Bipinella - Biventer
Bipinella And Bipemulla. See Plantago Minor And Pimpinella. Bipula A worm mentioned by Aristotle. Bira See Alla. Birao See Amomum. Bird's Nest The nest of the hirundo esculenta. See Aliment...
-Bixa Oviedi - Blepharotis
Bixa Oviedi See Achiotl. Bixa orellana. See Orleana. Blacciae See Morbilli. Black Vomit The discharge from the stomach in the last stage of the yellow fever. See Bile. Bladder See Vesica urina...
-Blepharoxysis - Bojobi
Blepharoxysis (From and to scrape off). See Ophthalmoxystrum. Blepharo Xyston The rasp-like probe. So Paulus AEgineta, in lib iii. cap. xxii. calls the specillum asperatum, from an eye lid, and ...
-Bolbidion - Bononiensis Lapis
Bolbidion A small fish, mentioned by Hippobolbiton. Bolynthon. Cow's dung. Bolchon See Bdellium. Bolesis See Corallium. Boleson See Balsamum. Bolismus See Boulimos. Bolster A soft pillow, t...
-Light Carrier - Bos
Light Carrier And Bononian Phosphorus. It is a small, grey, soft, glossy, fibrous, sulphureous stone, about the size of a walnut. When broken, a kind of crystal, or starry talc, is found in it. This...
-Bosa - Bovillae
Bosa An Egyptian word for a mass which is made of the meal of darnel, hemp seed, and water. It is inebriating. Boscas (From to feed). A sort of dry pitch, which is tenacious like bird lime. Also t...
-Bovista - Brachium
Bovista See Lycoperdon. Boxus See Viscus. Brabyla (Quasi i. e. because they are laxative, and clear the intestines of their contents). The plums which are called Hungarian. They are large, ...
-Brachuna - Brasiliana Arbor Aqua Tica
Brachuna See Satyriasis, and Furor ute-rinus. Brachychronius (From short, and time). An epithet of a disease which continues but a short time. Brachypnoea (From short, and to breathe). Breath ...
-Brasilis Lign Brasiletto - Briza
Brasilis Lign Brasiletto Logwood, also red wood. See Campechen, Lignum. Brasilium Lignum Brasil wood; called also pseudosantalum rubrum, Hirapitanga Brasnliensi-bus, ibirapitanga; Abelicea, crista ...
-Brochos - Brunella
Brochos Castellus thinks it must mean some chirurgical instrument, inasmuch as it is necessary to some operations, on the authority of Galen and Oribasius. It is considered also as expressive of some...
-Brunnieri Glandulae - Buccacraton
Brunnieri Glandulae Brunnier's glands. So called in honour of their discoverer. They are lodged under the villous coat of the intestines, closely adjoining to the nervous; and are smaller than in the...
-Buccales Glandulae - Bugula
Buccales Glandulae (From bucca, the cheek). The small glandular bodies on the inside of the cheeks. They open by small holes or orifices through the inner membrane of the mouth. Winslow. Buccea Bucc...
-Bulat Wela - Bullion
Bulat Wela See Betla. Bulbocastanum (From a bulb, and a chestnut,) agriocastanum, nucula terrestris, balanocastaneum, bulbocastunum majus et minus, earth nut, hawk nut, kipper nut, and pig Nut. ...
-Bullo - Buris
Bullo Sa Febris, (from bulla, a bubble). An epithet applied to the bullous or vesicular fever, from the appearance of the eruptions attending it. See Pemphigus. Bumelia (From a particle of increas...
-Burning - Buy
Burning Or Brenning, a disease mentioned by old historians, from which authors have unsuccessfully endeavoured to demonstrate the antiquity of Syphilis, q. v. Burrhi Spiritus Matricalis Burrhus's s...
-Byaris - Caa
Byaris See Cete admirabile. Byne (From to fill, because in wetting it swells much). See Brasium. Byng A Chinese name of green tea. See Thea. Byrethrum Byrethrus This word occurs in Forestus, l...
-Caa Ataya Brasiliensis - Cabala Cabula Kabala
Caa Ataya Brasiliensis (Indian.) It is a plant which grows in Brasil, of no smell, but bitter to the taste. A decoction of it operates powerfully, both upward and downward. It resembles the euphrasia...
-Cabalator - Cachos
Cabalator See Nitrum. Qq Caballica Ars From to throw down). A term in gymnastics, importing among wrest-lers the art of foiling, or throwing an antagonist down. Caballine (From caballus,ahorse...
-Cachou - Cocopragia
Cachou See Terra Japonica. Cachrys Libanotis Galen says it sometimes means parched barley; called also canchry, or canchrys. Cachunde A compound cordial medicine, much esteemed by the Chinese and...
-Cacorrythmus - Cajahaba
Cacorrythmus (From ill, and order). An epithet of a disorderly pulse. Cacos Evil, bad. Also the name of an Indian herb of a red colour: it is diuretic, and useful against calculous disorders. Ca...
-Cajou Cajum - Calcinatum
Cajou Cajum See Acajaiba. Calaba Indianmastich thee; catophyllum inophyllum Lin. Sp. Pi. 732. It hath rosaceous flowers, which are followed by a fleshy fruit that includes a nut. This tree is a na...
-Calcinonia - Calliblepharon
Calcinonia See Calcena. Calcis Vitriolatae Cataplasma Cataplasm of plaster of Paris. Mix plaster of Paris with water to a proper consistence, and, whilst soft, apply it to the ulcer, where it will ...
-Callicreas - Caltrops
Callicreas (rom good, and meat). See Pancreas. Calligonum (From beautiful, and a joint, or knot; so named from its being handsomely jointed). See Polygonum. Calliomarcus See Tussilago. Call...
-Calva Calvaria - Cambui
Calva Calvaria (From calvus, bald; so called because it is often bald). See Cranium. Calvata See Phalacra. Calvities Calvitium (From calvus, bald ). See Alopecia. Calx Antimonii See Antimonium....
-Camelina - Camphoricum Acidum
Camelina (From a camel; because they are fond of it). See Erysimum. Cameratio See Camaroma. Cames Or Camet. See Argentum. Caminga See Canella alba. Caminus A furnace and its chimney. In Ru-l...
-Campsin - Canicularis
Campsin The Egyptian name for the south wind. See AEtesiae. Campulum (From to twist about). A distortion of the eye lids, or other parts. Canabil See Eretria. Canabina Aquatica See Bidens. Ca...
-Canina Appetentia - Cantabrica
Canina Appetentia (From canis, a dog, and appetens, hungering). Fames. See Boulimus. Canina brassica. See Mercurialis sylvestris. Cani' na lingua. See Cynoglossum. Canina malus. See Mandragora. C...
-Cantabrum - Capiplenium
Cantabrum (From the Hebrew word kanta). See Furfur. Cantacon Garden saffron. Cantara See Nux vomica serapionis. Canthari Figulini Cucurbits made of potter's ware. See Cucurbita. Cantianus Pulv...
-Capistratio - Capolin Mexicano Rum Hernandez
Capistratio (From capiistrum, a bridle). See Phimosis. Capistrum The name of some chirurgical bandages about the head, resembling a bridle, or rather a horse's head stall. Sec also Trismus. Capist...
-Capotes - Capsula
Capotes See Covalam. Capra Alpina The chamois, called also rupicapra and dorcas, the rock goat. It is met with on the Alps belonging to Switzerland, and in Germany. It is a species of wild goat, in...
-Capsulares Arteriae - Carameno
Capsulares Arteriae (From capsule). The arteries of the renal glands are thus called, because they are inclosed by a capsule; and arise from the aorta, above the arteria renalis, and give out the art...
-Carantia - Cardameleum
Carantia See Siliqua dulcis. Cara Schulli (Indian.) Frutex Indicus spi-nosus. An Indian shrub like the caper bush. A decoction of the root provokes urine. Raii Hist. Caravata See Cacao. Carbasus...
-Cardamindum Minus - Carina
Cardamindum Minus (From and Indian cresses). See Nasturtium Indicum. Cardegi Indi See Folium. Cardia (From cor ). By this term the ancients meant the heart; but we call the upper orifice of th...
-Cariosse - Carcenum
Cariosse See Ady. Carium Terra Lime. See Calx. Carivillandi See Sarsaparilla. Carlina Or Carolina, (from Carolus, Charles the Great; because it was believed that it was shown to him by an angel...
-Caroli - Carunculosa Ischuria
Caroli See Chancre. Carolina See Carlina. Caropi See Amomum verum. Carora Also cynnia and cymia. The name of a vessel that resembles an urinal. Carota See Daucus. Carpasus (so named becaus...
-Carva - Cassatum
Carva See Cassia lignea. Carya A walnut, (from the head, because it is round like the head). See Juglans. Ca Ryce, or Carycia. Galen says it is a costly food prepared by the Lydians. Varinus supp...
-Cassave Cassavi - Gatachysis
Cassave Cassavi See Cassada. Casse Eau de, or eau de casse-lunette. It is water distilled from the flowers of the cyanus. Cassida (From its resemblance to cassis, a hood; or helmet); Lysimachia g...
