The form shown in Figure 26 is an economical ruling, as it only occupies one page and gives all required particulars. If necessary, two lines can be used for an item which requires a fuller description than ordinary. The entry of the name of the maker or drawee is unnecessary, for, in the case of a note or accepted draft, it is entered at once in the collection diary, where space is provided for the maker's name. If it is a draft for acceptance, the drawee's name is entered in the messenger's book, and in due course the draft is either returned refused to the correspondent or entered in the diary.

(Enter Month and Year

BANK

19

BILLS RECEIVED FOR COLLECTION

Their No.

Instruction

Day of

Month

Received from

Place

Maturity

Amount

B. C. No.

Date of Disposition

Remarks

Initials

Figure 26. Collection Register

Notes held as Collateral Security on Account of

When

Received

C.R. No.

Promissors and Endorsers

Addresses

Due Date

Amount

Balance of Notes on Hand

Dr.

Cr.

Figure 27. Collateral Register

In the case of customers who have a large number of collections, separate forms are frequently provided, on which the customer lists the items himself in duplicate and the bank files the list in a binder as its register and diary, adopting the customer's number as its own. An initial letter or prefix number can be used to distinguish one account from another. (Figure 28.)

Collection diaries are very similar in form to those used for bills for discount, and need no special description.