Atlanta, Ga Business section. Figures represent value of corners for lot of average width and depth, in dollars per front foot.

Toledo. Business section. Figures represent value of corners, for lot of average width and depth, in dollars per front foot.

Toledo. Business section. Figures represent value of corners, for lot of average width and depth, in dollars per front foot.

Columbus. Business section. Figures represent value of corners for lot of average width and depth, in dollars per front foot.

Columbus. Business section. Figures represent value of corners for lot of average width and depth, in dollars per front foot.

Richmond. Business section. Figures represent value of corners, for lot of average width and depth, in dollars per front foot.

Richmond. "Business section. Figures represent value of corners, for lot of average width and depth, in dollars per front foot.

From this figure, land for detached residences grades upwards more in proportion to the class of people utilizing it than the size of the city, to land worth $20 to $30 per front foot for the residences of small shopkeepeers and clerks, and $40 to $75 for the more fashionable residences in cities of 75,000 population and under. Such residence property would have good street car service, graded streets, sidewalks, sewer, gas, water, electric light, etc., the cost of which may vary from $5 to $15 per front foot.

Kansas City. Business section. Figures represent value of corners for lot of average width and depth, in dollars per front foot.

Kansas City. Business section. Figures represent value of corners for lot of average width and depth, in dollars per front foot.

The best residence land in cities of 100,000 to 200,000 population runs from $75 to $150 per front foot, in cities of 200,000 population to 400,000 population from $300 to $500 per front foot, and in New York from $2,000 to $5,000 per front foot on the side streets and $6,000 to $9,000 per front foot on Fifth avenue. The poorest locations utilized for shops in the small cities are ordinarily worth from $50 to $75 per front foot, from which point values rise to an average of $600 to $800 per front foot for the best business property in cities of 50,000 population, about $2,000 per front foot in cities of 200,000 population, $10,000 in cities of 2,000,000 population, and $15,000 to $18,000 in New York. Above these levels, land in the financial district of New York averages from $15,000 to $25,000 per front foot, this financial district having no counterpart in any other American city and being due to the supremacy of New York as a financial centre. The highest values in London are similarly in the financial district, while in Chicago and most of the smaller cities, shopping land, owing to the large amount of retail business and small amount of banking, is worth about twice as much as financial land. The average figures given represent corner lots having not less than 2,500 square feet, $350 per square foot (equal to $35,000 per front foot) having been paid thirty years ago for two small corners at Wall and Broad Streets, and recently for a small corner at Broadway and 34th Street. An approximate scale of normal values based on the consideration that each thousand of population adds from $10 to $12 to the front foot value of the best business locations and from $1 to $2 to the front foot value of the best residence locations would be as follows, it being understood that the application of any such scale is limited in practice by differences in wealth, character of industries and inhabitants, topography, transportation, platting, climate, etc.