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On Diet And Regimen In Sickness And Health | by Horace Dobell, M.D.



There are few medical questions which so test the depth and extent of a doctor's acquirements as the interdependence of diseases - by which I mean, the way in which one disease leads to another, substitutes another, aggravates, or relieves another; the way in which disease appearing at one part of the body depends upon the derangement of another part, perhaps distantly separated; the way in which disease of one kind in an ancestor, leads to disease of several different kinds in the descendants; the way in which one general morbid cause may produce different effects upon different persons, according to the conditions of health in which they happen to be at the time; and numberless other similar phenomena.

TitleOn Diet And Regimen In Sickness And Health
AuthorHorace Dobell, M.D.
PublisherH. K. Lewis
Year1882
Copyright1882, Horace Dobell, M.D
AmazonOn Diet and Regimen in Sickness and Health
-Preface To The Seventh Edition Of On Diet And Regimen In Sickness And Health
In preparing this work for the press for the seventh time, I may refer to the Prefaces of previous Editions, to show the progress of its development. I have now endeavoured, by cutting out old matter...
-Preface To The Sixth Edition. 1875. Of On Diet And Regimen In Sickness And Health
In introducing a former edition of this work, I stated that my object and endeavour had been to produce a small book founded upon accurate scientific data - a book from which a doctor might refresh hi...
-Preface To The Fifth Edition. 1872. Of On Diet And Regimen In Sickness And Health
This work was much enlarged and nearly re-written in its last edition just two years ago, and it has now been thoroughly revised. Much new matter has been introduced, and some of the old re-arranged....
-Preface To The Fourth Edition. 1870. Of On Diet And Regimen In Sickness And Health
My Manual of Diet and Regimen which appeared in 1864, having run through two editions in its first year, I published a third and revised edition in January, 1865. This has long been out of print, an...
-Preliminary Remarks Of On Diet And Regimen In Sickness And Health
The Interdependence of Diseases. - Narrow Specialities and Broad Departments in the Practice of Medicine. - Normal Diet. - Errors in Diet. - The Diet of Disease. - Food, Heat, and Motion. - Getting Fa...
-Preliminary Remarks Of On Diet And Regimen In Sickness And Health. Part 2
It is absolutely necessary that he who ventures to interfere with a person's diet should first understand the principles upon which the food of health is regulated in nature; and nothing more assists ...
-Preliminary Remarks Of On Diet And Regimen In Sickness And Health. Part 3
I have drawn up an Alcohol Table (see Chap. VIII.) - the result of many careful analyses of each article, so as to present a fair average result - from which it can be seen at a glance what quantity...
-Part I. Chapter I. Rules For Promoting And Maintaining Vigorous Health In Adults Living In The Climate Of The United Kingdom
Ventilation and Heating. - Gas. - House-drainage. - Clothing and Protection from Cold. - Sleep. - Exercise. - Posture. - Bathing. - Regulation of the Bowels. - Rest and Change. - Smoking. - Meals. - P...
-Using Gas For Heating - Rules For Promoting And Maintaining Vigorous Health
When gas is burnt in an apartment the following facts must be borne in mind, in addition to the foregoing, for the purposes of ventilation: - One cubic foot of ordinary London coal gas produces, in ...
-House And Water Drainage - Rules For Promoting And Maintaining Vigorous Health
The following valuable practical suggestions from an experienced architect (G. E. Pritchett, F.S.A., etc., etc.), I give in his own words, as conveyed in a letter to me. Architects have opportunities...
-Part 2. House And Water Drainage - Rules For Promoting And Maintaining Vigorous Health
If you wish to know what size to make such a tank, ascertain how many square yards of ground your roofs cover. About one hundred and twenty-six gallons of rain-water fall on an average every year upon...
-Part 3. House And Water Drainage - Rules For Promoting And Maintaining Vigorous Health
I will only slightly touch upon wells and drinking-water because it is impossible to exhaust such an important and interesting subject in a letter; but I do wish to observe, that every householder sho...
