Boatbill (cancroma cochlenria, Linn.), a bird of the order grallae, family ardeidae, so called from the peculiar form and breadth of the bill, which is much depressed, very broad toward the middle, with the sides gradually compressed at the end; the culmen has a prominent keel, with a deep lateral groove extending to the tip, which is hooked. The wings are moderate; the tail short and rounded; the tarsi rather longer than the middle toe, slender, and covered in front with large irregular scales; the hind toe long, and the claws short, curved, and acute; the length of the bill is about four inches, and of the bird two feet. The general color is whitish, with a grayish back, the belly rufous; the forehead white, behind which is a black cap, furnished in the male with a long crest. This bird is nearly allied to the herons, and is found in the tropical parts of South America; until recently it has been supposed to be the only species of the genus. It frequents marshy places and the banks of rivers where the tides do not ascend; it perches on the trees overhanging fresh water, darting thence on fishes which happen to swim beneath it; from its generic Daine, it is supposed to feed also on crabs, which it could readily crush in its powerful bill; on the ground it has very much the gait, attitudes, and air of the herons.

It is sometimes called "savacou."

Boatbill.

Boatbill.