If the center of the storm passes north of the observer, the wind will change from S.E. to S., then to S.W., and finally to W. or N.W. as the storm passes on its way eastward.

If the center of the storm passes south of the observer, the wind will start in from the S.E. and gradually "back" to the N.E., then to the N. and finally to the N.W.

To locate the center of the storm, stand with your face squarely to the wind, and extend your arms from your sides. Your right hand will then point in the direction of the center of the storm. For example, if one faces a wind from the south, his extended right hand will point toward the west; if one faces a west wind, his extended right hand will point north.

A study of the daily weather maps, printed in many daily papers, will be of much help in becoming familiar with the movements of these storm-eddies.

The pressure of the atmosphere at the center of the storm-eddy is always less than at a distance from the center; therefore, as the storm approaches, the pressure will decrease and the barometer will fall. Thus a falling barometer indicates the approach of a storm-eddy, and the direction of the wind will give approximately the location of the center.

If the barometer is falling and the wind square from the south, the indications are that the storm is approaching from the west and will probably pass near the observer.

If the barometer is falling and the wind from the southwest, the center of the storm will probably pass north of the observer.

If the barometer is falling and the wind N.E., the center of the storm is approaching from the southwest, and will probably pass south of the observer. If the barometer is rising and the wind S.W. to W., the center of the storm will pass north of the observer, and clearing weather follow soon.

The following barometer and wind table is condensed from Professor Garriott's more extended compilation, and is the result of many years of study and experience: —

Barometer steady; wind, S.W. to N.W.; fair weather, with slight changes in temperature for 1 or 2 days.

Barometer falling slowly; wind, S.W. to N.W.; warmer, with rain in 24 to 36 hours.

Barometer falling rapidly; wind, S.W. to N.W.; warmer, with rain in 18 to 24 hours.

Barometer falling slowly; wind, S. to S.E.; rain within 24 hours.

Barometer falling rapidly; wind, S. to S.E.; wind increasing in force with rain within 12 to 24 hours.

Barometer falling slowly; wind, S.E. to N.E.; rain in 12 to 18 hours.

Barometer falling rapidly; wind, S.E. to N.E.; increasing wind and rain in 12 hours.

Barometer falling rapidly; wind, E. to N.E.; in summer rain probable within 24 hours; in winter rain or snow with increasing winds, probably continuing 24 to 48 hours.

Barometer rising slowly; wind, S. to S.W.; clearing and cooler within a few hours, and probably continued fair weather for several days.

Barometer rising rapidly; wind, S. to W.; clearing and cooler. In winter cold wave probable.

Should the barometer continue low when the sky becomes clear, expect more rain within 24 hours. (C. L. Prince.)

Rapid changes in the barometer indicate early and marked changes in the weather. (E. B. Garriott.)

If the thermometer and barometer rise together, It is a very sure sign of coming fine weather.

If the barometer falls two or three tenths of an inch in four hours, expect a gale of wind. (C. L. Prince.)

In summer, when the barometer falls suddenly, expect thunderstorms; if it does not rise again when the storm ceases, there will be several days of unsettled weather.

The barometer falls lower for high winds than for heavy rains.

Popular Weather Signs (Wilson)

When it is evening, ye say, It will be fair weather: for the heaven is red. And in the morning, It will be foul weather to-day: for the heaven is red and lowering. — Matthew, xvi, 2, 3, Rev. version.

When ye see a cloud rising in the west, straightway ye say, There cometh a shower; and so it cometh to pass. — Luke, xii, 54, Rev. version.

After fine, clear weather the first signs in the sky of coming changes are usually light streaks, curls, wisps, or mottled patches of white, distant clouds, which increase and are followed by an overcasting of murky vapor that grows into cloudiness. Usually the higher and more distant the clouds seem to be, the more gradual but general the coming change of weather will prove. - Fitzroy.

If cirrus clouds form in fine weather with a falling barometer, it is almost sure to rain. - Howard.

If cirrus clouds dissolve and appear to vanish, it is an indication of fine weather. - Garriott.

When cloud streamers point upward, the clouds are falling or descending, and rain is indicated; when cloud streamers point downward, the clouds are ascending, and dry weather is indicated. - Garriott.

Clouds flying against the wind indicate rain.

If in hot weather two strata of clouds appear to move in opposite directions, thunderstorms are indicated.

Well-defined cumulus clouds forming a few hours after sun-rise, increasing toward the middle of the day, and decreasing toward evening are indicative of settled weather; if instead of subsiding in the evening, leaving the sky clear, they keep increasing, they indicate wet weather. - Jenyms.

Birds fly high in fair weather and low in foul weather. The explanation is that in fair weather the barometer is usually high, the air heavier and denser and capable of sustaining a given weight at a greater elevation than when less dense during the passage of a storm.