Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a scratch plane for working beads and small mouldings, and Fig. 2 is a view of it upside down. For the stock, a piece of birch or beech about 10 in. long is used, and a saw kerf A (Figs. 1 and 2) is cut nearly the whole length; the cutter B, of sheet or broken saw steel, is placed in this slot and kept secure by the screws C. Fig. 3 shows the cutter shaped for making a couple of beads D (Fig. 1). The cutter may be made to the desired shape with a file, the edge of the cutter being kept flat like a scraper. It is then finished with an oilstone slip of the reverse shape - that is, round. In working, the scratch is moved forward or backward, .aid is held by the right hand at the right end, and by the left hand at the left end of the job, the stock being kept well against the work. Having scratched the mouldings, next clean them up with sandpaper, wrapped about a piece of pine, say 3 in. long, 2in. wide, and 1/4 in. thick, the edge being the reverse shape to the bead or hollow. Fig. i shows a cutter for another pattern of beads.

Scratch Plane For Working Beads And Mouldings 406Scratch Plane For Working Beads And Mouldings 407

Fig. 3.

Scratch Plane For Working Beads And Mouldings 408

Fig. 4.

Scratch Plane for Working Mouldings, etc.

Scratch Plane for Working Mouldings, etc.