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The Boat-house or Yacht Club is made from the half of a deep box about eight inches long. Its roof and floor are shoe-box covers. The flagstaff is a pencil.

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Boxcraft Houseboat is made from the lower half of a plain shoe-box. Two shoe-box covers make the rest of the boat.

Material Required to Make a Boxville Boat-house: the lower half of a deep box about six inches long, and also two shoe-box covers.

Boxville Boat-house is made from an oblong box about two-thirds the size of a shoe-box. Its wharf is a shoe-box cover, and its roof is another shoe-box cover.

If you wish to cut a lake from a sheet of silver paper, the boat-house or yacht club is the very thing for this play. Any water toys, such as swans, ducks, fish, or frogs, may swim on Silver Paper Lake, and from your yacht club, parties of fishermen may angle for magnetized fish. The boat-house may be a part of the summer attractions of Hotel Bandbox in season.

To make a boat-house building, you will first need to turn your box over upon its rims so that its bottom becomes its top.

Draw a three-inch square on one short end of your box. Let its base come to the extreme edge of the box rim. This square is to be the door you see in the picture. Draw a vertical line down the center of this square. This gives two doors for the doorway. (To cut double door, see Diagram Two, B, page 167.) Cut across the top line and down the center to the outer rim. Bend outward the two halves of the doorway.

The boat-house is to have windows, and each window is to have an awning over it. To make windows with awnings, first draw on each long side of your box, two one-inch squares. Each square should be drawn about an inch and a half from a corner of the box. Each square should be half-way between top and bottom of the building. (For windows with awnings, see Diagram One, C, page 166.) Cut down both side lines and across the base line. Bend the cut card-board outward and upward to form an awning. Color this awning with red stripes, using your crayons or water-color paints.

When all windows are cut, then you may place your little building at the rear of the shoe-box cover which forms the wharf.

Over the top of your building, fit another shoe-box cover to form a projecting roof over the wharf.

A long pencil will be a fine flagstaff. Run its point through the front of the boat-house roof, and glue to the top of the pencil a triangular piece of colored paper to make the pennant.

My little Boxville people

Have a club-house where they go When they want to do some fishing, Or they want to take a row.

It stands beside a paper lake,

Upon my play-room floor; It has some pretty awnings,

And a dock, beside a door!

Upon the lake float water toys.

I put moss by the shore And pebbles: they make splendid rocks!

Some day I'll find some more!