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A Treatise On Diet | by J. A. Paris



With a view to establish, on practical grounds, a system of rules for the prevention and cure of the diseases incident to a disordered state of the digestive functions.

TitleA Treatise On Diet
AuthorJ. A. Paris
PublisherSherwood, Gilbert, & Piper
Year1837
Copyright1837, Sherwood, Gilbert, & Piper
AmazonA Treatise on Diet

By J. A. Paris, M.D. F.R.S, Fellow Of The Royal College Of Physicians, Etc. Etc.

"Some Physiologists will have it that the Stomach is a Mill; - others that it is a fermenting Vat; - others, again, that it is a Stew-pan; - but in my view of the matter it is neither a Mill, a fermenting Vat, nor a Stew-pan - but a Stomach, Gentlemen, a Stomach"

Manuscript Note from Hunter's Lectures.

Fifth Edition. Corrected, Enlarged, And Nearly Re-Written.

This Edition Is Inscribed To Davies Gilbert, Esq., M.P. Late President Of The Royal Society. As A Homage To Talent; A Memorial Of Long And Highly-Prized Friendship; And A Sincere Token Of Gratitude For Continued Acts Of Personal Kindness.

-Introduction
The present edition considerably extended - Popular interest of the subject - Works on Dietetics numerous, but not satisfactory - Contrariety of opinion begets Scepticism - The Fate of a Patient who c...
-Introduction. Part 2
For a certain period he submits to the ordeal, but his general strength gives way, and in the extremity of despair he becomes the victim of some crafty knave, who undertakes his cure by the aid of the...
-Introduction. Part 3
The potatoe again, whose introduction has added many millions to our population, derives its origin from a small and hitter root, which grows wild in Chili and at Monte Video 1. These few instances ma...
-Anatomical View Of The Digestive Organs
Their elaborate Machinery. - Their Structure varies according to the Food of the Animal to which they belong. - Enumeration of the several digestive Organs. - Their extraordinary sympathetic relations...
-I. The Alimentary Canal
12. In strict language the alimentary canal includes the whole passage from the mouth to the anus, but the term is more usually employed to express only the stomach and intestinal tube. It may be repr...
-I. The Alimentary Canal. Continued
The same observations will apply to the structure of the alimentary canal generally. 15. The villous, or mucous membrane has a whitish-red appearance, and presents a singular velvet-like appearance...
-22. The Coecum
The Coecum constitutes the first division of this portion of the intestinal canal, although some anatomists consider it as merely the head of the colon, and restrict the term coecum to a small gut whi...
-24. The Colon
The Colon constitutes the principal tract of the large intestines, and exceeds them all in diameter: as accumulations in its cavity frequently produce various ill effects from their pressure, it becom...
-II. The Various Glands Which Are Subservient To The Secretion Of The Different Fluids Intended To Act On The Alimentary Matter
27. There is nothing more mysterious in the digestive process than the great variety of the fluids which appear essential for its completion; each of which has appropriate glands for its secretion. Th...
-28. The Saliva
The mixture under this name is probably variable in its physical and chemical properties, according to circumstances which have not hitherto been examined. When first discharged from the mouth, it alw...
-30. The Gastric Juice
Great difference of opinion has existed with regard to the qualities and composition of this fluid; it would, however, appear that other secretions of a mucous nature take place in the stomach, with w...
-33. The Liver
The Liver is, by far, the largest gland in the human body, and is so disproportionate to the quantity of liquid secreted, that the bile must require a very extensive apparatus for its elaboration; and...
-33. The Liver. Part 2
M. Simon further observed, that if the hepatic ducts were alone tied, the liver became choked up and filled with globules of a green tint, which colour was diffused over the whole surface of the organ...
-33. The Liver. Part 3
45. Bile appears as a perfectly homogeneous fluid, of a yellowish green, or sometimes of a brown colour; in consistence, it is viscid and unctuous; its taste is bitter and pungent; and its odour pecul...
-51. Berzelius
Berzelius is not disposed to regard the peculiar matter, which is considered to be resin, as strictly falling under that denomination. He says it is precipi-table by acids; and the precipitate is a co...
-55. The Spleen
The Spleen is a viscus of a deep blackish-red colour, situated on the left hypochondrium, immediately under the diaphragm, and above the kidney. Its figure may be said to be that of a depressed oval, ...
