Tithes.

Tithes in lay hands.

Conveyances of tithes.

(h) Stat. 27 Hen. VIII. c. 28, intituled, "An Act that all Religious Houses under the yearly Revenue of Two Hundred Pounds shall be dissolved, and given to the King and his heirs;" stat. 31 Hen. VIII. c. 13, intituled,

"An Act for the Dissolution of all Monasteries and Abbiesj" and stat. 32 Hen. VIII. c. 24.

(i) 27 Hen. VIII. c. 28, s. 2; 31 Hen. VIII. c. 13, ss. 18, 19.

(k) Stat. 31 Hen. VIII. c. 13, s. 18; 32 Hen. VIII. c. 7, s. 1.

Descent of tithes.

Tithes exist as distinct from the laud.

Commutation of tithes.

Merger of tithes or rent charge in the land.

(l) Stat. 32 Hen. VIII. c. 7, s. 7.

(m) Doe d. Lushington v. Bishop of Llandaff, 2 New Rep. 491; 1 Eagle on Tithes, 16.

(n) Chapman v. Gatcombe, 2 New Cases, 516.

(o) Stats. 6& 7 Will. IV. c. 71;

1 Vict. c. 89; I & 2 Vict. c. 64;

2 & :; Vict, c. 62; 3 & i Vict. c. 15; 5 Viet. c. 7; 5 & 6 Vict. c.

54; 9 & 10 Vict. c. 73; 10 & 11 Vict. c. 104; 14 & 15 Vict. c. 53; 1C & 17 Vict. c. 124; 21 & 22 Vict. c. 53; and 23 & 24 Vict, c. 93.

(p) Stat. 6 & 7 Will. IV. c. 71, s. 71; 1 & 2 Vict. c. 64; 2 & 3 Vict. c. 62, s. 1; 9 & 10 Vict. c. 73, s. 19.

There are other species of incorporeal hereditaments which are scarcely worth particular notice in a work so elementary as the present, especially considering the short notice that has necessarily here been taken of the more important kinds of such property. Thus, titles of honour, in themselves an important kind of incorporeal hereditament, are yet, on account of their inalienable nature, of but little interest to the conveyancer. The same remark also applies to offices or places of business and profit. No outline can embrace every feature. Many subjects, which have here occupied but a single paragraph, are of themselves sufficient to fill a volume. Reference to the different works on the separate subjects here treated of must necessarily be made by those who are desirous of full and particular information.

Titles of honour.

Offices.