By A. E. ANDREWS

The transformer in its simplest form consists of two separate and electrically independent coils of wire, usually wound upon an iron core.

I   Two Coils on an Iron Ring

Ill: Fig. I - Two Coils on an Iron Ring

Figure 1 shows two coils, P and S, placed upon an iron ring, R. One of these coils is connected to some source of energy, such as an alternating-current generator, or an alternating-current lighting circuit, receiving its energy therefrom. The other coil is connected to a load to which it delivers alternating current. The coil of the transformer that is connected to the source of energy is called the primary coil, and the one that is connected to the load, the secondary coil.

The electrical pressure (voltage) at which current is supplied by the secondary bears a definite relation to the electrical pressure at which current is supplied to the primary. This relation, as will be explained later, is practically the same as the relation between the number of turns in the secondary and primary coils. If there are a smaller number of turns in the secondary coil than there are in the primary, the secondary voltage is less than the primary, and the transformer is called a step-down transformer. If, on the other hand, there are a larger number of secondary turns than of primary, the secondary voltage is greater than the primary voltage, and the transformer is called a step-up transformer.

The transfer of electrical energy from the primary coil to the secondary coil of a transformer is based upon the fundamental principles of electro-magnetism and electromagnetic induction, and it will be necessary to investigate these principles before we can understand the operation of the transformer.

A magnet is a body, which, when freely suspended, assumes approximately a north and south position. The end of the magnet that points north is called the north pole, while the end that points south is called the south pole. The region surrounding a magnet is called a magnetic field. In this field the magnetism is supposed to flow along a large number of imaginary lines, called lines of force, and these lines are all supposed to emanate from the north pole of the magnet, pass through the medium surrounding the magnet and enter the south pole. The magnetic field surrounding a bar magnet is shown in Fig. 2. The strength of any magnetic field depends upon the number of these lines of force per unit area (square centimeter), the area being taken perpendicular to the direction of the lines.

2   Magnetic Field

Ill: Fig. 2 - Magnetic Field

In 1812, Oersted discovered that a compass needle, which is nothing but a permanent magnet freely suspended or supported, when placed near a conductor in which there was a direct current, was acted upon by a force that tended to bring the needle into a position at right angles to the conductor. This simple experiment proved to Oersted that there was a magnetic field produced by the current in the conductor. He also found that there was a definite relation between the direction of the current in the conductor, and the direction in which the north pole of the compass needle pointed. If the compass needle is allowed to come to rest in the earth's magnetic field, and a conductor is placed above it, the conductor being parallel to the needle, and a current then sent through the conductor, the needle will be deflected from its position of rest. Reversing the current in the conductor, reverses the direction in which the needle is deflected. If the needle be allowed to come to rest while there is a current in the conductor, and this current is then increased, it will be found that the deflection of the needle will be increased, but not in direct proportion to the increase in the current. Hence the strength of this magnetic field surrounding the conductor depends upon the value of the current in the conductor, and the direction of the field depends upon the direction of the current. If a conductor be passed through a piece of cardboard, as shown in Fig. 3, and a current sent through it in the direction indicated by the arrow A, a compass needle, moved about the conductor in the path indicated by the dotted line, will always assume such a position that the north pole points around the conductor in a clockwise direction as you look down on the cardboard. If the current be reversed, the direction assumed by the compass needle will be reversed. Looking along a conductor in the direction of the current, the magnetic held will consist of magnetic lines encircling the conductor. These lines will be con- centric circles, as a general rule, except when they are distorted by the presence of other magnets or magnetic materials, and their direction will be clockwise.

