A good coasting sled, which I call a Yankee bob, can be made from two hardwood barrel staves, two pieces of

Runners Made of Barrel Staves

Runners Made of Barrel Staves

2 by 6-in. pine, a piece of hardwood for the rudder and a few pieces of boards. The 2 by 6-in. pieces should be a little longer than one-third the length of the staves, and each piece cut tapering from the widest part, 6 in., down to 2 in., and then fastened to the staves with large wood screws as shown in Fig. 1. Boards 1 in. thick are nailed on top of the pieces for a seat and to hold the runners together. The boards should be of such a length as to make the runners about 18 in. apart.

A 2-in. shaft of wood, Fig. 2, is turned down to 1 in. on the ends and put through holes that must be bored in the front ends of the 2 by 6-in. pieces. A small pin is put through each end of the shaft to keep it in place. The rudder is a 1-1/2-in. hardwood piece which should be tapered to 1/2 in. at the bottom and shod with a thin piece of iron. A 1/2-in. hole is bored through the center of the shaft and a lag screw put through and turned in the rudder piece, making it so the rudder will turn right and left and, also, up and down. Two cleats are nailed to the upper sides of the runners and in the middle lengthways for the person's heels to rest against.

Any child can guide this bob, as all he has to do is to guide the rudder right and left to go in the direction named. If he wants to stop, he pulls up on the handle and the heel of the rudder will dig into the snow, causing too much friction for the sled to go any further. --Contributed by Wm. Algie, Jr., Little Falls, N. Y.