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Pot-Pourri From A Surrey Garden | by C. W. Earle



These 'Notes' would never have been extracted from me without the encouragement I have received from all my dear nieces, real and adopted, and the very practical assistance of one of them. Now that the book is written, I can only hope that it will not prove too great a disappointment to them all.

TitlePot-Pourri From A Surrey Garden
AuthorC. W. Earle
PublisherSmith, Elder & Co
Year1898
Copyright1898, Smith, Elder & Co
AmazonPot-pourri from a Surrey Garden

With An Appendix by Lady Constance Lytton

'Often times he would make it his prayer that he should not be accounted as an hypocrite by reason that his life sorted not with his teaching; insisting there is a duality in unity in most of us, and that to a writer it hath still been permitted (not for his own behoof, since what true profit is there to a man in seeming that he is not?) to put his better mind in his books'

To My Sister The Countess Of Lytton.

-January
Introductory-Indispensable books-An old Hertfordshire garden-Reminiscences-My present garden plants in a London room Japanese floral arrangement-Cooking vegetables and fruit-Making coffee-Early blosso...
-January 2nd
I am not going to write a gardening book, or a cookery book, or a book on furnishing or education. Plenty of these have been published lately. I merely wish to talk to you on paper about several subje...
-January 3rd
I will begin by telling you that I was brought up for the most part in the country, in a beautiful, wild, old-fashioned garden. This garden, through circumstances, had remained in the hands of an old ...
-January 16th
I can hardly do better to-day than tell you about my dark London room, and what I have in it as regards plant life in this the worst month of the year. I will begin with the dead and dried things that...
-January 16th. Continued
On a table below the chimney-piece is a small flower-glass filled with a pretty early greenhouse flower, orange and red, called Chorozemia, which does well in water. I have made a considerable study o...
-January 18th
One excellent way of arranging flowers in most rooms is to have a table, a kind of altar, especially dedicated to them. This does the flowers or plants much more justice than dotting them about the ro...
-January 20th
I came from London, to pass two or three days in the country and look after my garden, as usual. I make lists and decide on the seeds for the year, and look to the mulching of certain plants. Hardl...
-January 22nd
I take back to London with me today, amongst other things, some Lachenalia aurea. All Lachenalias are worth growing. They are little Cape bulbs, which have to be treated like the Freezias, watered as ...
-January 31st
With the high temperature we have had this year, one is apt to forget the horrors of a severe winter, till reminded just lately by two very cold nights. The frosted windows of my bedroom made me think...
-John Frost
The door was shut, as doors should be, Before you went to bed last night, Yet John Frost has got in, you see, And left your windows silver white. He must have waited till you slept, And not a...
-February
Forced bulbs-The exhibitions of the Royal Horticultural Society-Early spring salads and vegetables-Rhubarb tarts-Orange marmalade-Recipes by a French chef. ...
-February 8th
This is essentially the month of forced bulbs-Hyacinths, Tulips, Jonquils, Narcissuses-charming things in themselves, and within easy reach of everyone who can afford to buy them either as bulbs in th...
-February 14th
Salads are rather a difficulty during the early spring in English gardens. In seasonless London everything is always to be bought. I wonder why Mache (Corn Salad, or Lamb's Lettuce), so much grown in ...
-February 27th
I have lately evolved a good spring vegetable dish. The common green Turnip-tops, which are wholesome, but not palatable if plainly boiled, are delicious when treated like the French puree of Spinach ...
-Pot Au Feu Soup
Proportions: 15 lbs. of beef, 5 1/2 lbs. of veal, 1 chicken, 2 1/2 gallons of water, 3 fine carrots, 1 big turnip, 1 large onion, a bunch of parsley, half a head of celery, a parsnip, 2 cloves, and so...
-Consomme
Consomme means the foundation of the soup; this foundation ought always to be clear, lightly coloured, and, above all, strong. Take about 2 lbs. of beef and veal, without fat, chop them up together...
-Julienne Soup
Ingredients: 3 fine carrots, 2 turnips, 2 small pieces of celery, 2 sprigs of parsley, 1 onion, the quarter of a large Savoy cabbage, the hearts of 2 lettuces, a bunch of sorrel, and a sprig of chervi...
