Prints having great contrast, that is, very bright highlights and very dark shadows, are difficult to copy successfully, particularly if the shadows are of a non-actinic color such as olive or brown. The copies usually lack detail in the shadows, which reproduce as a black mass. Even if such a prolonged exposure is given that the detail in the highlights is sacrificed it does not seem to help matters but serves only to show the grain of the paper.

When the contrast is merely due to the non-actinic color of the print, there being plenty of detail in the shadows, it is easy to copy by the use of a color sensitive plate with an appropriate filter, for example, a Wratten Panchromatic plate and a red filter in the Case of brown or reddish prints, or a green filter in the case of olive or greenish prints.

But sometimes even this expedient fails when the detail in the shadows seems to be beneath the surface.If it is an unmounted print, a good result may be secured by making the copy partially by transmitted light and partly by reflected light.The print is placed between two sheets of clean glass and placed in such a position that the light will fall on its surface as well as on a white reflector placed behind it.

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"LIGHT BEYOND" FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT

By G. E. Tingley Mystic, Conn.

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"FEBRUARY" FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT

By G. E. Tingley Mystic, Conn.

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Copy made by reflected light

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Copy made by transmitted and reflected light

If one exposure is made, the highlights will very likely be over-exposed and the grain of the paper will show in the lighter portions where the transmitted light is not necessary. If it is not possible to arrange the reflector so that light will be reflected only through the shadows where additional detail is desired, it will be found better to make one exposure with the light on the surface of the print and an additional exposure by transmitted light, moving a vignetting card about over the highlights while the shadows are receiving the additional exposure by the transmitted light.

The proportion of light coming through the print to that on its surface must be such that the detail required is just sufficiently brought out, otherwise the resulting negative will be too flat and the texture of the paper is apt to show badly.To shorten the transmitted light exposure, the paper can be rendered translucent with castor oil, but it is not always permissible to do this, and good results can be obtained even with prints made on heavy weight paper if both exposures are correctly made.

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"A DISCOURAGING FARM" FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT

By G. E. Tingley Mystic, Conn.

No exact rule as to the proportionate amount of each exposure can be given as this will depend upon the nature of the lighting and the character of the original print. Such extraordinary means to secure a good copy of a difficult subject may not appeal to the average worker, especially if making copies is not to his liking, but it is just such stunts - by using such painstaking care to secure a result that will please a particular customer, that many photographers have made a reputation and success and established a foundation of good will which is invaluable to them.