The bark of Atherosperma moschatum, Lab. (family Moni-miaceae) yields 1 p.c. of volatile oil upon distillation3). Because of its sassafras-like odor, the tree is also known as sassafras of Victoria or Australian sassafras. According to ). H. Gladstone4), the oil has a yellowish-brown color; specific gravity 1,0386 at 20°; optical rotation in a 10 inch tube -4-7°. It begins to boil at 221° and distills over almost completely at 224°. The oil probably contains safrol5).

The leaves have been examined by M. E. Scott"). Distilled a few days after collection, they yield 1,7 to 2,65 p.c. of oil.

1) Journ. de Pharm. et Chim. VI. 19 (1904), 132.

2) Schimmel's Bericht April 1890, 49.

3) ). H. Maiden, Useful native plants of Australia. London and Sydney 1889, p. 254.

*) Journ. chem. Soc. 17 (1864), 5; Jahresb. f. Chem. 1863, 545. - Chem. News 24 (1871), 283.

5) Fluckiger, Pharmaceutical Journ. III. 17 (1887), 989. °) Journ. chem. Soc. 101 (1912), 1612.

The first portion of the distillate (about 30 p. c.) was lighter, the remainder of the oil, heavier than water. The yellowish, unrectified oil had a distinct odor of sassafras; d 1,027; [a]d -7,5°; nD 1,5211. Of its constituents the following were determined: 15 to 20 p. c. of a-pinene (b. p. 157 to 158°; m. p. of hydrochloride 130°; of nitrosochloride 103°), 15 to 20 p.c. of d-camphor (m.p. 174,5 to 176°; [a]D +40,66°), 50 to 60 p.c. of methyleugenol (b.p. 251,7° under 755 mm. pressure; m.p. of bromide abt. 75°) and 5 to 10 p.c. of safrol (m.p. 8 to 12°; b.p. 233°).