Origin and Production. In Algeria the Atlas cedar oil is distilled from the wood of Cedrus atlantica, Manetti2), which is closely related to the Lebanon cedar. The yield varies between 3 and 5 p. c. The oil, which the manufacturer labels "Libanol-Boisse" is used as a medicament in bronchitis, tuberculosis, blennorrhcea, also for skin diseases.

Properties8. It is a somewhat viscid, light brownish, balsamic liquid: d15o0,950 to 0,968; aD + 46to +62°; nD30o1,512 to 1,517; A. V. to 2,0; E. V. 3 to 11; E. V. after acetylation 30 to 46, corresponding to 12 to 19 p. c. of C15H26 04); soluble in 1 to 10 vol. of 90 p. c. alcohol. The solubility increases with the sesquiterpene alcohol content.

Composition. According to E. Grimal5) 80 p. c. of the oil distilled over between 270 and 295°. Small amounts of acetone were found in the lowest fraction. In fraction 180 to 215° about 5 p. c. of a ketone C9H140 were found. It yielded a semicar-bazone melting at 159 to 160° and a liquid oxime, which upon bromination yielded a dibromide melting at 132 to 133°.

1) Report of Schimmel & Co. October 1909, 132.

2) Dr. Trabut, Sur I'huile de Cedre de 1'Atlas. Bull. Sciences Pharmacol. 1900, 262; Report of Schimmel $ Co. April 1901, 58; April 1902, 12; October & 1902, 25.

3) Observations made in the Laboratory of Schimmel & Co.

4) Comp. also Chemist and Druggist 61 (1902), 236.

5) Compt. rend. 135 (1902), 582 and 1057.

As the principal constituent of the higher fractions d-cadinene with the following properties was identified; b. p. 273 to 275°; d0,9224; [a]D20o + 48°7'; nD20o1,5107. The chlorhydrate melted at 117 to 118°; [a]D20o + 25°40'. The cadinene regenerated from the chlorhydrate with sodium acetate in glacial acetic acid solution revealed the following constants: b. p. 274 to 275°; d 0,9212; [a]D20o +- 47° 55'; nD20o1,5094. The bromhydrate melted at 124 to 125°.