-Proper Clothing - Rules For Promoting And Maintaining Vigorous Health
In winter, the body and limbs, from the root of the neck to the toes and elbows, and in many cases to the wrists, should be covered, next the skin, with some woollen material, such as lamb's wool or f...
-Getting Proper Sleep - Rules For Promoting And Maintaining Vigorous Health
During ordinary health, the hours spent in actual sleep should not exceed eight out of the twenty-four; and if the sleep is sound, continuous and refreshing, six will be sufficient for some persons. (...
-Getting Enough Exercise - Rules For Promoting And Maintaining Vigorous Health
During ordinary health, some part of every day ought to be spent out of doors; and in ill-health it is of great importance not to discontinue the observance of this rule without good reason; for, alth...
-Having Proper Posture - Rules For Promoting And Maintaining Vigorous Health
It is of great importance to acquire a habit of drawing the breath deeply and slowly, so as to expand the lungs freely during ordinary breathing. This requires that the head and shoulders be thrown we...
-Bathing - Rules For Promoting And Maintaining Vigorous Health
Warm baths, Turkish baths, vapour baths, shower baths, cold plunges, and sea baths should only be used under special medical orders. (See the author's work On the Mont Dore Cure 1st ed.) During ord...
-Regulation Of The Bowels - Rules For Promoting And Maintaining Vigorous Health
As a general rule, the bowels ought to act, at some stated time, once in the twenty-four hours; and it is best to accustom them to act in the morning, after breakfast. If they do not act spontaneousl...
-Rest And Change - Rules For Promoting And Maintaining Vigorous Health
Active life is essential to the health of body and mind; but both require periods of rest, in addition to the regular hours of sleep. It is much better, therefore, to work vigorously for a time and th...
-Meals - Rules For Promoting And Maintaining Vigorous Health
Counting from the time of beginning one meal to that of beginning the next, food should be taken at regular intervals of from four to five hours; except the interval between dinner and a very slight t...
-Proper Hours For Meals - Rules For Promoting And Maintaining Vigorous Health
Substance of a letter by the Author addressed to employers of labour, and printed for private circulation, 1852. That animal life cannot go on in even passable health and comfort without sufficient f...
-Proper Hours For Meals - Rules For Promoting And Maintaining Vigorous Health. Continued
I am aware that different businesses do, from their nature, present various obstacles in the way of carrying out such sanitary measures as are most desirable, and that one set of rules will not always...
-Afternoon Tea, etc - Rules For Promoting And Maintaining Vigorous Health
Some remark is necessary in reference to the now prevalent custom of dining very late and taking an afternoon tea. It assimilates our present hours for meals very nearly with those of old English coun...
-Chapter II. The Relationship Between Food, Heat, And Motion
(See Essentials of a Normal Diet.) A Foot-pound, a Foot-ton, a British Unit of Heat. - Mechanical-equivalent of a British Unit of Heat. - Combustion of Carbon. - Consumption of Oxygen, Evolution of H...
-The Relationship Between Food, Heat, And Motion. Continued
Looked at in the manner above represented, muscular work, like heat, in opposition to Liebig's theory, is derivable from the oxidation of non-nitrogenous as well as nitrogenous matter, and Professor ...
-Chapter III. What Do You Need For A Normal Diet
Essentials of a Normal Diet. - Mode of Constructing Diets. - Expensive Diets and Cheap Diets for Maintaining Health. - Tables and Analyses. Essentials of a Normal Diet A healthy adult man of average...
-Diet Tables - What Do You Need For A Normal Diet
For the maintenance of health in adults living in the climate of the United Kingdom. Each diet table contains all the essential elements of nutrition, in forms, quantities and proportions necessary t...
-Diets For The Very Poor - What Do You Need For A Normal Diet
The attention of those who visit the poor is requested to the following. (See also Appendix, On Bread Diet and Typhus Fever.) There is considerable difficulty in selecting diets, for the very poor,...