-Cataclasis - Catantlesis
Cataclasis (From to break or distort). Galen explains it to be a distortion of the eyelids. Vogel defines it to be a spasmodic occlusion of the eye. Catacleis Subclavicle. According to Galen it is...
-Catapasmus - Catarrhopa Phymata
Catapasmus A term used by Coel. Aurelianus, probably by mistake, for some other word. It implies, according to him, a rubbing of the posterior part of the shoulders and neck downwards. Catapeltes (...
-Catarrhopos Nosos - Cathaeretica
Catarrhopos Nosos (From to tend backwards, and morbus). A remission of the disease, or its decline, opposed to paroxysm. Catartismus (From to make perfect). According to Galen, it is a translat...
-Catharma - Catocathartica
Catharma (From to purge). The excrements purged off from any part of the body. Catharmos (From the same). Purgation by medicines, and the cure of a disorder by superstitious remedies. Catharsis ...
-Catoche - Caudex
Catoche And Catochus, (from to detain). See Catalepsis, Caros, and Tetanus. Catochites (From to retain). A stone found in Corsica, which Pliny says attracts and retains the hand when laid upon it...
-Cauledon - Cecryphalos
Cauledon (because it breaks like a stalk). A species of fracture, when the bone is broken transversely so as not to cohere. Caulias (From a stalk). An epithet for that juice of the asafoetida pla...
-Cedma - Cellulae Mastoideae
Cedma (From to disperse). See Pudendagra. Cedra Essentia de. See Bergamotte. Cedrelaeum (From the cedar tree, and oleum). Oil of cedar. See Cedria. Cedrelate According to Bellonius, this wo...
-Celotomia - Centrion
Celotomia (From hernia, and cut). See Castratio and Hernia. Celsa It means the beating of the life, or of the life's blood; and is a barbarous term of Paracelsus. Celtis A celsitate,from its he...
-Centrum - Cephalopo Nia
Centrum In chemistry, is the principal residence, foundation, or source of any thing; in medicine, that part in which its virtue resides; in anatomy the middle point of some parts. Centrum nerveum. ...
-Cephalos - Ceratomalagma
Cephalos (From the head; so called from the size of the head). See Mugilis. Cephalotos (From the same). See Capitatae Plantae . Ceramium A Greek measure of nine gallons. Ceranites, (from to tem...
-Ceratum Lithargyri Acetati - Ceropissus
Ceratum Lithargyri Acetati See Lythargyrum. Ceratum saponis. See Sapo. Ceratum cantharides, et hydrargyri. Cerate of Spanish fly. See Cantharides, and argentum vivum. Cerauno Chrysos, (from thun...
-Cerotum - Chalasis
Cerotum (From wax). See Ceratum. Ce Rro, (from cornu, because its wood is hard like horn). See Phellodrys. Cerussa So called because it was a pigment made by dissolving lead in vinegar, and for...
-Chalastica Medicamenta - Chamaecissus
Chalastica Medicamenta (From the same). Relaxing medicines. Chalbane See Galbanum. Chalcantiium (From brass, and a flower ). Flowers of brass. See Vitriolum. Chalcedonius The name of a medici...
-Chamaecistus - Chamaemorus
Chamaecistus (From and cystus). Panax chironium, consolidaaurea; cistus helianthemum Lin. Sp. Pi. 744. Little or dwarf cistus, or sun flower. It is vulnerary, and is supposed to make a good gargle...
-Chamaepeuce - Charonius
Chamaepeuce (From , and the pine tree). See Camphorata. Chamaepituinum Vinum It is wine in which the bruised green leaves of the chamaepitys have been infused. Chamaeplion A name in Oribasius fo...
-Charta Virginea - Che
Charta Virginea So called from its likeness to a piece of fine paper. See Amnion-. Chartreux Poudre de, invented by some friar of the Carthusian order. See Antimonium. Chasme (from to gape.) See...
-Cheirurgus - Chenopodium Chenopus
Cheirurgus (From manus, and opus.) See Cheiriater. Chela (From to take.) A forked probe mentioned by Hippocrates for extracting a polypus from the nose. In Rufus Ephesius it is the extremities ...
-Cheopi - Chiastre
Cheopi Na,(from to pour, and to drink). See Chopino. Cheras (From to pour out). It is so called during its discharge. See Scrofula. Cherefolium See Chaerophyllum. Chernibion (From the hand...
-Chibou - Chirotheca And Podotheca
Chibou A spurious species of gum elemi, little known in this country, though common in France. Chibur See Sulphur. Chichiaxocotl See Macaxocotlifera. Chicos Or Chicres. See Bovina affectio. Ch...
-Chirurgorum Sapientia - Cholagoga
Chirurgorum Sapientia See Sophia. Chirurgus See Cheiriater. Chist See Sextarius. Chiton (Greek.) See Membrana. Chium Vinum Chian wine. A wine of the island now called Scio. Dioscorides says i...
-Cholas - Chondrilla
Cholas See Ilium. Chole (From bile). See Bilis. Choledochus (From bile, and to receive). It is a common name for the gall bladder, the biliary ducts, and the common gall duct, which communicate...
-Chondroglossus - Chrupsia
Chondroglossus (From a cartilage, and a tongue). A muscle inserted into the basis, or cartilaginous part of the tongue. See Hyoglossus. Chondros (From to pour out, and water; from the manner, ...
-Chrypsorches - Chrysolachanon
Chrypsorches See Parorchidium. Chrysanthemum (From aurum, and a flower). Called also bellis lutea foliis pro-funde incisis major; chrysanthemum segetum Lin. Sp. Pi. 1254; corn marigold. It is an ...
-Chrysomelia - Chytlon
Chrysomelia (From and an apple). See Aurantia Hyspanica. Chrysopus (From and face or aft-, pearance). See Gambogia. Chu Or Chus. The name of a measure. The same as choa, congius. This was a liq...
-Cibarius - Cicindela
Cibarius Sal. See Marinum sal. Cibatio (From cibus,food). By this is meant the assumption of aliment; synonymous also with the application of the nutritious juices. Ciborium Cibotium (From a bag...
-Cicini - Cingularia
Cicini Ol. (from the ricinus). See Ricini ol. under Cataputia. Cicis In some places of Hippocrates and Theophrastus it is put for A gall. Sec Gallae Cicla See Beta alba. Cicongius Blanca...
-Cingulum - Circulatorium
Cingulum (From cingo, to bind). A girdle or belt. Dr. Cheyne, in his Essay on Regimen of Diet, says, Cincture, with a broad quilted belt about the loins, to keep the bowels in their natural situatio...
-Circulatum - Circumstantiae
Circulatum According to Boerhaave, the circilatum of Paracelsus was a liquor prepared from sea salt. Paracelsus obtained from this salt a perpetual oil, which he called circulatum minus, circulatus s...
-Circus Quadruplex - Citras And Citrats
Circus Quadruplex From the Chaldee term carka, to surround,) also circulus. The four fold circle. It is a kind of bandage; called also plin-thius laqueus. See Galen de Fasciis. Cirrhus Rather Cirru...
-Citrinatio - Clarificatio
Citrinatio Complete digestion. Citrinula (A dim. of citrus, a citron; so named because its smell somewhat resembles that fruit). Spearwort. See Ranunculus longifolius, etc. Citron And Citrus. See...
-Clasis Clasma - Clematis
Clasis Clasma (From to break). See FrActura. Clasper See Cirrhus. Claudiacon The name of a collyrium in P. AEgineta. Claudicatio (From claudico, to halt). Staggering, halting, or limping, as ...
-Clematitis - Clinopodium
Clematitis Peruviana. See Bexugo. Cleonis Collyrium The name of a col-lyrium described by Celsus. Cleonis gluten. It is mentioned by Oribasius, lib. iv. and recommended for restraining fluxes: it ...
-Clitoridis Flos Terxatexsibus - Clyma
Clitoridis Flos Terxatexsibus A beautiful flower growing in the island of Ternate. The inhabitants boil and eat it; but no medical virtues are attributed to it. Clitoridis musculus. Innes calls it e...
-Clymenum - Cnidosis
Clymenum Italorum, (from Clymenes, who first used it). See Androsaemum. Clypealis Cartilago (From its resemblance to a shield, clypeus). See Aspera arteria. Clypeus A shield. It is supposed to be...
-Cnipotes - Cocca Baptica
Cnipotes (From the same). Itching. It sometimes signifies a dry ophthalmy. Cnismos See Cnesis. Cnissoregmia (From a nidorous smell, and an eructation). A nidorous eructation. Cnyma (From to s...
-Coccarium - Cochliaxon
Coccarium (From a berry). The name of a very small pill mentioned by Oribasius in his Sy-nop. lib. iii. Cocceira Indica See Pal.ma coccifera. Cocci Orientales See Cocculus Indicus. Cocciae Mino...
-Cochlita - Coelo
Cochlita (From a snail's shell). It is also called cochlea fossilis or lapidea, and is a stone of the shape and figure of a certain shell snail; said to be lithontriptic. Cochone (From to turn ro...
-Coelosto Mia - Cohobatio Cohobium Cohoph
Coelosto Mia (From hollow, and the mouth). A defect in speaking, when a person's speech is obscured by sounding, as if his voice proceeded from a cavern. Coementatio Coementum (From caedo,to bea...
