We have heard a great deal about Russia during the recent war and have come to have a fair general idea of that great country, its important cities and unpronounceable names. It is interesting then to learn that a prominent Oklahoma photographer, Mr. J. L. Rivkin, is a native of Russia, having been born at Kiev, the capital of the Ukraine, through which flows the river Dnieper.

Mr. Rivkin came to America, the land of promise and opportunity, something over twenty years ago and went direct to Chicago where he received instant employment as a retoucher with Mr. Morrison.

He had learned this branch of photographic work in his native land, having been apprenticed to the leading photographer of Kiev for a period of three years. This meant three years of work for which he was to receive his "keep" but no wages. At the end of a year, however, he had proved so apt that his master voluntarily began paying him a small wage and with this he began to study art in one of the art academies of the capital.

After working for Mr. Morrison for a time, young Rivkin resumed his studies at the Chicago Art Institute where he graduated some years later. Drifting further west he was employed in Kansas City, later on acquired an interest in the Tulsa, Okla., studio with F. de Gueldre and finally became its sole owner.

Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By J. L. Rivkin Tulsa, Okla.

Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By J. L. Rivkin Tulsa, Okla.

Mr. Rivkin has the patronage of a discriminating class of people, uses Portrait Film exclusively and - well, we will let him tell his own story. He says: "Prior to coming to Tulsa I had always used glass plates, but finding that my partner had been using Portrait Films for several years with excellent results I decided that as he was a thoroughly capable man and had been what you call through the mill' he knew what was best for our business success. So I decided to grasp the opportunity of learning the definite peculiarities of film so that I might improve my work."

"To overcome the many serious obstacles encountered in home portraiture, of which I do considerable, such as shooting into a straight window light, as you designate it, white draperies against dark wall colors or heavy silken and satin draperies, I found Portrait Film indispensable. In the matter of gradation, of speed and of almost snap-shooting of babies they are all that one can desire."

"You know, of course, that I work with a straight up and down west light and in the afternoon it is very difficult at times, but Portrait Films are so wonderfully plastic - so accommodating I might say - that I have no trouble with those sudden jumpy contrasts which to the eye appear forbidding. Of course a contrasty light will be contrasty in plate or film, but there is this difference; in the glass plate the shadows would be clear glass or the highlights chalky, while in the film there generally is, in spite of bad handling, something in both highlights and shadows."

"I might add that I use Artura paper which enables me to get all I see in the film, so you see I believe thoroughly in these two products. The other day I accidentally dropped an 11 x 14 film and involuntarily I shuddered, forgetting for the instant that no harm would come. How happy 1 was afterward can easily be imagined. It was an expensive order too - they always are."

Our illustrations are from the regular run of Mr. Rivkin's work - excellent work of a remarkably uniform quality, which we regret to say can never be more than approximated by the halftone process and printers' ink.

Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By J. L. Rivkin Tulsa, Okla.

Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By J. L. Rivkin Tulsa, Okla.