-59. The Lacteals
The Lacteals, so called from the milky appearance of the liquor they are destined to carry, arise, by numberless open mouths, from the inner surface of the intestines. Each lacteal takes its origin up...
-60. The Mesenteric Glands
The Mesenteric Glands are seated in the fat, between the layers of the mesentery, near the branches of the blood-vessels. They are commonly scattered over the mesentery, at a little distance from each...
-IV. The Lungs
61. Although the lungs perform several essential operations not immediately connected with nutrition, still, as the chyle is incapable of becoming blood without their assistance, they necessarily cons...
-V. The Kidneys
62. These organs are situated upon the sides of the vertebral column, just before the last false ribs. From their oblong figure, they have been compared in shape to large beans. The right kidney lies ...
-VI. The Skin
63. The skin forms the envelope of the body, and is lost in the mucous membranes at the entrance of all the cavities; although some assert that these membranes are only a continuation of it, and thus ...
-Physiological History Of Digestion, And Its Consequences
Nutrition: - its final Cause. - Old Age: - Sir A. Carlisle's View of the Disorders of Senility objectionable. - The Author's opinion. - Chemical and Mechanical Agents of Digestion. - Conventional acce...
-Physiological History Of Digestion, And Its Consequences. Part 2
70. If there be one law in the animal economy which, above every other is irresistibly forced upon our attention, and which must command our unqualified assent, it is this, that the adjustment of supp...
-Physiological History Of Digestion, And Its Consequences. Part 3
75. M. Majendie says, we are informed that mastication and insalivation are carried sufficiently far by the degree of resistance and savour of the food; besides, the sides of the mouth being endowed w...
-Physiological History Of Digestion, And Its Consequences. Part 4
79. The gastric juice is remarkable for three qualities, - a coagulating, antiputrescent, and solvent power. I have already spoken of its coagulating properties. Of its antiseptic powers abundant proo...
-Physiological History Of Digestion, And Its Consequences. Part 5
83. After the chyme has passed into the duodenum, it becomes mixed and incorporated with the peculiar fluid secreted by that intestine; it still, however, preserves its colour, its semi-fluid consiste...
-Physiological History Of Digestion, And Its Consequences. Part 6
85. The experiment of Sir B. Brodie, as above related, was repeated by M. Majendie upon adult animals. He found that few of the subjects survived the operation, but that in two cases, wherein they out...
-Physiological History Of Digestion, And Its Consequences. Part 7
88. These observations are of great value to the physiologist, as well as to the pathologist, as they demonstrate the fallacy of that proposition which has been so frequently advanced; viz. that ther...
-Physiological History Of Digestion, And Its Consequences. Part 8
92. After the changes above related, the refuse matter accumulates in the colon, having now acquired that peculiar fetor which distinguishes excrement; it is considerably retarded in this part of its ...
-98. Oil
Oil, although possessed of the fluid form, does not appear to observe the law which governs the disposal of these bodies; it is not absorbed, but is entirely transformed into chyme in the stomach. To ...
-98. Oil. Part 2
101. If no material influence is produced upon the sum of oxygen absorbed, or of carbonic acid disengaged, by the different quantities and nature of our aliments, it follows, that the conversion of ch...
-98. Oil. Part 3
106. I shall conclude these remarks by stating that one of the objects of the urinary secretion appears to be the removal of a portion of nitrogen, and perhaps also of oxygen, from the blood, as that ...
-Reciprocal Relations Of The Digestive Functions With Our Sensations; And Of The Latter, With The Waste And Consequent Wants Of The System
Hunger: - Theories to explain the Sensation. - Referred by the Author to a peculiar Condition of the Nerves. - Destroyed by Narcotics. - Practice of the Indians to counteract its cravings. - Its conne...
-Hunger
113. When the stomach is in a healthy condition, and has remained for some time empty, the well-known sensation of hunger is produced; to account for which, various hypotheses have been devised. Some ...
-Thirst
119. This instinctive feeling announces to the individual the necessity of introducing a certain quantity of liquid into the system, in order to repair the waste which the body has sustained in the ex...
-Part II. Of Dietetic Observances, Founded Upon Physiological Principles
General Remarks - Population of a Country depends upon the Quantity and not the Quality of its Food - Immunity from Disease how connected with Salubrity of Diet - The Views of the Political Economist ...
-Part II. Of Dietetic Observances, Founded Upon Physiological Principles. Continued
128. It would, however, appear that although man is capable of subsisting upon almost every variety of food, he cannot bear with impunity a sudden and abrupt transition from one species to another. Th...