-Gnocchi A La Creme
Make a paste (pate a choux) as follows:-Ingredients: 4 1/2 oz. of flour, 4 1/2 oz. of butter, 1 1/2 pint of water, 3 whole eggs (4 if small), a pinch of salt and of sugar. Put the water, salt, and sug...
-Bechamel Sauce
Cut into little squares the half of a carrot and a small onion; take a small saucepan, put in a good bit of butter, add the vegetables, fry them lightly without letting them brown. This done, add a go...
-Pate A Ravioli
Ingredients for the paste: 9 oz. of flour, the yelks of 4 eggs, a pinch of salt, a little tepid water. Put the flour on a marble slab, make a hole in the centre, add the yelks of the eggs and the s...
-Preparation For Ravioli
Forcemeat of chicken, or, failing this, one can use veal, if nice and white and tender. Ingredients: 4 1/2 oz. of meat, 2 1/4 oz. of panade, 1/4 oz. of fresh butter, 2 yelks of eggs, salt, and nutmeg....
-Panade For The Forcemeat
Put about a gill of water in a saucepan, with a bit of butter the size of a walnut. Put the saucepan on the fire; as soon as it boils up, add one tablespoonful and a half of flour; work the mixture at...
-Mousse De Volaille
Take off the fillets, etc, of three chickens, cut them up into little dice, pound them into a mortar, and reduce them to a paste; this done, pass them first through a wire sieve, and afterwards throug...
-Sauce Supreme
This sauce requires great care in making. Put in a saucepan 4 1/2 oz. of butter and 3 1/2 oz. of flour. Put the saucepan on a slow fire, and let the flour cook lightly without getting coloured. As soo...
-Mousse De Foies Gras A La Gelee
Take a cylinder-shaped mould with an opening in the centre, put the mould for a second or two onto the ice. This done, pour into it a glassful of meat jelly, cold without being frozen. Turn your mould...
-Celeris En Branches, Demi-Glace's
Pick and peel very carefully six or eight heads of celery, according to their size. Bleach them for fifteen or twenty minutes in boiling water, dip them in cold water to cool them, strain them onto a ...
-March
Slow-growing hardy shrubs-The Swanley Horticultural College-Gardening as an employment for women-Aucubas berries-Planting Asparagus-Brussels Sprouts-Sowing annuals-A list of flowering creepers-' The P...
-March 2nd
Of all the low-growing quite hardy shrubs, especially in small gardens, nothing is more useful for picking and arranging with all kinds of flowers than the common Box. The kinds vary a little, some be...
-March 8th
To-day there has come up from the country one of the spring gems of the year, a large bunch of the lilac Daphne, the old Mezereum. It is a small shrub, not a quick grower, and most people, especially ...
-March 10th
The Aucubas fruit well with us, and a branch of their bright shining green leaves and coral berries looks exceedingly well in a Japanese wedge and lasts a long time. We plant the male and female plant...
-March 12th
Asparagus should be planted now, and, to save time, it is best to get two-year-old plants from France. I recommend Godfroy le Boeuf, Horticulteur, Argenteuil, pres Paris. Dig the ground three spits de...
-March 15th
I find that this is the best time for sowing annuals that have to be sown in place. If sown later, they never do so well. Poppies, Love-in-the-Mist, Mignonette, Sweet Sultans, Bartonia aurea, etc. Thi...
-March 22nd
Such a lovely spring day, in spite of its cold wind; it makes me long to be sixteen miles away in my little garden. Even here in London great pure white stately clouds are sailing over the blue. How l...
-The Poet In The City
The poet stood in the sombre town, And spoke to his heart and said: '0 weary prison, devised by man ! 0 seasonless place and dead !' His heart was sad, for afar he heard The sound of the spring'...
-The Poet In The City. Part 2
1629. I have both the Parkinsons. The first published of the two has the following curious descriptive inscription written on a shield at the bottom of the title-page:Paradisi in Sole Paradisus ...
-The Poet In The City. Part 3
1640. We now come to Parkinson's second book, 'The Theatre of Plants, or an Universal and Complete Herbal. Composed by John Parkinson, Apothecary of London and the King's Herbarist' - ('the King' ...
-The Poet In The City. Part 4
'From the twelfth to the end of the seventeenth century it was implicitly and almost universally believed that in the western islands of Scotland certain geese, of which the nesting-places were never ...
