The scope of the present work precludes any complete treatment of real estate brokerage and the forms used therein. Under the head of "Commissions" (Section 309), a few simple and effective rules are given as to the formal accounts for sales and loans. It is only possible here to touch on some points of general importance in the brokerage business, which varies so greatly in scope and in character of property handled that the details of each case must be worked out as a separate proposition.

The broker should keep accurate records of the properties he has for sale, and these should be so arranged that any desired reference can be quickly made. For this purpose, bound books, cards, and loose leaves have all been pressed into service. Bound books are not elastic enough for such temporary records, and cards present several disadvantages. A loose-leaf record is therefore the most suitable. A small loose-leaf volume may easily be carried while the broker is taking a customer to inspect various properties, and the integrity of the record is not destroyed, as it is in the case of a card system, from which cards are withdrawn. Several copies of a leaf can be filled out at one writing, and each may be on paper of a different color. This feature is of great convenience, for a broker should have his properties listed by (1) owners, (2) localities, (3) classification, i.e., dwellings, offices, etc.

Form 49. Broker's Record

Form 49. Broker's Record.

Form 49 is convenient for such listing and is kept in stock by different manufacturers. Form 50 is somewhat similar and is suitable when cards are used. It is so simple that, if desired, a rubber stamp may be used to imprint the cards. Here, again, cards and inks of various colors may be employed.

Another method of keeping track of properties is the map and tack system. This consists of a large wall map of the city or neighborhood in which the broker operates, mounted preferably on a backing of soft wood, together with a number of pins or small flags of various colors, one color being used to indicate property for rent; another, dwellings for sale; etc. When a piece of property is listed, a pin is stuck into the map at the proper place, and, if a flag is attached, there is written on this the name of the owner and the price, e.g.: "Allen, $4,500."

Wants, Buy, Rent or Sell

Price $..............

Terms..............

Rent ...............

Location.............By ............. 19..

Building .............. Story..............

Rooms, 1st Floor ............. 2nd ............. 3rd .............

Size Lot...........................Alley..........................

Sewer..........Light in Street.......... Light in House..........

Bath...... Closet...... Laundry...... Basement...... Cellar.......

Water................Heat................Barn.................

Remarks............................................................

Name..............................................................

Date................Address......................................

Form 50. Broker's Card Record.

The advantages of such a plan as a means of ready reference are as obvious as the flags themselves. A disadvantage of this system is that the flags and pins could easily be displaced by some irresponsible party in the office, thus vitiating the entire system. It need not be said that a map and tack arrangement does not enable the broker to dispense entirely with a written record of the properties in which he is interested.