-Cohol - Coliphium
Cohol (From cohol, antimony ). See Alcohol. Castellus says, that it is used in Avicenna to express collyria for the eyes, in fine powder. Coilima (From the bowels). A sudden swelling of the belly...
-Collatenna - Colocynthidis Compositum
Collatenna A certain specific for the cure vol. 1. of wounds. It is mentioned by Paracelsus in his work De Vita Longa. Collaterales (From con, and laterales, on the same side). See Erectores penis...
-Colophonia - Columella
Colophonia ( a city of Ionia, from whence it was first brought). Colophony, or black resin; called also berrionis resina fricta torta, vel nigra; dried or black resin. Phrycte is used alone in this s...
-Columellares Dentes - Coma
Columellares Dentes (From columella, on account of their shape). See Canini dentes. Col Et Colum Ecph. An abbreviation of Fabii Columnae minus cognitarum rariumque stirpium Ecphrasis, 1, 2. Romae, ...
-Comaroides Comarus - Commosis
Comaroides Comarus (From a lock of hair; so named from its strings, which are like hair). See Arbutus. Comata See Coma. The first order of Dr. Cullen's second class neuroses; defined a diminution...
-Communicantes Febres - Conchifolia
Communicantes Febres (From communi-co, to participate). According to Bellini, they are two fevers which infest a person at one and the same time, the paroxysm of one beginning as soon as the other ce...
-Conchis - Condyloi
Conchis (From a shell). Among the Romans it is an entire bean wrapped up in its perfect capsule. Conchylia Fossilia (From the same). Fos-sile shells. They are ridiculously supposed to be lithont...
-Condylus - Confusio
Condylus (From an ancient cup shaped like a joint). A condyle. It is a protuberance in any of the joints, formed by the epiphysis of a bone. In the fingers it is called the knuckles. See Processus. ...
-Congelati - Conia
Congelati Or Congelatici. ^Persons af-flicted with a catalepsis. See Catalepsis and conge-latus. Congelatio (From congelo, to freeze). Congelation, and coagulation. It is such a change produced by ...
-Coniferae Arbores - Constrictor Ani
Coniferae Arbores (From conus, a cone, and fero, to bear ). Trees which bear cones, as the cedar, fir, and pine. Conile See Myrrhis. Conis (From dust,) fine powder; ashes; a nit in the hair; scu...
-Constrictores Pharyngaei - Conus
Constrictores Pharyngaei See Pharynx. Constrictorii (From the same). Diseases attended with constriction. Constringentia (From the same). See Astringentia. Consumptio (From consumo, to waste aw...
-Convalescence - Copeia Cope
Convalescence (From convalesco, to grow well). This state implies a recovery from disease, when nature, with little assistance, is supposed capable of restoring health. In all acute diseases, conside...
-Cophos - Coraco
Cophos deaf,(from. to be deaf). A sort of toad mentioned by Nicander. It also signifies deaf, dumb, or both, or a dulness of any of the senses. Cophosis See Cophos and Dysecaea. Copovich Occassou...
-Coraco - Corda
Coraco Hyoidaeus,called also omo-hyoidaeus, omo-plato-hyoidaus, and costo-hyoidaeus. It rises from the superior part of the upper costa of the scapula, and is inserted into the basis of the os hyoide...
-Cordia Sebestina - Coronalis
Cordia Sebestina See Sebesten. Cordiala See Cardiaca. Cordolium (From cor, the heart, and dolor, pain). See Cardialgia. Core (Greek.) See Pupilla oculi. Coremata (From to cleanse). Brushes;...
-Coronaria Ligamenta - Corrosio
Coronaria Ligamenta (From corona, a crown). The coronary ligament of the radius is a sort of ligamentary hoop, surrounding the circular circumference of the head of that bone, reaching from one side ...
-Corrugator Coiterii - Corymbus
Corrugator Coiterii (From corrugo, to wrinkle). Volcherus Coiter first took notice of these muscles. The corrugator arises fleshy from the internal angular process of the os frontis, above the joinin...
-Coryphe - Cotti Vini
Coryphe The vertex or top of any thing. See Vertex. Coryza (From the head, and to boil; because it is attended with an inflammatory defluxion from the nose). Sec Gravedo and Catarrhus. Cosculi...
-Cotula - Couton
Cotula (See Cotyle and Cyathus). A twelve ounce measure; and sometimes the appellation of bugs. See Cimex. Cotula flore luteo radiato. Sec Buphthat.mum. Cotula foetida, (from cos, a whetstone). A k...
-Covalam - Crangon
Covalam Called also cucurbitifera trifolia, etc. beli, seu serifole Bengalensium, capotes, cydonia exotica. Crataeva marmelos Lin. Sp. Pi. 637. It is a tall tree, growing in Malabar, and in the isla...
-Cranium - Crataegonum
Cranium (Quasi from the head). Called also calva, and calvaria, cerebri galea. The skull. It is that part of the head which is covered with hair: besides the os frontis, it consists of the two pari...
-Cratevae Sium - Crepitus
Cratevae Sium See Nasturtium aquati-cum. Cratibula Craticula (From craticula, a gridiron). The iron bars or grate which cover the ash-hole in chemical furnaces. Craticularis (From the same). Brea...
-Crespinus - Crispatura
Crespinus (Quasi crispinus, from crispus, curled, crisped; so called from the crispness of its leaves and wood.) See Berberis. Crespulum (From. crispus, crisp; from the crispness and curledness of ...
-Crispinus - Crocide Confectio
Crispinus (From crispus,turned or curled). See Berberis. Crista (Quasi cerista, from a horn; or carista, from the head; as being on the top of the head). Any thing which has the appearance of a ...
-Crocinum - Cruciata
Crocinum (From crocus, saffron). Oil of saffron. It is mentioned by Dioscorides as consisting of olive oil, myrrh, and a small quantity of saffron. Crocodes An epithet for certain troches in P. AE...
-Cruciformis - Crusta
Cruciformis (From crux, a cross). Shaped like a cross; a botanical term, expressing the shape of flowers in a particular state. Cruditas (From crudus, raw). Crudity. It is applied to unripe fruits,...
-Crustula - Crythe
Crustula (From crusta, a shell). See Ecchy-mosis. Crustumina Pyra (From Crustuminum, a town, where they grow). Pears much admired by the Romans, and mentioned by Columella, v. 10. Rhodius thinks it...
-Cteis - Culina Rius Sal
Cteis See Pubis ossa. Ctenes A comb or rake. Its plural means the denies incisores. Ctesiphontis Malagma A plaster described by Celsus. Cubaris See Aselli. Cubebis See Fagara major. Cubiform...
-Culiltlawan - Cupella
Culiltlawan See Cort. culilawan. Culminiferae (From culmen, the top). The twenty-fifth order in Linnaeus's Fragments of a Natural Method. Culter (From colo, to cultivate). A knife or spear. The t...
-Cupellation - Cuscuta
Cupellation A chemical operation by means of a cupel. It is employed to separate the purer from the baser metals, by scorifying the latter. Cuperosa (From cuprum). Copperas. Cuphos Light. When ap...
-Cuspidatus - Cycliscus
Cuspidatus (From cuspis, a point or spear). Pointed. In botany the term regards the apex only, when the leaves have the apex sharp like a spear, or terminating in a bristly point. Some of the teeth a...
-Cyclopion - Cym
Cyclopion The white of the eve, (from to surround, and the eye). See Adnata. Cyclos A circle. See Buccae and Orbita. Cyclus Metasyncriticus It is a long protracted course of remedies, persisted...
-Cymbae - Cynodontes
Cymbae Os, (from cymba, a boat; so called from its supposed likeness to a skiff). See Scaphoides os. Cymbalaria, (from cymbalum, a cymbal; from the resemblance of its leaves to an ancient cymbal; als...
-Cynolopha - Cyrenaicus Sal
Cynolopha (From a dog, and a protuberance). The asperities of The Upper dorsal vertkbrae: in dogs they are particularly eminent. Cynolyssa (From a dog, and madness). See Lyssa and Hydrophobia. ...
-Cyrtoides Cyrtoma - Cystophlegica
Cyrtoides Cyrtoma Gibbositas. Any preternatural tumour or gibbosity, (from humpbacked). In Vogel's Nosology, it signifies a particular flatulent tumour of the belly. Cyrtonosus (From curved, and ...
-Cystocele - Dacneron
Cystocele (From and a tumour). A hernia formed by the protrusion of the urinary bladder. Cystocele vaginalis. See Colpocele. Cystoptosis (From and to fall). The inner membranes of the bladder p...
-Dacrydium - Daitdes
Dacrydium (From a tear). See Diagridium. Dacryodes (From a tear). In Hippocrates it is a sanious ulcer. Dacryoma (From to weep). A coalition of one or more of the puncta lacrymalia. Dacryopce...
-Daligthron - Dasymma
Daligthron A name of the thalictrum. See Sophia. Dama (From deima, fear; from its timidity). Fallow deer; cervus dama Lin. The venison of a deer killed, when cool, differs much from that of one hea...
-Datisca Cannabina - Decorticatio
Datisca Cannabina Lin. Sp. Pi. 1469, has been recommended as a substitute for the bark, in the same doses. Datura And Datyra. (Indian.) See Stramonium. Daucites VI Num. (from the wild carrot J. ...
