We annex illustrations of a meter designed by Mr. A. Schmid, of Zürich, and which, according to Engineering, is now considerably used on the Continent, not only for measuring water, but the sirup in sugar factories, in breweries, etc. It consists of a cast iron body containing two gun-metal-lined cylinders, and connected by an intermediate chamber. Round the body are formed two channels, one for the entrance and the other for the discharge of the water, etc., to be measured. Within the cylinder are placed two long pistons, provided with openings in such a way that each piston serves as a slide valve to the other, the flow being maintained through the ports in the connecting chamber. The arrangement of openings in the piston is shown in Figs. 5, 6, 7, and the intermediate passages in Figs. 1, 2, and 3. To the upper side of each piston is attached a cross-head working on a disk placed at each end of a horizontal shaft. To one of the disks is added a short connecting rod that drives the spindle of a counter.

SCHMID'S WATER METER.

SCHMID'S WATER METER.