The question of hybrids among species of plants is one which continues to be of considerable interest with scientific men. Some time since M. Naudin, of the plant garden at Paris made extended experiments with hybrids between distinct species, and found that the notion of the sterility of hybrids drawn from two or three cases in the animal kingdom was not borne out by his facts. He found over three-fourths of his seedlings fertile. Even this proportion is widening, and it is now believed that there is no more sterility between hybrids than we find often between individuals of the same species, and therefore when we find a sterile hybrid it is not because it is a hybrid. In orchideae the number of hybrid species is continually on the increase, and, so far as we know, all are fertile. We give with this another illustration. It has been named Cypripedium Microchilum by the raisers, Messrs. Veitch & Son, of Chelsea, near London. It is a pretty and distinct hybrid from Cypripedium niveum and Cypripedium Drurii. The flower is broader than that of Cypripedium niveum, the upper sepal more pointed, the petals not so broad and directed more downwards.

The upper sepal is white and has several dark cinnamon stripes outside, of which the middle one only is conspicuous inside; the petals are also white, and have a dark crimson middle line and lines of small spots; the lip is nearly as in Cypripedium Drurii, white, veined with pale green, but very small.

Cypripedium microchilum.

Cypripedium microchilum.