-Decrepita Tio Vel Crepitatio - Delacrymatiya
Decrepita Tio Vel Crepitatio (From de-creflo, to crackle). The crackling noise which common salt makes when thrown on the fire, from the sudden separation of its water of crystallization. Decumbens ...
-Delapsio - Dendrolibanus
Delapsio (From dclabor, to slip down). See Prolapsus. Delatio (From delatus, shown). See Jndica-tio. Deleterious (From to injure). Pernicious, or extremely noxious: an epithet of poisons. Deliq...
-Dendromalache - Dentillaria
Dendromalache (From and the mallow). See Malta rosea. Denodatio (From denodo, to loosen). See Dissolutio. Densitas (From densus, thick). Density. Dense bodies contain a considerable quantity of...
-Dentiscalpium - Depurato Ria Febris
Dentiscalpium (From dens, a tooth, and scal-fio, to scrape). Also called odontoglyphon. An instrument for scraping off the crust which is formed on foul teeth. In Oribasius, it is an instrument for s...
-Deras And Derma - Desquamatorium
Deras And Derma (From a sheep skin). The title of a book in chemistry, treating of the art of transmuting base metals into gold. It is written on sheep skins; hence also Derma. Derbia See Impeti...
-Desudatio - Deuteria
Desudatio (From desudo, to sweat). See Ephi-drosis. It is also profuse sweat, succeeded by an eruption of pustules, called sudamina, hydroa, and boa: these are of the miliary kind. Desurrectio (Fro...
-Deuterion - Diacastorium
Deuterion (From the same). See Secundina. Devalgatus (From de, and valgus, bow leg ged ). See Blaeesus. Dexamene (From to receive). Any receptacle, but particularly the labrum or folium, that is...
-Diacatholicon - Diachysis
Diacatholicon (From and universal). See Catholicon. Diaceltatlsson A name given by Van Helmont to a purging preparation of antimony. It seems to mean, in Paracelsus, a vomit excited by quicksilver...
-Diachytica - Diadaphntdon
Diachytica (From the same). See Discutientia, and Dlssolventia. Diachytos (From the same). An epithet of wine prepared from grapes that have been dried seven days, and were pressed on the eighth. ...
-Diadelphia - Diahermodactylus
Diadelphia (From twice, and a brother). The name of the seventeenth class, in Lin-naeus's artificial system, comprehending those plants which bear hermaphrodite flowers, with two sets of united sta...
-Diahexapala - Diambrae Pillulae
Diahexapala Or Diahexapte. See Laurus Alexandrinus. Diaion (From and a violet). The name of a pastil in Myrepsus. Violets are its chief ingredient. Diaireos (From and a lily). An antidote in My...
-Diamelon - Diapencia
Diamelon (From and a quince). The name of a composition containing quinces. Diamnes And Diapne. An involuntary and insensible discharge of urine; a word used by Joannes Anglicus. Diamoron (From ...
-Diapepereon - Diapnoe
Diapepereon An antidote mentioned in Galen. Diaphaenicon (From and a date). The name of an electuary for discharging phlegm; as well as a medicine made of dates. Diaphiledonu The name of an an...
-Diaporema - Diascinci
Diaporema (From to be in doubt). Anxiety, heat, and restlessness, in distempers. See Alysmos. Diaprasium (From horehound). A composition in which horehound is one of the ingredients, Diaprunum...
-Diascordium - Dia Stole
Diascordium (From and scordium,) from containing scordium, formerly called elect, e scor-dio. Hieronymus Fracastorius first described it; and it was named Fracastorii confectio; though now rejected ...
-Diastomotr - Diaulos
Diastomotr S, (from to dilate). It is usually joined with a probe. See Speculum. Diastremma And Dia Strophe, (from :to distort, or turn aside). A distortion of the limbs. Diasulphuris Empla S...
-Diazoma - Didymus
Diazoma (From and to surround). See Dlaphragma. Diazoster A name of the twelfth vertebra of the back; called from the belt, which rests on it. Dicenteton See Diacenteton; the name of a colly...
-Didyna Mia - Diglosson
Didyna Mia (From twice, and power). Linnaeus's fourteenth class, comprehending those plants which have hermaphrodite flowers, with four stamens, in two pairs, of different lengths, the outer pair l...
-Dignotio - Diocres
Dignotio (From dignosco, to distinguish.) See Diagnosis. Digynia (From bis, and mulier.) The name of an order in Linnaeus's artificial system, comprehending those plants which have two pistils. D...
-Diodos - Diorthosis
Diodos (From and the way through). See Diexodos. Dioe Cia,(from bis, and domus). A vegetable which has no hermaphrodite flower; but in which the male flower is upon one plant, and the female fl...
-Dioscor - Dipsacon
Dioscor An abbreviation of Pedacii Dioscoridis Opera. Dioscuri (From the sons of Jupiter, Castor and Pollux: the parotid glans are so named from their equality in shape and position). See Paroti...
-Dipsacos - Discussio
Dipsacos (From thirst). See Diabetes. Dipas Dry earth, (from the same). Also the name of a serpent, whose bite causes thirst. See Cobra. Dipseticus (From to thirst). An epithet for food which c...
-Discussoria Discutientia - Dissolutus Morbus
Discussoria Discutientia (From discu-tio, to discuss, or shake to pieces). Discutients, by Dioscorides called also diachytica. They are such medicines as dissolve or dissipate a stagnating fluid with...
-Dista - Divulsio Urinae
Dista (From double). See Dyota. Diste Nsio (From distendo, to stretch out). Distention; dilatatio, pandiculatio, convulsio. Tension has, however, a different meaning, and we shall return to it und...
-Dochme - Dogma
Dochme A measure among the Greeks of four fingers' breadth. Docimastica See Cupella. Docimastice The docimastic art: the art of analysing fossils. Dock A common plant, of which different kinds ...
-Dogmaticus - Dorsales Nervi
Dogmaticus Dogmatist. A sect of ancient physicians, of which Hippocrates is supposed to have been the first. They supposed principles drew conclusions, and applied those principles and conclu4e sions...
-Dorste Nia - Draco Ntium
Dorste Nia (From Dr. Dorston). See Contrayerva. Dorsum The back. Most etymologists derive it from deorsum, because it bends downwards; antister-r.on, and metaphrenon; but this last appellation prop...
-Dracunculus Hortensis - Dubel Coleph
Dracunculus Hortensis (A dim. of draco). See Draco. Dracunculus See Draco, Dracontium. Dracunculus pratensis. See Ptarmica. Jdragacantha Dragantum See Gum Tragacanthae. Dragma And Dragmis, (fr...
-Dubelech - Dwarfs
Dubelech The cavity of an abscess, with manifest solution of continuity. Dubletus See Abscessus. Duccia A drop. It implies also that species of bathing which we call pumping, and the French la do...
-Dyamassien - Dyscritos
Dyamassien See AEris flos. Dynamis (From to be able).. It is the faculty or power from whence an action proceeds. Galen often uses this word for a composition of a medicine, particularly of an ap...
-Dysecoe - Dyspepsia
Dysecoe A, (from difficult, and to hear). Deafness, called also cophosis. Dr. Cullen places this genus of disease in the class locales, and order dysesthesia, which he defines, hearing diminished o...
-Dysphagia - Wort Dane
Dysphagia (From and to eat). Dr. Cullen ranks this under his class locales, and order dyscinesiae, and defines it, impeded deglutitition, unattended with inflammatory affection, or injured respirat...
-Ebur - Eccoprotica
Ebur Ivory, (from e and barrus, the elephant, because ivory comes from that animal,) see Spodium arabum. Ebur fossile. See Unicornu. Ecalcaratus (From e, with out, and calcar, a spur). In botany i...
-Eccrinologica - Eclectica Medicina
Eccrinologica (From to secrete, or separate). That part of medicine which relates to the doctrine of excretions. Ecdora (From and to excoriate). See Excoriatio. An excoriation of the urethra. P....
-Eclysis - Ecpiptica
Eclysis (From to dissolve). An universal faintness. Ecmagma (From to form together). See Crocomagma. Ecpepiesmenos (From to depress or press outward). An epithet for ulcers with protuberat-ing...
-Ecplexis - Ectexis
Ecplexis (From to terrify or astonish). A stupor or astonishment, from sudden external accidents. Ecpneumatosis Ecpnoea (From and to breathe out). See Expiratio. Ecptoma, (from to fall out). T...
-Ecthelynsis - Edulcorantia
Ecthelynsis (From to render effeminate). Softness. It is applied to the skin, bones, and flesh when lax and soft; and to bandages when not sufficiently tight. Ecthlimma (From to dash, or press ou...
-Edulcoratio - Ela
Edulcoratio (From the same,) Sweetening with sugar or honey; but, in chemistry, it is the rendering preparations mild, by repeated affusions of water, to separate the acids and salts, or by different...
-Elaeagnus - Electrodes
Elaeagnus (From oil, and chaste). See Myrtus Brabantica, and Oleaster. Elaeomeli (From oil, and honey). In Syria this oil is prepared from the buds or the trunk of a certain tree unknown to na...
