These may be classified simply as: 1. Alkaline. 2. Saline. 3. Sulphurous. 4. Chalybeate, containing Iron. 5. Purgative. 6. Limestone or Calcareous. 7. Thermal, i. e., Warm or Hot Springs. While some special properties and effects upon the system in states of disease belong to each of these classes of waters, with differences also among the members of each class, they all agree in exerting an alterative influence, which is especially likely to be beneficial in chronic disorders. Some waters are largely supplied for particular remedial uses; as the Apollinaris, an agreeable table carbonated (effervescent) drink; Hunyadi Janos, Püllna, and Friedrichshalle, for purgative action; Vichy water (containing soda), to relieve acidity, etc. The most famous mineral waters in our country are those of Saratoga (several kinds, all more or less saline; with more or less sulphur also, or iron, iodine, bromine, etc) , Sharon {saline and sulphurous, with some iron), Richfield (sulphurous)—all these in the State of New York; Bedford (chalybeate, i. e, containing iron, and purgative), in Pennsylvania; and a remarkable variety of mineral springs among the mountains of Virginia—White and Red Sulphur, Warm Springs, Hot Springs, etc. In chronic rheumatism, liver and kidney disorders, obstinate affections of the skin, and nervous troubles of some standing, the best alterative effects from using mineral waters, internally or in baths, may be hoped for. A physician's advice had better always be obtained before they are resorted to in cases of serious disease of any kind.