-Percentage Of Water In Various Foods
The following table, constructed by Dr. Edward Smith, will show the proportionate quantities of water which are present in various solid and liquid foods: - Table III Per Cent, of Water. Per Ce...
-Chapter IV. On The Diet And Regimen Of Children
Dr. Sansom on the Diet of Infants up to Twelve Months old: - Mother's Milk; Wet-nursing; Artificial Feeding; Cow's Milk; Condensed Milk; Ass's Milk; Goat's Milk; Artificial Human Milk; Partial Suckli...
-Food For A Child About Eighteen Months Old - On The Diet And Regimen Of Children
Dr. West, Consulting Physician to the Hospital for Sick Children, Great Ormond Street, in a letter to the author advises as follows for a child about eighteen months old: Three meals, and one suppleme...
-Rules For The Prevention Of Infant Mortality - On The Diet And Regimen Of Children
The following rules, drawn up by a Committee of the Obstetrical Society appointed to consider the causes and prevention of infant mortality, were revised by the Council, and are inserted here by speci...
-Chapter V. On The Wholesomeness And Digestibility Of Various Articles Of Food And On The Modes Of Cooking In Common Use
Beef and Mutton, and some General Directions. - Cutting-up the Food. - Yeal and Lamb. - Pork. - Ham and Bacon. - Poultry, Game, Wild Fowl. - Yenison and Hare. - Rabbit. - Fish. - Shell Fish. - Wholeso...
-Veal and Lamb - On The Wholesomeness And Digestibility Of Various Articles Of Food
Both are the flesh of young animals, which is less nutritive and less invigorating than that of full grown animals, as it contains more gelatine and less fibrine, and, as a rule, it is less easily dig...
-Pork - On The Wholesomeness And Digestibility Of Various Articles Of Food
Pork is the flesh of young pig, and what I have said of veal applies in the main to pork, so far as nutritive value is concerned, but as there is more fat in pork than in veal, all the dangers of prod...
-Ham and Bacon - On The Wholesomeness And Digestibility Of Various Articles Of Food
These are the flesh of older animals than pork, and consequently, if digested, they are more nutritious; but as they are hardened by deep curing, they are more difficult of digestion in their lean p...
-Poultry, Game, Wild-fowl and other Birds - On The Wholesomeness And Digestibility Of Various Articles Of Food
Except when the flesh is poisoned by what they have eaten, the flesh of all birds is safe for food. Great differences, however, exist as to digestibility and wholesomeness, and these depend mainly upo...
-Rabbit - On The Wholesomeness And Digestibility Of Various Articles Of Food
Rabbit, stands rather alone. The fibre is both long and dense. It is very quickly hardened by careless cooking. It requires softening and disintegrating, by gradual stewing commenced at a low temperat...
-Fish - On The Wholesomeness And Digestibility Of Various Articles Of Food
Fish differ considerably in their digestibility and nutritive value, in consequence of differences in the quantity of fat and the mode in which it is distributed; and in the colour of their blood and ...
-Shell Fish - On The Wholesomeness And Digestibility Of Various Articles Of Food
Lobsters and crayfish consist principally of dense, tough muscular tissue, and are extremely difficult of digestion to most stomachs. The difficulty may, however, be greatly diminished by finely minci...
-Bread - On The Wholesomeness And Digestibility Of Various Articles Of Food
White; whole-meal; wheat-meal. - Bread (says Miss Yates, Hon. Secretary to the Bread Reform League), being the staple food of a large proportion of mankind, should approach, as nearly as possible, t...
-Cheese and Cream Cheese - On The Wholesomeness And Digestibility Of Various Articles Of Food
The time required for the digestion of cheese varies with its age and as the fat more or less abounds; and, in a fairly good cheese of medium age it is from three and a half to four hours. New cheese...
-Milk - On The Wholesomeness And Digestibility Of Various Articles Of Food
There is no milk which is so agreeable and so little disagreeable to the taste as cows' milk, for it has a fuller flavour than human milk, or that of the mare or ass, while it lacks the strong flavour...
