Another well-known breed is the Manchester or Black and Tan Terrier, which, some years since, enjoyed considerable popularity, and I think the main cause of its decline, was its getting into the hands of some unscrupulous members of the community, who dyed, faked, and "rang the changes," as it was called, with them, to such an extent, that respectable people were afraid to have anything to do with them. I have no doubt that the cropping edict has also been against them, as formerly, if a dog had large, or ugly ears, their appearance was often improved in the cropping, but now, unless the ears are naturally small, good specimens have little chance in the keen competition of these dogs. I need hardly describe them as fine-coated, rather snake-headed dogs with bright eyes of dark colour, and marked with tan, which should be clear in shade on the legs, thighs, feet, and other parts. They are well adapted as pets and companions, being smart, lively and intelligent in their manners and cleanly and vigilant in their habits. The points of the Manchester or Black and 'Tan Terrier are rather elaborate and run as follows: Head long and narrow, flat from the back to the nose and with no humps at sides or cheek, muzzle long and tapering, but not weak, eyes small and oval shaped, black and bright.

BLACK TAN TERRIER CH. STARKIE BEN LT COL. C.S. DEAN. OWNER.

BLACK TAN TERRIER CH. STARKIE BEN LT COL. C.S. DEAN. OWNER.

The correct carriage of the ears is a debatable point since cropping has been abolished, but probably the drop ear is correct; neck light and graceful, shoulders sloping, chest rather narrow but deep and the body slightly arched with good back ribs; forelegs quite straight with well arched toes and jet black toenails, powerful hindquarters with hocks well let down, tail very fine and carried almost straight, coat short, yet close. Colour: Lustrous blue black, with rich mahogany tan markings along the jaws, under the throat, over the eyes, on the cheeks, inside the ears, on each side of breast, on the inside of the hind legs, under the vent and on the forelegs up to above the pastern joint. The toes, however, have black lines called "pencilling," running up them and there is a black spot called the thumb mark just along the pastern joint in front of the limb. The general appearance is that of a high class and well-bred, smart and neat-looking dog well suited for any work, coming into the sphere of a terrier, and a fit companion or guard for either sex, or any rank of life.

He can adapt himself to the cottage, or the palace, and look well in either.