Burbot, Or Eel-Pout, a name given, both in England and the United States, to the fresh-water species of the genus lota, of which the ling is the salt-water representative. The anterior dorsal is small, the posterior and the (single) anal long; there are barbels on the chin, as in many others of the cod family. The European burbot (L. vulgaris) is from one to two feet long, and ordinarily weighs about 3 lbs.; head flat and smooth; jaws equal; gape large, with small teeth; body compressed posteriorly; tail oval; color yellowish brown, clouded and spotted with darker, lighter beneath. It conceals itself under stones, like the eel, watching for young fishes and insects brought within its reach by the current; it is very tenacious of life. The flesh is firm, white, and well flavored. The spotted burbot (L. maculosa) of the lakes and rivers of northern America is of about the same size, and with similar habits. The eel-pout (Z. compressa) of New England is smaller. (See Ling).

Burbot (Lota vulgaris).

Burbot (Lota vulgaris).