-Elemnifera Curassa Vica Arbor - Elminthes
Elemnifera Curassa Vica Arbor (From elemi, and fero, to bear). See Elemi. Elengi A tall tree which grows in Malabar, and bears fragrant flowers, esteemed for their cordial quality. Mimusops elengi ...
-Elodes - Emarg
Elodes From a swamp; from the great moisture attending it). This is a species of tritaeophya, or remittent fever, of the typhous kind, which usually terminates in fourteen or twenty-one days : it i...
-Emasculatus - Embryulcus
Emasculatus (From cmasculo, to castrate). See Malazissatus. Embamma Vel Bamma, (from to immerge, or dip,) apobamma. A sauce or pickle to dip victuals in. Mustard is a kind of embamma. It sometimes...
-Embula - Emplastica
Embula A pipe. Embularchi Suffumigium A suffumi-gation, described by AEtius. Emerus Also colutea, scorpioides major, and sena, scorpium, colutea humilis, colutea scorpioides humilis, colutea sili...
-Emplattomena - Emulgens
Emplattomena (From to obstruct). See Emphractica. Empneumatosis (From to blow into, or inflate ). An inflation of the stomach, the womb, or other parts. Emporium (From negotiator, from to...
-Emulgentes Arteriae And Venae - Encausis
Emulgentes Arteriae And Venae See Resales arterae. and Venae Em U Lsio,(From Emulgeo) Medicines of any kind resembling milk; though the London college has rejected that term, and supplied it with l...
-Encephalocele - Encaelia
Encephalocele (From cerebrum, and a tumour). See Hernia cerebri. Enceris (From and wax). Bits of found in plasters as they cool. Excharaxis (From and See Scarificatio. Encheiresis (From an...
-Encolpismos - Eneos
Encolpismos (From to insinuate). An uterine injection. Encope (From and to cut). An incision; and, figuratively, an impediment. Encranion (From and the skull). See Cerebellum. Encris (F...
-Enervatio - Ens
Enervatio (From enervo, to weaken,) an equivocal term, signifying aponeurosis or debility. Enflure Des Jambes See Lymphae ductus. Enfonde See Cassada. Engisoma (From to draw near). An instrume...
-Ensatus - Entero Epiplocele
Ensatus (From ensis, a sword). In botany it means shaped like a sword. Ensiformis Cartilago (From ensis, a sword, and forma, a form). The sword like cartilage, called also xiphoides; mucronatum os,...
-Enteromphalos - Entrochus
Enteromphalos (From and the navel). A rupture of the intestine at the navel. This seldom happens to women in labour, or from labour; but it often occurs in those debilitated by numerous births; to ...
-Entropium - Epargemos
Entropium (From and to turn in), lntroversion of the eye lid. See Trichia. Entyposis (From to make an impression). The acetabulum of the humerus. It is not used by any medical writer, but mentio...
-Eparma - Ephialtes
Eparma And Eparsis, (from and to elevate). Any kind of tumour, but usually applied to the parotis. Eparoth See Botrys Mexicana. Epencra Nis (From and the skull). A name of the cerebellum. Epe...
-Ephialtia - Epicolicae Regiones
Ephialtia (From ephialtes; because it occasions the night mare). See Paeonia. Ephippium A saddle. See Sella turcica. It is called ephippium, from its resemblance to a saddle. Ephodes (From and a...
-Epicranium - Epigastricae Arteriae
Epicranium (From and the skull). See Occipito frontalis. Epicrasis (From and to temper). A critical evacuation, or an attemperation of bad humours. When a cure is performed in the latter way, ...
-Epigastrium - Epimulis
Epigastrium (From upon, or above, and the stomach). The upper fore part of the belly; reaching from the pit of the stomach to an imaginary line above the navel, supposed to be drawn from one extrem...
-Epineneucos - Epiphyllospermus
Epineneucos (From and to nod or incline,) an epithet of a pulse which beats unequally in different parts of the artery; also called perineneucos. Galen thinks it common in hectics. Epinephelos (Fr...
-Eppphysis - Epiploomphalon
Eppphysis (From to grow to or upon). Additamentum, appendix, is a small bone annexed to the larger by means of an intervening cartilage, only observable in growing subjects, for in adults the epiph...
-Epiploon - Episphaeria
Epiploon (From to run over,) because it seems to float upon the intestines. See Omentum. Epiploscheocele (From the scrotum, and a tumour or rupture). See Hernia Scrota Lis. Epipolaeus (From t...
-Epistaphylini - Epithymum
Epistaphylini (From and a parsnip,) from their resemblance to a parsnip. See Staphylini. Epistasis (From and to stay,)cpischesis. A suppression of proper excretions; or rather the superficies...
-Epocheteusis - Equisetum
Epocheteusis (From to drain). A derivation of the juices to other parts. Epomis i. e. Acromion, (from and shoulder). See Scapula. Epomphalum (From and the navel). Any application to the na...
-Equi Venter - Ergasterium
Equi Venter See Venter. Equitatio (From equito, to ride). Riding. When the bowels are empty, they are powerfully strengthened by this species of exercise. Its use arises from the repeated gentle ag...
-Ergot - Error Loci
Ergot So the French call a disease, which resembles one in England, caused by eating bad corn. It consists of extreme debility, with mortification of the extremities, partly from the unalimentary nat...
-Eruca - Erythrodanum
Eruca (From erugo, to make smooth; from the smoothness of its leaves). Rocket; euzomon. It resembles mustard in appearance, but is distinguished by the smoothness of the leaves, and its disagreeable ...
-Erit Hroeides - Essentia
Erit Hroeides (The same, and form; from its red colour). See Testes. Erythroxylon (The same, and wood). See Campechense lignum. Esaphe (From to feel with the fingers). The touch or feeling t...
-Essentiale Sal - Eudiometer
Essentiale Sal See Diureticus sal. Esthiomenos (From to eat). Eating, corroding. An inflammation in the skin, attended with a sharp humour, more properly the herpes exedens; or indeed any invetera...
-Euelpidium - Eupatorium
Euelpidium A liquid collyrium. See Diasmyrnon. Euelpisti A plaster described by Scribonius Largus. Euembolos (From well, in, and to cast). A practitioner expert at setting of bones. Euemeti (...
-Eupepsia - Evaporatio
Eupepsia (From and to digest). Good digestion. Eupetalon (From and a leaf, so named from the beauty of its leaves). See Laureola mas. Euphorbia Palustris See Tithymalus. Euphoria (From and t...
-Everriculum - Excathisma
Everriculum (From everro, to sweep away). An instrument resembling a spoon used to clear the bladder from gravel after lithotomy. Pare. Eversio (From everto, to turn aside). See Ectrop1um. Exacerb...
-Excedens - Execheglutos
Excedens (From excedo, to surpass). In botany it means exceeding in length, comparatively long. Excitability And Excitement. The former of these is the capacity of the body to admit of increased ac...
-Exelcosis - Exoneirosis
Exelcosis (From an ulcer). See Exul Ceratio. Exerma (From to vomit up). The matter ejected by vomiting. Exercitatio (From exercito, to exercise). Exercise. (See AEora.) The exercise of the bod...
-Exophthalmia - Exsiccatio
Exophthalmia (From out, and the eye,) bufihthalmus, ecpiesmos, melon; a dislocatioi of the eye. In this disease the globe, more or less distended, rises from its orbit, either from its own increas...
-Exstipulatus - Facies
Exstipulatus (From ex priv. and stipula, straw or stubble). In botany it means without the haulm, or stubble. Exstasis See Ecstasis. Exsuccatio (From ex, out of, and succus, juice). See Ecchymoma...
-Facultas - Far
Facultas (From facio, to do). A faculty; or the power of performing any action. The animal faculty is the power of exercising sense, motion, and the principal functions of the body. The mental facult...
-Farciminalis - Fasciola
Farciminalis (From farcimen, stuffing sausage, or hog's pudding). See Aleantois. Farctura (From farcio, to stuff,) in pharmacy, the stuffing of any exenterated animal, or excavated fruit, with medi...
-Fastidium Ciborum - Fersae
Fastidium Ciborum (From fastidio, to loath). Loathing of food. Some barbarous writers, for this term, use abominatio. See Apepsia. Fastigiatus From fastigium, the toft or roof of a house). In botan...
-Ferula - Filipendula
Ferula A staff, which it resembles. Fennel giant. It hath a large, succulent, milky root; the stalk is fungous, and full of a pitchy matter. Ferula Africana Galdanii fera, Frutlcosa, sempervivens. S...
-Filius Ante Patrem - Fluor
Filius Ante Patrem The son before the father; because the flowers appear before the leaves. Tussilago is one of these plants, q. v. Filtratio (From filtrum, a strainer). See De-puratio. Generally a...
-Flus - Fomes
Flus (From fluo, to flow). See Fluor. Fluviatilis (From fluvius, a river). Belonging to a river. Flux Synonymous often with fusion; and frequently implying the substance by which fusion is promot...
-Fons Philosophorum - Fornax
Fons Philosophorum The philosopher's fountain; the balneum Mariae. Fons pullans, vel pulsatilis. See Fontanella. Fontale Acetosum See Acidulae.. Fonticulus (From fons, a fountain). See Fon-tanel...
