We gave in our Natural History column for February, some account of one of the curious East Indian pitcher plants, both as a matter of interest to all lovers of flowers, as well as of interest to those fond of science. We now give some account of another which will particularly interest the admirers of floral novelties. It was raised by Messrs. Veitch & Son, of Chelsea, England, who furnish us with the following account of it:

"This is indisputably the finest hybrid Nepenthes yet obtained. It was raised by our foreman, Mr. Court, from N. sanguinea and N. distillatora, Glasnevin variety (N. Khasiana of science), the latter being the pollen parent. The pitchers are as richly colored as those of N. sanguinea, but easily distinguished from that grand species by their having the characteristic blotches of N. distillatora (N. Khasiana), on the deep claret or blood-red ground of N. sanguinea. In form they are cylindric, slightly distended below, and contracted above the middle, where there is a rib or prominence; they attain a length of eight inches, and a breadth of two, dimensions that will doubtless be exceeded as the plants increase in strength. The wings are rather broad, irregularly and sharply toothed at the margin; the aperture is rounded and only slightly produced at the back, instead of the elongated triangular process of N. sanguinea, and is surrounded by a clear shining red, closely ribbed margin; the throat is pinky cream colored with red spots.' The lid is altogether that of N. Khasiana, suborbicular, convex, covering the mouth, and with a simple spur at the base.

Nepenthes Mastersiana.

Nepenthes Mastersiana.

"The above description shows that this hybrid is quite distinct from every other Nepenthes in cultivation; it has also the additional merit of being vigorous in constitution, and at the same time dwarf in habit. A pitcher is produced from every leaf, and presents, in its rich coloration, a striking contrast to the pale green of the blade and stem. We have much pleasure in associating this fine acquisition with the name of Dr. Masters, as a slight recognition of his invaluable labors in the cause of horticulture. It received the award of a first-class certificate from the Royal Horticultural Society, June 13th, and a certificate of merit from the Royal Botanic Society, July 5th, 1882".