By A. E. Andrews

Among the various methods for the transmission of speech electrically, without wire, from one point to another, the so-called "inductivity" system, which utilizes the principles of electromagnetic induction, is perhaps the simplest, because it requires no special apparatus. Since this system is so simple in construction, and its operation can be easily understood by one whose knowledge of electricity is limited, a description will be given of how to construct and connect the necessary apparatus required at a station for both transmitting and receiving a message.

Before taking up the actual construction and proper connection of the various pieces of apparatus, it will be well to explain the electrical operation of the system. If a conductor be moved in a magnetic field in any direction other than parallel to the field, there will be an electrical pressure induced in the conductor, and this induced electrical pressure will produce a current in an electrical circuit of which the conductor is a part, provided the circuit be complete, or closed, just as the electrical pressure produced in the battery due to the chemical action in the battery will produce a current in a circuit connected to the terminals of the battery. A simple experiment to illustrate the fact that there is an induced electrical pressure set up in a conductor when it is moved in a magnetic field may be performed as follows: Take a wire, AB, as shown in Fig. 1, and connect its terminals to a galvanometer, G, as shown. If no galvanometer can be obtained, a simple one can be made by supporting a small compass needle inside a coil composed of about 100 turns of small wire. The terminals of the winding on the coil of the galvanometer should be connected to the terminals of the conductor AB, as shown in Fig. 1. If now the conductor AB be moved up and down past the end of the magnet N, there will be an electrical pressure induced in the conductor, and this electrical pressure will produce a current in the winding of the galvanometer

1   Wire Connected to Galvanometer

Ill: Fig. 1 - Wire Connected to Galvanometer

G, which will cause the magnetic needle suspended in the center of the coil to be acted upon by a magnetic force tending to move it from its initial position, or position of rest. It will be found that this induced electrical pressure will exist only as long as the conductor AB is moving with respect to the magnetic field of the magnet N, as there will be no deflection of the galvanometer needle when the motion of the conductor ceases, indicating there is no current in the galvanometer winding, and hence no induced electrical pressure. It will also be found that the direction in which the magnetic needle of the galvanometer is deflected changes as the direction of motion of the conductor changes with respect to the magnet, indicating that there is a change in the direction of the current in the winding of the galvanometer, and since the direction of this current is dependent upon the direction in which the induced electrical pressure acts, there must have been a change in the direction of this pressure due to a change in the direction of motion of the conductor. The same results can be obtained by moving the magnet, allowing the conductor AB to remain stationary, the only requirement being a relative movement of the conductor and the magnetic field created by the magnet.

It is not necessary that the magnetic field be created by a permanent magnet. It can be produced by a current in a conductor. The fact that there is a magnetic field surrounding a conductor in which there is a current can be shown by a simple experiment, as illustrated in Fig. 2. If a wire be placed above a compass needle and parallel to the direction of the compass needle and a current be sent through the wire in the direction indicated by the arrow I, there will be a force acting on the Fig. 4 - Reversed compass needle

2   Compass Needle Test

Ill: Fig. 2 - Compass Needle Test

Lines of Force tending to turn the needle at right angles to the wire. The amount the needle is turned will depend upon the value of the current in the wire. There is a definite relation between the direction of the current in the wire and the direction of the magnetic field surrounding the wire, because a reversal of current in the conductor will result in a reversal in the direction in which the compass needle is deflected. Remembering that the direction of a magnetic field can be determined by placing a magnetic needle in the field and noting the direction in which the N-pole of the needle points, this being taken as the positive direction, if one looks along a conductor in which there is a current and the current be from the observer, the direction of the magnetic field about the conductor will be clockwise. Imagine a conductor carrying a current and that you are looking at a cross-section of this conductor (see Fig. 3), and the direction of the current in the conductor is from you (this being indicated in the figure by the cross inside the circle), then the lines of force of the magnetic field will be concentric circles about the conductor, they being nearer together near the conductor, indicating the strength of the field is greatest near the conductor. A compass needle placed above the conductor would place itself in such a position that the N-pole would point toward the right and the S-pole toward the left. If the needle be placed below the conductor, the N-pole would point to the left and the S-pole to the right, indicating that the direction of the magnetic field above the conductor is just the reverse of what it is below the conductor. The strength of the magnetic field produced by a current in a conductor can be greatly increased by forming the conductor into a coil. Figure 4 shows the cross-section of a coil composed of a single turn of wire. The current in the upper cross-section is just the reverse of what it is in the lower cross-section, as indicated by the cross and dash inside the two circles. As a result of the direction of current in the two cross-sections being different, the direction of the magnetic field about these two cross-sections will be different, one being clockwise, and the other counter-clockwise. It will be observed, however, that all the lines of force pass through the center of the coil in the same direction, or the magnetic field inside the coil is due to the combined action of the various parts of the conductor forming the complete turn. This magnetic field can be increased in value, without increasing the current in the conductor, by adding more turns to the coil.

The Construction Of A Simple Wireless Telephone Se 8073   Lines of Force

Ill: Fig. 3 - Lines of Force

A cross-section through a coil composed of eight turns placed side by side is shown in Fig. 5. The greater part of the magnetic lines created by each turn pass through the remaining turns as shown in the figure, instead of passing around the conductor in which the current exists that creates them, This results in the total num- ber of lines passing through the coil per unit of cross-sectional area being greater than it was for a single turn, although the value of the current in the conductor has remained constant, the only change being an increase in the number of turns forming the coil.

5   Magnetic Lines Passing through Center

Ill: Fig. 5 - Magnetic Lines Passing through Center

If a conductor be moved by the end of a coil similar to that shown in Fig. 5, when there is a current in the winding of the coil, there will be an electrical pressure induced in the conductor, just the same as though it were moved by the end of a permanent magnet. The polarity of the coil is marked in Fig. 5. The magnetic lines pass from the S-pole to the N-pole through the coil and from the N-pole to the S-pole outside the coil, just as they do in a permanent magnet.