-Vegetables and Fruits - On The Wholesomeness And Digestibility Of Various Articles Of Food
It has been stated that every complete diet must contain some potash-vegetable or fruit, and the following is a list of such articles of diet. (Table V.) They differ, however, greatly in wholesomeness...
-Modes Of Cooking In Common Use - On The Wholesomeness And Digestibility Of Various Articles Of Food
Boiling, Roasting, Broiling, Baking, Frying, Stewing. Boiling There is an art in cooking food in such a manner as to avoid, as much as possible, the loss of its nutritive principles. If the object...
-Chapter VI. Some Principles Of Diet In Disease
(See also On Getting Fat and Getting Thin.) Principles upon which to Arrange the Diets of Disease. - Rules for Carrying out these Principles. - Examples of Diets for Consumption and for Diabetes. ...
-Maintenace Of Healthy Nutrition - Some Principles Of Diet In Disease
The first and leading principle of diet in disease is, to provide for the maintenance of healthy nutrition, under the peculiar alterations of circumstances attendant upon disease. In other words, the ...
-Rules To Help Achive The Maintenace Of Healthy Nutrition - Some Principles Of Diet In Disease
In the next place I will give you a few Rules which may assist you in carrying out these general principles. Rule 1. - When the power of appropriating any essential ingredient of a normal diet is los...
-Diets For Consumption - Some Principles Of Diet In Disease
In these Diets for Consumption it is assumed that no fat is assimilated except that artificially pancreatised. In Table VII., The required amount of carbon is supplied by an excess of carbo-hydrates....
-Diet for Diabetes - Some Principles Of Diet In Disease
Table X., In this Diet starch and sugar are reduced to a minimum, and fat and albuminoids are given in their place, some of the fat being introduced in the form of Pancreatic Emulsion to assist in its...
-Chapter VII. What You Need To Know About Fat In Nutrition
Fat Essential to Healthy Nutrition. - Importance of Distinguishing between Solid and Liquid Fats. - On Getting Fat and Getting Thin. - On Getting Thin. - Bantingism. - Analysis of Banting-diet, Showin...
-Importance of Distinguishing between Solid and Liquid Fats
The peculiar isomeric modifications of which stearin and palmitin are susceptible, as shown by Duffy, pointedly distinguish them from olein, which, so far as at present known, has not this susceptibil...
-On Getting Fat and Getting Thin
The fact that it is possible for a human being to maintain from year to year a stationary weight, has always appeared to me one of the most wonderful evidences of the perfection of vital existence. W...
-On Getting Thin
On comparing the following analysis of Mr. Banting's diet for getting thin with my tables of normal diets it will be seen that it yields less than half the normal quantity of Carbon, leaving the defic...
-On Getting Fat
The measures necessary for getting fat are of course the reverse of those for getting thin. They consist in - 1. An abundant supply of Carbo-hydrates and Hydrocarbons (fats, starch, and sugar) in the ...
-Fat And Starch In The Nutrition Of Children
A very interesting article by Dr. Prospero Sonsino, of Pisa, in the September, 1872, number of the Practitioner, On the Physiological Dyspepsia for Starchy Food in Infancy, revives an intention, f...
-Fat And Starch In The Nutrition Of Children. Continued
But organs, like individuals, do not rise to the full performance of their duties unless called upon by the necessity for their activity; and, as I pointed out in 1866 (On Tuberculosis, p. 40, secon...
-Chapter VIII. Fermented Liquors
Administration of Alcohol. - Properties of Various Wines. - Wines in General. - Spanish Wines. - German Wines. - Hungarian Wines. - Greek Wines. - Acid, Gout, Rheumatism. - Acid and Sugar in Spirituou...
-Wines In General
In the economy of nature, wine has always held a prominent position. Corn, and wine, and oil, represent the highest agricultural development of the vegetable world - the corn and oil to nourish and su...