-The Poet In The City. Part 5
1771. 'The Flora Londinensis, by William Curtis. The first number was brought out by subscription on the above date. I have the two volumes of the first edition. It is the handsomest, the most ...
-The Poet In The City. Part 6
1793. 'Oxalis Monographia' is an exquisite study of about a hundred Oxalises. Nearly all the plates are coloured. Most of these delicate little plants with their bulbous roots come from the Cape of ...
-April
Whims of the weather-Spring flowers-The herbaceous nursery-Love for the garden-A light sprayer-Homely French receipts -French gardening-The late frosts. ...
-April 2nd
We came down to our little Surrey garden, only sixteen miles from London, for good yesterday; and though the wind be ever so cold and the skies ever so grey, I yet feel that that which makes going to ...
-April 3rd
This is the time of year when we make up our nursery, which I consider one of the most important gardening acts of the whole year, and one most fruitful in results. We take up, from wherever they happ...
-April 4th
All the Linums and Linarias (see Mr. Robinson's book) are useful for house and table decoration, and are very suitable for small gardens. The common blue Flax is a lovely thing; so is the white French...
-April 5th
We started to-day to spend a week in a French country house, sleeping one night on our way at beautiful Chartres, which, as I am not writing a guidebook, I shall not describe. The weather was bitterly...
-Vol-Au-Vent Au Maigre
Make a high Vol-au-vent crust. Prepare some quenelles made of fish-any white fish would do (lemon-soles, whiting, haddock, gurnet, etc.); some white bottled mushrooms preserved in salt, not vinegar (t...
-April 16th
We returned home last night. At this time of year how a week or ten days changes the growth in one's garden ! I must confess that sometimes, coming home after dark, I have taken a hand-candle to inspe...
-April 17th
We have had lately a severely cold week -Blackthorn winter indeed. How the poor garden shrivels and shrinks, and seems to lose all its colour! Many years ago, in a volume of Tennyson given me by Ow...
-May
Vegetable growing-Autumn annuals-Spring seeds-Description of my own garden-Weeding-Houses facing west-Flowering shrubs-May flowers-Sundials-Eoses and Creepers-History of the Tulip-Salads-Plant shelter...
-May 1st
I have not mentioned during these spring months the cultivation of the kitchen garden. I leave that entirely to my gardener, only helping throughout the year by looking up in Vilmorin's book (mentione...
-Baby Seed Song
Little brown brother, oh! little brown brother, Are you awake in the dark ? Here we lie cosily, close to each other; Hark to the song of the lark-'Waken!' the lark says, 'waken and dress you; ...
-May 3rd
It seems almost useless to describe my garden. Though I myself am so very fond of it, there is no reason anyone else should understand why I love it; and when I read the description of the gardens tha...
-May 3rd. Continued
The longest side of the house faces west. How I love it because of this! To my mind, every country house is dull that does not face west, and have its principal view that way. Modern civilisation forb...
-May 5th
The garden looks dull just now; but four weeks of no rain always produces that effect on this soil. When the showers do come, everything revives in the most extraordinary way, partly from the earth be...
-May 10th
I have a friend who to-day writes she is having iron rings driven into an old stone house round the windows so as to hold pots of Carnations and Geraniums, to hang down as they do in Tyrol and Switzer...
-May 11th
Epimediums are charming little plants with lovely, graceful foliage, and are well worth growing if you have a moist and shady corner. E. pinnatum is perhaps the best, and has long clusters of small ye...
-To The Blue Anemone
Flower of starry clearness bright, Quivering urn of coloured light, Hast thou drawn thy cup's rich dye From the intenseness of the sky ? From a long, long fervent gaze Through the year's first golden ...
-May 16th
None of the small cheap bulbs are better worth growing than the Alliums, white and yellow. They increase themselves rapidly, and are quite hardy, though the white ones force well and are useful. Peopl...
-May 19th
This is the first day of one of the great gardening interests and treats in the year-the Royal Horticultural Show in the Temple Gardens. I go every year now, and should be sorry to miss it. How odd it...
-May 22nd
Not the smallest and dryest garden should be without Stachys lanata, a white woolly leaved plant, called Rabbit's Ears by cottage children, and particularly attractive to some people, who through life...
-May 28th
After a great deal of practice I really think I have evolved a way of packing cut flowers which is both economical and satisfactory. I collect all the linen-draper's and milliner's cardboard boxes tha...
