Earache may be due to a reflex irritation from teething, or to catarrh of the stomach extending to the throat, nose, and ears. Most earaches in children are brought on from catarrh. Many children have enlarged tonsils from chronic tonsilitis brought on from catarrh of the stomach. The throat inflammation extends through the Eustachian tube to the ear, and not infrequently an abscess will form at the ear end of the tube. Real diagnosticians with their X-ray discover blocks to all sinuses; and, of course, there is no way to get rid of blocks except to go beyond the block and open up the sinus and scrape it. This scientific maneuver reminds one of the philosophical darky who sits in the limb of a tree, in order that he may saw it off close to the trunk. Logically, there was nothing else to do. Don't guffaw at the darky, you wise ones! His logic is strictly in line with scientific surgery.

Where an abscess forms at the distal (ear) end of the Eustachian tube, it is exceedingly painful and requires puncturing to allow the pus to escape. Is that all that should be done? No; get rid of the cause--catarrh of the stomach. As soon as the pain develops, hot fomentations to the ear usually bring about a certain amount of relief, and often relieve entirely. If no food is given, the inflammation subsides in a day or two.

Where the earache is of a nervous character, due to teething, a little hot oil in the ear, and the ear closed up with cotton, will usually give the desired relief. Such children should be treated for the constitutional cause of catarrh which they always have.