-Spanish Wines
Of all those wines possessing distinct characteristics, and which impress the palate in a marked degree, none is more prominent, in the opinion of Mr. Cosens, than that one of Spanish growth, known un...
-German Wines
German Wines, when obtained in their native purity, contain medicinal and health-promoting qualities of great value. Foremost in medicinal respects, Mr. Verkriuzen says, we should consider the Mosell...
-Hungarian Wines
Mr. Max Greger says he can speak with the utmost confidence of the medicinal properties of the different kinds of Hungarian wine, not only from many years of personal experience in the districts where...
-Greek Wines
The following are the leading properties, in a Dietetic point of view, attributed to the wines of Greece: - Wine. Colour. Property. St. Elie White Stimulant and exhilarating. Thera White...
-Acidity, Gout And Rheumatism From Fermented Liquours
The question most frequently requiring consideration with regard to the selection of alcoholic beverages, is their tendency to encourage acidity and to promote gout or rheumatism. For practical purpos...
-Ardent Spirits And Their Peculiarities
Brandy makes people nervous, Gin weakens, Rum and Whisky produce biliousness. Whisky is the least objectionable. When Whisky produces biliousness, Rum, which has been made hot and then cooled, may be ...
-Chapter IX. Special Recipes, Directions, And Appliances For The Sick-Room
Farinaceous Articles. - Beef Tea. - Liebig's Extract of Meat. - Brand's Meat Jelly aud Solid Beef Tea. - Valentine's Meat Juice. - Darby's Fluid Meat. - Van Abbott's Extract of Vegetables. - Malt Extr...
-Special Recipes, Directions, And Appliances For The Sick-Room. Part 2
The nicest forms of malt extract are Kepler's Malt Extract, and Maltine. Most valuable and palatable preparations of farinaciae, digested by diastase, are provided under the names of Savory and ...
-Special Recipes, Directions, And Appliances For The Sick-Room. Part 3
20. Invalid Soup. The following Invalid Soup has proved extremely useful in a large number of cases, and since I first published the recipe in 1864 it has been usually kept nicely prepared by Donges (...
-Special Recipes, Directions, And Appliances For The Sick-Room. Part 4
The use of condensed milk necessarily leads to a dilemma. Either the dilution is made moderately, so that the proportion of casein is not less than 3 per cent, as in human milk (in that case, the milk...
-Special Recipes, Directions, And Appliances For The Sick-Room. Part 5
Pancreatic Emulsion (Savory and Moore's) 1/2 oz.; Pancreatine powder (Savory and Moore's) 20 grains; Pepsine (Porci) 20 grains. Mix the whole in a warm mortar quickly, and add brandy one table-spoo...
-Special Recipes, Directions, And Appliances For The Sick-Room. Part 6
40. Warm Baths should not exceed a temperature of 98 without medical orders. 41. Fluids for Inhalations should have a temperature of about 170 Faht. 42. The Lights in a Sick-Room should always be ...
-Making Appointments
Those who have been called upon to bear the responsibility of the Nursing in a severe case of Innutrition, Sickness, Fever, Inflammation, Surgical Operation, or the like, will have a vivid recollectio...
-Chapter X. Disinfection
Media by which the Catching Diseases are Communicated. - Means for Preventing Infection and Contagion. - Directions for the Sick Room and Attendants. - Precautions to be used by Doctors - Proper Disin...
-What To Do When A Contagious Disease Occurs In A House
1. The first thing to be done is - to select a room for the patient as much isolated as possible from the rest of the house; a room through which no one has to pass and by which there are as few passe...
-How To Prevent The Spread Of Contagious Diseases And For The Proper Disinfection Of Rooms
The following are the directions for the Prevention of the spread of catching diseases and for the proper disinfection of rooms issued by Dr. C. Meymott Tidy. 1. Recollect that Scarlet Fever or Scarl...
