The first and indispensable operation, in the preparation of the surface to receive the transfer, is the "sizing of the surface." It simply consists of a solution of gelatine chrome-alumed, as follows:

 Gelatine. 10 grains.

Water. 1 ounce.

A trace of chrome alum. 

Coat with a soft camel's hair brush and let dry. It is needless to say that numbers of plaques, plates, vases, etc., may be coated right off, and will then be ready for use at any time.

Having settled on the subject and carefully dusted the negative, as well as placed it in situ for reproduction, the next thing required is a suitable collodion, and the following will be found all that can be desired:

 TRANSFER COLLODION. 
Cotton. 3 drachms. Iodide of cadmium. 65 grains. Ammonium iodide. 25 " Bromide of cadmium. 19 " Ammonium bromide. 11 " Alcohol. 15 ounces. Ether. 15 "

The plate thoroughly cleaned and coated with the collodion is now transferred to a bath, as follows:

Nitrate of silver (common) 25 grains to the ounce.

Made slightly acid with nitric acid.

After sensitizing, the plate is exposed in the usual way and taken to the room where pictures are ordinarily developed, and quantum suff. of the following poured into the developing cup to bring out the image:

 DEVELOPING SOLUTION. 
A Winchester of water, i.e. 80 ounces. Protosulphate of iron. 240 grains. Citric acid. 240 "

Or the following may be used:

 Pyro 3 grains\

Citric acid 2 " } per ounce of water.

Glacial acetic acid 30 drops / 

After perfect development the picture is well washed and then fixed in a saturated solution of hypo.; after which it is thoroughly washed.

It will now be found that the picture is not altogether satisfactory; it lacks both vigor and color. To improve matters recourse is now had to

Toning

 Gold. 1 grain.

Water. 5 ounces. 

With this a very fine depth is soon attained, and a nice picture the result. Leave out the toning, and only a poor, sunken-looking picture will be the outcome; but directly the toning bath is employed richness at once comes to the fore. I have, however, known of instances where the picture needed no toning.