-On The Periods Best Adapted For Meals, And On The Intervals Which Should Elapse Between Each
132. It is not extraordinary that a discrepancy of opinion should exist upon a question which involves so many fluctuating circumstances. Controversy upon this, as upon many other subjects of diet, ha...
-136. Breakfast
This is, perhaps, the most natural, and not the least important of our meals; for, since many hours must have intervened since the last meal, the stomach ought to be in a condition to receive a fresh ...
-138. Dinner
Among the Romans this was rather considered as a refreshment to prevent faintness, than as a meal to convey nourishment. It consisted principally of some light repast, without animal food or wine; but...
-140. Supper
In the time of Elizabeth, the nobility and gentry were accustomed to dine at eleven, to sup between five and six, and to go to bed at ten. It is therefore evident, that any argument in favour of this ...
-On The Quantity Of Food That Ought To Be Taken At Different Meals
141. There is no circumstance connected with diet, which popular writers have raised into greater importance; and some medical practitioners have even deemed it necessary to direct that the quantity o...
-On The Quantity Or Volume Of Liquids That Should Be Taken At Meals
147. As the introduction of solid aliment into the stomach is for the purpose of furnishing materials for the repair of the different textures of the body, so is a supply of liquid matter, essentially...
-Conduct To Be Pursued Previous And Subsequent To Meals
151. As dietetic regulations are intended for the use of those who are either suffering under disease, or are compelled, from the precarious state of their health, to attend to every circumstance whic...
-Conduct To Be Pursued Previous And Subsequent To Meals. Continued
154. In speaking of inordinate exercise before meals, I have alluded principally to bodily exercise; but let me here observe, that the undue exertion of the mind is equally hostile to the due performa...
-Part III. Of The Materia Alimentaria
Whether Nitrogen be an essential Element of Food. - M. Majendie's Experiments. - Classification of Aliments. - Digestible and Nutritive not synonymous. - Texture of Food. - Cookery. - Boiling. - Roast...
-162. Gum
Gum is another substance that does not contain azote, but which is considered as nutritive. To ascertain whether it acted like sugar and oil, he fed several dogs with this substance, and the phenomena...
-Of The Classification Of Aliments
166. The arrangements which different authors have proposed will be found to vary according to the particular theory by which each may have been influenced. The chemist investigates the composition of...
-167. Chemistry
Chemistry has satisfactorily demonstrated the nature of those proximate principles of organic matter, upon the presence of which the nutritive qualities depend, viz. fibrin, albumen, gelatin, oil and ...
-178. Boiling
By this operation, the principles not properly soluble are rendered softer, more pulpy, and, consequently, easier of digestion; but the meat, at the same time, is deprived of some of its nutritive pro...
-179. Roasting
By this process the fibrine is corrugated, the albumen coagulated, the fat liquefied, and the water evaporated. As the operation proceeds, the surface becomes first brown, and then scorched; and the t...
-182. Baking
The peculiarity of this process depends upon the substance being heated in a confined space, which does not permit the escape of the fumes arising from it; the meat is, therefore, from the retention o...
-Of Condiments
183. These may be defined substances which are, in themselves, incapable of nourishing, but which, in concert with our food, promote its digestion, or correct some of its deleterious properties. The ...
-185. Salt
Salt appears to be a necessary and universal stimulus to animated beings; and its effects upon the vegetable as well as animal kingdom have furnished objects of the most interesting inquiry to the phy...
-188. Vinegar
This acid, in small quantities, is a grateful and wholesome stimulant; it will often check the chemical fermentation of certain substances in the stomach, and prevent vegetable matter in its raw state...
-189. The Aromatic Condiments
The Aromatic Condiments comprise the foreign spices, as pepper, cayenne pepper, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, ginger; and the indigenous herbs and roots, such as parsley, thyme, sage, garlic, leek, onion,...
-190. Oil
This, with butter, constitutes what is called the oleaginous condiments. Melted butter is, perhaps, the most injurious of all the inventions of cookery: oil, when used in extremely small quantities, a...
-An Estimate Of The Nutritive And Digestible Qualities Of Several Species Of Aliment
An Estimate Of The Nutritive And Digestible Qualities Of Several Species Of Aliment, As Derived From The Application Of The Physiological And Chemical Principles Established In The Preceding Pages. ...