-Disinfection Of A Room After Scarlet Fever, Small-pox Or Other Infectious Diseases
The infection hangs about a room or house for a very long time and is difficult to dislodge. Fumigation with Sulphur, however, may be employed by any one, and must first be carried out. A pound of Bri...
-Suggestions For The Prevention Of Cholera
It is most important, in view of the possibility of an outbreak of Cholera, that owners and keepers of houses should be more than ordinarily careful in the management of their property, thus supportin...
-The Use Of Chloride Of Lime, Carbolic Acid And Condys Fluid
The following particulars as to the mode and proportions in which to use Chloride of Lime, Carbolic acid, and Condys fluid, have been kindly furnished by Messrs. Savory and Moore, and by Mr. Calvert. ...
-Part II. On The Interdependence And Prevention Of Diseases And The Diminution Of Their Fatality. Chapter XI. The Duties Of Medical Men
The Duties of Medical Men. - The Interdependence of Diseases showing the Importance of Periodical Examinations. Gentlemen, we are all members of a practical profession. We have taken upon ourselves h...
-Chapter XI. The Duties Of Medical Men. Continued
But this should in no way interfere with the power of the poor to participate in such a system. Every hospital and dispensary should institute a distinct department for the conduct of such examination...
-The Duties Of Medical Men Lecture Four
In my fourth Lecture I gave an Etiological analysis of those states of disease assembled under the following six headings in the Registrar-General's Reports of the deaths in London. (Report of the dea...
-The Interdependence Of Diseases
My present object is to exhibit in a conspicuous manner the Interdependence of Diseases. (See Preliminary Remarks,) I have, therefore, restricted myself to a statement of the influence exerted by th...
-Chapter XII. Anaemia - The Interdependace Of Diseases
A careful examination of the subject teaches us that Anaemia is one of the most frequent vestiges of all severe diseases when they do not terminate in death; - the patient remains anaemic during conva...
-Chapter XIII. Fatty Degeneration Of The Body - The Interdependace Of Diseases
In the present day, we have all learnt that something much more than a general tendency to form fat, or a general excess of fat in the blood is necessary to produce a local fatty degeneration. - (Si...
-Fatty Degeneration Of The Body - The Interdependace Of Diseases. Continued
In Angina Pectoris, again, Dr. Wilks, in common with other observers, has found that the heart is usually fatty, and the coronary arteries ossified. - (Ibid.) It is impossible, says Dr. Ormerod (...
-Chapter XIV. Abnormal Physiological States - The Interdependace Of Diseases
We pass on, Gentlemen, to another and most important branch of our subject. I must now speak more at length of those states of health to which I referred in my second Lecture, when I said that I shou...
-Abnormal Physiological States - The Interdependace Of Diseases. Continued
The subjects of erysipelas and pneumonia, and the man who had haemoptysis, were already suffering from depraved states of the blood, or of the organs to which it was determined; and from which, in the...
-Appendix I. Cod Liver Oil
(A.) - Extract from the Author's Work on Loss of Weight, Blood-Spitting, and Lung-Disease, Etc., 2nd Ed. Oil, even when it agrees and passes into the blood, does not completely represent the solid ...
-Appendix I. Pancreatine
(B.) - Paper by the Author On the Action of Pancreatine upon Fat, and the Proper Form in which to use it. (Reprinted from the British Medical Journal, November 27, 1880.) I have watched with much sat...
-Appendix I. Pancreatised Foods, and Pancreatic Emulsion
(C.) - From the proceedings of the Royal Society, No, 97, 1868. On the Special Action of the Pancreas on Fat and Starch. By Horace Dobell, M.D., etc. I have been engaged for several years in experim...
-Appendix I. Pancreatised Foods, and Pancreatic Emulsion. Continued
3. 'Pancreatized fat' (lard) consists of minute separate acicular crystals of margarine and fine granular matter uniformly distributed. The special character is the complete loss of aggregation of the...
