Put a little hot glue on the end of a stretcher, B, locate it by means of the marks already made in it by the nails in the leg, and drive in the nails, leaving the head of the brad projecting half an inch, so that it can be easily withdrawn later. In the same way nail stretcher C in place to the same leg. Then nail the opposite leg to the other ends of these two stretchers. Proceed in the same way with the other two legs, working as speedily as accuracy will permit in order that the glue may not set before the clamps are applied. The clamps are applied to these joints as shown in Fig. 135. Test the interior angles to see that they are square. If not, adjust the clamps on a slight diagonal, so as to pull the piece into shape as in the diagram Fig. 136, in which the distortion is exaggerated. Set aside six hours to dry.

While the glue in these joints is hardening, the top may be made, according to directions given below, p. 109.

When the glue in the frame joints is hard, take off the clamps, pull out one nail at a time (see Handwork in Wood, Fig. 163, p. 96) and bore with a 5/16" bit a hole 2" deep, Fig. 137. To gage the depth, use the auger-bitgagc, (Handwork in Wood, p. 116) or improvise one by boring a hole lengthwise thru a piece of wood of such a length that when this piece is slipped up to the jaws of the brace, two inches of the bit will protrude. See Fig. 138.

Fig. 130. Method of shaping leg's.

Fig. 130. Method of shaping leg's.

Fig. 131. A stop A, in miter box for use in cutting the dowels of equal length.

Fig. 131. A stop A, in miter-box for use in cutting the dowels of equal length.

As each hole is bored, work some glue into it by means of a small dowel-pin (say " diameter) and insert one of the 5/16"x 1" dowel pins already prepared. In order to keep the work clean put no glue on the pin itself. With a mallet, drive in the pin leaving ⅛" projecting. In order to make sure that all the pins project an equal amount lay a strip of wood, ⅛" thick, next the pin as you drive it in, so that the mallet head will hit the strip on the final blow.

The reason why the dowel pin is not made long enough to drive it clear to the bottom of the two inch hole is because the glue at the bottom of the hole may act like a cushion, which, if the pin is driven home, may force open the joint between the joint and the stretcher.

In case it is not convenient to round off the ends of the dowels before driving them, or in case they are not driven in so that the projections are all equal, proceed as follows: Saw off the protruding parts of the dowels to within ⅛" of the surface, thus: Holding the frame in the vise, as in Fig. 139, lay a piece of wood ⅛" thick next each pair of dowels, and resting the face of the back-saw on this, saw off the dowels. Then round up the ⅛" projections into buttons thus:

Fig. 132. Driving dowel thru dowel plate.

Fig. 132. Driving dowel thru dowel-plate.

Fig. 133. Dowel pin for taboret.

Fig. 133. Dowel-pin for taboret.

Fig. 134. Improvised clamp.

Fig. 134. Improvised clamp.

Fig. 135. Taboret, nailed, glued, and clamped.

Fig. 135. Taboret, nailed, glued, and clamped.

Fig. 137. Boring the holes for the dowels.

Fig. 137. Boring the holes for the dowels.

Fig. 136. Method of squaring  up angles.