-193. Milk
This is the only nutritive fluid with which nature has presented us; but if we examine its chemical composition, we shall soon discover that it possesses an ingredient which is instantly coagulated in...
-199. Eggs
Eggs, in point of nutriment and digestibility, may be classed next to milk; but their qualities will greatly depend upon the manner in which they have been cooked. When raw, they are certainly not so ...
-Fish
200. Fish have been generally considered as holding a middle rank between the flesh of warm-blood animals and vegetable food. It is certain that they are less nutritive than mutton or beef; but the ...
-202. Shell Fish
Shell Fish have been greatly extolled by some physicians, as nutritive and easily-digestible articles of food. It will be necessary to examine this question, by the application of those principles whi...
-202. Shell Fish. Continued
Similar accidents have occurred at different periods in Paris; upon which occasions, the police officers visited the pig-dealers, and were perfectly assured that the animals had never been fed with un...
-Birds
207. There exists a great variety in the qualities of the food which is furnished by this class of animals, with regard to nourishment, stimulus, and digestibility: the whiter meat of domesticated ...
-Farinaceous Aliments
208. We are principally indebted to the industry of man for this valuable addition to our materia alimentaria. The vegetables which yield it may be said to owe their nutritive qualities to ...
-211. The French
The French have many varieties of bread, in which eggs, milk, and butter, enter as ingredients. They are also in the habit of adding ammonia to the dough; which, during its evaporation in the oven, ra...
-212. Barley Bread
Barley Bread has a sweetish but not unpleasant taste; it is, however, rather viscid, and is less nutritive, as well as less digestible, than wheaten bread. It is common to mix peas-meal with the barle...
-218. Rice
Rice is the general aliment of the people of the East, with whom it answers the same purposes as bread does with us. As it is not much disposed either to acescency or fermentation in the stomach, it f...
-221. Peas
Peas form a wholesome and light food, when green and young, but when full grown and dry, they are very indigestible: in this latter state they contribute, in a remarkable degree, to the generation of ...
-222. Nuts
Nuts are generally supposed to have constituted the earliest food of mankind; and they still furnish, in some countries, a considerable source of food. In this country they are principally known as an...
-Esculent Roots
224. These are of two kinds; those used as food, and those which principally answer the purposes of condiment or seasoning. Under the first division may be classed turnips, carrots, parsnips, ...
-225. The Carrot
The Carrot, from the quantity of saccharine matter which it contains, is very nutritive, and slightly laxative; but it also possesses a large proportion of fibrous matter, which in some stomachs preve...
-Esculent Herbs
226. In this class are arranged the leaves and stalks of such vegetables as are eaten at table in the form of greens and salads. Some ancient nations, we are told, were accustomed to range over ...
-Fruits
228. These are generally regarded as articles rather of luxury than of food; and were we to form our opinion of their value from their abuse, we should certainly be rather disposed to class them ...
-234. Water
Water is unquestionably the natural beverage of man; but any objection to the use of other beverages, founded on their artificial origin, I should at once repel by the same argument which has been add...
-2. Spring Water
Spring Water, in addition to the substances detected in rain water, generally contains a small portion of muriate of soda, and frequently other salts: but the larger springs are purer than the smaller...
-3. River Water
This, being derived from the conflux of numerous springs with rain water, unless in the immediate vicinity of a large town, generally possesses considerable purity; that the proportion of its saline c...
-5. Snow Water
Snow Water has been supposed to be unwholesome, and in particular to produce bronchocele, from the prevalence of that disease in the Alps; but it does not appear upon what principle its insalubrity ca...
-7. Marsh Water
Marsh Water, being the most stagnant, is the most impure of all water, and is generally loaded with decomposing vegetable matter. There can be no doubt that numerous diseases have sprung up from its u...
-240. Toast Water
By impregnating water with the soluble parts of toasted bread, it will frequently agree with those stomachs which rebel against the use of the pure fluid. It is thus rendered slightly nutritive, holdi...
-241. Barley Water
The decoction of barley is a very ancient beverage: it is recommended by Hippocrates, and preferred by him to every other aliment in acute diseases. Barley has the advantage over other grains, in affo...
-242. Gruel
Oats, when freed from their cuticle, are called groats; in which state, as well as when ground into meal, they yield to water, by coction, the fecula they contain, and form a nutritious gruel, which h...
-243. Sage Tea
The virtues of sage have been so extravagantly praised, that, like many of our remedies l, the plant has fallen into disuse from the disgust which its panegyrists have excited. I am convinced, however...
