The Antitoxic Laxative Diet

Every constipated person, then, requires a bill of fare consisting of antitoxic and laxative foods. It is most essential that his diet should eliminate flesh foods of all sorts, including fish, oysters, fowl, as well as beefsteaks, chops, and other red meats. In many cases it is also wise to avoid eggs, or at least to use them very sparingly. Many persons find themselves able to digest the yolks of eggs, who cannot take the whites either cooked or raw without suffering inconvenience, because of the readiness with which this form of albumin undergoes putrefaction in the intestine. When eggs are freely eaten, especially if hard boiled or poached, or in the form of an omelette, portions of undigested albumin may always be found in the stools, and in a state of very advanced putrefaction. The gas formed in the colon when eggs are freely used consists largely of sulphuretted hydrogen, which is toxic as well as offensive, and affords most substantial evidence of the luxuriant growth of putrefactive bacteria in the colon.

Those who have been accustomed to the free use of meat and eggs are sometimes afraid to dispense with them lest they should suffer from an insufficient supply of protein; but the experiments of Chittenden and the extensive practical experience of the Battle Creek Sanitarium have shown most conclusively that the amount of protein required by the body is so small that it may readily be furnished by food derived exclusively from the vegetable kingdom. In other words, eggs, and meat, and even cow's milk, are quite superfluous as food, when a good variety of fruit, cereals and fresh vegetables are available. If, however, an additional supply of protein is required, it may readily be obtained from nuts. Peanuts, pine nuts, English walnuts and almonds are all rich in protein; a pound of pine nuts, in fact, contains fifty per cent. more protein than a pound of lean beef, and besides, contains twice as much more nutrient in the form of a most easily digestible fat. Practically the same thing may be said of almonds and peanuts. Any possible deficiency in protein may readily be made up by taking at meals a handful of any kind of nut meats. It is only necessary to take care to masticate them thoroughly, so that the protein present may easily be accessible to the digestive juices. A somewhat extensive study of the laxative and antitoxic properties of various foods will be found of practical value.

Cellulose-Containing Foods

All vegetable foods contain more or less cellulose, but the amount differs very greatly. This element, as has already been mentioned, is highly necessary as a means of securing normal bowel action. Indeed, bulk, not simply in the food itself, but in the residues left- behind after the absorption of the nutritive portions of the food, is of first importance. This quality in food is even more important than the antiseptic properties, for the reason that putrefactive bacteria may always find in the bile and other intestinal secretions abundant material to support their growth, provided sufficient delay occurs to encourage putrefactive changes. The thing most necessary in the prevention of putrefaction is rapidity of movement of food residues and body wastes along the intestine to the exit.

The following tables show the amount and percentage of cellulose found in the dried substance of various food stuffs:

Vegetables

Grains per ounce

Dried Beans

40.

Vegetables ColonHygiene 16

Dried Peas

285

Vegetables ColonHygiene 17

Lentils

20.

Vegetables ColonHygiene 18

Green Peas

9.35

Vegetables ColonHygiene 19

Cabbage

9.2

Vegetables ColonHygiene 20

Parsnip

8.65

Vegetables ColonHygiene 21

Brussels Sprouts

7.85

Vegetables ColonHygiene 22

Kohlrabi

7.75

Vegetables ColonHygiene 23

Celery

7.

Vegetables ColonHygiene 24

Turnip

6.6

Vegetables ColonHygiene 25

Pumpkin

6.1

Vegetables ColonHygiene 26

B. Potato

5.45

Vegetables ColonHygiene 27

Beefs

5.25

Vegetables ColonHygiene 28

Asparagus

5.2

Vegetables ColonHygiene 29

Carrots

4.9

Vegetables ColonHygiene 30

Spinach

4.65

Vegetables ColonHygiene 31

Cauliflower

4.55

Vegetables ColonHygiene 32

Tomatoes

4.26

Vegetables ColonHygiene 33

Green Peas

4

Vegetables ColonHygiene 34

Cucumber

3.9

Vegetables ColonHygiene 35

Lettuce

3.65

Vegetables ColonHygiene 36

Onion

3.55

Vegetables ColonHygiene 37

Fruits

Grains per Ounce

Huckleberries

61.5

Fruits ColonHygiene 38

Red Raspberries

37.

Fruits ColonHygiene 39

Blackberries

25.

Fruits ColonHygiene 40

Cranberries

25.

Fruits ColonHygiene 41

Currants

23.

Fruits ColonHygiene 42

Figs

22.5

Fruits ColonHygiene 43

Goosberries

17.5

Fruits ColonHygiene 44

Pears

15.

Fruits ColonHygiene 45

Apricots

12.5

Fruits ColonHygiene 46

Prunes

10.

Fruits ColonHygiene 47

Cherries

10.

Fruits ColonHygiene 48

Strawberries

10.

Fruits ColonHygiene 49

Oranges

10.

Fruits ColonHygiene 50

Plums

7.5

Fruits ColonHygiene 51

Grapes

7.5

Fruits ColonHygiene 52

Raisins

75

Fruits ColonHygiene 53

Stewed Raisin

7.4

Fruits ColonHygiene 54

Peaches

5.

Fruits ColonHygiene 55

Apples

5.