-Fornicatus - Frigus
Fornicatus (From fornix, an arch or vault). Fornicated petals are such flower-leaves as are arched, like the roof of the mouth, as the crest of clary or sage. Fovi Lla A fine substance imperceptibl...
-Fritta - Fructus
Fritta Fritt; ammonitrum, is a mass of salt and ashes concreted with the sand in making glass. Frond A twig of a tree with its leaves; Linnaeus applies this term to the peculiar leafing of palms an...
-Frumentaceus - Fulcratus
Frumentaceus (From frumentum, wheat). A term applied to all such plants as resemble wheat in their fruit, leaves or ears. Frumentum (Quasi frugamentum, from fruges, fruit). Corn. It is spontaneous ...
-Fugile - Fusio
Fugile Ear wax. (See Cerumen auris). An appearance in the urine like wax. (Paracelsus.) It sometimes means a bubo, at others a tumour of the parotid glands. Fuligo (Quasi fumi/igo, from fumus, smot...
-Gabianum Oleum - Galanga
Gabianum Oleum See Petroleum vulgare. Gabirea See Myrrha. Gabrien. See Beta. Gacirma. See Cumana. Gagel. See Myrtus Brabantica. Galactia, and Galactirrhoe'a, (from lac, and fluo). An excess or o...
-Galaxa - Galenical
Galaxa (From milk). Is that white line in the heavens called the milky way; and is a congeries of fixed or nebulous stars. By analogy it is applied to the porosities in the cranium; and Charlton dis...
-Galenion - Gallium
Galenion The name of an anodyne malagma, in P. AEgineta. Galeopsulon Galeopsis,(from good, and sight; because it is supposed to assist the sight). Lamium rubrum, urtica iners magna fatidissi-ma, ...
-Gallium Latifolium Flore Luteo - Gastricus Succus
Gallium Latifolium Flore Luteo See Cruciata vulgaris. Galreda (From galrey, jelly, German). A jelly made by boiling the cartilaginous part of animals. In Paracelsus, it signifies an excrementitious...
-Gastrinum - Gaudium
Gastrinum See Clavellati cineres. Gastritis (From ; venter). See Inflammatio Ventriculi. Gastrocele (From the stomach, and a tumour). A rupture of the stomach. The tumour is in the upper part ...
-Gazar - Geniculatus
Gazar See Laurus Alexandrina. Gazella (Indian.) The African wild goat, which affords the oriental bezoar. Gazella Africana is the antelope. See Antelopus. Gecco Poison, peculiarly violent in its ...
-Genipi Herba - Gerocomia
Genipi Herba See Artemisia. Genipiverim, is a species of achillaea in Haller, which we have not been able to trace in the system of Linnaeus. It is the achilleafoliis pinnatis,fiinnis simplicibus, g...
-Gero Nsterre Water - Glama
Gero Nsterre Water See Spadanae aquae. Gerontoxon (From an old person, and a dart,) a small ulcer like the head of a dart, appearing sometimes in the cornea of old people. See Bothrion. Gerula ...
-Glandium - Glaucoma Glaucosis
Glandium (From giant, a nut). See Thymus Glandula Ceruminis See Auditorius Meatus. Glandul.? myrtiformes. When the hymen is torn, the broken fimbriae of the membrane contract and form apparent gla...
-Glauco Phyllus - Glossa
Glauco Phyllus (From blue, and a leaf ). Botanically applied to leaves of an azure or sea green colour. Glaucosis See Cataracta. Glaura See Succinum. Glaux Vulgaris (From tea green,) astrag...
-Glossagra - Glutaea Arteria
Glossagra (From the tongue, and pain). A rheumatic pain in the tongue. Glossocatochos (From tongue, and to repress). An instrument for depressing the tongue, described by P. AEgineta. Glossoce...
-Glutaeus Maximus - Gnaphalium
Glutaeus Maximus (From the same,) glutaeus major, is a muscle which rises from the posterior lateral part of the os coccygis, from a ligament extended between the os sacrum and the latter bone; from ...
-Gna Thos - Gossipium
Gna Thos (From to bend, from its curvature). The entire cheek, sometimes only the lower part, between the angles of the mouth and ear, which the Latins call bucca; occasionally the jaws and the jaw...
-Gotta - Graviditas
Gotta See Gambogia. Gou Tier See Bronchocele. Gracilis (From gracilesco, to become small). The name of some thin and flat muscles. Gracilis internus See Rectus internus. Gracilis anterior. See ...
-Gravidity Spurious - Guajava
Gravidity Spurious Water in the abdomen; polypi, or water in the uterus; a mola, or unformed mass; and steatomata in the uterus, or Fallopian tubes; will often produce appearances of gravidity. The u...
-Guao - Gu
Guao Comoc/adia dentata Lin. Ed. Wildenow, vol. i. p. 189. A West Indian tree, called thetlatian; its effluvia are so acrid as to be injurious to those who sleep under it. It has the odour of dung, a...
-Guttalis - Gyna Ndria
Guttalis See Arytaenoides. Gutteta (From goutte, the cramp). Castellus informs us that the word goutte in French signifies convulsion; hence the name of a preparation called pulvis ad guttetam, whi...
-Gyna Nthropos - Haematemesis
Gyna Nthropos (Form a woman, and a man). That species of hermaphrodite which partakes more of the female than of the male, opposed to that which partakes most of the male, called andro-gynus. Thes...
-Haematia - Haemocerchxus
Haematia And Haemation. An epithet for garum, made of the intestines of fish macerated in salt. Haematites, (from its supposed virtue of stopping blood). It is called also blood-stone, azedegrin, ase...
-Haemodia - Halimus
Haemodia (From to stupify). A painful stupor of the teeth, from acid and austere substances. Haemoptoe (From and to spit up). See Haemoptysis. Haemoptyicus (From the same). Haemotoricus. A pe...
-Halinitron - Harmos
Halinitron (From and Nitre; more probablvrocjc salt. Hallucinationes (From hallucinor, to err ). See Dysaesthesiae;. Halmyrax (From salt). The nitre produced in the valleys of Media. Halmyro...
-Harpastrum - Hedra
Harpastrum A species of exercise with a ball. Harpax And Harpaga, (from to seize). See Succinum. Also a mixture of quicklime and sulphur. Hartfell Water Issues from the Hartfell mountain in the...
-Hedycroon - Helleborize
Hedycroon (From sweet,) a mixture of a number of aromatic ingredients, formed into troches, said first to be invented and described by Androma-chus. Their composition is in some of the later dispens...
-Helleboroides - Hemiolion
Helleboroides (From and likeness,) aconitum hyemale; aconitum luteum minus; aconitum unifolium luteum bulbosum; helleborus hye-malis Lin. Sp. Pl. 783. The leaves resemble those of the aconitum; bu...
-Hemionitis - Hepar Heper
Hemionitis (From a mule; because, like a mule, it is sterile). Mule's fern. Hemionitis lan~ ceolata Lin. Sp. Pl. 1535. It grows in Italy; resembles the hart's tongue in appearance and virtues. See L...
-Hepata Rius - Hepta Ndria
Hepata Rius (From the liver). Hepatic. Hepateros (From the same,) is an epithet for that kind of dysentery in which the discharge is of a dark yellow or sanious. Hepaticae Venae Arise directly f...
-Heptapharmacum - Herring
Heptapharmacum (From seven, and a medicine or remedy). A plaster or ointment, containing seven ingredients, viz. litharge, wax, colophony, fat, etc. Heptaphy Llum (From seven, and a leaf). See ...
-Herva - Hibiscus
Herva De Anil Lusitanis. See Indicum. Hesperis (From the evening, so named because it smells most in the evening). Hesperis matro-nalis Lin. Sp. Pl. 9 27. It is said to be diaphoretic and antisep...
-Hidrocr - Hippolithus
Hidrocr Ltica, (from sweat, and to judge). Signs taken from sweat. Hidronosos Or Hidropyretos, (from sweat, and morbus, or fever). See Sudor Anglicus. Hidrotes Cenchroides See Cenchros. Hidro...
-Hippomanes - Hircus Bezoarticus
Hippomanes (From a horse, and to be mad,) a name of the cynocrambe, apocynum, or cynomoron, because, when eaten, it seems to produce madness in horses. It sometimes means the juice of tithymalus, a...
-Hirquus - Homolinon
Hirquus (From a hedge). The great angle of the eye. Hirsuties (From hirsutus, hairy). Unnatural hairiness of the body. Hirundinaria (From hit-undo, a swallow; so called from the resemblance of i...
-Homonopa Gia - Hortus
Homonopa Gia See Cephalalgia. Homophagia (From a shoulder, and edo). A sacrifice; from the shoulders being assigned to the priests. The shoulders of the deer are still the privilege of the keepe...
-Hospital - Hura
Hospital Sec Noso comium. Houi Poun See Tincal. Huaxacensis Hucipochotl Ricinus Novae Hisfiania; a species of cither croton or jatropha not easily ascertained. Hernandez describes it as a shrub w...
-Huso - Hy Deros
Huso See Ichthyocolla. Hutzochitl See Peruvian, bals. Hyaci Nthus (From a violet, and a flower, from its colour). It is poetically said to be named from the friend of Apollo, who was turned into...