-244. Tea
There is no subject that has occasioned a greater controversy amongst dietetic writers than the subject of tea. By one party it is decried as a poison; by another it is extolled as a medicine, and a v...
-245. Coffee
The hostility which has been manifested against the use of tea has been extended, with equal rancour, against that of coffee; and, probably with equal injustice. The principle upon which its qualities...
-246. Chocolate
In consequence of the large quantity of nutritive matter which this liquid contains, it should be regarded rather as food than drink. It is prepared by reducing the cocoa-nut into paste, with sugar, m...
-247. Cocoa
Cocoa is usually considered as a substitute for chocolate. As it contains less nutritive matter, it is not so objectionable; and, as the oily matter exists only in small quantities, it is less likely ...
-248. Whey
Whey is a delightful beverage; but as its nature and operation cannot be well understood until the composition of milk is investigated, the observations which I have to offer upon its use will be defe...
-251. Imperial
This is a solution of cream of tartar flavoured with lemon peel. It ought never to be used except as a medicine. If employed as an ordinary drink, it is apt to retard digestion. If ever useful as an a...
-252. Soda Water
The modern custom of drinking this inviting beverage during, or immediately after dinner, has been a pregnant source of dyspepsia. By inflating the stomach at such a period, we inevitably counteract t...
-Fermented Liquors
253. Volumes have been written to prove that spirit, in every form, is not only unnecessary to those who are in health, but that it has been the prolific source of the most painful and fatal diseases ...
-Fermented Liquors. Part 2
A popular writer remarks, When my stomach is not in good temper, it generally desires to have red wine; but when in best health, nothing affronts it more than to put Port into it; and one of the fir...
-Fermented Liquors. Part 3
Let the acids be what they may, let their intermixture be ever so complicated, the respective bases must always unite with them in an invariable and constant ratio. 1 An Essay on the Disorders of O...
-Fermented Liquors. Part 4
266. In a dietetic point of view, wines may be arranged into four classes; viz. 1. Sweet Wines; 2. Sparkling or Effervescing; 3. Dry and Light; 4. Dry and Strong. 1. Sweet Wines Sweet Wines ...
-269. Beer
This is an article of beverage in almost every country. The Chinese prepare it from rice, and the Americans from maize. We are also informed by Herodotus, that, in very early history, the art of makin...
-272. Porter
This is made from high-dried malt, and differs from other malt liquors in the proportions of its ingredients, and from the peculiar manner in which it is manufactured. Much has been said upon the frau...
-273. Ardent Spirits
The art of extracting alcoholic liquors by distillation from vinous liquors, must be regarded as the greatest curse ever inflicted upon human nature. The fatal effects of dram-drinking have been vivid...
-Part IV. Of Indigestion
275. It has been already observed (9), that authors have differed in their acceptation of the term Digestion - some regarding it as merely denoting that preparatory process which the food undergoes ...
-I. Imperfect Chymification
278. The symptoms which arise from the food undergoing its appointed changes in the stomach with difficulty, or in an imperfect manner, are generally those which first indicate the approach of ...
-Imperfect Chymification. Part 2
The other case was that of a keen sportsman, who, after a day of such severe fatigue as to have been unable to dismount his horse without assistance, partook of a very hearty meal, and retired to rest...
-Imperfect Chymification. Part 3
1 During a late commercial excitement, so extremely prevalent did dyspepsia become, that it was distinguished by the appellation of the City Disease. 286. As the skin acts upon the stomach, so do...
-Imperfect Digestion In The Duodenum
292. In the earlier part of this work, the structure, position, and functions of this second stomach have been fully described, and the practitioner must bear in mind the peculiar circumstances ...
-Of Headachs Which Arise From Indigestion
296. From the intimate sympathy which subsists between the nerves of the stomach and the brain, it is not extraordinary that any casual derangement of the digestive process should communicate its ...
-Indigestion From Biliary Derangement
303. It is evident that a regular and healthy secretion of bile is indispensable to the act of chylification, and to the proper action of the intestines, and that a deficiency, redundancy, or a ...
-Progress And Symptoms Of Chronic Indigestion
307. From considering a fit of indigestion in the stomach or duodenum, let us now proceed to trace its consequences, when it is frequently repeated or protracted. In this case, other organs become ...