Fruits ColonHygiene 56

Bananas

.3

Fruits ColonHygiene 57

Chart Showing Proportion of Cellulose in Some of the Common Vegetables and Fruits - Also Grains of Cellulose per Ounce.

Cereals

Crains per Ounce

Bran

200

Cereals ColonHygiene 58

Oatmeal

44.

Cereals ColonHygiene 59

Barley

20.

Rye

15.

Cereals ColonHygiene 60

Wheat

10.

Cereals ColonHygiene 61

Corn Meal

Corn Flakes

10.

Cereals ColonHygiene 62

Graham Flower

Granola

10.

Cereals ColonHygiene 63

Rolled

Wheat

9.

Cereals ColonHygiene 64

Graham

Bread

6

Cereals ColonHygiene 65

Wheat Grifs

Whole W.Bread

1.

Cereals ColonHygiene 66

Unpolished

Rice

.75

Cereals ColonHygiene 67

Polished Rice

.4

Cereals ColonHygiene 68

Fine Flour

.3

Cereals ColonHygiene 69

Diets. Normal Diet. Fruit. Green Vegetables& Graham Bread

Cracked Wheat.

Cracked Wheat.

Ordinary Mixed.

Ordinary Mixed.

White Breğd and Milk.

White Bre»d and Milk.

Meat.

Meat.

Chart Showing Proportion of Cellulose in Some of the Common Cereal Foods   Also Grains of Cellulose per Ounce.

Chart Showing Proportion of Cellulose in Some of the Common Cereal Foods - Also Grains of Cellulose per Ounce.

Cereals

Percent Cellulose.

Number of Cellulose grains in one ounce.

Calories in an ounce.

Grains of Cellulose in 100 calories.

Ounces necessary to give 800 grains of cellulose.

Wheat (Cooked).......

2

10

26.3

38

30

Wheat Grits (cooked) ...

1

5

18.4

27

60

Boiled Wheat (cracked)

2

9

26.3

36

30

Graham Flour.....

2

10

104

9.6

30

Fine Flour......

.3

1.5

101

1.4

200

Oatmeal (cooked)....

10

44

18

37

6

Barley (cooked)....

4

20

31.08

64

15

Polished Rice.....

.4

2

101.8

1.96

150

Unpolished Rice.....

.75

3.75

101.8

3.68

82

Rye (small).....

3

15

104

14.4

20

Corn Meal......

2

10

103

9.7

30

Corn Flakes........

2

10

103

9.7

30

Beans (dried).....

8

40

100

40

75

Peas (dried).....

5.7

28.5

100

28.5

10

Lantils......

4

20

101.8

19.6

15

Granola (cooked).....

2

10

101.7

9.8

30

Sterlized Bran......

40

200

......

.....

1.5

Graham Bread....

1.2

6

76

8

50

Whole Wheat Bread ..

1

5

71.7

7

60

Vegetables

Number of Cellulose grains in one ounce.

Calories in an ounce.

Grains of Cellulose in 100 Calories.

Ounces necessary to give 800 grains Cellulose.

Asparagus.....

5.2

13.9

37.4

57.7

Beans......

4

30.96

12.9

75

Beets.......

5.25

11.6

45

57

Brussels Sprouts.....

7.85

6

131

40

Cabbage.......

9.2

8.8

145

,32.4

Carrot (raw).....

4.9

14

36

60

Cauliflower (steamed).....

4.55

10.2

44.6

66

Celery (raw).........

7

5.5

127

45

Cucumber (raw)..........

3.9

5

78

75

Green Peas.........

9.35

34.4

27

32.2

Kohlrabi (raw).........

7.75

9

86

39

Lettuce........

3.65

5.6

65

82

Onion...........

3.55

10.52

33.7

85

Parsnips..........

8.65

17.1

50

36

Peas (dried)...........

28.5

103

27

10.8

Potato (baked)..........

5.45

32.7

16.6

55

Pumpkin........

6.1

9.3

65.6

50

Spinach..........

4.65

9.3

50

65

Tomatoes...........

4.20

6.6

63.6

71

Turnip..........

6.6

6.1

108

46

Fruits

Percent Cellulose.

Number of Cellulose grains in one ounce.

Calories In an ounce.

Grains of Cellulose in 100 calories.

Ounces necessary to give 800 grains of cellulose.

Prunes (cooked)........

2

10

27.5

36

30

Apples...........

1

5

101

5

60

Pears...........

3

15

18.5

81

20

Peaches..........

1

5

12.8

40

60

Plums.............

1.5

7.5

24.7

30

40

Cherries..........

2

10

22.8

44

30

Raspberries, red..........

7.4

37

18.3

200

81

Blackberries........

5

25

16.8

150

12

Huckleberries.........

12.2

61

21.5

300

5

Strawberries..........

2

10

11.4

87

30

Currants.........

4.6

23

16.7

138

17

Grapes...........

1.5

7.5

20.3

36

40

Raisins.........

1.7

7.5

100.3

38.4

30

Raisins (stewed).......

1.7

7.4

100.6

....

40

Oranges .........

2

10

14.9

67

30

Bananas..........

.3

1.5

28.9

5.2

200

Figs..........

4.5

22.5

92.4

24.3

13.3

Apricots...........

2.5

12.5

16.3

74

24

Gooseberries (stewed)...

3.5

17.5

19.4

90

17

Cranberries......

5.0

25

48

51

12