One of the hinderances to the production of a regular and steady light in electric illumination is the absence of perfect uniformity in the carbons. This defect has more than once been pointed out by us, and we are glad to notice any attempt to remedy an admitted evil. To this end we illustrate above a machine for manufacturing carbons, invented by William Cunliffe. The object the inventor has in view is not only the better but the more rapid manufacture of carbons, candles, or electrodes for electric lighting or for the manufacture of rods or blocks of carbon or other compressible substances for other purposes, and his invention consists in automatic machinery whereby a regular and uniform pressure and compression of the carbon is obtained, and the rods or blocks are delivered through the formers, in a state of greater density and better quality then hitherto. The machine consists of two cylinders, A A', placed longitudinally, as shown at Fig. 1, and in reversed position in relation to each other. In each cylinder works a piston or plunger, a, with a connecting rod or rods, b; in the latter case the ends of the rods have right and left handed threads upon which a sleeve, c, with corresponding threads, works.

This sleeve, c, is provided with a hand wheel, so that by the turning it the stroke of the plungers, a a, and the size of the chambers, A A', is regulated so that the quantity of material to be passed through the dies or formers is thereby determined and may be indicated. In front of the chambers, A A', are fixed the dies or formers, d d, which may have any number of perforations of the size or shape of the carbon it is intended to mould. The dies are held in position by clamp pieces, e e, secured to the end of the chambers A A', by screws, and on each side of these clamp pieces are guides, with grooves, in which moves a bar with a crosshead, termed the guillotine, and which moves across the openings of the dies, and opening or closing them. Near the front end of the cylinders are placed small pistons or valves, f f, kept down in position by the weighted levers, g g (see Fig. 2, which is drawn to an enlarged scale), which, when the pressure in the chamber exceeds that of the weighted levers connected to the safety valve, f, the latter is raised and the guillotine bar, h, moved across the openings of the dies by the connecting rods, h', thereby allowing the carbon to be forced through the dies.

In the backward movement of the piston, a, a fresh supply of material is drawn by atmospheric pressure through the hoppers, B B', alternately. At the end of the stroke the arms of the rocking levers (which are connected by tension rods with the tappet levers) are struck by the disk wheel or regulator, the guillotine is moved back and replaced over the openings of the dies, ready for the next charge, as shown. The plungers are operated by hydraulic, steam, compressed air, or other power, the inlet and outlet of such a pressure being regulated by a valve, an example of which is shown at Fig. 1, and provided with the tappet levers, i i, hinged to the valve chest, C, as shown, and attached to spindles, i' i', operating the slide valves, and struck alternately at the end of each stroke, thus operating the valves and the guillotine connections, i² and i³. The front ends of the cylinders may be placed at an angle for the more convenient delivery of the moulded articles.--Iron.

MACHINE FOR MAKING ELECTRIC LIGHT CARBONS

MACHINE FOR MAKING ELECTRIC LIGHT CARBONS