-Progress And Symptoms Of Chronic Indigestion. Part 2
He tells you, that he begins to feel his usual avocations irksome, and too laborious; that he has long suffered from a bad digestion, which by care and management he had been hitherto enabled to con...
-Progress And Symptoms Of Chronic Indigestion. Part 3
The permanent tenderness of the epigastrium, if accompanied by a clean bright tongue, excites a greater apprehension in my mind. The pulse is very treacherous in its indications: I have found it to be...
-A Scheme For Investigating The Causes, Nature, And Seat Of Indigestion
1. Leading Questions, Concerning Specific Symptoms. 1. Their Nature; Intensity; Duration; Permanence and Locality. 2. Their Accession; Concourse; and Order...
-328. Hereditary Susceptibility
So many vague notions are entertained upon this subject, that it will be necessary for me to define the latitude in which the term is to be received. Dyspepsia, depending upon peculiarity of stomach, ...
-333. Animal Heat
The degree, uniformity, and equable diffusion of heat are circumstances of importance: they will enable us to form some estimate of the state of the vital powers generally; and when we consider what a...
-333. Animal Heat. Part 2
It has been generally supposed that their dryness affords a proof that the nutritive part of the aliment has been duly absorbed; and there can be no doubt that such motions, if their colour be natural...
-333. Animal Heat. Part 3
1 A patient may be so circumstanced, that the preservation of the faeces, for inspection, is attended with inconvenience. It is, therefore, worthy of notice, that a table-spoonful of sweet oil poured ...
-333. Animal Heat. Part 4
The first variety indicates a strong tendency to the lithic acid diathesis: although in some cases an opposite state of system prevails, and an alkalescent condition of the stomach and bowels may be s...
-Of The Cure Of Indigestion, As It Relates To Diet, Exercise, And Medicinal Treatment
347. The previous habits of the patient, and the origin and seat of the disorder, are the circumstances from which the physician is to derive his indications of cure. If the disease has not extended ...
-Acidity Of Stomach, Flatulence, Etc
353. It has been a question more frequently discussed than satisfactorily answered, whether the morbid acidity which occurs in the stomach of invalids be the product of a fermentation generated by ...
-359. Flatulence
Flatulence is often a very distressing disease; it sometimes is associated with acidity, but frequently is the only symptom which indicates an imperfect digestion. Whether the gas, with which the inte...
-359. Flatulence. Continued
Where the biliary discharges are faulty, small doses of mercury are useful; and I prefer the hydrargyrum cum creta, on such occasions, in doses of three or four grains, and combined with two or three ...
-369. Blisters
Blisters are of eminent service in cases of intestinal irritation, accompanied with tenderness on pressure; they will frequently also put a stop to obstinate vomiting, when other methods have failed o...
-369. Blisters. Part 2
376. The patient generally inquires whether, before bathing in the sea, it may not be proper to prepare himself by the use of a warm bath. I generally recommend a previous immersion in the tepid bath,...
-369. Blisters. Part 3
Is there any evidence to show that the air of different places, remote from towns, varies in its salubrity in different places, or in the same place at different times? I apprehend that most of the be...
-Recapitulation
1. The first object is to discover the origin and seat of the disease (322). 2. If it arise from a debilitated state of the stomach, in which either the secretions are deficient or depraved, or the...
-Cases In Illustration Of The Preceding Views
Illustration Case I A. B., a gentleman of rank and fortune, of the age of twenty-four years, had suffered for several months with occasional headach in the evening, which, at first, was generally r...
-Cases In Illustration Of The Preceding Views. Continued
It is very odd that I never had two of my severe headachs on two successive days; that they never make me look the least pale or yellow. Their progress is exactly similar: I am at first heavy and dull...
-Illustration Case II
C. D., a gentleman resident in the country, and far advanced in life, was seized with a violent pain in the gastric region at two o'clock in the morning: he arose from his bed, walked for some time ab...
-Illustration Case III
E. F., a young man, twenty-six years of age, and a clerk in one of the public offices, applied to me under the following circumstances. Previous to the attack of which he complained, he had enjoyed ve...
-Illustration Case IV
G. H., the active partner in an extensive firm at the west end of the town, applied to me for advice, in order that he might be relieved from a severe attack of heartburn and flatulence, which invaria...
-Illustration Case V
K. L., a gentleman of forty-five years of age, who had long indulged in the luxuries of the table, and sacrificed liberally to Bacchus, was attacked, about six months before I saw him, with severe sym...







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