Stewing is allowing food to simmer in a small amount of hot liquid for a long time. A simmering heat is that just below boiling point. This is the most economical way of cooking food, as all the juices and nutriment are retained, while the food being cooked is softened and rendered entirely digestible. Stewing is often spoiled by being done too rapidly. The meat is really fried over a hot fire to begin with, and after this very slow cooking is absolutely necessary. There is a true saying that " to boil a stew is to spoil a stew." If a stew boils one observes large bubbles on the top of it; if it simmers, the bubbles are tiny and rise only here and there on the stew. There are two varieties of stews made from meat: the white stew or fricassee, and the brown stew or ragout.

A close covered casserole or saucepan is best for making stews, which may be cooked in the oven, on top of the stove, or in the tireless cooker. Stewing is specially suitable for the coarse and therefore cheaper parts of meat, which are thus rendered tender without loss of their juices. The slow cooking in moist heat softens the hard fiber and gelatinous substances. Meat loses but little weight if stewed. Vegetables being usually added to the meat, the bulk of the stew is economically increased, and it is rendered more savory and wholesome. Stews are convenient for family use, as they can be easily reheated or kept hot without spoiling them.

A Place for Everything. Everything in Its Place

A Place for Everything. Everything in Its Place

Making Cocoa. Page 19.

Making Cocoa. Page 19.

Choca. Page 18.

Choca. Page 18.