-May 29th
An excellent fish sauce is to beat some cream, and drop into it a little anchovy sauce from a quite recently opened bottle. It is served cold, in a little deep dish, not in a sauce-boat. Here is an...
-Gascony Butter
Take equal quantities of parsley (picked from the stalk and parboiled), of anchovies (washed, boned, and pounded), and of fresh butter. Mix the ingredients well together, and pass them through a hair-...
-To Boil Patna Rice For Curry
Put 3 quarts of spring water in a saucepan to boil, and add 1/2 lb. of rice. Let it boil as fast as possible, with the lid off. Keep skimming it all the time. When done (which means that it is soft...
-Curry Of Ham Toast
This receipt is useful to finish up an old ham:-8 oz. of lean ham chopped very fine, 1 teaspoonful of Harvey and 1 of Worcester sauce, 1 teaspoonful of curry paste, a small piece of butter, a good tab...
-Bottled Green Gooseberries
Pick off noses and stalks, but be careful not to burst the berries. Then fill some wide-mouthed bottles quite full, tie over the mouths paper with pricked holes, stand the bottles in boiling water, an...
-Wax For Bottles
2 parts of beeswax, 1 part of resin, 1 part powdered colour (Venetian red). Melt the beeswax and resin in an old iron saucepan. (Only melt, do not boil.) Then stir in the colour and let it cool a litt...
-June
Hands and fingers after weeding-Shrub-pruning-Boxes for birds-Robins in greenhouse- 'Burning Bush' - Two Polygonums-Strawberries-Geraniums and cuttings-Cactuses-Freezia bulbs -Gloriosa superba-Luncheo...
-June 2nd
It must be admitted that one of the great drawbacks to gardening and weeding is the state into which the hands and fingers get. Unfortunately, one's hands belong not only to oneself, but to the family...
-June 4th
Now, and even a little earlier, is the great pruning-time of the year for all spring-flowering shrubs. No doubt this cutting-out may be especially important in a light soil such as ours, where things ...
-June 9th
The Strawberry season is beginning. For many years this fruit was poison to me; now it gives me pleasure to think that I live almost entirely upon it for some weeks in the summer, eating it three time...
-June 20th
For anyone with a small stove or warm greenhouse I can thoroughly recommend the growing of the Gloriosa superba or Creeping Lily. It is a lovely and curious flower; it lasts very long in water, and fl...
-June 27th
For those who live in the country, or those who spend the early summer months in towns and have their flowers sent up, no family of plants are more useful than the Campanulas (all described in the 'En...
-July
The Welsh Poppy-Astrantias - Old Green Peas-Red Currants-The Madonna Lily, L'epee de la Vierge-The value of the reserve garden-An English summer's day-Light soils and dry summers -Other people's garde...
-July 6th
One of the prettiest weeds that we have in our modern gardens, and which alternates between being our greatest joy and our greatest torment, is the Welsh Poppy. It succeeds so well in this dry soil th...
-July 8th
I consider no trouble too great, whether the garden be large or small, to grow the beautiful stately Madonna Lily (Lilium candidum). It requires very different treatment from other Lilies, and flouris...
-July 10th
This is about the time we move our things from the reserve garden, spoken of before, and from the late-sown seed beds, and plant into the borders and square beds those amiable autumn annuals that do n...
-July 14th
How beautiful are the really hot, lovely English summer's days. They come sometimes, and they are exquisite; nothing beats them. Why, oh ! why, can I never enjoy such things without that tinge of sadn...
-La Vie
Le ciel est par-dessus le toit, Si bleu, si calme ! Un arbre par-dessus le toit Berce sa palme. La cloche dans le ciel qu'on voit Doucement tinte, Un oiseau sur l'arbre qu'on voit Chante s...
-July 15th
July is a very busy month in all gardens. The borders must be cleared and replanted, the seeds of perennials have to be gathered and sown, and many other things require attention. The Delphiniums may ...
-July 17th
We have had a most unusually hot dry summer, and to go into the garden is absolute pain to me, for all the trouble and labour of the year seem more or less wasted. Plants are miserably forced into blo...
-July 25th
Not the least delightful part, in my opinion, of the growing knowledge of gardening is the appreciative visiting of the gardens of others. On first going into a garden one knows by instinct, as a houn...
