The following excerpt from a letter, written by a man connected with a New York house, which does a national business, is interesting- "I was down to see my father a few evenings ago and found him perusing the 'ads' in one of the magazines. He was very quiet until he came across a full page 'ad' of Eastman's, which, by the way, wasn't very full. His remarks were to the effect that he couldn't see any sense to it as it didn't call attention to any of the good qualities of Kodaks but was more of an 'ad' for the local photographer.

"The 'ad' in question had at the top, 'Between friends - a photograph', then a big blank space, and at the bottom, 'There's a photographer in your town' 'Eastman Kodak Co.'

"With all due respect to your Advertising Manager, I had to admit that there didn't seem to be much 'sense' to the 'ad' but that it was just peculiar enough to attract attention, and that is what an advertisement is really for. However, there may be a little catch in the 'ad' that neither my father nor I could see through, and I thought possibly you would like to enlighten me so that I can explain that the Eastman Kodak Co. is not throwing its good money away."

Eastman Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By Blank & Stoller New York, N. Y.

Eastman Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By Blank & Stoller New York, N. Y.

Eastman Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By Blank & Stoller New York, N. Y.

Eastman Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By Blank & Stoller New York, N. Y.

He couldn't see the sense of it because it didn't advertise Kodaks but did advertise the local photographer. He was the unusual reader who wanted to know the "why" of it - and of course we took the trouble to explain to him.

He or some of his family have possibly been to a photographer by this time, or will be reminded to go before Christmas, because of his interest in that advertisement. That is all we expected. It is immaterial to us whether or not any one thinks we are throwing good money away so long as we know the advertisement is getting results for the photographer.

If we increase his business we will increase our own - not to the same extent, of course, for we do not sell all of the photographic material that is used. But we will trust to the quality of our goods to bring us our share of the business created.

This brings up a shallow argument against advertising that has often been used: "I can't advertise without my competitor getting the benefit of my advertising." The best advertising you can do will bring your competitor some business but it will bring you the greater share and so pay for itself. If it is poor advertising - if it is made up of selfish boasting, untruths or exaggerated claims, it will most likely drive business away. But if it is advertising written with the one idea of making more people want photographs, and the arguments are good, it will make business.