The illustration shows a handy device for cutting roots for food, and for chopping and mixing stale bread, potatoes, peelings, refuse fruit, etc., for poultry. Any blacksmith can make the chopper at little cost. For the cutting blades use two pieces of steel a little heavier than oil-barrel hoops, each 1 1/2 in. wide and 8 in. long. Procure a 1/2-in. iron rod, about 3 ft. long, bend one end in the shape of a spade handle and split the other end for a distance of about 2 1/2in.

The Chopper Consists of a Rod Handle to Which Blades are Attached by Riveting or Welding

Ill: The Chopper Consists of a Rod Handle to Which Blades are Attached by Riveting or Welding

Sharpen one edge of each blade and curve the metal slightly. Lay the two blades together with the convex sides' touching in the center and insert them in the slit in the handle end. They are riveted or welded in place. Heat and bend the blades at right angles.

Many of the materials mentioned for poultry foods may be chopped in an ordinary pail having a strong bottom, but it is best to make a box, about 1 1/2 ft. square and with a plank bottom, for use with the chopper.