4   Magnetic Field Surrounding a Conductor

Ill: Fig. 4 - Magnetic Field Surrounding a Conductor

Fig. 5 - Magnetic Field about a Coil

Fig. 6 - A Coil about a Magnetic Circuit through Iron and Air

3   Magnetic Field around Conductor

Ill: Fig. 3 - Magnetic Field around Conductor

The strength of the magnetic field at any point near this conductor will depend upon the value of the current in the conductor, and the distance the point is from the conductor. The magnetic field surrounding a conductor is shown in Fig. 4. The plus sign indicates that the direction of the current is from you. The strength of a magnetic field due to a current in a conductor can be greatly increased by forming a coil of the conductor. Each turn of the coil then produces a certain number of lines, and the greater part of these lines pass through the center of the coil, as shown in Fig. 5. The field strength inside such a coil is dependent upon the number of turns in the coil, and the value of the current in these turns. Increasing the number of turns in the coil increases the number of magnetic lines passing through the center of the coil, as shown in Fig. 6. If the current be decreased in value, the field strength is decreased, and if the current be reversed in direction, the magnetic field is reversed in direc- tion. The number of magnetic lines passing through the solenoid depends also upon the kind of material composing the core of the solenoid, in addition to the number of turns and the value of the current in these turns. The number of lines per unit area inside a solenoid with an air core can be multiplied several times by introducing a soft-iron core. If this core be extended as shown in Fig. 7, the magnetic circuit (the path through which the magnetic lines pass) may be completed through it. The larger part of the total number of lines will pass through the iron, as it is a much better conductor of magnetism than air.

7   A Coil about a Magnetic Circuit through Iron

Ill: Fig. 7 - A Coil about a Magnetic Circuit through Iron

In 1831, Michael Faraday discovered that there was an electrical pressure induced in an electrical conductor when it was moved in a magnetic field so that it cut some of the lines forming the field. If this conductor be made to form part of a closed electrical circuit, there will be a current produced in the circuit as a result of the induced electrical pressure. The value of this induced electrical pressure depends upon the number of magnetic lines of force that the conductor cuts in one second. If 100,000,000 lines are cut in one second, an electrical pressure of one volt is produced. The direction of the induced pressure depends upon the direction of the movement of the conductor and the direction of the lines of force in the magnetic field; reversing either the direction of the magnetic field or the motion of the conductor, reverses the direction of the induced pressure. If both the direction of the magnetic field, and the direction of the motion of the conductor be reversed, there is no change in the direction of the induced pressure, for there is then no change in the relative directions of the two. The same results can be obtained by moving the magnetic field with respect to the conductor in such a way that the lines of force of the field cut the conductor.

If a permanent magnet be thrust into a coil of wire, there will be an electrical pressure set up in the coil so long as the turns of wire forming the coil are cutting the lines of force that are produced by the magnet. When the magnet is withdrawn, the induced electrical pressure will be reversed in direction, since the direction of cutting is reversed. A magnetic field may be produced through a coil of wire by winding it on the magnetic circuit shown in Fig. 8. Now any change of current in the coil P will cause a change in the number of magnetic lines passing through S and hence there will be an induced electrical pressure set up in S so long as the number of lines passing through it is changing. The pressure induced in each of the turns comprising the coil S depends upon the change in the number of magnetic lines through it.

Fig.8   Two Coils about a Magnetic Circuit through Iron

Ill: Fig.8 - Two Coils about a Magnetic Circuit through Iron

Let us now consider a condition of operation when there is no current in the secondary coil and the primary coil is connected to some source of electrical energy. When this is the case the current in the primary coil is not determined by Ohm's law, which states that the current is equal to the electrical pressure divided by the resistance, but is considerably less in value, for the following reason. The magnetic lines of force produced by the current in the primary induces an electrical pressure in the primary winding itself, the direction of which is always opposite to the impressed pressure, or the one producing the current. As a result of this induced pressure being set up in the primary, the effective pressure acting in the circuit is decreased. At the same time there is an electrical pressure induced in the secondary winding in the same direction as that induced in the primary.

If the secondary circuit be connected to a load, there will be a current in the secondary winding, which will pass around the magnetic circuit in the opposite direction to the primary current, and as a result will decrease the number of lines passing through the primary coil. This will in turn decrease the electrical pressure induced in the primary coil, and a larger current will exist in the primary winding than there was before any current was taken from the secondary coil. The decrease in induced pressure is small, but it is always ample to allow the required increase in primary current. There is, at the same time, a small decrease in the secondary pressure.

When the transformer is operating on no load, with no current in the secondary coil, the induced pressure in the primary coil is practically equal to the impressed pressure and hence a very small current will be taken from the source of energy. It is apparent now that if the primary and secondary coils have the same number of turns, the induced electrical pressure in each of these coils will be the same, assuming, of course, that all the magnetic lines that pass through the primary also pass through the secondary coil, and vice versa, or the secondary pressure is practically the same as the pressure impressed on the primary. If the number of turns in the secondary coil is greater or less than the number of turns in the primary, the magnetic lines will be cut a greater or less number of times by the secondary coil, and hence the induced pressure will be greater or less, depending upon the relation of the number of turns in the two coils.