Average list price per one thousand (1000) feet of drain tile quoted by dealers in New York (Fippin). Subject to large discounts

Diameter of Tile

Price per 1000 Feet

Diameter of Tile

Price per 1000 Feet

2 inches..........

$13.50

6 inches ....

$62.00

2 1/2inches.............

16.50

8 inches ....

95.00

3 inches........

21.00

10 inches ....

165.00

4 inches........

34.00

12 inches ....

230.00

5 inches.........

44.00

   

Prices, weights, and average carload of tile (Wis. Sta.)

Diameter

Price per 1000

Feet, including

Freight at

Rates prevailing IN THE

Southern Half of Wisconsin

Pounds per Foot

Average Car Load

Inches

   

Feet

Rods

4...........

$18.00

6

6500

390

5...........

26.00

8

5000

300

6...........

35.00

11

4000

240

7...........

45.00

14

3000

180

8...........

60.00

18

2400

144

10...........

80.00

25

1600

96

12...........

120.00

33

1000

60

14...........

185.00

43

800

48

15...........

200.00

50

600

36

16...........

225.00

53

500

30

18...........

310.00

70

400

24

20...........

400.00

83

330

20

22...........

500.00

100

320

19

24...........

550.00

112

300

18

27...........

800.00

150

240

15

30...........

1000.00

192

160

10

Cost per rod of digging the trench, laying the tile, and blinding with four inches of earth (Wis. Sta.)

Size of Tile

 

Feet in

Depth

 

3

4

5

6

Inches

       

4...........

$0.30

$0.50

$0.80

$1.25

5...........

.35

.55

0.85

1.30

6...........

.40

.60

0.90

1.35

8...........

.45

.65

0.95

1.40

10...............

.50

.70

1.00

1.45

12...........

.55

.75

1.05

1.50

Drainage points (Fippin).

1.   Surface or open ditches are:

Of low efficiency,

Wasteful of land,

Expensive to maintain,

Harbor weeds,

Interfere with cultural operations.

2.  Stone drains are:

Not permanent,

They have a small capacity,

Therefore, are expensive.

Ten good rules

1.   Use dense, hard-burned tile.

2.   Water enters through the joints.

3.   Round or hexagonal shapes are best.

4.  An even grade is essential.

5.   Avoid tile smaller than three inches on low grades.

6.   Hill land may need drainage.

7.   Ditching plows are very useful.

8.   Carefully construct and protect the outlet.

9.   Depth in heavy clay, two to three feet.

10. Depth in loam and sandy loam, three to four feet.

Don'ts in land drainage (Jones, Wis. Sta.).

1.   Don't dodge the wet spots in cultivated fields. A few dollars spent in drainage will make these spots yield valuable crops and will make the cultivation of the whole field more convenient.

2.   Don't be content with raising marsh grass on muck and peat marshes. Drainage is the step that begins their adaptation to tame grasses and other farm crops.

3.   Don't condemn the muck and peat marshes on which timothy has died out once. Drain thoroughly and then apply barnyard manure or commercial fertilizers, as is done on uplands. In other words, give the marshes a square deal.

4.   Don't wait for nature to drain the wet lands without assistance. Nature alone did not remove the stumps and stones from the wooded, stony lands. Neither does she irrigate the arid lands of the West without the aid of man.

5.   Don't let damaging water get on to land, if it can be prevented. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure in drainage.

6.   Don't think it takes a wizard to lay tile properly. Have a survey made sufficient in detail to show that there is sufficient fall. An intelligent use of this fall will then insure success.

7.   Don't install a part of a drainage system to which the remainder of the system cannot later be joined with advantage.

8.   Don't let the waste banks of ditches grow up to weeds. Get them sodded, and make them both valuable and attractive.

9.   Don't let outlet ditches remain idle when they should be working. Have surface ditches and tile to keep them busy.

10.   Don't spend a dollar for small ditches or tile on a marsh until an outlet is assured.

11.   Don't fail to give land drainage the attention and thought it deserves.

" Our marshes and pot-holes are evils that tell: Where corn shocks are thickest the land is drained well, But justice to drainage demands first of all, That we should drain wisely, or not drain at all."