-Hydragogos - Hydrogenium
Hydragogos From water and to bring away). Hydroticus; aquiducus. Hydragogue. Medicines that evacuate much water. In Hippocrates, Epidem. lib. vi. it imports a person affected with dropsy from drinki...
-Hydrolapathum - Hydropoides
Hydrolapathum (From and dock). See Lapathum aquaticum. Hydromeli (From and honey). Hydromel; mulsum, aqua mulsa, melicratum, braggat. 'water impregnated with honey. After it is fermented, it is ...
-Hydrorachit - Hygrocirsocele
Hydrorachit Ls, (from water, and the spine). See Spina bifida. Hydrorosaton (From water, and a rose,) a drink made of water, honey, and the juice of roses. Se Paulus .AEgineta, lib. vii. c. 15....
-Hygrocollyrium - Hyperartetiscos
Hygrocollyrium (From humid, and a collyrium). A liquid collyrium, or consisting chiefly of liquids. Hygrologia (From liquid, and a discourse). Hygrology, which treats of the various humours of t...
-Hypercatharsis - Hypersarcosis
Hypercatharsis (From a preposition signifying excess, and purgation,) hyperinesis, and hyperinos; excessive purging from medicine; a variety of the diarrhea mucosa of Dr. Cullen. It is not only pro...
-Hypezocos - Hypocistis
Hypezocos Membranes spread under other parts, as the pleura. Hypnobates And Hypnobatasis, (from sleep, and to go). See Somnambulo. Hypnologia (From sleep, and a discourse,) instructions relat...
-Hypoclepticum Vitrum - Hypogastrium
Hypoclepticum Vitrum (From under, and to steal; because it seems to steal away the water from the oil. See Separatorium. Hypocoe Lon (From under, and a cavity,) a cavity under the lower eye lid. ...
-Hypogastrocele - Hypophora
Hypogastrocele (From hypogastrium, and tumour). See Hernia ventralis. Hypoglossi Externi Vel Majores, Nervi (From under, and a tongue,) linguales and gustatorii; the ninth pair of nerves, which...
-Hypophyllospermi - Hypothesis
Hypophyllospermi (From under, a leaf, and seed). Such plants as bear their seed on the back part of their leaves. Hypo Physis (From under, and to produce). - See Trichia. Hypotia (From and o...
-Hypotheton - Hysteroptosis
Hypotheton (From under, and to put). Sec Suptositoiuum. Hypozoma (From and to bind round). See Diaphragma. Hypsiloglossus i. e. Basioglossus, (from v, the hyoid bone, and lingua, the tongue)....
-Hysterotomia - Icon
Hysterotomia (From the uterus, and a section). See Caesarea sectio. Hystrioiasis (From a hedgehog). A disease in which the hair is said to stand erect like the prickles of a hedgehog. See Philos...
-Icosandria - Igbucaini Brasilianorum
Icosandria (From twenty, and a husband). The names of the twelfth class of the Lin-naean system, comprehending those plants which have hermaphrodite flowers, with twenty or more stamina, growing on...
-Igname - Illecebra
Igname Sec Cara. Ignitio (From ignis, fire ). Calcining. I' Gnye, Ignys, (from to supplicate; because bent in supplication). See Poples. Ikan Aroot apparently of the orchis tribe, brought from ...
-Illegitimus - Impatiens Herba
Illegitimus (From in, and legitimus, lawful). Illegitimate; an epithet for the false ribs, and for some anomalous fevers. Illinctus (From illingo, to lick up). See Linctus. Illisio (From illidor,...
-Imperialis Aqua - Incisores Dentes
Imperialis Aqua See Fluor albus. Impetigines, (from impeto, to infest). Diseases which occasion blemishes on the skin; terna, derbia, ignis sylvaticus, volagrius, or volaticus, and serpigo. See Lepra...
-Inciso Rium - Indicatio
Inciso Rium (From incido, to cut). A table whereon a patient is laid in order to have an incision made on any part; or a body to be dissected. Incisorium foramen, lies behind the dentes incisores of...
-Indicator - Infundibulum
Indicator (From the same). See Extensor indicis. Indicon See Myrtidanon. Indicus See Costus. Indiga Spuria. See Colinil.. Indige' Nl. Indigenous; natives of the country in which they are found. T...
-Infusum - Insolatio
Infusum An infusion. Sometimes styled di-lutum; at others it means a clyster or an injection. Ingesta (From ingero, to throw in). The contents of the stomach; generally alimentary, sometimes ...
-Inspiratio - Interseptum
Inspiratio (From in, and spiro, to breathe). Inspiration; eispnoe, epipasmos. The action of the chest and diaphragm, by which the air is drawn into the lungs. See Respiratio. Instillatio (From inst...
-Inters - Introsusceptio
Inters Linales Colli,(from inter, between, and spina, the spine). Winslow calls these muscles spinales colli minores. Dr. Hunter calls them intras-pinalis, adding, that they lie between the spinal pr...
-Intsia - Ira
Intsia Mimosa intsia Lin. Sp. Pl. 1508. A large evergreen tree in Malabar, called also acacia Ma-labarica globosa. The juice of the leaves, and bark is used to relieve pains in the bowels. See Raii H...
-Iracundus Musculus - Ischnopho Nia
Iracundus Musculus (From ira, anger). See Abductor oculi. Irlngus, Eryngo. See Eryngium. Iris Latifolia Tuberosa See. Zingiber. Ibis vulgaris; iris hortensis nostras; iris Ger- manica Lin. Sp. P...
-Ischnotis - Jacea
Ischnotis (from slender). Leanness. Ischuretica (From a suppression of urine). Medicines that remove a suppression of urine. Islington Waters See Aquae Minerales. Isora Muri. Helicteres isor...
-Jacobaea Pratensis - Julapium
Jacobaea Pratensis Because it was gathered about the feast of St. James. See Doria. Jacobae'a palustris. See Virga aurea. Jade Stone See Lapis nephriticus. Jagra See Palma coccifera. Janamunda ...
-Junctura - Kaolin
Junctura (From jungo, to join). See Articu-i.atio. Jus (because in families it was distributed in just proportions). Broth; brodium. Broths made of the lean parts of beef or mutton are very nourish...
-Kapa Mata - Kibes
Kapa Mata See Acajaiba. Karatas The penguin, or wild ananas; common in the West Indies, as an acid in punch, but too austere to be swallowed alone. The karatas of Plumier is, however, a different s...
-Kik - Labyrinthus
Kik Or Kiki, (from kike, Arabic). See Cataputia. Kikekunemalo A gum resin, whose source we are not acquainted with. It has a subacrid resinous taste, and has been supposed an useful resolvent, as w...
-Laccopedon - Lactic Acid
Laccopedon See Scrotum. Laceratura (From lacero, to tear). See Vulnus. Lacertuli And Lacertus (From lacertus, an arm). Bundles of fibres. In every muscle, long, slender, soft fibres are found, po...
-Lactica - Lagostoma
Lactica See Typhos, and Typhodes. Lacticinia (From lac, milk). Ga/actina, lacta-ria; aliments prepared of milk. See Animellae. Lactiferi Ductus Vel Tubuli (From lac, milk, and fero, to bring). La...
-Lalo - Lancet
Lalo See Baobab and Couscous. Lamac See Gum Arabicum. Lambdacismus (From the Greek letter ). A defect in speech, consisting in an inability to pronounce certain consonants, particularly L...
-Lanigerus - Lascivus
Lanigerus (From lana, wool, and gero, to bear,) an epithet of trees, which bear a woolly or downy substance, like what is contained in the catkins of the willow. La Ntana. See Viburnum. Lanugo (Qu...
-Laser - Laurifolia Magellanica
Laser Laserpitium. See Asafoetida. Laserpitium (From the Arabic lazar,) the name of the oreoselinum, and of the silphium, the altiht of the ancients. Laserpitium vulgare; bupleuron arborescens sa-...
-Laurinum Oleum - Ledum Palustre
Laurinum Oleum (From laurus). See Laurus Vulgaris. Laubo Camphorifera, (from laurus cam-fihora, and feroj. The Camphor bearing laurel, or bat tree. See Camphora. Lauro Cerasus, (from laurus, and ...
-Leguminosa - Lenticula Palustris Major
Leguminosa See Fabago. Legumen (From lego, to gather, usually gathered by the hand). The seeds of the leguminous plants-are called pulse, as pease, beans, etc. Ray calls all those plants leguminous...
-Lenticulare - Leseolus
Lenticulare A lenticular; a rugine. Lenticulare os, (from lenticula, lentil). A name of the fourth bone in the first row of the wrist; os or-biculare, and pisiforme. The os lenticulare, or orbicula...
-Lethargus - Libanotis
Lethargus (From forgetfulness, and slothful). Lethargy; veternus. See Caros and Apoplexia. Leucanthemum (From and as it only differs from the chrysanthemum in the white floret). A name also for...
-Liberans Aqua - Limonium
Liberans Aqua See Calcis aqua majus Composita. Libido See Prcritis. Libra (From a pound). See Pondus. Lichandos (From to lick; because used in the action of licking). Fore .finger. See Index....
