Some few years since, Mr. Harrison Weir (whose drawings of natural history are known probably to a wider circle of the general public than the works of most artists), wishing to pursue his favorite study of animals and horticulture, erected on the steep hillside of the road leading from Paddock Wood to Brenchley, a small "cottage ornée" with detached studio. Afterward desiring more accommodation, he carried out the buildings shown in our illustrations. Advantage has been taken of the slope of the hill on one side, and the rising ground in the rear on the other, to increase the effect of the buildings and meet the difficulty of the levels. The two portions--old, etched, and new, shown as black--are connected together by a handsome staircase, which is carried up in the tower, and affords access to the various levels. The materials are red brick, with Bathstone dressings, and weather-tiling on the upper floors. Black walnut, pitch pine, and sequoias have been used in the staircase, and joiner's work to the principal rooms. The principal stoves are of Godstone stone only, no iron or metal work being used. The architects are Messrs. Wadmore & Baker, of 35 Great St. Helens, E.C.; the builders, Messrs. Penn Brothers, of Pembury, Kent.--Building News.

Weirleigh Brenchley Kent 275 12a

ARTISTS HOMES
NO 11
"WEIRLEIGH"
BRENCHLEY, KENT.
THE RESIDENCE OF
HARRISON WEIR ESQ'RE
WADMORE & BAKER
ARCHITECTS