Hints For Yachtsmen 226

Diagram Showing Names Of Parts Of Sailboat. Nautical Terms

Starboard - Right hand side of boat, Port. - hand side of boat. Aft. - Toward the rear. Forward. - Middle section of boat. Fore and Aft - From bow to stern.

Athwartships - From side to side. Aloft - Above the deck. Below - Beneath the deck. Abaft - Towards the stern. Avast - To cease, stop.

A Short Splice

The accompanying illustrations show the different stages of a short splice, such as is used for making an eye in the end of a rope. The strands are first unlaid or separated. For convenience of handling, the ends of the strands are sometimes whipped, as shown in Fig. 1. The strands are then tucked under the stand ing part of the unlaid rope, as shown in Fig. 1. This operation is repeated by tucking again and then each strand is divided, as shown in Fig. 2. The splice is then finished by tucking one-half of each strand, as shown in Fig. 3. This last tuck will taper off the splice. To loosen or raise the strands of the rope, so that you may tuck under them, a pointed marlin spike is used.

A Short Splice 227

Fig. 1.

A Short Splice 228

Fig 2.

A Short Splice 229

Fig. 3.

In splicing two ends of rope together the operation is the same, only in this case you will have two ends or six strands instead of three, and will of course tuck both ways from the center.

BELL TIME ON SHIP BOARD.

No. Bells.

Time.

Time.

Time.

1

12 30

4 30

8 30

2

1 00

5 00

900

3

1 30

5 30

9 30

4

2 00

6 00

10 00

5

2 30

6 30

10 30

6

3 00

7 00

11 00

7

3 30

7 30

1130

8

4 00

8 00

Noon.

Signals To Engineer

When engine is stopped, one bell means go ahead slow.

When engine is running either way, one bell means stop.

When engine is going full speed either way, three bells mean check down.

When engine is stopped, two bells mean go astern.

When engine is going ahead, two bells mean reverse and go full speed astern.

Lights

Lights must be carried on all boats from sunset to sunrise.

White light is placed forward and is screened so as to be visible over ten points of the compass on each side.

Red light is placed on the left or port side and is screened so as to be visible from straight ahead to two points abaft the beam.

Green light is placed on right or starboard side and is screened so as to be visible from straight ahead to two points abaft the beam.

Upon being overtaken by another vessel, a white light must be shown astern.

A sail vessel carries two side lights only, but when approached by another vessel shows a bright light or torch from the point in which the other vessel is approaching.

Rules regarding lights apply to boats under way only.

When laying at anchor a white light visible all around the horizon is shown.

A row boat should carry a white light and show it upon the approach of another boat.

Buoys

in accordance with Section 4678 of the Revised Statutes of the United States, the following order is carried out in the coloring and numbering the buoys along the coast, or in the bays, harbors, sounds or channels, viz.:

1. In approaching the channel, etc., from seaward, red buoys with even numbers will be found on the starboard or right side of the channel.

2. In approaching the channel from seaward, black buoys with odd numbers will be found on the port or left side of the channel.

3. Buoys painted with red and black horizontal stripes will be found on obstructions, with channel ways on either side of them.

4. Buoys painted white and black perpendicular stripes will be found in mid-channel, and be passed close to.

When perches with balls, cages, etc., are placed on buoys, it indicates that they are turning points, the •color and number indicating on which side they shall be passed.

To use a buoy for mooring purposes with a boat is unlawful and punishable by fine and imprisonment, except when such mooring is done for the purpose of saving life.

The U. S. Government Sailing Rules, as applied to your district, together with a classified list of all lights, beacons and buoys, giving their description, character and location, will be sent you upon request to the Secretary of the Treasuiy, Washington, D. C.

Steering And Sailing Rules. Sailing Vessels

When two sailing vessels are approaching one another so as to involve risk of collision, one of them shall keep out of the way of the other as follows:

(a) A vessel which is running free shall keep out of the way of a vessel which is closehauled.

(6) A vessel which is closehauled on the port tack shall keep out of the way of a vessel which is close-hauled on the starboard tack.

(c) When both are running free, with wind on different sides, the vessel which has wind on the port side shall keep out of the way of the other.

(d) When they are running free, with the wind on the same side, the vessel which is to windward shall keep out of the way of the vessel which is to leeward.

Steam Vessels

When two steam vessels are meeting end on, or nearly end on, so as to involve risk of collision, each shall alter her course to starboard, so that each shall pass on the port side of the other.

When two steam vessels are crossing so as to involve risk of collision, the vessel which has the other on her own starboard side shall keep out of the way of the other.

When a steam vessel and a sailing vessel are proceeding in such directions as involve risk of collision, the steam vessel shall keep out of the way of the sailing vessel.

Where, by any of the rules here prescribed, one of two vessels shall keep out of the way, the other shall keep her course and speed.

Every steam vessel which is directed by these rules to keep out of the way of another vessel shall, on approaching her, if necessary, slacken her speed or stop, or reverse.

Notwithstanding anything contained in these rules, every vessel overtaking any other shall keep out of the way of the overtaken vessel.

In all weathers every steam vessel under way in taking any course authorized or required by these rules, shall indicate that course by the following signals on her whistle, to be accompanied, whenever required, by these rules, shall indicate course by the following signals on her whistle, to be accompanied, whenever required, by corresponding alteration on her helm; and every steam vessel receiving a signal from another shall promptly respond with the same signal: One blast to mean, "lam directing my course to star-board." Two blasts to mean, "I am directing my course to port." But the giving or answering signals by a vessel required to keep her course, shall not vary the duties and obligations of the respective vessels.

Sailor's Rule Of The Road

When both side lights you see ahead

Port your helm, and show your red.

Green to green, or red to red Perfect safety - Go ahead!

If to your starboard red appear,

It is your duty to keep clear.

To act as judgment says is proper;

To port - or starboard - back-or stop her.

But if upon your port is seen

A steamer's starboard light of green,

There's not so much for you to do,

For green to port keeps clear of you.