-July 25th. Continued
Water-plants, such as the Sweet-smelling Rush, the flowering Rush Butomus umbellatus, the Water-lily, the Cape pond-weed Aponogeton, can all be grown in tanks if the plants are planted in baskets or h...
-July 27th
Watering outdoor plants not in pots or tubs is a question about which people differ much. Gardeners as a rule are against it, and it certainly kills perennial plants and small shrubs if begun and left...
-July 30th
Two shrubs are now flowering in the garden which in this month of the year are valuable. One is called Glethra (Sweet Pepper Bush), mentioned in May for pot-cultivation, and useful, as it stands pulli...
-August
Gilbert White-The decline of vegetable culture in the Middle Ages-Preserving French Beans and Scarlet Runners-Scotch gardens-Tropaeolum speciosum-Crimson-berried Elder-The coast of Sutherlandshire-The...
-August 1st
I cannot allow a summer to go by without referring to that dear old classic, Gilbert White's 'Natural History of Selborne.' Even now I do not quite know why I am so fond of these letters, except that ...
-August 1st. Part 2
I have made this long extract because it seems to me to throw an exceedingly interesting side-light on the non-cultivation, and above all on the bad cooking, of vegetables, which extended to a great d...
-August 1st. Part 3
I had always heard of the brilliant beauty of Scotch gardens, and the moment I saw them I understood why it was. The seasons are so late that all the summer flowers bloom together; May and June of the...
-August 1st. Part 4
There had always been a tradition that one of the ships belonging to the Spanish Armada had been wrecked off this coast, but no treasure had ever been found. Two years ago, when the river was low, a c...
-September
Weeds we alternately love and hate-Amaryllis belladonna-First touch of frost-Colour-blindness - Special annuals-Autumn seed-sowing-Re-planting Carnation layers-Planting drives and approaches to small ...
-September 11th
In talking of the Welsh Poppy in July I spoke of it as one of the plants which are such weeds that at times one says, 'Oh, I wish I had never introduced the horrible thing into the garden at all!' ...
-September 15th
Everyone who lives at all in the neighbourhood of suburban residences must be struck with the extraordinary sameness of the shrubberies which surround these houses and gardens, especially those which ...
-September 20th
Towards the end of this month we take up the double Violets-old Neapolitan and Marie Louise are the ones we grow-exchanging runners with friends and neighbours in the spring, as it is not well always ...
-September 25th
The plants moved from the reserve garden in July have done very well. The Michaelmas Daisies are unusually good. There are a great many dwarf kinds, very suitable for small gardens. Little shapely tre...
-September 3oth
We have tried for the first time just lately the baby chickens, which were a fashionable and expensive luxury last season in London. Boast them as you roast a quail, or they can be boiled and served c...
-October
Autumn mornings and robins-Italian Daturas-The useful 'Myti-cuttah'-Nerines-Three Cape greenhouse plants-Sweet Chestnuts-Other people's gardening difficulties-Making new beds-The great Apple time-Fren...
-October 1st
Once more we are back in the month when the robin sings so much. The robins, I find, are the tamest of all the birds in a garden; and as we fork over the beds, or dig new ones, they follow us all abou...
-To The Redbreast
Unheard in summer's flaring ray, Pour forth thy notes, sweet singer, Wooing the stillness of the autumn day; Bid it a moment linger, Nor fly Too soon from winter's scowling eye. The blackbird...
-October 2nd
How beautiful are these early autumn mornings! Here, at any rate, they have qualities unequalled all through the long year. The flowers shine with colour out of the grey mists, as they do at twilight ...
-October 4th
The Nerines (see Johnson's 'Gardener's Dictionary') have flowered well and been charming this year. N. Fothergillii is the finest colour, but all are most useful autumn bulbs, and last a long time in ...
-October 8th
I have been lately on the East Coast. One cannot help being amused to find that gardening is so like life, each one has his own difficulties. I was suggesting to my friend to plant her Violets in leaf...
-October 14th
It is a very good plan, when you want to cut a new bed or alter the shape of an old one, to shuffle along the wet dewy grass on an October morning -and this leaves a mark which enables you very well t...
-October 15th
This is the great Apple time. All the windfalls that take place in September and October we collect, and either eat or stew down into Apple jelly. It is very useful through the winter in many ways, an...
-October 18th
I have at last succeeded in flowering the Schizostylis coccinea. I am relieved to see that in the new edition of the 'English Flower Garden 'this is pronounced a great difficulty in a light dry soil. ...
