We were fortunate in obtaining a record of the thermometer, carefully kept oh a plantation very nearly in the latitude of Havana, and fifty miles from it. This record is for twelve months, excepting April, when the glass was broken: the first record is April 30, 1856, the hour of observation being between twelve and one o'clock (noon), which it will be well to remember.

THERMOMETER

April 30, 1856 .......................................

... 840

Average of May ................................................

.. 850

THERMOMETER

Average

of

June

...............

86

"

"

July

................

88

"

"

August

................

88

"

"

September

..................

85

"

"

October

..................

83

"

"

November

..................

81

"

"

December

.................

80

"

"

January,

1857 ..........

75

"

"

February,

" .......

75

"

"

March

" .......

80

In January and February no fire was required, and Americans wintering there wore nothing but thin clothing.

The equability of the above averages of the thermometer at noon, so different from our own, will strike every one. Rarely does the record show the height to exceed 90° till after the first of June, and then it reaches above that height more rarely than with us, and the changes during the intervals from noon to noon, are rarely even great enough to call for a change of clothes.

As a winter residence, and as an easy means of escaping the worst periods of our northern colds, Cuba presents great attractions, and will soon be a necessity to the wealthy and the invalid.