Veal A La Mode

Four pounds of veal cut two inches thick (from the round); one pound of fat bacon; two ounces of fresh butter; six bay leaves; half a teaspoonful of powdered mace; half a teaspoonful of powdered cloves; four tablespoonfuls of cider vinegar; two teaspoonfuls of browned flour. Wash the veal in cold water, dry it off, cut the outside skin to prevent it from curling, and pound it well on both sides. Cut the bacon in slices, take off the skin, trim off the outside edges and cut it in pieces wedge shaped, then make the incisions deep with a sharp pointed knife and lard it half an inch apart. Have ready on the fire a dutch oven with two ounces of fresh butter in it, and when it is hot enough to brown, salt, pepper and dredge the veal with flour on the upper side and lay it in, flour side down, then season and dredge the other side, cover the oven close, and brown it on both sides a yellow brown, then put in the bay leaves and hot water enough to reach half of the veal. Cover the oven and cook it slowly one hour. Baste it often and when done lift it into a warm chafing-dish, skim off part of the fat from the gravy, then put in two teaspoonfuls of browned flour, half a pint of hot water, the mace, cloves and vinegar. Let it boil a few minutes, stir it up from the bottom, put in salt and pepper to the taste and pour it through the gravy strainer into the gravy dish.

Cincinnati Pates A La Strasbourg

One pound of young calf's liver weighed after it is cooked; six bay leaves; half a teaspoonful of salt; one gill of the water the liver was cooked in; half a teaspoonful of powdered cloves; half a tea-spoonful of powdered mace; half a teaspoonful of pepper; half a teaspoonful of salt; four ounces of fresh butter with one teaspoonful of browned flour mixed with it. Wash the liver in cold water and put it into a stew pan with cold water enough to cover it, and when it begins to boil skim it as long as anything rises to the surface, then put in the bay leaves and half a teaspoonful of salt, boil it until it is very tender; it takes about two hours. When done put it into a deep porcelain dish, pour the water and bay leaves over it and let it stand until cold. The water should have boiled down to about half a pint. Strain the water through a gravy strainer or wire sieve, put one gill of it into a skillet, add all the spices and seasoning, set it over the fire, mix the browned flour and butter together, stir it in, let boil a minute and take it off. Weigh the liver, cut it in to thin small pieces and grind it in a porcelain mortar to a fine paste, moistening it each ime with two tablespoonfuls of the sauce. It can be put into small molds or one large one, and cut in slices when served. It is very nice for lunch or tea.

Veal Cutlet

A veal cutlet should be cut from the thickest part of the round and should be one inch and a half thick. After it is washed in cold water and dried off, cut the outside skin to prevent it from curling, then pound it on both sides, salt and pepper it and dredge it with flour on the upper side. Have ready on the fire a frying pan with a tablespoonful of fresh butter and one of lard, and when it is hot enough to brown lay in the cutlet, flour side down, then salt, pepper and dredge the other side. Cover the frying pan close, (the steam makes the veal tender) and cook it slowly twenty minutes, then turn it and cook it twenty minutes longer. When it is done lift it into a warm chafing-dish, put two teaspoonfuls of browned flour and a gill of hot water into the gravy. Let it boil a few minutes, stir it up well from the bottom, then pour it over the cutlet.