-Appendix II. On London Noise And London Sleep
(A). - Letter by the Author published in the Times, August 13 th, 1869. Sir, - The London season is over once more, and every one is hurrying to get a dash of sea water or of mountain air, before r...
-Appendix II. On London Noise And London Sleep. Continued
We are afraid that nothing short of a miracle could provide a complete remedy for the evil of which our correspondent complains. We should require a second Joshua to bid modern civilisation stand stil...
-Appendix III. Bread Diet and Typhus Fever
Letter from the Author to the Daily Telegraph, published during the prevalence of Typhus Fever in the Metropolis, to call attention to the mischief which may accrue from neglecting even one of the e...
-Appendix IV. On Alcohol Usage
(A.) - Temperance and Abstinence. - ( Med. Times and Gazette, November 23rd, 1878.) There is no question more interminable than that of Alcohol, its use and abuse. Again and again it has cropped ou...
-Appendix IV. On Alcohol Usage. Part 2
Next comes an important and, as we believe, a highly logical passage in reply to the objection that the use of alcohol in any shape or form is not 'natural.' The essayist remarks, 'Our natural state i...
-Appendix IV. On Alcohol Usage. Part 3
(C.) - Alcohol. - Leading Article from the Lancet, January 1st, 1870. After a great many fluctuations, professional opinion upon the question of alcoholic stimulation in disease appears to have rec...
-Appendix V. On Dust And Disease
Abstract of a Lecture delivered at the Royal Institution. From the British Medical Journal, January 29th, 1870. Professor Tyndall, in making some experiments on vapours, wished for a current of air...
-Appendix VI. On the Importance and Dangers of Rest in Pulmonary Consumption
By Horace Dobell, M.D. (From the British Medical Journal, Nov. 22nd, 1873.) Had not Mr. Heather Bigg brought forward my name as the originator of 'lung-splints' (Journal, November 1st, p. 530), I s...
-Appendix VI. On the Importance and Dangers of Rest in Pulmonary Consumption. Continued
Those who enter into my views as to the importance of avoiding peroxidation of lung-tissue in consumption, will at once see how dangerous may be the effect of throwing exaggerated action upon one port...
-Appendix VII. On the Digestibility of Gelatine-yielding Tissues
From the London Medical Record, Jan. 20th, 1875. J. Etzinger (Zeitschrift fur Biologie, 1874, Band x., abstract in Centralblutt fur die Medicin. Wissenschaften, No.- 45, 1874) tested on the one han...
-Appendix VIII. Nutritive Enemata
From the Lancet, Feb. 1st, 1874. In the experiments upon digestion, lately performed by Czerny and Latschenberger (Virchow's Archiv., Band lix., Heft ii.), comparative trials were made between the...
-Appendix IX. Infantile Mortality
Letter from the Author published in the Times, Feb. 4th, 1862. Sir, - I think it will be a great satisfaction to those who have taken an especial interest in Infant Mortality to know that some of t...
-Appendix X. On the Prevention of Disease and the Diminution of its Fatality by Periodical Examinations
A Paper by the Author read at the Guildhall, June 7th, 1862, before the Public Health Department of the National Association for the Promotion of Social Science. The object of this paper is to brin...
-Appendix XI. Diet and Regimen in Typhoid Fever
Except, perhaps, ulcer of the stomach, there is no complaint in which the question of life or death is so imminently associated with diet and regimen as in Typhoid fever. A little solid food on the wr...
-Appendix XI. Diet and Regimen in Typhoid Fever. Part 2
Alcohol in fit doses improves the nerve energy, and so increases temporarily the muscular power of the intestinal and abdominal walls. When blood in ever so small a quantity is observed in the stools...
-Appendix XI. Diet and Regimen in Typhoid Fever. Part 3
(B.) Extracts from Remarks on the Treatment of Enteric Fever By John S. Bristowe, M.D., F.R.C.P., etc., etc. (British Med. Journal, Nor. 21th, 1880.) 1. Diet. - It was formerly the custom to 'starve...







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