Two of the three species which form the subject of this article are not only highly ornamental, but also valuable timber trees. Until recently they were considered to belong to the genus Planera, which, however, consists of but a single New World species; now, they properly constitute a distinct genus, viz., Zelkova, which differs materially from the true Planer tree in the structure of the fruit, etc. Z. crenata, from the Caucasus, and Z. acuminata, from Japan, are quick growing, handsome trees, with smooth bark not unlike that of beech or hornbeam; it is only when the trees are old that the bark is cast off in rather large sized plates, as is the case with the planes. The habit of both is somewhat peculiar; in Z. crenata especially there is a decided tendency for all the main branches to be given off from one point; these, too, do not spread, as for instance do those of the elm or beech, but each forms an acute angle with the center of the tree. The trunks are more columnar than those of almost all other hardy trees. Their distinct and graceful habit renders them wonderfully well adapted for planting for effect, either singly or in groups.

The flowers, like those of the elm, are produced before the leaves are developed; in color they are greenish brown, and smell like those of the elder. It does not appear that fruits have yet been ripened in England. All the Zelkowas are easily propagated by layers or by grafting on the common elm.

YOUNG ZELKOWA TREE (21 FEET HIGH)

YOUNG ZELKOWA TREE (21 FEET HIGH)