-October 24th
This is about the time we replant the Violas and Saxifrages in the sunny beds, taking them out of the shady border in the reserve garden. London Pride is better taken up and divided every two years. A...
-October 27th
I have been taking up to-day the Lobelia cardinalis and L. fulgens. Cardinalis is the one with the dark leaves and the handsomer grower; the other flowers rather the earlier. ...
-October 28th
With all the weeks and weeks of wet we have had this year we have waited long for our 'st. Luke's Summer'; and now it has come at last, it is not with its usual still, lovely warm days. It has come fi...
-Trees For Autumn
Trees for autumn leaves and berries:-Ash (Mountain), Cherry, Siberian Crab, Buckthorn (sea), Elder (golden), Filbert (purple), Hawthorn, Hornbeam, Maple. Creepers and shrubs for autumn:-Aristolochi...
-October 26th
The French proverb, 'La variete c'est la vie,' always appeals to me in many things, especially domestic ones. I know nothing such a test of a good housekeeper as a periodic change of biscuits. Everybo...
-Dinner-Table Decorations
April White Allium with greenhouse Asparagus, red Geranium in low vases between, with no green. Various spring flowers and blossoms arranged, each separate, in small narrow-necked vases, having the...
-October 30th
It is an excellent plan, if you have a very sunny window that you are glad to have shaded in the summer and not in winter, to put two bars of wood like a bracket out from the wall as a support for one...
-October 30th. Continued
Sowing your own seeds takes too long, and is too uncertain without a hot-bed. Do not put off planting all the hardy plants too late. London is warmer than the country, and your great object ought to b...
-November
Letting in the autumn sun-Jerusalem Artichokes-Hardy Bamboos -Polygonum cusjndatum-Autumn flowers-Small Beech-trees -Last day in the country-Some gardening books of this century. ...
-November 2nd
I recommend housekeepers to take down about the end of October all muslin curtains, silk blinds, etc, which shade the windows, only keeping such curtains as are drawn at night for warmth. The differ-a...
-November 8th
To-day we have had our first dish of preserved French Beans out of the salt pan, before described; and they are really delicious, just as if they had been freshly picked in August. I suppose everyb...
-November 6th
The last few days there has been quite a hard frost, and last night our garden thermometer registered ten degrees. This means, of course, death to everything not quite hardy; and even the hardiest han...
-November 9th
One or two hardy Bamboos should be in all gardens, because of their appearance just now, apart from all other reasons. The 'English Flower Garden'gives the best kinds, which must be selected according...
-November 14th
This is my last day in the country, calm and warm. I eat my luncheon by the open window. All Nature is very, very still, the silence broken now and then by the chirp of a bird and the distant crow of ...
-La Melancolie
Que me dis-tu, morne vent d'automneMiserable vent ? Toi dont la chanson douce et monotone Jadis charmait tant ? Tu me dis, helas ! qu'amour et jeunesse M'ont fait leurs adieux . . . Et du fon...
-Modern Gardening Books
In the month of March I finished noticing the books in my possession up to the end of the last century. I begin again with this century, and shall carry them down to the present day. 1803. (An X...
-Modern Gardening Books. Part 2
I wonder if it will strike anyone on reading this that the sins of the botanist have been inherited in some degree by the modern gardener ? The book is dedicated to William Roscoe of Liverpool. Rar...
-Modern Gardening Books. Part 3
1824. 'The Universal Herbal,'by Thomas Greene. This is an ambitious book in two large fat volumes. It professes to contain an account of all the known plants in the world, adapted to the use of the ...
-Modern Gardening Books. Part 4
The story of Mrs. Loudon's marriage is rather interesting. As a girl (1825) she wrote what she herself describes as 'a strange, weird novel,' called 'The Mummy'-perhaps the first of the prophetic stor...
-Modern Gardening Books. Part 5
1828. 'Memoires du Musee d'Histoire naturelle. 1834. 'Memoires sur quelques Especes de Cactees.' These are portions of two books with most beautiful and curious illustrations of Cactuses, the ...
-Modern Gardening Books. Part 6
1835. Culpepper's 'Complete Herbal.' A republication of his original 'Epistle to the Reader' is dated from 'spitalfields, next door to the Red Lion, September 5, 1653.'The frontispiece has Culpepper'...