-Linctus - Lipoma
Linctus (From lingo, to lick). Lohoc eclegma, elexis, eclectos, illinctus, lambative; a composition thicker than syrup, but softer than an electuary, first made to be licked from a slick of liquorice...
-Lipome - Lithias
Lipome See Naevus. Lipopsychia See Leipopsuchia. Lippitudo (From lippus, blear eyed). See Eri-hora and Xerophthalmia. Celsus means by it an ophthalmia. Liquefactio Melting. The fluidity of a bo...
-Lithodendron - Lonchites
Lithodendron (From , and a tree). Coral; from its resembling a petrified branch. See Corallium. Lithoeides (From and form; from its hardness). See Temporum ossa. Litron Nitron. See Anatron. Li...
-Lonchoton - Ludus Helmontii
Lonchoton See Vitriolum. Longanon (From longus, long). See Rectum intestinum. Longissimus Digitus See Digitus. Longissimus dorsi, is a muscle named from its length, and has the same origin with ...
-Lujula - Lutea Luteola
Lujula (Corrupted from the diminutive allelujula, q. v .). Acetosa. Lumbago (From lumbus, a loin). Pain in the loins. See Rheumatismus and Arthritis. Lumbago psoadica, and apostematosa. See Arthro...
-Luxurians - Lycopersicon
Luxurians (From luxurio, to exceed). A flower is called luxuriant, when the teguments of its fructifications are augmented so as to exclude some other essential part. Double flowers, which are luxuri...
-Lycopus - Maceratio
Lycopus (From the same). See Marrubium Aquaticum. Lydius Lapis (From Lydia). See Magnes. Lygismos, (from to distort). See Luxatio. Lygmos (From to hiccough). See Singultus. Lyra (From a ly...
-Macerona - Magdaleones Magdaliae
Macerona See Hipposelinum. Macha Mona. A sort of calabash in Africa and America; the pulp of which is agreeable, and serves instead of rennet for curdling milk. It does not occur in any systematic ...
-Magellantca Aroma Tica Arbor - Mail
Magellantca Aroma Tica Arbor See Winteranus cortex. Magiste Rium (From magister, a master). The ancient chemists meant by this term a peculiar and secret method of preparing any medicine; but at pr...
-Mala - Malazissatus
Mala (From a resemblance to malum, apple). The prominent part of the cheek. (Martinius.) See Buccae. Mala Assyria. See Citreum. Mala aurantia. See Aurantia Hispalensis. Mala aurea. See Amoris ioma...
-Male - Malleus
Male See Axilla. Malic Acid A vegetable acid found chiefly in unripe apples, as well as in plums, gooseberries, elderberries, barberries, and even in the houseleek. It becomes oxalic by the additio...
-Malpighia - Mancanilla
Malpighia (In honour of Malpighi). Barba-does cherry tree. Cerasus Americana, Malphigia punicifolia Lin. Sp. Pl. 609. The fruit is eaten by the native Americans, but has no medicinal virtue. Malvasi...
-Mancoron - Manyl
Mancoron Probably sugar, since it is a sweet substance found in cane. Oribasius. Mancurana See Origanum. Mandaru Assitra, bauhinia variegata Lin. Sp. Pl. 535, the pod bearing Malabarian tree with...
-May - Marmarygae
May See Manga. Maranda A plant resembling the myrtle, not yet reduced to any genus, growing in the island of Ceylon: a decoction of the leaves is recommended in the venereal disease. Maranta Galan...
-Marmolaria - Masticatio
Marmolaria (spotted like marble). See Acanthus. Marmor (From to shine). Marble. A calcareous stone, chiefly used for the carbonic acid gas it contains, employed in preparing the acidulous minera...
-Masticatorium - III
Masticatorium (From mastico, to chew). A masticatory. See Apophlf.gmatica. Mastiche (From to express). Mastich. See Lentiscus. Masticiien Odoratum fundens. See Nux VlRginiana. Mastichina Gall...
-VII - XXI
VII SlAlagoga. . Secretoria. Hydrargyri praeparationos. Acidum nitricum ? . Excretoria. Nicotiana. Pyretrum. Piper. Carypphyllus. Angelica. Imperatoria. Stavisagria. semen. Zinziber. ...
-XXII - Maxillaria Superiora Ossa
XXII Erodentia. . Azoetiea. Sabina. Euphorbia. Gallae. Saccharum ustum. Cevadilla. Ranunculus, folia 8c radix. Tithymelea. Daphne laureola & mezereum Persicaria urens. Flammula Jovis. To...
-Mays - Mediastinum
Mays A kind of Indian wheat. See Cerealia. Meatus, (from meo, to pass,) a duct, passage, or any open canal. The auditory passage is the meatus audi tortus; the Eustachian tube meatus a palato ad au-r...
-Medicamentosus Lapis - Melasma
Medicamentosus Lapis (From medica-jnentum, medicine). The medicinal stone, which consists of litharge bole and alum, of each lb ss. colcothar of vitriol iij. vinegar lb ij- m. evaporated to hardnes...
-Melazzo - Melo
Melazzo See Saccharum. Melca (From to milk). Milk well seasoned with boiling hot vinegar, to separate by rest the curd from the whey. Constantine de Agricultura, lib. xviii. Melegeta See Paradi...
-Meloe Vesicatorius - Menstrua
Meloe Vesicatorius See Cantharides. Melon (From an apple). An apple; the cheek, (see Mala and Buccae,) or a disorder, of the eye, when it protuberates from the socket. See Ex-ophthalmia and Malum....
-Menstruum - Merocele
Menstruum (From the same). A fluid body capable of reducing a given solid to the same state, and thus diffusing the latter through every part of the former; called a menstruum, because the chemists f...
-Meros - Meso
Meros (From to divide). See Femur. Mesang De Vacca. See Bezoar bovinus. Mesaraeon (from medius, and belly). Mesenterium, q. v. Mesaraica Vel Mesaraica Major Vena, (from the mesentery). The ...
-Mes - Metastasis
Mes Othenar, (from and the, of the hand,) is a flat and nearly a triangular muscle, lying between the first phalanx of the thumb and the bottom of the palm of the hand, inserted into the ligament wh...
-Metasyncrisis - Metrocelides
Metasyncrisis (From and to mix together). The word generally implies a change in any given part. Asclepiades. See Medicina (His-tory). Metatarsius (From and the tarsus of the foot). A fleshy mass...
-Metrorrhagia - Miliarium
Metrorrhagia (From the wotnb, and to break out). See Menorrhagia. Meu Meum (From less,) on account of its diminutive size. Sfignel, baud, or vauld Money. Athamanta meum Lin. Sp. Pl. 553. Faenie...
-Miliolum - Mithridatum
Miliolum A small tumour in the eye lids, of the size of a millet seed. Militaris Aizoides See A loides. Militaris Herba (From miles, a soldier,) from its efficacy in curing fresh wounds. See Mill...
-Mitralis - Mollugo
Mitralis Va Lvula, (from mitra, a mitre, from their resemblance). See Cor. Miya Cydoniorum, (from the Hebrew term migma). Marmelade of quinces. See Cydoni A. Mixtio (From misceo,to mix). Mixtion....
-Molucca - Monarda Purpurea
Molucca Melissa. Molucca baum. Its qualities agree with those of melissa. Moluscum The appellation given by Dr. Willan to a cutaneous disease, consisting in small soft wens, which may be extirpated...
-Moneres - Monophia
Moneres (From alone,) properly a boat with a single oar; but figuratively applied to a melancholy person fond of solitude. Monoceros (From unicus, and cornu, horn). See Unicornu. Monocolon Se...
-Monorchis - Morus
Monorchis From and a testicle. Monospermus From single, and seed. Mons Veneris The hill or mount of Venus, lies before and on the upper part of the symphysis of the ossa pubis, formed by fat i...
-Morxi - Moxa
Morxi A pestilential distemper very common in Malabar and other parts of the East Indies. Mosa A liniment used in Germany, made of wheat flower and milk, nearly of the consistence of thin paste. M...
-Mucago - Multisiliquae Plantae
Mucago (From mucus, mucilage). See Mucilago. Mucharum A barbarous word, signifying an infusion of roses, in warm water, reduced to a syrup, with sugar. Much Luxus Activus And Passiyus, (from mucu...
-Mundi Anima - Muscipula
Mundi Anima According to Plato, or rather his commentators, is a certain universal ethereal spirit, which exists perfectly pure in the heavens, as retaining its proper nature; but on the earth pervad...
-Muscularis Arteria - Myce
Muscularis Arteria (From musculus, a muscle). See Scapulariae arteriae. Musoularis venae, A branch of the posterior or upper branch of the external jugular; it spreads in the muscles, which cover th...
-Mychthismos - Myositis
Mychthismos (From to mutter or groan). A sighing or groaning during respiration, while the air is forced out of the lungs. Hippocrates. Myconotdes (From a nostril, and resemblance). An epithet ...
-Myotomia - Mystax
Myotomia (From a muscle, and to cut). A dissection of the muscles. Myrepsicum Oleum See Ben. Myrica (From the Hebrew, marak). See Tamariscusmyrica gale. See Myrtus Brabantica. Myriophyllon. See...









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