About a hogshead of acorns of the Cork Oak have been introduced from the south of Europe and distributed in the Middle and Southern States for experiment, or to test their adaptation to the climate. This tree, in its native country, where it is an evergreen, usually grows to a height of twenty or thirty feet: but in England there are specimens which exceed fifty feet in height, with a diameter of more than three feet The substance familiarly known to us as Cork, is the epidermis or outer bark, and sometimes grows two or three inches thick. Should the experiment succeed, it will be a subject of great national importance that plantations should be established in various parts of the country, for the purpose of growing this useful substance, particularly in the event of a war between this country and Europe, in consequence of which the supply would be cut off".

The National Intelligencer, reasoning upon the above paragraph in the Washington Union, arrives at the following conclusion:

"The Government is sensible how great an inconvenience it would be to the country to have its supply of Corks cut off by a foreign war. Spain is the country from which we are chiefly supplied, and as Spain is the country with which we are most likely to be involved, it is proper, as well on the general principle of national independence as for the particular emergency, that we should be rendered independent of importation by naturalizing the tree in our own country; and thus this large judicious importation of the Cork tree acorns. Further - the Cork Oak (Quercus tuber) does not attain its growth, so as to mature its cortex, in less than forty or fifty years; and we argue, therefore, that, as the Government is providing by the planting of the tree for the interruption which a Spanish war will cause in our supply of Corks, the President does not expect war to ensue much before our exotic trees shall come to maturity - namely, fifty years".

The Cork Tree #1

About a hogshead of acorns of the cork oak have been introduced from the South of Europe, and distributed in the Middle and Southern States for experiment, or to test their adaptation to the climate. This tree, in its native country, where it is an evergreen, usually grows to the height of 20 to 30 feet, but in England there are specimens which exceed 50 feet in height, with a diameter of more than 3 feet. The substance familiarly known to us as cork, is the epidermis, or outer bark and sometimes grows 2 or 3 inches thick. Should the experiment succeed, it will be a subject of great national importance that plantations should be established in various parts of the country for the purpose of growing this useful substance, particularly in the event of a war between this country and Europe, in consequence of which the supply would be cut off. - Union.