-Modern Gardening Books. Part 7
1848. 'The Rose Garden,'by William Paul. This is a most interesting publication as regards plant growth, increased variety, and the utter collapse and deterioration of the art of illustrating. Viewed ...
-Modern Gardening Books. Part 8
I am afraid that the hopeful instructions on 'wild gardening'so cheerfully laid down by Mr. Robinson must be taken with a great many grains of salt when it comes to putting them into practice, especia...
-Modern Gardening Books. Part 9
'This is pretty much the law of a garden. 'Nothing is more objectionable than the manner in which the common plants are often treated to make way for the grandees. Bulbs taken up before they are re...
-Modern Gardening Books. Part 10
The quotations throughout the book are quite unusually original and appropriate. (No date.) 'Gleanings from Old Garden Literature,' by W. Carew Hazlitt. Of all the recent little books referring in ...
-Modern Gardening Books. Part 11
1892. 'The Garden of Japan,'by F. T. Piggott. A charming little book, the fascinating subject of which is described by the title. The illustrations are very nicely drawn; among them are two or three ...
-Modern Gardening Books. Part 12
1896. 'The Bamboo Garden,' by A. B. Freeman Mitford, C.B. Mr. Mitford tells us in his preface that his book is simply an attempt to give a descriptive list-what the French call a catalogue raisonne'-...
-December
Orchid-growing on a small scale-Miss Jekyll's articles in the 'Guardian '-Winter vegetables-Laver as a vegetable-Advice to housekeepers-Cooking sun-dried fruit. ...
-December 5th
For anyone with a small stove I can thoroughly advise growing some of the more easily cultivated Orchids. For many years all Orchids seemed to me to smell of money, and to represent great expenditure;...
-December 10th
There has been in this year's 'Guardian'a succession of monthly papers on a Surrey garden, written by Miss Jekyll of Munstead Wood, Godalming. I give her address, as she now sells her surplus plants, ...
-December 12th
One of the every-day English dishes that is often so bad, and can be so excellent, is the old, much-abused hashed mutton. What I am going to say about it applies equally well to every kind of meat tha...
-Sons
Boys and girls-The health question-Early independence-Public schools-Influence of parents-The management of money-Family life and its difficulties-Sir Henry Taylor-'Mothers and Sons'-The feeding of ch...
-Sons. Part 2
Truthfulness is so essential to moral superiority that any young man who consistently acts a part in life for ambitious or other reasons is very apt to become morally degenerate, and hardly able to di...
-Sons. Part 3
Once more I ask you to consider how common it seems in human nature that people will give what they are asked for and bothered about, rather than what they can afford. However much this weakness may b...
-Sons. Part 4
In 1892 a little book was published called 'Mothers and Sons.'It made some impression on a good many mothers, and this is not surprising, as it was written by the successful headmaster of a public sch...
-Sons. Part 5
If the fashion grows of parents handing over to children some of the money which would otherwise come to them only after their parents' death, the habit of early saving when expenses are increased on ...
-The Antiquity Of Man
When I was a freshman, old age did appear A reverend and beautiful thing; For knowledge must gather as year follows year, And wisdom from knowledge should spring. But I found the same years t...
-Furnishing
Books on furnishing-Smoking-Morris's 'Lectures on Art'-London houses-New and second-hand furniture-Curtains versus blinds -White paint-Bookcases-Bed-rooms-Bath-rooms-Bedding -Useful tables-Rain-water....
-Furnishing. Part 2
Mr. Morris spoke of the fireplace as such an important thing in our climate; it is so indeed. One of the first essentials is that it should not smoke or be ugly, and another is that it should give out...
-Furnishing. Part 3
On first doing up a house, keep as many rooms as you can plainly whitewashed ('white distemper' it is called), but see that it is white, and not mixed with black, blue, or yellow, such as painters del...
-A Day In London. Advantages Of Suburbs-London Life-Picture Exhibitions
People who live in London, and those who live in the depths of the country, are both equally inclined, for different reasons, to laugh a little, and even sneer, over the obvious disadvantages of subur...
-Health. Nurse - Janet's Repentance - Private Hospitals - Sick - Nursing Convalescence - Medical Books
Our home-coming this September was an agitating and painful one. We had been warned by telegraph that we should find grave sickness in the house, and so indeed it was. Doctors, nurses, everything prov...
