There is practically no limit to the photographic stunts the commercial photographer may be called upon to perform, and as it is often up to him to suggest novel uses for photographs, the Giant Newspaper produced by Brown & Rehbaum of Milwaukee, and the method of making it may be of interest to our readers.

An advertising show was to be held in Milwaukee recently and the Milwaukee Journal called upon Brown & Rehbaum to make a giant newspaper that would fill the entire background of their booth. Any one having even a slight knowledge of the newspaper business knows that such a piece of work was practically impossible for the printers, so it was put up to the commercial photographer, who is so often called upon to "make good" when other means fail.

A standard size newspaper was submitted for copy, from which 8 x 10 negatives were made of the two pages. As the newspaper would not be satisfied with a patched-up job it was necessary to use the largest Bromide paper made and make four enlargements, each 40 inches wide by 108 inches long, making two pages each 6 feet 8 inches wide by 9 feet high.

Two trays were necessary and these were made from one-inch lumber and were 48 inches wide and 10 feet long. They were made water-proof and cost, when finished, $18.00. Two stretcher frames 80 x 108 inches, were made of dry kiln lumber and these were thoroughly braced and reinforced with angle irons, and then covered with a good grade of linen. The lumber and materials to make the frames cost $25.00 and the linen to cover them, $8.00.

These stretchers were then used in the enlarging room as easels for focusing. When the exact focus was secured and correct exposure determined by making several test strips, the two big sheets of paper, Eastman Standard B Bromide, Double Weight, each 40 x 108 inches, were fastened in place and matched in the center. A 12-inch lens was used and the light was furnished by a Cooper Hewitt "M" shaped tube. The exposure given was 55 minutes.

Each strip of paper was developed separately in the large trays. It required 700 ounces of developer for the four long strips, making the two pages. It also required the work of three men for twelve hours to get the prints into the final wash water.

The prints were placed face down on a large strip of oil cloth for mounting and the paste was applied with a paper hanger's paste brush. The prints were carefully mounted on the stretchers and set up to dry and were finally ready for placing in the exhibit.

Our two illustrations show a detail and a general view of the finished work. So far as is known, this is the largest facsimile of a newspaper ever shown and it attracted an unusual amount of interest at the advertising show.

It was good advertising for the photographer as well as the newspaper, and may suggest some similar stunt to other wide-awake photographers.

The Big Prints Mounted.

The Big Prints Mounted.

The Finished Display.

The Finished Display.

From An Artura Iris Print By H. Mishkin New York.

From An Artura Iris Print By H. Mishkin New York.

From An Artura Iris Print By H. Mishkin New York.

From An Artura Iris Print By H. Mishkin New York.