The device illustrated seems paradoxical for it apparently works without any power being applied to it, making from two to three revolutions per hour, which, though slow, is nevertheless motion, requiring energy.

The shaft A is supported on the edges, in the bearings B and C, of a tank, D. A disk, E, having a central hole larger in diameter than the shaft, is located at the middle of the latter. The disk is supported by 12 or more cotton ropes, F. The tank is filled to the level G with water. The lower ropes, being immersed in the water, shrink and lift the disk slightly above the center in the position of an eccentric, as shown by the dotted lines in the sketch. The center of gravity of the disk in this position, being higher and slightly to one side of the shaft, the disk has a tendency to turn around. The motion drives the next rope into the water where it becomes soaked and shrinkage takes place again, lifting the disk to a higher position, while the rope coming out of the water dries out. The ropes emerging from the water but not yet thoroughly dry cause the upper part of the disk to be in an eccentric position laterally with reference to the center of the shaft, thus causing the center of gravity to be not only above but also slightly to one side. - Contributed by Charles Roberts, Brooklyn, N. Y.

The Expansion and Contraction of the Ropes Keep the Disk Up and to One Side of the Center

Ill: The Expansion and Contraction of the Ropes Keep the Disk Up and to One Side of the Center