-Health. Private Hospitals - Sick - Nursing Convalescence - Medical Books. Continued
Nurses have a very hard life, and almost all women who work are apt to belong to the overworked portion of the community. That they should combine in any way that is possible, for their own advantage ...
-Food And Feeding
By Sir Henry Thompson This is a much-to-be-commended and really instructive book. It goes into first principles, both of health and of the chemical properties of food, and would be far more useful ...
-Sympathy
In this sad world, where mortals must Be almost strangers, Should we not turn to those we trust To save us from our dangers ? Then whisper in my ear again, And this believe-That aught which g...
-Amateur Artists
Amateurs-Want of occupation-Work amongst the poor-Music and drawing-Ruskin's teaching-Technical skill-Natural and acquired talent -Leaving home-Water-colours versus oils. Drawing and gardening are ...
-Amateur Artists. Continued
Granting the wish, how is an ambitious girl to set about learning to draw ? She may do a great deal by herself; but in the initial stage, help is very desirable-not in childhood, but after seventeen. ...
-Daughters
School-girls-Ignorance of parents-The confidence of children must be gained-The way to do it-Drawbacks of nurseries and schoolrooms- Over-education-Show - training-Delicate girls-A woman's vocation-Su...
-Daughters. Part 2
A great drawback, not only to the children but to the parents, in what is called upper-class life, is that the duties of that life necessitate the consigning of their children for a great part of the ...
-Daughters. Part 3
In England, on the contrary, I think we often sacrifice our girls'good to the selfish pleasure of keeping them with us, making the girls'education the excuse. Broadly speaking, it is far better for a ...
-Daughters. Part 4
In my youth, and still more before my time, girls were brought up to think that marriage was their one and only chance in life, and that, if they did not marry quite young, they would never marry at a...
-Daughters. Part 5
Another thing that mothers should teach their children, and of which they should ever remind their young men and women as they grow older, is the extreme importance of prompt note-answering. The habit...
-Daughters. Part 6
When parents are the energetic, hard-working ones, let them remember a passage in a letter of Madame de Stael's, whose biography is so interesting because she represents in a large sense what most wom...
-Daughters. Part 7
When I say that it is wise to gather as many opinions as we can, it must always be with the idea of helping our own judgment, never as putting the responsibility on to others of any important decision...
-Daughters. Part 8
I have been asked whether an unmarried woman is happier with a profession or without one. Without hesitation of course I answer - 'Yes, with a profession,' especially if it is the outcome of any parti...
-Daughters. Part 9
This to many will be a hard saying, as it means leaving the higher employment of women to those who are most free from natural duties; that is, generally, to the unmarried, who for that very reason ar...
-Daughters. Part 10
I fear many young people will probably think me priggish and disagreeable if I say that, be a woman ever so delicate, it is far better for her to get up early and see to her work, even if she finds it...
-Appendix. Japanese Art Of Arranging Cut Flowers
It is now some years since Mr. J. Conder's excellent book, 'The Flowers of Japan and the Art of Floral Arrangement,'was first published. But the principles laid down in it have so little penetrated th...
-Appendix. Japanese Art Of Arranging Cut Flowers. Part 2
The direction of the stems at starting need not be strictly vertical; but, if curved, the curves should be strong ones. The artist studiously avoids an equal-sided or symmetrical arrangement, but o...
-Appendix. Japanese Art Of Arranging Cut Flowers. Part 3
From all these select those of a most suitable shape-i.e. either broad and flat for water decorations; or narrow-necked with a wide mouth; or a tall, narrow-necked shape, suitable for supporting only ...
-Books
Smith, Elder, & Co.'s New Books. ' Dr. Conan Doyle's fascinating story.'-Daily New*. With 12 Full-page Illustrations. Crown 8vo. 6*. Uncle Bernac: a Memory of the Empire. By A. Conajst Doyle,...
-Books. Part 2
Through London Spectacles By Constance Milman. Crown 8vo. 3$. 6d. 'Altogether a very pleasant and companionable little book.'-Spectator. An Account Of The Life And Works Of Dr. Robert Watt, Author...
-Books. Part 3
London : Smith, Elder, & CO., 15 Waterloo Place. W. M. Thackeray's Works - The Library Edition Twenty-four Volumes, Large Crown 8vo. 7s. 6d. each, with Illustrations by the Author, Richard Doyle, a...







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