The consideration of the principles upon which diets are constructed has led us to the following proportions of foodstuffs for a man of 11 stone of moderate activity : -

Protein ....

100 grammes equals

410 calories.

Fat ....

100

930

Carbo-hydrate.

360

1,480

Total heat value equals

• •

2,820 „

In this 14 per cent of the heat value is derived from protein, 33 per cent from fat, and 53 per cent from carbo-hydrate. It supplies 40 calories and 1.4 grammes of protein per kilogramme.

1. This is almost exactly given by: -

Bread, 1 lb.; meat, 4 oz.; eggs, 4 oz. (two small ones); cheese, 2 oz.; potatoes, 1 lb.; butter (or other fat), 2 oz.; milk, 1/4 pint; sugar, 1/2 oz.; tea, coffee which works out to - Protein, 99; fat, 97; carbo-hydrate, 362.

2. For a man or woman of 9 1/2 stone an adequate supply would be: -

Bread, 12 oz.; meat, 6 oz.; potatoes, 1/2 lb.; butter, 1 oz.; milk, 1 1/4 pints; sugar, 1 oz.; milk pudding, 8 oz.; soup, a pint.

This is the "ordinary" diet at St. George's Hospital, and contains :

Protein, 90; fat, 75; carbo-hydrate, 330; calories, 2,400; giving 40 calories and 1.5 grammes of protein per kilogramme.

3. A similar diet actually taken by a man of 9 stone has been given above and may be repeated here.

Bread, 19 oz.; meat, 4 oz.; potatoes, 8 oz.; butter, 1 oz.; milk, 1 pint; milk pudding, 4 oz.; tea, a pint.

This contains :

Protein, 90; fat, 67; carbo-hydrate, 385; calories, 2,300; and gives 40 calories and 1' 6 grammes of protein per kilogramme.

4. The following diet was that taken by the French soldiers in the trenches during the siege of Paris (1870-71) (Gautier).

Bread, 9 oz.; meat, 6 1/4 oz.; rice, 2 3/4 oz.; biscuit, 9 oz.; fat, 3/4 oz.; coffee, 2 oz.; sugar, 1 1/2 oz.; wine and brandy equivalent to 3 1/3 oz. of carbo-hydrate.

This contains :

Protein, 83; fat, 32; carbo-hydrate, 457; calories, 2,510; and gives for a man of 10 stone 40 calories and 1.5 grammes of protein per kilogramme.

This diet, owing to the scarcity of food, was lower in protein and fat than that taken by hard workers, and finds its place among the diets for sedentary occupations. The soldiers suffered a little from hunger, but were generally in good health, although the winter was a cold one.

The diets of those doing muscular work show a considerable increase, especially in protein. We may take as an example the ordinary diet in the French Army in order to compare it with the last example.

Bread, 1 lb. 10 oz., or biscuit bread, 1 lb. 9 oz.; or biscuit, 1 lb. 5 oz.; meat, 14 oz., or preserved meat, 7 oz.; dried vegetables or rice, 2 oz.; lard, 1 oz.; sugar, 3/4 oz.; coffee, 1/2 oz.; salt, 3/4 oz.

This contains :

Protein, 129; fat, 69; carbo-hydrate, 440; calories, 2,956.

For a man of 10 stone this is 46 calories and 2 grammes of protein per kilogramme. For a man of 11 stone the figures are 42 and 1.8 respectively.